By on November 15, 2016

Jaguar I-Pace Concept (Image: JLR)

Jaguar has pulled the wraps off its I-Pace Concept SUV ahead of the Los Angeles Auto Show, but this prototype isn’t just a one-off piece of vaporware, never to be seen again.

The automaker’s first electric vehicle is a go, and is expected to hit the road in 2018 to challenge Tesla’s Model X in the fledgling premium electric SUV segment.

Riding atop a homegrown EV platform built to underpin a range of EV models, the I-Pace aims to be the emissions-free brother of the brand’s popular F-Pace. Make that a cousin, as the I-Pace looks nothing like its conventionally styled stablemate. Low, with a short nose, severely slanted rear glass and a cab-forward layout, the I-pace might have some wondering if it fits the “SUV” label.

Well, Jaguar says it does, and the fact that it has a liftgate and a name that doesn’t end in “Type” should (apparently) be all the evidence one needs.

Power and traction are easy to come by, but the I-Pace needs to satisfy another element if it wants to compete: range. Jaguar claims the I-Pace should be good for 220 miles of it, thanks to its 90 kWh lithium-ion battery pack. Like the platform, the vehicle’s battery pack was also designed in-house. The company claims that a full recharge at a public 50 kW DC charging station should take two hours.

Motivating this beast are two electric motors, each driving one axle. The combined output — 400 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque — should see the all-wheel-drive vehicle accelerate to 60 miles per hour in four seconds. The low center of gravity provided by the in-floor battery pack coupled with lag-free electric torque should equal a compelling ride, assuming platform and body stiffness is up to snuff. The company claims it has borrowed some suspension components from the F-Pace, so the tossability factor could be high.

Jaguar’s director of design, Ian Callum, claims he wants the I-Pace to ooze British craftsmanship, both mechanical and technological. Once it hits the roads, drivers can expect two touchscreens and a host of creature comforts, including a panoramic sunroof and probably half a herd’s worth of supple hide.

A production version of the I-Pace should appear next year, ahead of its 2018 on-sale date.

[Image: Jaguar Land Rover]

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57 Comments on “Jaguar I-Pace Concept: Electric Cat to Slink onto Roads in 2018...”


  • avatar
    philadlj

    I’m getting a Renault Vel Satis kinda vibe. Not a bad thing.

    As for “oozing British technological craftsmanship”, don’t UK-branded cars still suffer a horrible reputation for piss-poor wiring from the Leyland era? Aside from McLarens, that is…

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “ooze British craftsmanship, both mechanical and technological.”

    This man is clearly a sadist.

  • avatar

    I will say it makes the Model X look like the bloated, ungainly, malproportioned, wallowy roadpig that it always was but no one owned up to it being.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Meh.

  • avatar
    Click REPLY to reload page

    I’m all in favor of electric vehicles – the more choices that are on the market, the better decisions buyers can make, at least in theory.
    That said, an SUV that is taken into the wilderness (admittedly, not likely in many cases) will be without recharging capability, unless the driver brings along a very large generator. These are city and suburb vehicles, for the present.
    Maybe someone can invent a portable waterwheel generator that you could just plug into the car and place in a stream.
    Once the engineers figure out how to refill the electric tank way out in the boonies, we will be blessed with hi-torque emission-free Jeeps.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    I’m a fan of the looks! Let’s hope the production model ends up as pretty.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    Pricing will be key.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    It is expected to cost 10% more than the F pace

  • avatar
    Da Coyote

    Very handsome.

    However, does anyone remember the name Lucas? The prince of darkness?

    As much as I loved all of my British cars (Triumph, MG, Jaguar), electrics were their bane. (Ahead of the leaks, early component wear, etc, etc.)

    Sorry, but an E-Jag wouldn’t be on my shopping list.

    • 0 avatar
      cdnsfan27

      Why can’t we have one article on Jaguar without a comment on the bad electrics they had thirty years ago. Let it go already, Jaguars are very reliable now and come with a five year/60,000 mile warranty to convince the skeptics like you!

      • 0 avatar
        Jagboi

        Agreed, if we judged cars today by what they were in the 1970’s nobody would buy Japanese either, they rusted through within 2 years.

        Imagine how much you’d be laughed at if you warned people not to buy a Honda today because you had a 1975 Civic that was crap. Or Hyuandi obviously can’t make good cars because of the Pony?

      • 0 avatar

        They are somewhat reliable today – reliable enough compared to their German competitors – but Godawful depreciation dumpster fires. Purchasing/financing a new Jaguar is exactly the same as flushing thousands of dollars down the toiler, much moreso than virtually anything else on the market.

        • 0 avatar
          pragmatic

          So they are good to buy used. I haven’t owned a Jaguar, but their depreciation has always kept them on the list of possible cars to buy. Models with high depreciation are what I look for in used vehicles. Better if I can tell why. Jags seem to go down based on past performance (at least it seems to be in the past) so they should be a good buy.

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            I think they are excellent buys used. I think part of it comes from at the 3-4 year old point you could buy a used Jaguar XF, or a new Camry. Most people are not car enthusiasts, and are looking for transportation to get to work, kids to school etc. They want the certainty of a warranty and a fixed payment vs the possibility of unknown repairs out of warranty. For most they probably don’t value the extra things a European Luxury car could offer enough to buy it over the boring certainty of a Camry.

            It’s not just Jaguars, but all big European cars like BMW 7 series and to a slightly less extent the MB S Class have lead balloon depreciation. The people who can afford to buy them new, do so. The people who can afford to buy used, buy or lease a Camry/Accord instead. That leaves a small pool of people who can afford the Euro cars, and are not afraid of them and value what the cars can offer. That small pool of buyers drives the price down and makes for bargain hunting.

            I’ve driven Jaguars for the last 20 years, all bought used, starting with a 1964 E Type. My current car is a 2007 Jaguar X Type, bought 4 years old just out of warranty with 55,000 km on it. New it was $51K (Canadian $), I paid $18,000 all in. I have 115,000 km on it now, and all I have done is the usual tires, brakes, a battery and scheduled maintenance. There has been no breakdowns or unscheduled repairs.

            The previous car I had was a 1995 Vanden Plas, bought 10 years old, 1 owner and 80,000km. New was $89,000 and I paid $12,500. It was immaculate, even still smelled like a new car. Again, it never left me anywhere and I did the usual brakes etc. Only non-scheduled part I needed to replace was the air injection check valve – a GM part I bought off RockAuto. I drove it for 6 years and up to 180,000km. Unfortunately, it got hailed on and written off, but the insurance gave me $7500 for it. I though a depreciation cost of $830 a year was excellent value to drive such a nice car.

            Like all cars there are years to seek out and years to avoid, if you buy a good year I think Jaguars are very enjoyable cars for no more money than something much less pleasurable to drive.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “My current car is a 2007 Jaguar X Type”
            “There has been no breakdowns or unscheduled repairs.”

            Yes the reliability of the Ford Mondeo was always pretty good.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Jagboi

            Nice post.

            @Corey

            Maybe they fixed those… or maybe Canada got the FWD version?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Hmm, he will no doubt be back to inform!

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            @ 28 – Canada only got the AWD versions. From 2005 on, only engine was the 3.0. We didn’t get the smaller gas or diesel versions sold in Europe.

            @ Corey – 18% of the X Type parts are common with the Mondeo. Big ones are the center section of the floorpan, some suspension parts, and lower portion of the engine block. Heads, exhaust and intake manifolds are unique to Jaguar.

            The Mondeo was well respected in Europe at the time, so it was a good starting point. Wasn’t like they started with a 200 :)

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            Sorry, I lie! I did do an unscheduled repair on the X. I had to replace a headlight bulb. Shoddy thing only lasted 10 years…

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Is yours a Vanden Plas one?

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            Corey – The X you mean? No, they only used the VDP designation on X Types for 2005 and 06. Mine has the “luxury pack” though, which is the same thing. Just no badge to say so.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            #pretendvandenplas

            (I’m just trolling you btw. You’re a good sport about it.)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Jagboi

            Have you been following the recommended maintenance schedule?

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            28 – Loosely. I do change the oil a bit more frequently because I live in a cold climate. I have not changed the brake fluid or coolant as often as I should. I don’t follow it religiously with a spreadsheet to tick things off, just take a more common sense approach. The transmission is one of those “sealed for life” things, but I’ll probably change the fluid in it at some point. It works fine now, so I’m leaving it alone.

            I’ve completely stripped and restored old Jaguars, so I just keep an eye on things and do them when I think they should be done. Perhaps more of an inspection regime? I have a hoist, so whenever I do an oil change I put it in the air and have a good look underneath, and similarly when changing from winter to summer tires I always inspect the brakes, hubs and CV boots.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’ve seen many of the earlier examples in poor condition at relatively young ages (6-7yo) so I started to wonder was it as simple as followed the scheduled maintenance and these were actually alright?

            I also do recall the AWD system in those being the source of many issues so I hope that’s not a shoe waiting to drop on yours.

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            28- It seems that the X more than other Jaguars falls into the hands of people who like the image of driving a Jaguar but can just barely afford to buy the car. It was half the price of an XJ when new, so also attracted a much younger buyer.

            AWD: the transfer case is the problem. It only held 550 ml of oil when new, so a leak can kill it quickly. It’s officially “sealed for life” so not on the maintenance schedule. A few of the early ones had problems with the alloy case cracking if full power was used frequently – or you liked doing burnouts. The X Type had a fairly major update for 2005, a lot of internal parts were changed in the trans and transfer case, and the 05 and on cars have much fewer problems.

            I’ve checked the oil in mine, and it was fine, the oil in my Mom’s car didn’t look as nice so I changed it and so far it has been fine. She bought her’s used, so I have no idea how it was driven before she got it.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Hmm. A nice alternative to the Model X, without a long ride to the dealer (at least for me). But still out of range for my wallet.

    Nice 3/4 view: http://gtspirit.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Jaguar-I-PACE-2.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      One problem I see is that at least with the concept, is that they’re quoting charge times from a 50kWh charger. That won’t cut it with a 90 kWh battery. Tesla SuperChargers are 120kW. Even better, the Porsche Mission-E will be using an 800vdc 220kW charging system that will be even faster.

  • avatar
    GS 455

    @Jagboi what models/years of Jaguar are a good buy?

    • 0 avatar
      Jagboi

      Depends on what you want – Sedan or Sports car?

      The Aluminium bodied XJ’s from 2004-09 (X350) are excellent, they make great long distance cruisers. The XF is also good, I would prefer the facelift models from 2010 onward with the 5.0, or one of the current AWD models.

      Going older, the 1995-97 XJ’s (called X300) are also very good mechanically, but there are some interior/ trim things that break at that age. Starting to see more notes on the forums of the Japanese made ignition coils starting to fail at this age too.

      The 98-03 models (X308) could be troublesome. They had problems with the timing chain tensioners and waterpumps (both plastic) and the normally aspirated cars had that same ZF 5 speed transmission BMW used, with the same problems. XJR and supercharged cars used a Mercedes trans that seems to have been good. If one of these cars has the updated 4.2 style metal chain tensioners it will be good, same with the updated waterpump. The ZF trans is “sealed for life”, but a fluid change will extend it’s life considerably.

      The 2005-07 X Type is a good buy as Jaguar’s first AWD car. Caution point is the transfer case, they only held 550 ml of oil from new. Another one of those “sealed for life” things, but a leak can kill it quickly. Changing the oil is recommended, lots on various Jag forums about how to do that.

      In sports cars, the first XK8 (1996 on, 4.0 models) had the same engine and trans problems as the X308 sedans. The 4.2 cars had it fixed. I would recommend an XK from 2007 onward (X150), again with an aluminium body. Those have proved to be pretty much bulletproof, much more reliable than the MB SLK sports cars.

      The F Type is amazing, nothing has shown up as an “they all break here” thing, but they are also all still under warranty.

      Assuming I didn’t have to deal with winter and need AWD, my first choice for sedan would be 2005-8 XJ, and sports car 2007-14 XK. With AWD, I would get a 2013-on XF.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        You’re forgetting about the Nikasil defect prior to Mid 2000 on AJ-V8s.

        • 0 avatar
          Jagboi

          That doesn’t seem to be an issue anymore. The engines that wore out have been replaced with steel sleeved versions (or the car scrapped), and now we have low sulphur fuel so any survivors should be ok.

          It seemed to be a bigger problem in Europe than in North America.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “The engines that wore out have been replaced with steel sleeved versions (or the car scrapped)”

            Now I hesitate to accept these sort of “it’s fine now” explanations where time is the primary factor. Because Northstar.

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            Those cars wouldn’t be on my must buy list anyway, but more for the ZF transmission than the engine. A 2001 and onward reverted to steel linered bores so no problem.

            Although a Vanden Plas Supercharged would be a very nice ride, if I could pick up one that had the water pump and tensioners done I wouldn’t hesitate.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I actually ran into a low mile’d MY98 XJ8 last year. Pity as I believe it was sold for peanuts from the original elderly owner.

            The Nikasil defect affected many Jags stateside at the time, but it was so long ago most won’t remember.

            Additional: Didn’t the earlier I6 X300s use a ZF transmission (or the same one)?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Just get moar cylinders.

            https://cincinnati.craigslist.org/cto/5853186444.html

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            He should pay me to take that.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That V12 walnut panel on the passenger side is probably worth $500.

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            28- the XJ6/VDP X300 cars used a 4 speed ZF, not 5 speed. It’s bulletproof. The XJ12 and XJR used a GM 4L80E. Same internals as the trans used on 3/4 and 1 ton trucks and Suburbans, but in a case unique to Jaguar.

            Corey – that XJ12 is a rare car. I don’t have numbers produced off the top of my head, but ~1000 is a good working number. The colour is “rose bronze”. A rather unfortunate colour. I have only seen one car in that colour in person, and it doesn’t look much better than in the photo. A bit, but not much. My Grandmother had a 1990 Crown Victoria in a very similar colour called Woodrose. Very much an old lady colour.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I have also seen a Town Car in that pink color, from the 90-94 generation. It comes off very… oddly in person. Always looks kinda dirty IMO.

            However, they used it in two-tone format on the slant back Continental in the mid 80s, with a darker brown/red color, and that looked awesome.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Jagboi

            I have seen an XJS/Chevy SBC swap but I wonder if the later XJ81s and X305s with the GM transmission will also accept a swap?

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            There is a place that puts LS1’s into the X308’s, but it’s not a popular conversion, unlike 350’s into the old Series III XJ6.

            The bolt pattern of a Jaguar application GM trans is different than a GM application, so the Jaguar version of the 4L80E won’t bolt up to a GM engine. That is true of the older TH400 Jaguar used as well.

            The earlier cars were easier to do an engine swap, I’m in the process of putting a 6 cylinder XJR engine and trans into an older Daimler, but I wouldn’t try it with an X308. The electronics are much more complicated and everything is networked. I looked at using a V8 XJR engine as my donor, but dismissed it after studying the Electrical Guide. The 6 cylinder will be relatively easy, as it has discrete ECU’s for the engine and transmission.

            Beacham in New Zealand has put the modern V8 into older Jags, but what they do is basically put everything from a modern car into an old bodyshell. It’s a recreation, not a restoration.

            I have no idea if everything works on an LS1 converted X308 as the factory intended. I suspect not. Usually things like cruise control or the trip computer don’t work after the swap.

            The 6.0 V12 in the XJ81 and X305 is quite reliable, no reason to swap it out. Quite rare cars too! I think they will be future collectables. So smooth, and they make such nice noises. I have a 6.0 XJS convertible, it’s great to drive, that unending wave of torque makes passing effortless.

  • avatar
    GS 455

    So would you roll the dice on a 2013 XF AWD with 52,000 km for $32,995 CDN rather than a 2017 Camry XLE for the same price?

    • 0 avatar
      Jagboi

      Personally, I would take the XF. I freely admit to being biased though!

      Drive both and see what you like. For Canadian winters, I love the AWD, and Canadian market XF’s come with a heated windshield. You’ll never have to scrape frost again, which I quite like when I have to park outside.

      It’s hard to make a recommendation of XF vs Camry without knowing what’s important to you and what sort of driving you do. You won’t have to worry about the Jag falling apart in your driveway though.

      The idea of owning a car out of warranty doesn’t bother me in the least, I know I’ve come out ahead financially vs the depreciation of a new car. I have a friend who isn’t mechanically inclined in the least and would never consider owning a car out of warranty, he’s petrified of potential repair costs. I think he pays a high price for the peace of mind on depreciation, and new cars are not immune to breakdowns either. You just don’t have to pay to have it fixed.

      There are several XF trim levels, see if you can get a Portfolio, that is the highest level, and used prices don’t seem to differentiate much between the trims. A general spotting feature is 2 tone seats and contrasting piping.

      • 0 avatar
        GS 455

        I wouldn’t really get a Camry but a 3-4 year old XF AWD, A6 3.0T or E350 4 matic I would consider. $1000 a year repair costs would be acceptable and I always do my own oil changes and can do simple socket wrench repairs on my vehicles. Absorbent ride quality is my most important requirment since the streets in my city are 3rd world grade. I’m guessing the MB rides the softest but is least fun to drive and the XF 3.0 is the firmest riding but the most fun? With -30 winter weather heated steering and remote engine start are a must for me. Does the heated steering in the XF heat the entire circumference of the wheel?

        • 0 avatar
          Jagboi

          Yes, the heated steering wheel goes all the way around.

          I have not driven a E350, but I have rented a 2013 E250 when I was in the UK. Personally, I though the XF was nicer riding and much nicer to drive than the MB. The controls were more logically laid out and I could figure it out without reading the manual. Couldn’t do that in the MB. Jag has a touchscreen, MB didn’t, so that made entering an address in the navigation a pain in the MB.

          I don’t own an XF, but I have rented them a number of times in the UK, so I have a fair amount of seat time in them. Seems odd to me now to have one that isn’t right hand drive!

          Ideally, drive the XF, A6 and E350 and see how each rides on your roads. Historically, Jaguar has always had the best compromise between comfort and sport, the Germans tend to bias more toward sport and a firm ride. I can use a comfortable ride everyday, the slightly increased cornering ability I might never use.

    • 0 avatar
      Jagboi

      Be aware there was a 2.0 version, I think starting in 2014 that was RWD only. I would stick with the 3.0 AWD.

      This is my favourite colour combination, Caviar exterior and an Ivory interior. There was a variety of different finishes available, from piano black to ebony, and burl walnut like this car. I love the walnut!
      http://www.autotrader.ca/a/Jaguar/XF/Toronto/Ontario/5_29585404_ON20080114094512226/?ursrc=hl&showcpo=ShowCPO&orup=22_15_58

      • 0 avatar
        GS 455

        Yes, the black 2013 XF although I don’t like black exteriors or interiors either, I think I’ll go have look at it anyway. Like a lot of people I’ve always liked Jaguars but have been afraid of their reputations. I know that they’ve improved greatly and are probably as good or better than German cars in terms of reliability but old attitudes die hard.

        • 0 avatar
          Jagboi

          Agreed on black. Did that once and said never again. Then guess what? 2 cars later, black on black.

          The old wives tales do die hard. Jaguar has made great strides lately, especially under Tata. Doesn’t hurt that the chairman of Tata is a big Land Rover and Jaguar fan, he bought the company because he liked the cars, and has poured billions into them.

          A few years ago now Jaguar tied with Lexus for the #1 reliability spot in the JD Power surveys. I belong to a big Jaguar club on the west coast and I see it in the members cars, the newer ones just don’t have anything go wrong. The days of going to the dealer with a long laundry list of things to be fixed are over.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The MY14s were holding at about 30K for the XFs and 40K for the other models. Historically they should be much lower in terms of valuation.

          • 0 avatar
            Jagboi

            28 – You’re quoting USD I assume? I see lots of cars asking low to mid 30’s in CAD. Come north to buy a car and make it up on the currency difference!

            Even cheaper in Quebec, but the first rule of used cars is don’t buy one in Quebec. Too many rebuilds and chopshop specials with “clean” titles. Have to pay sales tax too, no matter of the car is exported from Quebec or not.


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