By on September 16, 2016

Porsche 924 Turbo (931)

There are few better ways to get instant recognition as a connoisseur of cars than to drive a classic. People will applaud your discerning taste, your unique choice in an age of appliance automobiles. Good for you!

You’ve decided to get something German because you like your 1970s classic to run. And you’d like a sports car, which pretty much makes Porsche your default choice. Few models now generate the collective automotive “OOoooo!” of the air-cooled 911. It’s so cool, it’s backwards!

But then you find out what classic 911s cost. If you’ve been living under a rock recently, prices for classic and rare 911s are through the roof. One of the last great air-cooled models just sold at RM Sotheby’s London Auction for £1,848,000. I’ll save you some quick math: that’s $2,460,242 USD at time of writing.

As you wipe the coffee from your screen, allow me to suggest it doesn’t have to be this way. You, too, can have an obscure, classic Porsche for only around 1/1000th the price of an air-cooled 911.

The 1970s were a transitional time for Volkswagen and Porsche. Three key developments rolled out over the decade, culminating in the central character in our story: the Porsche 924.

First was Volkswagen’s attempt to recapture and rebrand the mostly defunct Audi marque. Rising from the ashes of the Mercedes-Benz-owned era, Audi would be the upscale branch of the Volkswagen group. Though ostensibly most of the Audis would be based upon Volkswagen models, in fact there were a few like the B series that went the other way. The B1 Audi 80 would usher in a new era of front-engine, water-cooled, front-wheel-drive Volkswagen/Audi products. It was the other two changes that were perhaps more revolutionary.

Both Porsche and Volkswagen needed to revise their aging fleet of cars. Both were still relying on 1930s technology, effectively, and with fuel crises and increasing focus on vehicle emissions, both moved towards new platforms with front-engine, water-cooled designs. In their own way, each was successful, but it’s hard to deny that the Golf was the real keeper. At Porsche, two new platforms emerged: the top-flight 928 and the diminutive, Volkswagen-borrowed project 924. While it was the V8 that got all the laurels and headlines, the 924 proved to be a successful model and the basis for many enthusiast favorites later.

Now some 40 years on, the 924 has emerged as one of the best kept collector secrets in the Porsche world. As 911s have rocketed out of sight in value, the four-cylinder has been largely ignored as an also-ran. But even though it was the “poor man’s Porsche,” the 924 has many things going for it as a potential collector on a reasonable budget.

First, they were pretty expensive even in period, ranging from around $11,000 up to just north of $20,000 by the end of the run — and that meant they were treasured by owners who were clearly happy the brand offered an entry-level option. That means it’s still possible to find 924s today in relatively decent shape.

They’re also quite cheap because the market continues to pretend that, in general, they don’t exist. Except some racing and limited models, which their respective owners seem to think are worth a hundred grand, you can buy just about any 924 for under $10,000 — and most for well under that amount. Repairs and upgrades are relatively inexpensive, too, because there is a fair amount of parts interchangeability with other models.

So far this is shaping up well!

1978 Porsche 924LE

Since we’re talking about Porsche, we must immediately recognize its special models.

Porsche can hardly make it through a week without dreaming up some special edition, and the same was true in the 1970s and 1980s. As a result, there were an almost comical number of special edition models of the Porsche 924, each one with a slightly different character. Since there were a lot (relatively speaking) of Porsche 924s produced — approximately 121,000 in total — you may want to differentiate yourself from all those other plebeian 924 owners with a special model. But which one is for you?

1976/1977 Porsche 924 Martini Championship Edition

1976/7 Porsche 924 Martini Championship Edition

A well-named model, this special edition celebrated the Martini-run Porsche World Championship in 1976. While visually they were ready for the front row of a race series, sway bars were the only performance upgrade. Otherwise, the model received Martini racing stripes on a dipped white body and more red velour than a brothel in Amsterdam.

Why buy: You think everything should have Martini racing stripes.

1978 Porsche 924 Limited Edition

1978 Porsche 924 Limited Edition

This limited edition came with two-tone Dolomite Gray Metallic/Silver Metallic paint, fog lights and special non-red velour inserts in the seats. That’s about it. Oh, you got sway bars again. This is a Porsche, after all.

Why buy: You don’t think everything should have Martini racing stripes and you like seeing through the fog.

1979 Porsche 924 Limited Edition Sebring

1979 Porsche 924 Limited Edition Sebring ’79

Poised to celebrate race victories at — surprise! — Sebring in Florida, Porsche launched the Sebring ’79 model. These 924s featured red paint with yellow and orange stripes, giant “924” decals on the front to announce your arrival, and enough plaid inside to make a lumberjack jealous. Fog lights returned, since Sebring is partly raced at night. There were effectively no performance upgrades.

Why to buy: You want a full size Hot Wheels® model.

1979 Porsche 924S

1979 Porsche 924S

Technically, it doesn’t exist, which makes everyone all hot and bothered. But if you ticked option code M471 when ordering your 924 for the 1979 model year, Porsche provided a host of performance upgrades: brakes, wheels, sway bars, and special “S” decals for the hood. Good luck finding one.

Why buy: You enjoy memorizing option codes and don’t want a BMW.

1980 Porsche 924 Le Mans Limited Edition

1980 Porsche 924 Le Mans

Basically, this is a Martini edition with the Sebring’s strip colors. That, and Turbo-spec ATS alloys. It’s also easily confused with the more popular Le Mans/Special Edition ’88 below. However, this one didn’t come to the U.S., so you may as well forget about it altogether.

Why buy: You’re totally obscure and a Francophile.

1981 Porsche 924 Weissach Limited Edition

1981 Porsche 924 Weissach Limited Edition

Don’t like Florida? Not to worry. Porsche has its own test track in Weissach and, of course, it named one of its 924s model after after it. This one came in a special color (!!!) with special interior (!!!). But wait, there’s more: this 924 had 15-inch ATS two-tone alloys borrowed from the Turbo model and a rear spoiler.

Why buy: You like the look of the Turbo without the performance of the Turbo and you remember when 15-inch alloys were a big deal.

1979-1983 Porsche 924 Turbo

1979-1983 Porsche 924 Turbo

There were few ways to be cooler in the ’80s then by slapping “turbo” decals on everything. Even better was actually having a turbo, the perfect have-your-cake-and-eat-it-too scenario. The 924 finally became a “real” sports car with forced induction, and there were several upgrades over the run. The biggest change, and the one to look for, was the later addition of 5-bolt ATS wheels (or the rare 16-inch forged wheel option and accompanying M471 performance options if you want to really pedantic). Five bolts meant rear disc brakes — and you want that.

Why buy: You enjoy performance to go with the look of your car. And ducts. Lots of ducts. Oh, and protracted warm-up and cool-down procedures.

1988 Porsche 924S

1988 Porsche 924S

After killing off the 924 briefly, Porsche realized that the 944 was pretty expensive. It’s solution was to take the 944 engine, brakes, and suspension, then cram them into a 924 chassis. Finally, Porsche gave the 924 some performance to back up its looks. It was popular, with some 16,000 produced, the bulk of which came to the U.S.. The ones to get are the unspoken upgraded models. 1988 had a bump in compression just before closing the run out, resulting in 160 horsepower.

Why buy: You think you’re cleverer than everyone else.

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

Just before the curtain closed on the 924S, Porsche released a final special model. It was called the “Le Mans” edition in Europe, while the U.S. model was creatively dubbed “Special Edition.” What you got was less: manual windows, no passenger side mirror, lightweight maroon-striped cloth, and any color you wanted as long as it was black. This was a defacto Club Sport model Porsche never chose to offer on the regular 924 (if you want to get really, really pedantic, there was a Club Sport 924 Carrera GTS). Slightly larger rear wheels, integrated mudflaps, M030 Koni adjustable suspension, the higher-output M44/09 and one of the most seldom seen editions make this the secret weapon of the 924 lineup.

Why buy: You actually are cleverer than everyone else.

If you’re really a 924 fan, you’ll note I skipped the Carrera GT, GTS and GTR models — all very limited production — mostly because they’re extremely expensive today.

Truth be told, 924s aren’t for everyone, but they’re fun to drive and you can snap up one of these reasonably reliable classics on a budget. Outside of the Turbo, which is currently enjoying a bit of limelight, the 924 — and especially the late 924S models — are a great way to get Porsche credentials and enthusiast recognition without the market insanity surrounding their air-cooled brethren.

[Images: Flüssig Magazine]

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62 Comments on “Want to Buy a Classic Porsche? Here Are 10 Limited Edition 924s That Aren’t Selling for Bonkers Prices...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    The final year 924S has always been slightly intriguing to me…consider it a 944 Light. Actually, if I recall correctly, the 924 was slightly quicker off the line as it was a tad lighter. But I think the 924 usually falls under the same dilemma as the 914, as in “gee, not a REAL Porsche…”

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      It’s fun taking one to a car show and parking it with all the 911’s. I love watching snobs get uncomfortable.

      • 0 avatar
        Nostrathomas

        As a guy who guys to his fair share of car shows, and who owns a 911, I’m not really sure what about having a 924 there would make anyone be uncomfortable. I have a feeling you may be projecting. Personally I love seeing a nice of Porsche cars at shows…only having 911s would be boring.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Personally, I’d have gone with the 944 anyway – the styling was more distinctive. The 924 always struck me as the Meg Ryan of cars – pretty but not all that memorable. Porsche could have done themselves a major favor with the car and given it proper sports car power up front.

  • avatar
    Syke

    And you’ve just written my forever-favorite TTAC article. Thank you.

    Still have wonderful memories of my 924S (since I recently bought my Fiat 500C Abarth, I’ve finally quit wining about trading it in), and still can’t believe I was stupid enough to trade it in on a Pontiac Solstice. Proving that drop tops aren’t everything.

    The special editions are nice, but if you can’t find one, just get yourself a regular 924 or 944 (easier to find and they’re newer). You’ll thank me. I’ve never had a better driving car.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I’m more of a fan of the 924 and not a fan of any 911, but I am REALLY a fan of the 914 for some reason, and saw a gorgeous one coming home from work the other day on the highway – green, of course!

    I actually rode (in the back seat) of a 924 in the early 80s one day, but never drove one, but certainly wanted to.

    I had read that the 914s had issues, but don’t remember what, but I loved them just the same.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      I think the 914s caught fire, and they were air-cooled H4s.

      I once worked with an engineer who turned his college daily-driver 914 into a 916 clone. Had a widebody kit, air-cooled 6cyl, DOT slicks, cage, racing seats and harnesses. That thing was a beast.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      When I was in high school (mid to late ’70s), I knew a cockpit engineer on the A-7 Corsair program (he’d been in the Air Force in Europe in the ’50s, and seen guys like Fangio and Ascari race in GP racing – I’m still jealous, 40 years later). He drove a 914, and carried a box end wrench close at hand, so he could quickly jump out and disconnect the battery should the electrical system suddenly go haywire.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Interesting write up for an overlooked car.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    I didn’t realize some of these were built with rear drum brakes. Entry level or not, WTF??

    Anyhoo… if you’ve ever worked on the engine in one of these, the cylinder head familial similarities are obvious between these, VW Golf, and the Volvo red engines. The overhead cam-shim-bucket-valve is a really simple, brilliant arrangement.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Yes, it’s true, disc/drum brakes.

    • 0 avatar

      Because… it was the 70’s… and the car was supposed to be a Volkswagen.

      Not that hard to convert to disc brakes though–and you can go from the 4 lug to 5 lug wheels, which means Fuchs alloys will fit.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        I understand “why,” and that “because it was the 1970s.” But it was still lazy of Porsche to do that. German engineering excellence asterisk-footnote-but-except-for-this.

        It’s not that hard to convert them but it would have been even easier to build them that way from the factory. Volvos had all discs from 1966 in a stodgy compact sedan. Beat the more expensive “entry level” Porsche by ten years.

        • 0 avatar
          Carter Johnson

          Really, 40+ years ago when the car was initially conceived, drums weren’t a bad braking solution in the back of a 2,500 lb, 100 horsepower car. I ran my Audi Coupe with rear drums on track for years with no issues, and there are still people racing with them. Agreed it was lazy, but it’s not like they cut a hole in the floor, handed you some coarse sandals and said “good luck, feet!”

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          The Volvo was heavier and faster (in the better models) than the original 924. It didn’t need rear disks.

          Ultimately there is very little wrong with drums on the back end of a light car. They work just fine, last forever, and make the handbrake much, much simpler to arrange. They don’t shed heat as well as disks, but if there isn’t much heat to shed, who cares?

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            Meh, the Volvo 140 was probably about 300lbs heavier than the 924. Significant but not altogether different. Yes, rear drums had adequate endurance in heavy use.

            Anyway, you’re missing the point of all discs (with a c, I blame computer geeks for causing the common misspelling with a k). Since disc brakes don’t self-energize like drums do, it’s a lot easier to balance front/rear brake bias. The Big Four proved that time and time again by doing a terrible job on disc/drum combinations in the time before ABS was available in mainstream cars.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    re: “Though ostensibly most of the Audis would be based upon Volkswagen models”

    Not historically accurate. Arguably, VW bought Audi to get watercooled engineering skills. No aircooled rear-engined Audis came out of the deal.

    All the current Audis, save for the A3/Q3 and R8 are direct descendants of pre-VW Audis, with their north-south watercooled engines and FWD (later Quatro).

    • 0 avatar
      qfrog

      NSU already made rear engined air cooled cars by the time VW took over. The NSU prinz comes to mind.

      The NSU K70 is the example you have in mind. It was briefly a NSU but later a VW with a water cooled inline engine and mounted in front of the front axle longitudinally.

    • 0 avatar
      Carter Johnson

      @Heavy handle – you didn’t complete the quote:

      “Though ostensibly most of the Audis would be based upon Volkswagen models, in fact there were a few like the B series that went the other way. The B1 Audi 80 would usher in a new era of front-engine, water-cooled, front-wheel-drive Volkswagen/Audi products.”

      Ostensibly means, in this scenario, that most people believe Audis are little more than gussied up VWs. But, as I pointed out, and then you reinforced, that isn’t the historical case. As this article wasn’t about the EA 827 or it’s development, the Audi mention was really to lay the groundwork for the discussion of where the 924 came from.

      Thanks for the comment!

  • avatar
    qfrog

    Carter, are you coupe GT and V8 quattro Carter? If so I’m pretty sure we’ve met at some NEQ events over the years. I think this was you at the wheel. https://photos.smugmug.com/Cars/Feb-07-WDS-III/i-3Mh7fht/0/XL/PICT0031-XL.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Carter Johnson

      @qfrog – that’s me, alright! I still have the Coupe GT which now sports a lot more power and looks a bit nicer than it did back then, but the V8 has gone the way of the Dodo. Perhaps an article? Thanks for the image – that day, I was supposed to arrive in my 200 quattro Avant which threw the alternator belt en route. As we were only 20 miles from home, my friend and I turned around, drove to his house at 5am with no lights on, and grabbed the 318i. It was still fun, but not as much fun as the V8 was around Tim O’Neils.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    My recollection from the time was that the 924 was kind of crappy (weak and loose), and it was the 944 which really took the water-cooled 4-cylinder Porsches to the next level in terms of solidity and performance.

    • 0 avatar
      Carter Johnson

      The 924 Turbo, and the Le Mans-run Carrera GT/GTS/GTR project, laid the groundwork for the 944. The Turbo was a pretty big step up over the original normally aspirated 924.

  • avatar
    Acd

    The late 70’s/early 80’s was definitely the era of the cheesy special edition from European makes with cars that either weren’t competitive (Triumph, MG, Alfa Romeo) or overpriced to begin with (Porsche) to help give them pizazz. The formula was pretty easy: commemorate something that 99% of the population didn’t care about, add tacky tape stripes of questionable taste, change carpet color and throw in some option equipment like a special steering wheel and now you’ve got an instant classic (or so they thought).

    The ultimate collection from this era would be 924 Championship & Sebring Editions, an Alfa Romeo Spider Nikki Lauda Edition and a Triumph TR7 Victory Edition.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Triumph TR7 Victory Edition.”

      Is the “Victory” if it goes 48 hours without breaking?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      It was the cheesy special edition for pretty much everyone. Remember the “King Cobra” Mustang II?

      When you can’t dazzle ’em with brilliance, baffle ’em with bulls**t, you know?

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        The King Cobra Mustang II was Peak 70s. They were awesome.

        http://cdn.johnywheels.com/2015/07/23/1978fordmustangiikingcobra-l-5a2a74a6b3a4464c.jpg

        But don’t forget the Smokey-and-the Bandit Firebird T/A 6.6.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          True, but those ’77 T/As actually had ***some*** balls left (by the pathetic standards of the day, anyway), so it wasn’t just tape and paint. They were also darn good handling cars. Starting in ’80, that all ended, though (301 FTW).

          I had a ’75 Olds wagon with the 455 in high school with no emissions controls (my dad had them all removed after they broke down…$50 a year in cash to the local shop = somewhat big nasty horsepower and an annual inspection sticker). I could actually beat all kinds of early-’80s “muscle” cars with that thing (the sneak attack approach helped). Embarrassing as hell for them.

          Nothing was more pathetic than those late-’70s Corvettes, though…no power AND junk heaps to boot.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I love the front engine Porsches for their “German Corvette” factor and (like Syke) they make the faithful uncomfortable.

  • avatar

    Porsche 924 = driver’s car, a true sports car, a “momentum” car, blah blah.

    BRZ/FR-S= Omg needs more hp, too slow bro!

    Old and “slow” sports cars get viewed through rose color glasses, new ones just get crapped on until they become old and everyone suddenly wants one.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The trouble with the Toyobaru is not a lack of power – it’s plenty fast, it just doesn’t feel like it because it isn’t all that willing. I t doesn’t egg you on. The thing just is not as much fun as something like that should be (I bet it gets that from the Toyota side of the family). Imagine one with the raucous 1.4T from the Fiat Abarth in it – less power, but it would be way more fun! Or the engine it should have had in the first place, the Subaru 2.0T.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The cars may be cheap, but some parts are insanely expensive, and clutch replacements are a nightmare.

    • 0 avatar

      That’s what forced me to sell my 924. I spent stupid money on a gasket set and suspension bushings when I rebuilt the engine and suspension. Then the clutch started going out. We were expecting our first child and I was hit by the sudden urge to be practical and an opportunity to sell the car for what I had in it.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Having owned an ’87 924S, all the parts that are shared with VW Rabbits are absurdly cheap. $12 for a new turn signal lever, $14 for a door handle. Suspension parts practically free in a box of Cracker Jacks. Anything that touched the engine, cooling system, or transmission with a Porsche symbol on it required absolutely absurd amounts of money, even with digging in the dark corners of the Internet for deals. The “Porsche Tax” is no joke. And working on anything around the engine and drivetrain just completely sucked. That Porsche 2.5L was MUCH, MUCH bigger than the Audi 2.0 the car was originally designed to have. It fit, barely. Such a brilliant car to drive though. Worth the pain if you have the time.

      I actually also sold mine to buy a 500 Abarth, oddly enough. Two of us in the world, go figure!

  • avatar
    patman

    This article made my 10 year old inner child very happy.

    The 944 is still my favorite car of all time but it all started with the 924 which imprinted on my psyche like a researcher in an ultralight on a freshly hatched baby duckling. I’ve still got the ancient Porsche magazine that’s responsible – they built a race spec 924 that came shipped from Porsche in several big boxes with some assembly required.

  • avatar
    TAP

    Agree that they were pretty cars, but calling the 924 a classic shows the word has lost all meaning.

  • avatar

    For a look at the ultimate front engined four cylinder Porsche, you might want to check out a piece I did on a restomodded 968.

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/08/unloved-porsche-purists-1993-porsche-968-well-loved-nonetheless/

    Just coincidentally I saw two front engined Porsches yesterday, a 928 and a 928S.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “Just coincidentally I saw two front engined Porsches yesterday, a 928 and a 928S.”

      Hopefully neither had just been fished out of Lake Michigan after a drag race with a Cadillac pimpmobile.

    • 0 avatar
      Carter Johnson

      @Ronnie Schreiber,

      Yes, generally speaking the 968 Turbo S is considered the ultimate development. Real ones are worth a pretty penny, too. The Carrera GTS, though, is probably the most desirable classic model. Both are seriously impressive machines, with no excuses to offer their bigger brothers.

    • 0 avatar
      Testacles Megalos

      I had a 968 for a few years, a stunning car. David E. Davis once commented the magic of the largest I4 engine in production (ca. 750cc in each cylinder)…off the line that engine felt like an electric motor, and had the most subtle howl. And the chassis dynamics were sublime. Not the glam factor of a 911 but no apologies as a sports car.

      My first track instructor had a 924 Turbo. He was a good driver, and could really hustle that car around the track; maybe not keeping up with the contemporary 911s on the straights but he could take it through the corners with no embarrassment. Best thing about the 924 must have been that they kept pounding that formula until they arrived at the 968. I wonder where that evolution (and the 928) would have gone if Porsche had been making money in the early 90s.

      The air-cooled 911 chassis is great entertainment if your hands, feet and butt all play well with each other. But I doubt it’s as inherently quick in the bends as the 924/44/68 series, all else equal.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Unfortunately, I see front-engined Porsches every day. Reboddied Touaregs and Q5s.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    I’m sure that a modded-out 924 is good around a track, and might be a good “collector” item. But, as a daily driver in traffic, needing to handle sudden stops, gaps to accelerate into, etc.. It strikes me that a 5-speed based WRX would handle all that, and even part-time track duty much better, and much more reliably than a 30+ year old car that was never “fast” to begin with.. I had an ’84 Jetta GLI with ~95 hp, so I can kinda relate.. Still fun in 1990 as a first car, but… it would be horrible to daily drive today..

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Having owned an ’84 GLI until relatively recently, I fail to see why its performance would be a problem. 0-60 in 9 seconds is competitive with most mid-size 4cyl automatics, and it is surely far more maneuverable.

      My qualm with driving one on a daily basis today would be that the thought of getting hit in one by the typical 5Klb Soccer Mom Mobile doesn’t even bear thinking about. A tinbox death trap by modern standards. At least it is a small target.

      Where do you live that you need such mighty acceleration to get by day-to-day? I travel all over the US for work, and find that the overwhelming majority of Americans could not find full throttle with a GPS, and a Model T Ford probably has more than enough acceleration to get by. If you “need” that to squeeze into gaps in traffic, please stop driving like an asshat.

  • avatar
    Alfie

    “You, too, can have an obscure, classic Porsche for only around 1/1000th the price of an air-cooled 911.”

    Not anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      Tosh

      Sorry, but it’s really true: 924 Championship Edition just like the first pic, $3750 asking price.
      http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/cto/5746649081.html

    • 0 avatar
      Carter Johnson

      $7,000 48K 1988 924S: http://phoenix.craigslist.org/evl/cto/5744872930.html
      $2,650 1988 924S: http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/cto/5743006662.html
      $5,000 1988 924S: http://atlanta.craigslist.org/eat/cto/5739028779.html
      $4,500 40K 1982 924 Turbo: http://longisland.craigslist.org/cto/5789198866.html
      $800 M471 1981 924 Turbo: https://phoenix.craigslist.org/nph/cto/5788909716.html

      Just in a quick search. They are out there.

  • avatar
    lon888

    I can’t imagine how few are left. During the late 70’s and early 80’s I worked on “Poorsh’s” to pay for my engineering school habit. I have never seen cheaper plastic than what Porsche put in those damn things. Late 70’s cars were already heaps of hydrocarbons in the early 80’s.

    The Datsun Z-cars were mechanically superior but they didn’t have the coveted Stuttgart crest on the nose.


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