By on June 12, 2016

Honda Ridgeline Rock Drop

You may’ve noticed an ad campaign by General Motors touting the toughness of its steel cargo bed in comparison with Ford’s aluminum cargo hold. The Chevy came out battered and bruised, but Ford’s aluminum-bodied F-150 incurred multiple lacerations. GM, in its comparison, proclaimed itself the winner.

Then late Friday, a plucky upstart called Honda (you may know the company for its motorized bicycles and electrical generators), threw massive shade on the Detroit rivalry using the same test.

Honda’s engineers (not the PR folks, though Honda PR distributed the video) performed roughly the same rock-drop test as the Chevrolet advertising campaign. The result? Just some scratches in the Ridgeline’s composite bed. Not a dent. Not a break. And the in-bed storage door still opened and closed as designed.

Well done, Honda. Now all we need is a real truck for your trick bed.

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156 Comments on “Chevrolet Upstages Ford – Then Honda Throws Composite Shade on Both...”


  • avatar
    NormSV650

    They don’t even center load it. Rail loading the side breaks the fall that could damage the bed. Plus you wouldn’t go down road with heavy, uneven load.

    Want to change your flat tire with a load? You’re out of luck as the spare is not coming out when loaded.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Most people, including myself, use a dedicated trailer towed behind the truck to haul stone, gravel, sand, aggregate. whatever. You can rent an open U-Haul (local) for $10/day plus tax.

      Only a fool would use their truck bed as a dump truck?

      They deserve any and all damage they incur.

      • 0 avatar
        OldBlueTruck

        Nice trolling. Using your pick up as a work tool…only a fool would do that.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “Most people, including myself, use a dedicated trailer towed behind the truck to haul stone, gravel, sand, aggregate. whatever. You can rent an open U-Haul (local) for $10/day plus tax.

        Only a fool would use their truck bed as a dump truck?”

        Really? Why would I rent a trailer when I own a PU? My Sierra HD wasn’t even a month old when I had a yard dump 2800 lbs. of 1 1/2″ river rock in the bed. Of course they didn’t drop it in from 10′ up. Rode

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Dude, damage your pickup truck all you want!

          You paid for it. You can FUBAR it!

          It’s one thing to carry bales of hay, bags of cement or max out the bed with siding, plywood or sheetrock.

          But gravel, stone, cinder blocks, bricks or aggregate? Only someone without any pride in their truck would do something like that.

          Go head on bud! Use your pickup as a dump truck!

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “Dude, damage your pickup truck all you want!’

            What? It’s a truck for crying out loud. Again I’d love to post a picture of the bed & then maybe you could point out where the damage is. You can use them without beating the crap out of them. Guess you buy a truck for different reasons than I do.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            My 2011 Tundra bed was pretty beat up with dents, dings and scratches (on the outsides), but it was used for actual construction work.

            All my trucks were used as actual work trucks. That was my business, to maintain, repair, remodel the properties of the family business. A real application of its intended purpose.

            Like other contractors who trade every 2-3 years, we tried to keep damage to a minimum.

            When I wanted to use my 2011 Tundra as a trade in on my 2016 Tundra, the dealer in El Paso offered me $15K for it. I knew that was low, but it had some dings all around.

            So my oldest son pops up and says, “Hey dad, I’ll pay you that much for it!” And he wrote out a check on the spot which I used along with my own check to pay for the 2016.

            You should have seen the look on that sales-manager’s face!

            Shot down by his own low-bid.

            Regardless, if you want some retained value, bed-damage has to be kept to a minimum.

            And an owner can do that any way they like. If a spray-on works for you, have a ball. They don’t work very well where I’m at, because of the heat and the sun.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Honestly I have no idea what the story about your son buying your old truck has to do with you telling me I’m damaging my truck because I actually use it like a truck. Good grief.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Point of the story was that in spite of me doing my best to minimize damage to my old truck, some damage occurred.

            The dealer low-balled me, in the hopes of retailing the truck for $22K, in as-is condition.

            Having an unexpected buyer pop up caused the dealer’s plans to take my truck in trade to take another turn.

            Point was, if you can minimize damaging your truck, you will generally get more money for it in trade. Protecting the bed is one of the easiest ways to do that.

            We each choose how we take care of our stuff. No doubt what you do works for you.

          • 0 avatar
            BrunoT

            My father is a home builder. My uncle is a home builder. My grandfather was a homebuilder. My brother is an electrical contractor. I worked in construction and owned a landscaping business for 25 years. I have NEVER seen any contractor show up to a jobsite with a freaking trailer in tow unless it was to haul a bobcat, tractor, or an enclosed trailer used by insulation companies. You’d look like a dork in a Ridgeline with a trailer behind it to haul a few brick from jobsite to jobsite. In fact, I often was tasked with doing just that for my father. Nobody uses a trailer to haul a few materials around. Good lord, you must be Canadian or something.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Leave out the Canadian thing, Bruno, and I’d agree with you here. I agree that it looks stupid for a pickup truck to tow a trailer for anything that could be carried in the bed. What’s really hilarious is when they’re towing a tiny utility trailer SMALLER than the bed of the truck carrying an easy load with absolutely nothing in the bed itself. It seems many pickup owners today are far too much about appearances and not enough about “Real Work”.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Good lord, you must be Canadian or something.”

            LOL

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Do Canadians do that?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Good lord, you must be Canadian or something”

            WTF?

            Canadians per capita buy more trucks than Americans.

            I prefer carrying my stuff in the box. That is why I bought a truck. I don’t know a single guy who works in logging, mining or heavy construction who routinely pulls a trailer.
            If you want aggregate or rock delivered then that is what dump trucks are for. I see many small contractors with single axle class 5-6 trucks for that sort of work. They often pull a trailer with a bobcat on it.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @ Lou_BC
            As well as flatbeds and smaller dumpers based on Vans.
            I saw these are lot :Van towing a digger or a utility trailer
            http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/image_zps5hfwxafd.jpeg
            One with a Cab Chassis and a turntable
            http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/image_zpsf1dcmgvn.jpeg

        • 0 avatar
          56BelAire

          Just the past week, I hauled 2,400lbs of “chunky Uinta” stone in the steel bed of my 2004 F-150, 6cyl, stick, 195,000 mile work truck.

          My bedliner of choice is 3/4″ plywood.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Bruno T
            “Nobody uses a trailer to haul a few materials around. Good lord, you must be Canadian or something.”
            Do in Europe, either cars ,( there are virtually no Pickups) Vans or Cab Chassis variants instead of F250/F350’s

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            RobertRyan, what BrunoT writes has a lot of merit, and that’s the locale, area and region of use. Out West where I live we have the wide-open spaces.

            Also the scale of the loads. For instance, one lawn-conversion I did from weeds to lava-rock took four 8x14x4ft trailer loads of lava-rock.

            Imagine how many times you’d have to go back to fill up that truck bed, if not using a trailer.

            Now, we could also opt for commercial dump-truck delivery to the site, at $65 per load.

            Cheaper to rent that $10/day U-Haul open-bed trailer.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Cheaper to go one load from a dump truck than four loads in that trailer. When adding the $10/day plus four round trips of fuel, the $65 for the dump means a single load and no time wasted running back and forth for the rock.

            Cheating out on a project almost guarantees higher costs overall.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            RobertRyan – Europe and most other places in the world have vans with tray backs or even small dump bodies.

            HDC – how long did it take you to load and unload that trailer multiple times to get that job done?

            Oh and what were you using to tow that load?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            ” how long did it take you to load and unload that trailer multiple times to get that job done?”

            A long time to unload, even with four guys shoveling. No time at all at the gravel pit where they loaded the trailer with a big front-end loader.

            If you’re familiar with desert-scape conversions, it’s done in stages, with ground leveling being the first stage, laying down tar-saturated fiberglass mat being the second stage, and then spraying hot roofing tar over the fiberglass mat being the third stage.

            The final stage is to spread the lava-rock (or gravel, or river stone, or other aggregate) with a steel rake to a uniform level of about 3-inches.

            But the conversion does save a lot of water in an already arid region.

            We used my father-in-law’s 3500 Duallie to tow the open trailer and my 1988 Silverado to tow the 36 rolls of tar mat inside my 9×15 HaulMark trailer. The bed of the Silverado was filled with 5-gallon tar blocks to be melted.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            The better question is, how far away was the site where you got the rock and how much fuel did you use in those four round trips? How much time were you away from the job site?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @HDC – I’m not familiar with “desert-scaping” but I grew up around logging and road construction. I could run a loader, cat or dump truck before I had a drivers licence.
            The trailer dimensions you gave would translate to 16.2 cubic yards. Even at a “low ball” of one ton per cubic yard you’d be towing 32,000 lbs of stone not including the weight of the trailer. That one ton dually would be grossly overloaded even with a goose neck trailer. That would be insane with a bumper pull.
            I followed a guy with a 1 ton Silverado last summer on a back road pulling a similar load. He lost control of it on a 5% downhill with a gentle s-curve as he tried to slow it down for the 90 degree left at the bottom. Luckily there was no traffic as he wandered into the oncoming lane before he got a handle on it. I bet his shorts were brown after that was over.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The detail given here sounds like a dump truck would have been quite helpful. Either as an hourly rental or (since it’s your business) a cheap purchase.

            My dad’s had an old dump truck for years for such occasions. Very handy.

      • 0 avatar
        BrunoT

        Yeah, a landscaper would NEVER have his truck bed full of mulch or potted plants, a homeowner have a riding lawnmower back there taking it to get serviced, or a builder have a load of lumber back there. Why, those dummies should all be driving sedans with 10,000 lb tow ratings. Trailers are the new thing, man.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      That’s a good point about the spare, except that you need a crane and welder to get the spare out from under a conventional pickup when the truck is loaded and a rear tire is flat. Love those rusty chains!

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “They don’t even center load it. Rail loading the side breaks the fall that could damage the bed. Plus you wouldn’t go down road with heavy, uneven load.”

      I suggest you check out some prior reviews of the Honda Ridgeline that came out LONG before this Chevy debacle. Honda was, in fact, the FIRST to use river stones being dropped into the bed of a 2017 Ridgeline to show the toughness of its composite lining. This is hardly a copycat PR stunt unless you want to call the Chevy commercial the copycat.

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        Ford has videos from 2014 hauling 50 tons worth of river rock to a job site and unloading it with another excavator.

        All these videos should be taken with a grain of salt, especially coming from the manufacturer but I’m pretty certain Honda was not the first.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I will simply state it in very plain English & then sit back and watch the LITERAL RELIGIOUS-CULT-ZEALOT LIKE REACTION FLOW AS IF “BLOOD IS COMING OUT OF EVERYWHERE” FROM THE HARDCORE FORD FAN BOYS –

          The Chevy commercial was a fair one that showed the Ford’s aluminum bed construction for what it is; an idiotic use of aluminum in an area of any truck that even remotely pretends to even be a seldom used work truck.

          FORD CULTIST-FANBOIS BUTT-HURT RAGE ENSUES AS THEY REJECT THE REALITY OF MERE PAVING STONES AND BRICKS (relatively light-weight COMMON BUILDING AND LANDSCAPING MATERIALS) LACERATING & LEAVING HUGE PUNCTURES IN THEIR PRECIOUS ALUMINUM TRUCK BED THAT’S MADE OF SODA CAN GRADE ALUMINUM.

          Go f*ck yourself and your “military grade aluminum” bull$hit, Dennis Leary, you loser who isn’t the least bit talented and who totally ripped off material from a massively talented Bill Hicks.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You need a beer. I’ve got an Ed Fitz or Founders Porter here… oh and I have some AV Winter Lager left which I bought on sale in April.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Sunday nights can be rough.

            My generation at least had Bonanza.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I am pumped, bro!

            England, the most overrated soccer crew of all time (throughout history) with similarly overrated, prima Donna “soccer stars” (*cough* Beckham, *cough* Rooney, etc., etc.) was played to a draw today by Russia!

            It was beautiful to see the wanker Brits humiliated yet again!

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            “Sunday nights can be rough.

            My generation at least had Bonanza.”

            Apparantly, some resort to mommy’s medicine cabinet.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            “mommy’s medicine cabinet”

            Weren’t nothin in there but merthiolate and iodine.

            My generation and younger are the pussies; Mom & Dad just toughed sh1t out.

          • 0 avatar
            TriumphDriver

            I think you have had far too much too drink.

            England’s football team is vastly overrated by a media that frankly would not know how to develop players or a team if their life depended on it. Most English football followers are far more realistic in their expectations, it’s just the mediocre journalists who hype everything from a football match to a snowstorm.

            But have another drink, it’ll do you good.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I love British people, many British cultural icons (e.g. Monte Python, Rolling Stones and MANY other British msuicians/bands, some British Literature, Clarkson-era Top Gear, etc.), but DESPISE THE QUEEN AND ROYAL FAMILY AND DESPISE DAVID BECKHAM & BRITISH SOCCER/FOOTBALL.

            GO F*CK YOURSELF, QUEEN ELIZABETH II, YOU OLD, STIFF, FRIGID BITCH, AND THE ENTIRE ROYAL FAMILY, TOO!!!

          • 0 avatar
            BrunoT

            Or you can relax and spend $200-$300 on a plastic drop in liner.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Deadweight – you have a giant hate on for Ford and Cadillac, we get it already.

            Do you own a truck or have ever done any heavy work with one?

            Any guy who has and has purchased that truck with his own money thinks those Chevy adds are stupid.

            That isn’t any different than Howie Long’s attack adds for the “man step” or heated steering wheel.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            DW:

            GM was scrambling to follow in Ford’s footsteps last year. According to our Aluminum suppliers, they are still in development stages for a Aluminum truck.

            BUY UP YER STEEL BODIED NATTTY V8’S WHILE YOU STILL CAN MUA AH AH AH

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            No one need advise me that GM will today try to rip on Ford for using aluminum in the inside of the truck bed of the F Series, while doing the same thing at some point in the near to intermediate future.

            I’m with y’all there; GM’s incompetence knows no bounds.

      • 0 avatar
        BrunoT

        Brand new invention you should check out. It’s called a $300 bedliner over a steel bed. You can drop Geraldo Rivera’s safe in it and it’ll be fine.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          I’m sure you’ve already read my comments on drop-in bed liners, Bruno. I’ve now had two trucks with them installed and in both cases I’ve taken them out and cut them up for recycling.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Interesting stuff. I was wondering if TTAC was going to cover this or the GM ads. Seems like a topic ripe for glorious internet rage.

    I’ll come back this time tomorrow to catch up on all the bomb throwing from the truck fan contingent.

  • avatar
    Andy

    I wonder if its the same composite they use on their HRX mower decks? Several rocks later I believe in it!

  • avatar
    Speed3

    At least GM and Ford have the hand up when it comes to build quality…

  • avatar
    mason

    They need to test that Honda out with a few more loads before an honest comparison can be made.

    https://youtu.be/KKy4J9YDonY

    For some reason I can’t link the YouTube video but Ford loaded 50 tons of rock (through multiple loads), hauled it to another job site, and then proceeded to unload it with a small excavator.

    Kinda makes this attempt at a comparison from Honda somewhat of an embarrassment.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Honda was doing the dropped stones into the bed before Chevy even started their campaign–long enough before that I’m inclined to believe Chevy is the copycat here.

      As far as loading and unloading with a fork lift… that’s not even close to what we’re talking about now.

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        Who said anything about a forklift? If your confusing a forklift with an excavator you obviously don’t have an interest in any of these trucks or the tests.

        https://youtu.be/KKy4J9YDonY

        https://youtu.be/KKy4J9YDonY

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Without being able to see the video referenced, how was I to know? Most pickup loading videos tend to use forklifts and pallets, not raw stone. Now that I’ve SEEN the video, it’s clear that a spray-in bed liner is what saved that bed by spreading the impact of each stone over a broader area to prevent scrapes and punctures. Definitely proves bed liners work but subsequently means the curb weight of the truck (and actual load capacity by weight) is changed. When these trucks begin arguing “greater load capacity by X pounds,” that added weight makes a difference.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            “Without being able to see the video referenced, how was I to know?”

            Perhaps because I described the video with the word “excavator” in it above?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Believe what you see and only half of what you are told.” That was a lesson taught me by my father many long years ago. To some, a fork lift IS an excavator if it is used in bare-dirt construction.

            In other words, I rarely take anybody’s statement at face value–no matter who it is.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I have never ever heard someone refer to an excavator as a fork lift even if the excavator has a thumb.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      You can’t just copy-paste a YouTube URL; the comment system thinks it’s spam. To get around it, just paste the end of it, like this:

      /watch?v=AqAxM-SKuHM

      We’re all able to recognize this and paste it in accordingly.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    These sort of adds are stupid but they will work on people who don’t actually use a truck for any real work.

    I don’t know a single guy with a truck that is used for work that would do this, even with trucks that are fleet supplied.

    Spray in liners, aluminum checker plate liners, even plywood liners are all the standard in work trucks. Most have cab/rail guards i.e. headache racks.

    A HD with a flat deck or aftermarket dump box are used by guys who will be hauling bulk aggregate.

    Cue BARFO and an anti-aluminum rant.

    • 0 avatar
      Joe Btfsplk

      I bet that a couple of layers of old berber carpet would prevent the aluminum Ford damage…. or a 4×8 sheet of pressure treated plywood. Just toss it in when you’re headed for a load of concrete bricks.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Lou_BC
      These are aluminium, but they can take logs trees,boulders etc.owner not worried about scratches
      http://www.trucksales.com.au/buy/new/AG-AD-389174/Hamelex-White-Aluminium-3-Axle-Dog-Trailer

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        RobertRyan – a lot of gravel trucks in my region also run aluminum boxes. They work great for “fine” aggregate. My dad had steel dump boxes because he used to spend most of his time hauling off-highway. He did have one job hauling rock for bridge abutments and lined the boxes of his trucks with rough sawn 2×8 planks. They absorbed the abuse of the big rocks.
        An excavator with a “thumb” works the best for loading large rocks since a skilled operator can place the boulders into the box without dropping them. http://www.excavatorthumb.com/mojo/mojo.php?attachment=excavator+backhoe+thumb+31

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    I don’t know what’s worse. Having to get a Honda pickup or a stinkin’ bedliner.

    But it’s hard to believe GM is still butt hurt over the F-150 going full aluminum. They need to let it go, GM pickup buyers don’t care. Or they might have to wonder what the big deal is, and why is GM so scared.

    Meanwhile ’15+ GM trucks will start to show signs of rust soon, if they’re not already. I’ll bet Fords is paying attention.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @DenverMike – we all remember those Howie Long attack adds.

      I love the “throw the tool box in the bed” drop test.

      I don’t know a single tradesmen who’d do that, do you?

      “The automaker’s share of the light truck market dropped 2.3 percent this year compared to the same period in 2015.”

      That is with the Colorado/Canyon on line selling with Sierra/Silverado 1500’s and HD’s.

      This is a BARFOesque attempt at saving face.

      The marketplace has spoken.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Meanwhile ’15+ GM trucks will start to show signs of rust soon, if they’re not already. I’ll bet Fords is paying attention.”

      Oh cut the ignorant BS. I’m a GM guy(Sierra HD, Tahoe, Volt) and even I can admit that was stupid commercial on GM’s part. Especially considering we all know that’s where they are headed. Which is a good thing because I’m all for aluminum bodied PU’s. But lets cut out the stupid comments that ’15 GM trucks are rusting. My ’04 Sierra is still rock solid (rust wise) after 12 MN salty winters. Too bad you can’t post pictures on this stupid web site, I’d prove it.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Yeah maybe trucks don’t rust. My bad…

        youtube.com/watch?v=0NLp0Z-pcrg

        youtube.com/watch?v=2din5kmNqfw

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          Big deal a few anecdotal you-tube videos which I didn’t bother watching. Statistically insignificant and therefore meaningless.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yeah, but in the *rare* instances it happens, you’ve got a truck that’s “totaled” by rust. What would’ve been a $7,000 truck is a $300 rust bucket. Yes, anecdotally, I’ve seen way too many 12 year old pickups with brake pedals rubbing the floor, with cab-collapse. It’s frustrating. If it’s a 12 year old Camry, rusted to hell, no one cares. Pickups should have a virtually unlimited life, provided no wrecks and no rust.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Getting back to your original comment, my point is unless there was a material or process problem when the truck was manufactured they don’t start rusting when they are 2 years old. I’ve got a 21 year old aluminum snowmobile trailer. I know how much better aluminum is over steel when your talking about corrosion.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s gotta start somewhere. Maybe we’re talking the size of pinheads at 2 years, if it’s going to be full blown rust at 10 or 12 years, but it doesn’t simply start from zero at 8 or 9.

            Right now, Ford may be play a waiting game. with “anecdotal” steel and aluminum pickups working side by side, maybe for the same companies/fleets, where there’s snow/salt.

            A 12 year old pickup is considered “mid-life”, especially in the southwest, but there’s no reason that shouldn’t be “everywhere”. It’s a real shame when they have to be scrapped for their rust alone.

            But there’s a reason your aluminum trailer is hanging tough. Aluminum rusts exponentially slower than steel. And we’re talking mostly surface rust on aluminum, not the kind that’s structural.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I don’t see Chevy’s rusting any worse than similar aged Ford trucks with steel bodies. I see more older Ram trucks and Toyota T100’s with rust than Gm or Ford.

            The one thing that is universal now is crappy chrome. I’ve seen a lot of surface rust on all of them.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yeah no way GMs are the only ones, they all rust 2 hell. GM had that composite bed, and its biggest reason for existing was rust prevention. Except my 2 favourite rusty pickup vids are of GMs. Except for “Dave’s Farm” tribute to his F-250.

            youtube.com/watch?v=ZFF2tvA7fKE

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I wouldn’t be against buying a Honda Ridgeline. Honda’s tend to be reliable and the only real negative to buying one is stigma. My wife has been grumbling about getting an SUV. I’d have no issues if she wanted one of these.
      The previous Ridgeline I looked at but the small box and sloped sides with a monster C-pillar killed it for me.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Frankly I’m tired of every pickup truck commercial explaining how tough (and it’s Texas Tough here) they are. That being said I’m sure the Honda truck is fine for the suburban guy (like me) who would do a lot of commuting with only only weekend hauling duties.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Found your comment interesting and reply-worthy because I have owned a number of half-ton pickup trucks over the past 54 years since I got my drivers license at age 16.

      So, I found that my 2011 Tundra 5.7L did the same jobs better than my 1988 Silverado 350 and my 2006 F150 5.4 XLT, both which I bought new, and all the other trucks I bought used.

      I liked that 2011 Tundra well enough that I bought a 2016 Tundra (full-boat) TRD 4-door 4×4. That’s putting my money where my mouth is.

      This does not mean that I’m recommending Tundra for everyone. It means that for what I use a pickup truck for, the Tundra 5.7L works perfectly, for me.

      Only the gullible and fanclub members will fall for the marketing shpiel about how tough pickup trucks are.

      People who want to buy a really tough truck buy a 1-ton with Dual Rear Wheels. Now, that is tough!

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        I have found that the new truck I purchased always does everything better than the one it replaced. They improve every truck generation which is truly amazing. That has little to do with swapping brands.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          I do not believe that my 2016 Tundra would do the same jobs as well as my 2011 Tundra did.

          My 2016 is just a completely different beast. It really is far removed from what my 2011 Tundra was.

          What was noticeable for me switching between trucks over the years was that the 1988 Silverado 350 I owned was better than my 2006 F150 5.4 for some jobs. And the F150 excelled in other jobs.

          But that 2011 Tundra! Now there was a beast that beat both my 1988 Silverado and my 2006 F150! And…., in all aspects of the work where I pressed it into service. All jobs.

          I owned both the Silverado and the F150 simultaneously up until Jan 2011 when I bought that first Tundra.

          Once I got that 2011 Tundra, there was no longer a need to keep the other two oldies around. I sold them both within a week.

      • 0 avatar
        anti121hero

        I have a good friend in the snowplow business up here in cny, and he has shown me how the tundras literally start to fall apart and break into pieces after a winter of plowing, where the fords and chevys do fine. That is my only experience with tundras. And that I have never ever seen one on a contractor site or actually hauling anything of any kind.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Whereas I have seen Tundras working on farms and construction sites–including highway construction–working just as hard as any other pickup truck on the site. One such carried the fuel tanks and pumping gear for refueling heavy equipment.

          See how anecdotal evidence works?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            The main reason why I don’t see Tundra’s on job sites is because all they make are 1/2 ton trucks. I know a bridge construction supervisor who had one and loved it but needed more payload.

    • 0 avatar
      BrunoT

      I agree. If you feel you need a truck bed for some reason and prefer the more carlike ride and handling, and can live with a little more space inside (and the mundane looks), it’s a good choice. Having used a truck daily in business for 25 years, I have a hard time imagining the exact scenarios where homeowners would need one, but it should continue to fill a niche’ the others have ignored. I’m not sure trying to “out-tough” the others in marketing will work, though. Failures usually happen when pressed to the limit day after day, and this isn’t going to have that happen.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      I, too, don’t need “industrial grade” or “Texas tough.” It just needs to handle bikes, appliances, yard stuff, camping gear, etc. The Honda would be great for me if it had a shorter cab/longer bed option (I really don’t care about moving people, so I’d delete the full-size second row). And it’s prohibitively expensive.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Except they dropped the bricks from a LOT higher in the Chevy/Ford video. Still a stupid test because if someone at a yard loaded my GMC HD the way they did in the Ford/Chevy video they’d be buying me new box if there was even one small dent. If I bought a new PU, Ford or otherwise, within the first week it would have a sprayed in bedliner to protect the bed. Best money you can spend on a new PU.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      A sprayed-in bedliner does not protect the bed from dents.

      But a slide-in Rhino does (because of the compressible flex-space between the liner and the bed).

      I’ve had both. I like the slide-in better.

      I currently have NO bedliner on my 2016 Tundra TRD. Use a trailer if I ever need to haul something nasty.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Of course it protects the bed from dents because the rubber helps absorb the energy. Mine is thick enough that I’m sure it actually strengthens the bed. Sure abuse it hard enough, it’ll still dent. Slide in bedliners wear away the paint & trap moisture which causes the bed to rust. No thanks. Plus everything slides all over the place in them. Only way I’d ever go is with a sprayed liner. Honestly I didn’t think they even sold the slide-ins anymore.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “Slide in bedliners wear away the paint & trap moisture which causes the bed to rust.”

          That’s not true! Never had that happen.

          I don’t know who does your slide-in work, but in my area they use a sticky silicone adhesive to hold the slide-in in place.

          The silicone adhesive peels way when the slide-in liner is ever pulled out. When I sold my trucks in the past, the buyers all insisted I include the slide-in liner. But I did pull one out to give to one of my sons for his truck.

          The spray-on liner is only good for about 3-5 years in the desert before the sun destroys it, but it comes off with a solvent when a new coat needs to be applied.

          Slide-ins are big in my area. To keep stuff from sliding around the bed, most guys use tension-bars and/or aircraft ratchet straps.

          For my uses I used both because I carried an AC generator in the bed, along with a gasoline-powered air compressor, MIG-welder, ladders, tool boxes, gasoline jugs, coolers and the like.

          The slide-in holds up better when using a handtruck with a heavy appliance inside the bed. Often the spray-on would be gouged by a protruding edge.

          Different strokes for different folks with different real-life practical experiences.

          What works for me may not work for you. I go with what works for most people in my area, based on other people’s experiences.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “That’s not true! Never had that happen.”

            It most certainly is true and people in the business will tell you that’s one of the big problems with them. They vibrate anytime the truck is being driven and that hard plastic basically sands the paint off the metal.

            Aren’t all factory bedliners now of the sprayed in variety?
            That’s pretty much proof in the pudding right there isn’t it?

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            The bad thing about hauling stone or sand in the back of a pick up is that it has to come back out and there’s no quick way to do that. The old man and I went halves on a 5 ton dump trailer several years ago. We share the maintenance costs and registration. We’ve found uses for it beyond our original intentions.

            My 98 Dodge has had a bed liner in it since new and the inside of the bed looks much better than the rest of the bed that’s been subjected to the last 18 years worth of abuse and elements. I’ve owned several over the years with slide I’m bed liners and never experienced the issues some have claimed. Things do slide around but Ive also got a rubber mat laid down over top of the bed liner.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I’ve owned two different pickups that had slide-in liners in them. Both of them showed heavy wear on the bed rails where it constantly flexed with or without a load while the F-150 (which had a lot more miles on it, was severely scored where the plastic liner rubbed on otherwise pristine paint. Granted, both trucks lived under a lean-to (carport) or in a garage so neither had rust in the bed, but the older one definitely showed what plastic liners do to the paint.

            On the other hand, neither showed any physical damage in the form of dents or scars due to tools and gear being thrown around in them.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I can see if you use a slide-in liner that isn’t properly fastened that it moves around and can do all sorts of damage to the bed.

            That’s what that silicone adhesive is for, to keep the slide-in fastener from slipping around. It always stays tacky, never hardens and forms an adhesive cushion. I believe RTV makes it.

            I guess different installers in different regions use different mounting criteria for slide-in liners.

            BTW, you cannot slide cargo on a spray-on liner. No doubt there will be individuals who will claim that they can slide cargo on a spray-on liner. But my experience is that it cannot be done.

            So we each go our separate ways, based on our own experiences.

          • 0 avatar
            BrunoT

            Yeah, I’ve owned about 12 trucks from Chevy, Ford, Toyota, and Dodge over the years, and while years back a few had scraped paint when I pulled the bedliner to clean it out before selling it, none had any real rust other than perhaps a dusting in a spot or two. I screw them in place as instructed and they don’t really slide around much. They had 1000 lb loads in the back regularly (almost daily) too. Never even a dent.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Maybe your experience, Bruno, but not mind. Both screwed in place and BOTH with scarring in the paint.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          The best set up I’ve seen in a work truck is to get a spray in liner then add an aluminum checkerplate liner protecting the entire box. That is then topped off with a headache rack and rails along the top of the box. You can also buy thick rubber matts for the bottom of the bed.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “You can also buy thick rubber matts for the bottom of the bed.”

            That’s what we use in my area, those huge, thick rubber Stall Mats used for race horses. We get them from Tractor Supply.

            The mats are used under bed-mounted AC generators and gasoline-powered air compressors, to lessen the vibrations transmitted into the truck.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Without the bed liner (spray in preferably) under those mats, they can still trap water and promote corrosion. I do like the idea though, especially if you’re hauling stone or metal around.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @HDC
        Bit of a storm in a Egg Cup here. They use Utility beds and also tow They also dump mainly dirt into the back
        European illustration, but general idea. Renault Master, with a max 5,500lb capacity with a load of dirt in it’s Utility bed on a construction site .We do not use European vehicles like that on a construction site, . Japanese Heavier trucks
        http://www.renault.com.au/vehicles/commercial/master/cab-chassis/renault-master-single-cab-chassis-l3h1#features

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          RR, I understand completely the how, what and wherefore of this article.

          What escapes me is why anyone would want to potentially damage their truck bed if that can be avoided by using a trailer.

          I lived that life-style for more than 30 years, and I always tried to keep my truck, new or used, from being damaged;

          Partially with an eye toward future resale value, and partially because money was so hard to come by for me to replace that truck.

          You can take some precautions like a spray-on or slide-in bedliner, and those are cool for relative softer or pliable loads.

          But nasty stuff like rocks, aggregate, bricks, and cinder blocks?

          Naw man, I’ll rent that U-Haul trailer if I don’t have one I already own to do the job.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        “A sprayed-in bedliner does not protect the bed from dents.”

        It may, and likely will, spread sharp impact loads out enough to prevent the alubed from tearing. In fact, by spreading the load, it may change the result of this particular “test” in Ford’s favor. Ford uses a substantially thicker gauge of alu than Chevy uses of steel in the 1500, so it wouldn’t take too much load spreading before the results could (not saying would) swing in their favor.

        In either case, worktrucks should come with apitong beds/liners :)

  • avatar

    These tests are all weak sauce. Bring back the 90s!

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      Spot on mate:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IocCC1-jeTY – go to 00:09

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3j-qy1s1RIM – Bring in your boots, raincoat and boat.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDuOp3Uff9Q – jump to 00:47

  • avatar
    probert

    I prefer the RPG test. If it ain’t a HiLux, it’s crap.

  • avatar
    daver277

    I can haul more in my bicycle trailer than most ‘real trucks’ in my town carry in their beds 95% of the time.

    What really kills me is a $70,000 ‘real truck’ hauling stuff in a crappy little trailer because they’re afraid of scratching their bed.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Sometimes it is about preserving the money you sank into your pickup truck.

      My oldest son bought a new 2015 F350 4-door 4×4 Long Bed DRW with a slide-in and he prefers to use a trailer for the nasty loads.

      Could be because he doesn’t want his truck to look beat up before its time.

      Interesting to note that contractors and builders in my area often use a trailer to haul the nasty stuff, even when their truck bed is empty.

      Maybe it’s better and cheaper to wear out the bearings on that trailer than the bearings on their trucks.

      They can always get another trailer but it is hell to be without their truck when it is in the shop.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Trucks were meant to work, not be babied like a show car. Trailering, unless it’s a load too big or heavy for the bed, simply makes no sense.

        In my case, I will be having a liner sprayed in my 97 Ranger’s bed for traction, protection and sealing. It only makes sense when the thing has to sit out in the weather full time.

        • 0 avatar
          BrunoT

          And good luck turning that crew cab truck around with a trailer behind it in many parts of the country. South Florida is full of dead end streets and tiny lot homes with cars lining the road. I watched guys backing their big rigs out of neighborhoods. I say this having used a trailer at work daily for over 20 years. They are not something you relish having to haul around if you can use the bed instead. Any “resale” savings from a trailer are erased by terrible fuel economy towing that 1500 lbs of trailer around, and having to replace trailer tires regularly. A drop in bedliner will let you toss anything you want in back from any height. My trucks always were nearly pristine at resale even using the beds. The idiot using it is a big factor there, not what he’s hauling.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            BrunoT – trailers are a pain in the ass unless you need to haul something too big to fit in the box. As you point out, they suck in tight spaces. They also are a pain in the winter on icy roads and rough gravel roads.

            If you are faced with a 2 hour drive (one way) to a remote site with a loaded pickup you can add an extra hour or more towing a trailer to the same spot.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If only GM had a composite wonder bed… oh wait they did.

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/when-gm-couldnt-think-outside-the-box-remembering-pro-tec/

    They just had no clue what the heck to do with it.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Sorry GM, Ford, Honda your ad wouldn’t work on me.

    If I was buying a pup for this kind of intended use I wouldn’t even bother buying new.

    Similar thing with a passenger car if I was limited to on-street parking.

  • avatar
    Rday

    have a ridge and will probably buy a 1ton diesel. Too bad Honda doesn’t make one. My ridge is 11+ years old and going strong. Love the truck and the bed is in very good shape. Too bad all the pansies out there are so inadequate that they can’t see a really good pickup when it is right in front of their eyes. But probably 90% of americans don’t have the smarts to really separate the really good products. Still living in the past and listening to stories of their grandpa when he owned a truck. Sad to read the products on here. really sadd!!

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      If you want a 1-ton, I highly recommend the F350 DRW. My son bought one with 4-doors, 4×4 and the long bed at Don Chalmers near ABQ.

      Many of my Travelin’ Elk brethren also chose the F350 as their tow-vehicle for their travel trailers.

      I’ve seen a number of drivers switch from GM and RAM to Ford, but never the other way around. Ford rules when it comes to serious pickup trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Too bad all the pansies out there are so inadequate that they can’t see a really good pickup when it is right in front of their eyes. But probably 90% of americans don’t have the smarts to really separate the really good products”

      Life must be such a treat when your so much smarter than everyone else. The problem I have with the Ridgeline is that the bed is too damn small. Useless is he best word to describe it. That’s what you get when you take a Pilot and basically remove the rear SUV part of it. The things I did with my ’93 compact Toy PU over the 11 years I owned it you would have never done/attempted with a Ridgeline. Glad you like yours, I think the idea is great but the execution by Honda was poor. Maybe the Gen 2 will be better.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        The Ridge is hugely popular with the ladies in my area. And, they can be seen hauling one-horse trailers to various events in which these ladies compete.

      • 0 avatar
        BrunoT

        And good luck turning that crew cab truck around with a trailer behind it in many parts of the country. South Florida is full of dead end streets and tiny lot homes with cars lining the road. I watched guys backing their big rigs out of neighborhoods. I say this having used a trailer at work daily for over 20 years. They are not something you relish having to haul around if you can use the bed instead. Any “resale” savings from a trailer are erased by terrible fuel economy towing that 1500 lbs of trailer around, and having to replace trailer tires regularly. A drop in bedliner will let you toss anything you want in back from any height. My trucks always were nearly pristine at resale even using the beds. The idiot using it is a big factor there, not what he’s hauling.

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      @Rday,

      Maybe people just aren’t fans of FWD. Ever consider that?

      Until the most recent Ridgeline I could get an F150 or Silverado with more horsepower and better fuel economy. Now the current Ridgeline has the Colorado Diesel to contend with.

      One thing Honda does I wish others would do as well is the dual opening tailgate. My Caprice wagon had this (opens down and opens to the side like a door) and its supremely useful for many tasks.

      If I could cherry pick small but useful features I’d have a truck with GM’s bumper corner steps, Toyota’s power rear window, Honda’s tailgate, and the Avalanche’s bed side compartments (which are ideal for storing fishing poles).

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Honda may make a reliable truck but it will never be taken seriously without a V8. It’s too expensive not to have one.

  • avatar
    Dave W

    This reminds me of the Consumer Reports “test” in which they jerk the wheel 90 degrees and let go at 45mph to see how quickly the car recovers. Not too much real world application here either.

    I’m a landscaper and know lots of carpenters, and I don’t know any that don’t have some kind of bed liner. When I’m getting large stone or blocks it’s pallet-ed and slid on rather then dumped. Big stone and blocks will do a decent job of reducing themselves to small stone and sand if left to rattle against themselves. For a large load it’s even easier to have it delivered by a truck that carries a forklift with it. You needn’t move it very far by lift truck to more then make up the price of delivery in labor costs and morale. Drain/trap rock, staymat, river rock, whatever, have a ball. With the small stuff the first stone in kind of becomes the bed liner for the rest of the load.

    I will admit that I do not have a bed liner because I have a station wagon. I prefer my tools to be out of the weather and the public eye, and haul a trailer for bulk loads rather then have to decide if I want to bring tools or bulk in the bed.

  • avatar
    zip89105

    Good thing I don’t buy a truck to haul rocks, or I’d have to buy a Honda instead of a Chevrolet!

  • avatar
    el scotto

    1st of all, those blocks should have been on a pallet and loaded with a fork truck. Yeah, they’ll do that. Or secondly, someone ordered wrong and should have had more blocks delivered. I know “it happens” but what sort of gobshyte puts his tool box across the bed rail to begin with? At least set it parallel so it will balance better. Odd s are that wasn’t the 1st dumb thing they did that day. The ad appeals to truck owners who worry about their leather seats getting scuffed up.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    HONDA: Our truck is super duper serial!

    Excelsior!

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    This seems like a bit of ironic parody of the Tuff Truk mentality begun by the engineers who were then indulged by Honda corporate because while inconsequential to typical Ridgeline buyers it still shows the product in a good if irrelevant light.

    But if I ever bought a Ridge no effin’ way it’d be treated like a real work truck. Too Honda for that and I’m long past that kind of grunt work anyway.

  • avatar
    jcisne

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CH67RSthlo

    Here’s a video of a 1.3 liter Suzuki Jimny pulling an 18 wheeler in the snow. And it’s not a commercial. My point is that they could have done something more impressive or creative than just throwing some rocks in the bed.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I’d rather have the beat up late 80s Chevy K30 quad cab dually for sale in town.

    Sure it probably gets 2 mpg but at least it looks tough.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I’m confused. Is Honda the Calvin or Hobbes in this analogy? What kind of mother let’s her son play with a tiger all day?

  • avatar
    Frylock350

    So in regards to the original Chevy vs Ford video. Is this a case of steel vs aluminum or is GM’s bed thicker than Ford’s? Knowing that aluminum is more dent resistant than steel my initial thought was that the F150’s bed must be thinner in a bid to save weight. Is that correct?

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Aluminum is softer than steel, Frylock. It may be as strong in certain applications and aluminum honeycomb panels are incredibly stiff for their weight, but aluminum is very susceptible to scoring and denting… and yes, even tearing, as compared to steel of the same thickness.

    • 0 avatar
      True_Blue

      Actually, I believe the aluminum gauge used in the F150 is thicker than the sheet steel used in the GMs, but aluminum doesn’t have the tensile strength of an equivalent thickness of steel.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I have a bed liner in my trucks when I do get an occasional load of gravel, pavers, top soil, and mulch. My granddad bought an old IH dump truck from the State of KY years ago to haul gravel in to use on the farm roads. It was a early to mid 50’s IH and it more than paid for itself. Since he got the gravel from the farm and the truck was never on a public road he didn’t license it. He got it for a very cheap price and used it for years.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Vulpine–Very true about aluminum. One of the landscape suppliers I have bought large rocks from told me that it has gotten harder to get the big rocks because most of the big tractor trailers made are aluminum and that they dent and tear when hauling large rocks. If you are hauling something other than rocks then aluminum is good.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      No way, man.

      Ford is the best, and the F Series is the best pickup of all time with MILITARY GRADE ALUMINUM PERSONALLY INSPECTED AND CERTIFIED BY DENNIS LEARY.

      With an ecoboost 6 cylinder F150, you can tow 20,000 pounds, carry 12,000 lbs in the bed, accelerate from 0-60 in 4.8 seconds, get 28.999 miles per gallon city, and have an aluminum bed that can’t be damaged even by industrial diamond coated drill bits, because MILITARY GRADE ALUMINUM, PAL, AND DENNIS LEARY.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Personally, I’m not a fan of Ford for reasons other than the all-aluminum truck. I have never owned a Ford I didn’t grow to hate due to their abysmal reliability. Yes, I know many people love their Fords, but I also know many people who trade away long before they’re paid off, too. In some cases, within a year of purchase.

        But this article is about Ford’s aluminum bed and as the videos make very clear, unless you spend the cash and sacrifice fifty pounds of load capacity for a spray-in liner (or drop in if you’re being cheap,) that bed will be trashed the first time you throw loose metal or stone into it. I wouldn’t even guarantee no damage if you throw hand-sawn firewood into that bed (as compared to carefully stacking it for stability.) Mythbusters proved that the spray-on liner is effective for limiting damage and the aluminum bed in the Ford absolutely needs that protection.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “that bed will be trashed the first time you throw loose metal or stone into it.”

          Only if you get a good arc on it so it crashes down from 6′ or more.

          Seriously, who the eff ever loads anything into a truck bed like the willfully stupid destructiveness of those ads?

          People that dumb should be following behind an ox, not owning pickups.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I gather you haven’t watched any truck commercials over the last 20 years or so. Ludicrously, some of the old, “Built Ford Tough” ads had stone being dropped from well above the cab of the truck, hitting hard enough to see the suspension sag and recover from the force of impact. The other brands copied that ad style for a while.

            The point is that pickup trucks until recently were always advertised as real, working, TRUCKS. Advertising today touts quietness, luxury and ride quality along with towing capacity while totally ignoring the bed of the truck. Anyone remember the old Dodge Ram commercial where it climbed a loose stone hill carrying a Ford across the bed and towing a Chevy at the same time?

            And I have watched people loading their older, true utility, pickup trucks; they don’t baby them. They get used and used hard. Without that bed liner, an aluminum-bed Ford won’t last more than a couple years, if that long, with such an owner.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Don’t watch TV. Have owned & worked many pickups. Anyone throw sh1t like that into one of mine would’ve had it thrown right back at ’em.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Wouldn’t argue that, Kenmore. But not all owners are like you. I, too, prefer to take at least a little care in loading the bed of my truck. But what happens if you’ve got a V8 big block in the back and you take a corner too hard or have to slam on the brakes? Some damage is inevitable unless you simply never carry anything in the bed. At which point I have to ask, why own a pickup truck at all if you’re never going to USE it as a truck?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Sorry about your 25+ year old F-150, but despite commercial abuse/neglect, US sold pickups have the reliability/longevity of Lexus, except maybe where turbos are involved.

            You can bring your little anecdotal evidence, but there’s mountains of anecdotal to prove otherwise.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Sorry about your 25+ year old F-150,” — WHAT 25-year-old F-150? I was talking about ALL 25-year-old and older pickup trucks. And even my former F-150, the bed liner did more damage than any load it ever carried, judging by the few scars the plastic bore over that time. Fun thing was, even the guy who sold it to me suggested the bed would be rusted out… It wasn’t.

            “but despite commercial abuse/neglect, US sold pickups have the reliability/longevity of Lexus, except maybe where turbos are involved.”
            — Where I live, 25-year-old trucks are a rarity and Fords are not predominant among them. Chevys, GMCs and Dodge Rams each outnumber similarly-aged Fords. And their beds are beat to heck and back because of the loose materials that never get thrown out. Yes, there are exceptions but every one of those has been very obviously restored and repainted. Of course, YMMV depending on where you live. I live in farming country, albeit within 50 miles of two state capitols and 75 miles of two others. Not counting our Nation’s capitol.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I need to put some sh-t in mah truck.

            What I’ma do?

            Drop it from way high! Big noise.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Stupid to even consider.

          I’ve never “babied” a pickup but have yet to load a pickup in the harsh manor depicted in the attack/promotional videos, in 40+ years. Not with stone, bricks, branches, cinder blocks, gravel, etc. That’s regardless if the truck was mine or not, newer or beater.

          I rarely see one with out a bedliner of some sort, but that’s not point. It’s a desperate video by GM marketing, scrambling for an answer to aluminum pickups.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Of course, DM, you conveniently forget that bed liners were practically unheard-of 25 years ago. What did owners do before bed liners, hmmm? How many 1990 pickup trucks have pristine paint in the bed? Imagine that aluminum bed WITHOUT a liner, even in ordinary use. To be quite blunt, a spray-in bed liner should be standard equipment, but noooo, that would take away from its fairy-dust load capacity by the few pounds that MIGHT give it a higher rating than its competition.

            And I’m not just laying it on Ford here; every full-sized truck on the market is more luxury car than working truck any more. Ram has it right when they differentiate their Work trucks from their Retail trucks. Maybe the others should do it too.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            You probably wouldn’t own an new pickup without a bedliner, or at least a rubber mat, unless it’s strictly “lifestyle”/hair dresser, but how does anyone go to extreme abuse, when they’re not already a contractor or hardcore truck guy??

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Trucks get sold, DM, and not all buyers of used trucks worry about keeping them pristine. Some of the hardest-used trucks I see where I live are essentially rust buckets–suitable only for the scrapyard when they’re done with them.

            I never said the original owner would be the abuser.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Remember when pickups came without rear bumpers? Bedliners are getting to be like rear bumpers, practically standard equipment on pickups. I demand them included in the deal, as most pickup buyers do.

            But bedliners stay in pickups when they’re sold. All it takes is a piece of old carpet, just to keep things from rattling and driving you crazy, if not sliding around the bed. My dogs demand carpet regardless.

            But the aluminum attack video is just stupid. Who would do that to a truck, new/used/beater? Not even contractors or hardcore DIY dudes. But how many of those raw-dog their pickup beds?

            Mostly, if you rented a pickup truck, from U-Haul or Avis, and for some reason it didn’t come with a bedliner, say a Silverado, do you think you wouldn’t get charged for bed damage like that? Do you think they would *buy* “Normal Use”???

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Remember when pickups came without rear bumpers? Bedliners are getting to be like rear bumpers, practically standard equipment on pickups. I demand them included in the deal, as most pickup buyers do.”
            — Except that they’re not… yet… standard equipment. Bed liners are still optional up to and including the fact that some brands offer both drop-in and spray-on liners… typically installed by the dealership. And most pickup buyers do NOT order the liners, they take what the dealership has on the lot (which is usually applied for a MASSIVE profit. A $600-$800 spray-in job gets sticker-priced at $1200 and up, depending on the model. Look it up for yourself.)

            “But bedliners stay in pickups when they’re sold. All it takes is a piece of old carpet, just to keep things from rattling and driving you crazy, if not sliding around the bed.”
            — or not. The guy that sold me the F-150 didn’t want me to even lift the bed liner in that truck. He was absolutely terrified that the bed would be rusted out and all the debris right under the edge seems to support his concern. He was shocked when I took the truck back a little over a week later to show him the condition of the bed after a bath… not one bit of rust. That said, the liner had a major, gaping crack at the front corner so needed to be removed/replaced anyway. By that indicator, the bed could have been in far, FAR worse shape.

            ” My dogs demand carpet regardless.” — Which is patently illegal in most states today. If your dogs are in the bed, they’re supposed to be in crates where they can’t get thrown around as much. (And the crates have to be secured to prevent THOSE from getting thrown around while the dogs are in them.)

            “But the aluminum attack video is just stupid. Who would do that to a truck, new/used/beater? Not even contractors or hardcore DIY dudes. But how many of those raw-dog their pickup beds?”
            — People who actually use them for work. There are a LOT of landscaping materials locations around where I live and they use huge front-end loaders to dump mulch and dirt into whatever you bring to carry your load. Though I’ll grant they tend to use fork lifts to load palletized paving stones, etc.

            “Mostly, if you rented a pickup truck, from U-Haul or Avis, and for some reason it didn’t come with a bedliner, say a Silverado, do you think you wouldn’t get charged for bed damage like that? Do you think they would *buy* “Normal Use”???”
            — I suggest you go look at Budget’s trucks or the hourly-rental Home Depot or Lowes’. They do expect “normal use.”

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            So what else are you incapable of setting up? Floor mats? Mud flaps are more trouble installing than a bedliner.

            Bedliners are standard equipment on many trucks, especially mid-grade and up, like bumpers were. On my last truck, it was sitting on the lot with a drop-in bedliner, but the dealer forgot to charge me for it.

            My dogs ride in the cab as a rule, but around the neighborhood, inside a recreational park, etc, they love riding back there.

            But I’d like to see you do this little, skiploader, rock/paver drop-test on a rental pickup, just to see if they agree with what you deem “Normal Use”. You’re lucky if they don’t bill you for the whole damn bed!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            If I had been willing to piece out that F-150, I probably could have made twice as much money off the bed alone as to what I made off the entire rig. I had a guy offer me $2K for the bed alone mere days after I bought the truck.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Vulpine – plywood. My dad always laid down a sheet to protect the bed. That would have been over 45 years ago.

            I also recall most of the cab being bare painted metal.

            Your point being?

            Regular cab trucks were the norm. crew cab trucks were all HD trucks.

            Car companies realized that by adding doors and seats and luxury to pickups turned them into a cash cow.

            Those higher end personal use trucks fund all of those striped down fleet queens.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Wooden beds. Factory installed 60 years ago.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Dennis Leary does not impress me as being a truck expert nor even that good of an actor or comedian.

  • avatar
    92golf

    The bedliners available these days are a great invention. When I worked in the forest industry way too many years ago there were no such things available. The companies I worked for would take a 4×8 foot piece of sheet steel and bolt it to the frame rails through the bed. To keep rust somewhat in check a tube of grease would be spread on the bed before putting the steel on top. It saved a lot of wear and tear when loading and unloading drums of fuel, hydraulic fluid and other things. Added a bit of weight in the rear for slippery times as well.

    When the truck died they would take the piece of steel and bolt it into a new truck.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Denver Mike–I don’t like either Dennis or Howie. Maybe a Ford fan boy would like Dennis. I always liked Mike Rowe and I liked Sam Eliot on the Ram commercials–both are more believable. Ford should hire Mike back. Anson Mount would be a good spokesperson for Chevy trucks.


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