By on March 9, 2016

2015 Mercedes-Benz C-Class, Image: Daimler

Through the first one-sixth of 2016, U.S. sales of passenger cars sold by so-called premium brands plunged 17 percent. That year-over-year loss of nearly 25,000 sales occurred over the course of the auto sales calendar’s two lowest-volume months.

Lost in the story of booming auto sales volume in February 2016 — the highest-volume February since 2001 — was the underachieving premium market. Auto sales jumped 7 percent in February, a gain of 86,000 units, but 19 premium brands — from sector-leading Mercedes-Benz to one-model Alfa Romeo — combined for only a 1-percent year-over-year uptick during the same period.

Why, in such an apparently healthy market, are premium auto brands collectively losing market share?

There are three key reasons. First, their SUV/crossover sales are shooting through the roof and those high-riding utilities are stealing some of the traditional luxury car’s limelight. Over the course of January and February, a dozen premium brands produced 150,000 SUV/crossover sales, up 17 percent, or 22,000 units, compared with the same period one year ago.

In February specifically, Lexus, the top-selling premium auto marque, lost 1,883 car sales. But Lexus added 1,978 SUV/CUV sales. In February 2015, Lexus cars narrowly outsold Lexus utilities. One year later, Lexus utilities easily outsold Lexus cars.

Or consider Porsche, which is quickly becoming a prominent player in the luxury arena despite decreasing sportscar interest. The Cayenne and Macan utilities combined for a 670-unit increase, easily masking the Porsche car division’s 311-unit decline.

2016 Volvo XC90, Image: Volvo Cars

What about rebounding Volvo? The XC60 and the new XC90, which now accounts for over half of all U.S. Volvo sales, added 1,645 sales in February, year-over-year. Volvo’s other models garnered 397 sales.

At BMW, 2015’s top-selling premium auto brand (allegedly), added 1,112 SAV sales across five X models in February, but that wasn’t enough to make up for 3,815 fewer car sales.

Indeed, while the losses accrued by passenger cars across all premium auto brands were more than matched by huge improvements from their SUV/crossover sales in February, the same can’t be said for the first one-sixth of 2016 on the whole. Sales across the premium spectrum are down 1 percent this year despite the SUV/CUV sector’s 17-percent increase and the fact that these higher-riding vehicles now account for 55 percent of all U.S. sales in premium brand showrooms.

Second, during the month of December, when luxury auto sales traditionally take off, luxury cars which may have been purchased or leased in the early part of 2016 were pulled forward into the final month of 2015.

Yes, year-over-year, luxury brand car volume was down 8 percent in December, but it would have been even worse if, according to AutoNation CEO Mike Jackson, incentives weren’t so high.

The third reason is an extension of reason numero deux. Sales were being pulled forward precisely because automakers and their dealers recognized that demand was decreasing. And what a decrease in demand we’re seeing now.

Over the last three months, between December 2015 and February 2016, car volume at 19 premium auto brands plunged 13 percent, or 34,000 sales. Acura, Alfa Romeo, Audi, BMW, Cadillac, Infiniti, Jaguar, Lamborghini, Lexus, Maserati, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, and Volvo all sold fewer cars during that period than during the same stretch of time one year earlier.

Largely, the exceptions weren’t profound in their ability to buck the trend. Ferrari added 19 sales; Rolls-Royce another 12, according to the Wall Street Journal. Lincoln car volume rose 5 percent. Tesla, based on estimates from HybridCars.com, stood out with a 40-percent Model S improvement. These aren’t big players in the luxury car arena, mind you. Together, Ferrari, Rolls-Royce, Lincoln, and Tesla produced just 7 percent market share in the luxury car category since December.

2014 BMW 5-Series, Image: BMW

Best sellers are certainly not exempt from the downturn. Through 2016’s first two months, the Mercedes-Benz C-Class, BMW 3 Series, Lexus ES, BMW 5 Series, Infiniti Q50, Mercedes-Benz E-Class (CLS inclusive), Acura TLX, Lexus IS, Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class, BMW 4 Series, and Audi A3 — the 11 top-selling cars at premium auto brands — were in decline. The most modest? A 7-percent decrease in A3 sales, a 6-percent 5-Series decline, and a 5-percent Q50 drop.

The C-Class and 3 Series are down 16 percent and 27 percent, respectively, a joint decrease of 5,000 sales.

On one hand, January and February don’t serve invariably as accurate predictors for the remainder of 2016. What happens during these two low-volume months doesn’t tell us everything about the trends we’ll see in May, June, July, and August. On the other hand, the fact that premium auto brands have already lost so many sales should cause us to wonder how many sales will be lost when the selling season really gets underway.

In the meantime, consider the decreasing strength of premium auto brands in America’s passenger car sector in early 2016. These brands produced 14 percent of America’s passenger car volume in January and February of 2015. In 2016, their share is down by two points.

U.S. car volume slid 0.4 percent in February. Exclude the disappointing results from these premium brands, and that 0.4-percent drop turns into a 1.6-percent improvement.

Thank Malibus, Maximas, and Miatas for that.

* Full Disclosure: I’m driving a GM Canada-supplied $85,510 GMC Yukon Denali this week. It’s not “luxury” but it is luxurious. We’ve nevertheless excluded high-end vehicles built by volume/mainstream brands from luxury/premium status for the purposes of this article.

[Images: Mercedes-Benz, Volvo, BMW]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

90 Comments on “Luxury Car Sales Are Plunging in America in Early 2016...”


  • avatar
    seth1065

    Holy crap a 85,000 GMC Yukon , even in Canada where prices are higher than the states that is a ton, perhaps that is where some of the Luxury car sales are going ???

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Mercedes should lose sales on their sedans, because their current styling theme is crap. I saw a C-Class couple days ago, and the grille looked like it was made of tin foil.

    http://benzblogger.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/29213123/C300-Luxury-Grille.jpg

    That is not a good look. I’m assuming it was an upper trim since it had hood ornament versus in-grille emblem.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      I prefer the previous generation C-Class styling to the current generation styling as well. The new styling looks pretty good on the E-Class in my opinion.

      The Luxury package C-Class sedans get a hood ornament as opposed to the Sport package C-Class which have the emblem. Of course, there are several other changes to distinguish between the two.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        Given the new unlimited mileage CPO they give out, a previous generation C300 looks like a really good buy right now if you really want a Mercedes. I’m partial to the exterior look of them over the new ones, but I got an uber in one a couple weeks ago and the interior wasn’t really any better than a trimmed out mass market car.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      It’s just a question of Luxury vs Sport trim.

      edit: guess I ought to have reloaded prior to replying.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’m going to disagree here – I think Mercedes’ current styling is outstanding (though I agree with you on that particular grill).

      And the interior on the C-class is spectacular.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I looked at that pic of the front a bit more, and realized what it really was reminding me of.

        https://cdn1.terrysfabrics.co.uk/main/1535/MetalVeneWhite.jpg

        I like the interior on the C-Class fine. I think they’re messing up the E with the piano black and chrome 50s look, though.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      The luxury is the base model. The silver parts of that grille are flaps, they open electronically. I won’t say it looks any better with them open, at least not up close.
      http://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.mbworld.org-vbulletin/940×627/80-gw_2015_mercedes_benz_c_class_55swf4kb6fu006795_3_f384000ee52e99116425b24dd8afb6b81e1ac833.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Wow, those are some poor people wheels on there. Why do they open and close, engine temp? Those will definitely still work in five years.

        “Yes sir, we’ll get your grille shutters fixed right away. No sir, that’s not covered by your warranty anymore. Yes… $1,500. There are a lot of actuators.”

        • 0 avatar
          Ion

          Engine temps and fuel economy. Edmunds has a article on active grille shutters. They’re becoming a common feature, like pop up headlights. Ironically like pop up headlights the two that did fail, failed with one side stuck open like pop up headlights.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I hope this will be one of those little trends which ends up a footnote, like automatic door mount seat belts or mounted car phones.

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          And another $1000.00 to replace the hydraulic fluid that activates the actuators…

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            The previous C-Class was just to give Mercedes some skin in the game for badge whores. The new one is a bona fide luxury car.

  • avatar
    deanst

    If you define “luxury” as any vehicle over $50,0000 then the Ford F-150 is the top selling luxury vehicle. I would guess that “luxury” sales are up using this definition.

    From the stats I’ve seen, the Ram 1500 would be #2.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That’s not the definition, though.

      • 0 avatar
        Higheriq

        Which poses an interesting question, to which after some googling I haven’t yet found an answer: what defines a luxury vehicle? We know what the luxury brands are, but brand aside, what really separates them from pedestrian brands?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Jack has written a piece about the luxury subject, basically. If you can keep him going past women, watches, shoes, and guitars he gets to the car stuff eventually!

          Now, what was that piece called I can’t remember. It’s been a while.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Sedans in general are taking it on the chin. If you are like the other 99.9% of Americans who range from being ambivalent to outright annoyed by driving, there’s pretty much nothing a sedan/hatchback/wagon/coupe offers over a CUV/”SAV”/whatever. Plus luxury buyers aren’t gas price sensitive so they can’t hide behind cheap gas as an excuse.

    The sad truth is big luxury sedans are becoming quasi relics. I can’t imagine anyone under the age of 50 looking to buy a new S class or 7 series. Even in that older age range a lot of folks are going for the 3s and Cs because they are just as big as Es and 5s were 15-20 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “there’s pretty much nothing a sedan/hatchback/wagon/coupe offers over a CUV/”SAV”/whatever.”

      Styling? Subjective I know, but how many people don’t think an S-Class Coupe, F-type, A7, or Quattroporte is attractive?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I like all of those things. The S-Coupe in particular has a ton of presence. As it goes past it just says “Shh, be quiet. Money.”

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        If styling sold cars all of those cars would not be complete niche players. I would argue styling doesn’t matter to most buyers- luxury included. If it did, Lexus would have gone out of business with its Predator maw; the X3 would have been DOA; families would be cramming into F-types; Audi/BMW/MB’s sedans would not be rocking their most generic, “design by council” unimaginative looks probably in the history of the segment. Sales show styling doesn’t matter to the market. Some of the top sellers are some of the most generic or outright ugly designs I’ve ever seen.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I’m just saying that styling is something many cars can still offer over the CUVs.

          It is true that many people don’t make their personal buying decision on style, but I disagree with the idea that people straight up “don’t care”. The public isn’t blind, the good-looking stuff just doesn’t fit their lifestyle.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. “Sport utility coupes” like the X6 are helping bridge both gaps, for better or worse.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Oh, that reminds me. Other day I saw a lady from HR here in her new IS-C, top up. That is the sloppiest hard top convertible setup I have ever seen. I can’t believe they let that pass to production.

          http://www.cargurus.com/Cars/l-Used-2015-Lexus-IS-C-250C-t56056#listing=134991450

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        My wife, who is pretty conservative loves the F-Type coupe styling. So much so that when we were test-driving the XF and she saw it on the dealer floor, I could see her imagining herself in it rather than in the sedan we were ostensibly interested in.

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          Well to be fair, the F-type looks like pure sex. My wife’s aunt has one and it’s absolutely stunning in person, and the exhaust note is downright erotic.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      You can’t even say fuel economy anymore since it’s not car vs. body-on-frame. Before, you could be sure you were getting 5-10mpg more. But:

      2016 Lincoln MKS EcoBoost: 19 combined
      2016 Lincoln MKT EcoBoost: 18 combined

      And the crossover is better in non-boosted numbers. So, as Ajla said, styling is the difference, and that’s about it.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Luxury sedans these days are not bad, just a bad value. They are shooting themselves in the foot in terms of price. An entry level BMW 5-Series is just shy of $60k. That’s the one with a 4-CYL. By the time one decently equips one, let alone adds a bigger engine, it’s pushing $70k. For almost HALF that I can get a fully loaded Grand Cherokee, Explorer, Highlander, etc with all the bells and whistles you can imagine. I can get a fully loaded GM full size SUV for about $15k less after discounts.

        Luxury sedan prices need to come down about 20-25% if they want to want to move product.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          They were always a bad “value” and that didn’t stop the outgoing E Class (which wasn’t that great; the MCE improved the ride/handling a good bit) from being a huge seller for Mercedes or the current S Class enjoying very good sales.

          More and more buyers are shifting to crossovers/SUVs/trucks – whether it be luxury or mainstream.

          If a 5 Series is a “bad value,” the X5 is even more so.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I’m hoping that the XC90 has smart braking standard. The first one I saw, last night, the driver was way more interested in her phone than the traffic in front of her. Of course, when you’re driving a siege tower, you don’t have to worry about the safety of others.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    The sedan-to-SUV trend won’t end anytime soon. At least not until local and state governments start paving roads again.

    We are all still on the post-2008 austerity regime, saving taxpayers money one bent rim at a time. I still drive a sedan, but I have my doubts about the next purchase. No point having something with a decent center of gravity if I can’t safely drive it anywhere.

    • 0 avatar
      210delray

      I’d like to see automakers go back to 60- or 65-series tires on sedans with 16- or 17-in. wheels, at least in the non-sporty trims.

      I’m still smarting over scraping a wheel on a curb with my new sedan with 55-series tires (yes, my stupid fault), whereas with the older car, I got away grazing curbs with only minor scuffing on the tire sidewall.

      In terms of potholes, we NEVER take our other car with 215/45-17s to NYC!

    • 0 avatar
      cimarron typeR

      +1 on the road situation. Add the under budgeted snow removal departments equal an awd vehicle with at least 7 inches of ground clearance in our garage .
      Winter tire lovers, been there done that, not the same so save the comments.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        OK, Cimarron,
        No one here will try to convince you that a tippy, high center-of-gravity vehicle with slippery tires isn’t the best choice for winter, since you obviously know better. Good luck!

  • avatar
    raph

    Blargghhhh! How depressing to be lost in sea of these covert red neck mobiles. I wonder if I could somehow start a grass roots campaign to restrict them to the right most lane where they deserve to exist only?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Returning to TTAC’s favorite whipping boy, Cadillac, I think this helps explain the drop in sales for their sedans as well.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Perhaps, although their suck factor is a 9.6.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Nawww, it isn’t. I’ve driven their stuff…it’s good, certainly good enough to compete on its own merits (and, yes, CUE, the gauge cluster and back seat room on the ATS are issues…but the competitors have their own issues too).

        Problem is, sedans are passe now, just in time for Cadillac’s to have become very good. Their CUV and SUV sales are very strong, though.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Cadillac got the handling right in their RWD sedans, but got the packaging wrong (cramped interior space).

          The CT6 corrects the packaging (and to a lesser extent, pricing) issue.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “Returning to DeadWeight’s favorite whipping boy, Cadillac…”

      There, fixed that for you.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    Another reason for the overall downturn in luxury vehicle sales might be the stock market correction in Jan/Feb?

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    So where is then line drawn between luxury and premium, and luxurious?

    Add Buick and GMC, both premium brands, to Cadillac and you have the segment leader in premium vehicles by close to 100,000 units?

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      Let’s just include Chevy, too, because they have that commercial where people think the Malibu is an $85k car.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      If you think the Encore, Terrain and Verano are premium, then you’ll believe that guy from Area 51 who claims his “Trifecta Tuned” Buick out-performs a Ferrari, while getting better mileage than a Prius, hauling 16,000 lbs. on a Figure-8. Uphill, both ways, in the snow.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        More relevant way to put it is: How much nicer is the interior of an XTS, vs. a nicely optioned Lacrosse vs. an Impala LTZ? Or how much nicer is the MKS vs an up-level Taurus? Are price differences really justified? Because if my non-enthusiast passengers won’t notice the difference I know where the smart buy is no matter if you call the car premium, luxury, or luxurious.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          If you measure luxury by how much your car impresses passengers, sure. But there are clear equipment/engine/refinement differences between a Lacrosse and Impala LTZ.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Like the Acura ILX doesn’t share similar engines with the economy car-based Civic?

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          You would almost have a point if anybody here called the ILX premium. Everyone readily acknowledges the ILX is a Civic Touring Plus. Are you willing to acknowledge the Encore is just a lifted n bedazzled Sonic?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Luxury cars are sold by luxury brands through luxury dealers.

            When someone sober tells you how impressed they are that you could afford a Buick Encore, THEN, you get to claim that Buick is a luxury brand. Until that time, rest easy, smug in the knowledge that anyone with a FICA above 600 can get an Encore for $199/month.

            And just to be clear, the ILX shares engines with the *previous* version of the Civic, but that doesn’t make what you drive anything different from a Trak with chrome.

        • 0 avatar
          wmba

          No Norm, the new ILX doesn’t share engines with the Civic – that was the old ILX. The new one has the premium fuel version of the Accord 2.4l DI engine, the same one they fit to the 4 cylinder TLX.

          The new ILX also has the 8 speed DCT (DSG) transmission from the TLX, not the ropy CVT from the Accord.

          So now you know.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Is the Verano any less “premium” than the ILX (esp. pre-refresh)?

        The CLA and its various bodystyle variants aren’t exactly “premium” on the inside.

  • avatar
    Fred

    In our parking lot one woman trader her Volvo S60 for a XC60. Another traded her BMW 3 series for a Grand Cherokee. Both within the last 6 months, which pretty much confirms Mr Cain’s article to me.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Yup, the CUV, like the Mongol hordes in the 12th century, have swept across the landscape conquering all.

      I fully understand why. Since I got my Tacoma, I’ve really enjoyed being able to see past the CUV or truck in front of me. These days, in traffic, being in a sedan is an exercise in claustrophobia.

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        The only thing in front of traffic, is more traffic.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        ” I’ve really enjoyed being able to see past the CUV or truck in front of me. These days, in traffic, being in a sedan is an exercise in claustrophobia.”

        I’ve been driving trucks since 1993 and and have been in my Volt for almost 3 weeks. Can’t say that sitting lower and not being able to see over/around larger vehicles bothers me one bit. In fact I love driving something that isn’t so big. Especially around town. I’ll take the Volt over my GMC PU or Chevy Tahoe any day of the week as long as I don’t need to tow/haul something or there isn’t 8 inches of snow on the roads.

  • avatar
    Freddie

    Here’s the problem and it’s a good “problem” for we car buyers.
    Mass market brands now offer performance, comfort and features that not that long ago were mainly in the domain of luxury brands. The high end brands distinguish themselves mostly through snob appeal and gimmicks and gadgets that are increasingly peripheral to the driving experience.

    • 0 avatar
      210delray

      Exactly! Why pay $$$ more for a luxury brand when the plebeian brand with the right option packages will be 95% as nice? And I never go to the dealer for routine maintenance, so no chance to take advantage of those fancy waiting rooms.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      The democratization of all the things you listed has really put luxury brands in a tight spot.

      At the same time though, luxury has always been about the intangibles. An old ES250 offered nothing over a Camry LE V6 besides the badge and dealership experience… but to some folks that little difference was worth it. Mainstream brands are much closer to luxury brands in those intangibles today than they have ever been though. But I think there is still a gap.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      It seems the only thing that distinguishes a luxury brand anymore is the ability to create and fill every possible niche and sub-niche the way BMW has done. A luxury buyer should be able to find the perfect fit, as opposed to buying off the rack, so to speak. I doubt the X5 M-series Sdrivei35i X-drive has to sell a lot of copies with all those 3-series rolling out the door to cover the costs.

    • 0 avatar
      jthorner

      Right on. A well equipped Kia Optima SX provides a passenger experience as good as many “luxury” brands new. It kicks some in the ***, like any current Acura sedan. You can buy that Optima in top trim, fully loaded, for under $30k. The only thing missing is snob appeal. Not many coworkers are going to oooh and ahhh over your new Kia :)

  • avatar
    SomeGuy

    I do not get the crossover / SUV hate on this website. I have a crossover and it is just nice to have something like that. I don’t have to worry about parking in grassy areas, gravel / rock chips aren’t a big deal, and they are easy as hell to DIY on.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Why would rock chips not matter on something simply because it’s not a sedan?
      Why would it be easier to DIY on something which is based on a passenger car anyway, with a car engine?

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        It’s the same reason you can’t park a sedan on a grassy area. I thought everyone knew.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        Maybe he’s saying that rock chips are simply not a factor anymore. We were putting some mud flaps/splash guards on a buddy’s new CX-5 and I concluded that they don’t even need them, because all the places where rocks would damage the body on gravel roads are covered in plastic anyway.

        This is good, because the cheap Chinese E-bay ones he bought have already torn at the seam, and the Mazda ones were a complete ripoff in Canada.

        I suppose the other thing is that rock chips caused by other vehicles are more likely to hit the bigger, higher, plastic bumper of a CUV – where they don’t matter – rather than metal.

        As my experience with CUVs grows, the more practical they seem.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Ar, my arthritic knees betray me some days when my near 70 year old body plops down into the driver seat of the old Legacy.

    Then I drive me brother’s CX-5, and all is forgiven for the car. The CX-5 is not close in agility, and supposedly about the best handling CUV out there. The Forester is even worse, that’s for sure. And I got a huge dose of horse fright recently in an X5 – too high for me, and I hate getting on a horse, too high from the ground. Sure you get used to it, but why bother if you really don’t have to? I’ll struggle on with a car as long as I can.

    On the autos.ca website, their recent Toyota Camry Hybrid 4 day test said much the same thing. Laughingly said the Camry felt like a sports car, because he’d been driving CUV/SUVs so long, he’d forgotten the difference between a car and a a vehicle on stilts.

    Of course, I’m in the minority these days, and what’s of value to me is obviously not so for a growing proportion of vehicle purchasers. So be it.

  • avatar
    tnk479

    I know exactly why people aren’t buying these “premium” auto brands. The mainstream brands caught up to them in nearly ever measurable way. Interiors are quiet enough. They all come with similar or better electronics and “infotainment” systems or at worst it’s good enough to play music through with your iPhone. Google Maps on a mobile phone is better than nearly every Nav system, premium or otherwise. You can get the same electronic safety package on a Honda Civic as you can a premium car. The premium cars just aren’t that much better anymore.

    As a good example, let’s look at a Mazda6 versus a 320i. Truecar has the BMW modestly optioned at 7k more than a fully loaded Mazda6. What does that 7k buy you? Near as I can tell, only a bit more sound deadening material and a propeller badge. With only 180 horsepower to haul 3400 lbs around I’d hardly call it much of an “ultimate driving machine”. Shame on BMW for offering so little car for so much money. The Mazda is the better car straight up without even considering the fact that it is 7k cheaper.

    Just to make matters even worse, my local Subaru dealer puts my local BMW dealer to shame in customer service.

    Recommendation to BMW: if you want people to pay 50k+ for a sedan, it better be a lot more fun to drive than a typical mid-size sedan, it better be fast, and it had sure as heck better be stylish. The current crop is overpriced for what they offer and consumers have noticed.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    Luxury CAR sales falling yeah.

    But BMW X3, Audi Q3, MB GLCs Lexus RX whatever. Nah. They’re terribly popular and its easy to see why. Over here they are cheaper than the equivalent sedan in as far as features practicality and metal for the money. That’s not even touching on the high spec Jap and even Korean CUVs that push $40-$50k.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    I have to chuckle at how GMC can advertise “Professional Grade” when their products are made on the very same assembly line as Chevrolets by the same lazy and drunk UAW workers who can’t build a Chevrolet well.

    Any idiot who is driving an $85k GMC is one of the top ten idiots ever conceived. You’d be better off with a low rent Chevrolet of the same class and then buy a Shamaro so you can experience the misery of GM interior design as well.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    We are all station wagon drivers now.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Give a station wagon several extra inches of ground clearance and compromised sight lines …. ta da, you have a popular product! Just don’t call it a station wagon :).


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Kamil Kaluski, United States
  • Seth Parks, United States
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Kyree Williams, United States