By on March 1, 2016

2012 Toyota Prius c reveal at the 2012 North American International Auto Show in Detroit January 10, 2012, Image: Joe Polimeni/Toyota

There must be something about being the world’s most powerful automaker that makes you just, you know, wanna spread some branding around like your showroom is a big slice of bread and your best-loved nameplates are just sweet, sweet chrome jelly. How else can you explain Toyota’s attempt to expand the “Prius” into a three-car lineup, in the same way that General Motors gave us a veritable squadron of Cutlasses in the early ’80s?

The original Prius, now in its fourth and most bizarre-looking iteration yet, is an unmitigated triumph that probably has more millionaire owners than the Bentley Flying Spur, but at the same time is often the car of choice for cost-conscious Midwestern families. The Prius V, on the other hand … well, let’s just say that it isn’t flying off showroom floors. The Prius C has been just as unpopular with buyers while also managing to become the subject of several negative reviews, including a one-out-of-five-star recap from Car and Driver.

“This is the perfect car for the person who doesn’t care about what, exactly, he’s driving,” quoth AutoWeek, but over the past year The Littlest Prius has become quite popular with a section of the American driving population that really cares about what they drive — because it’s how they are making a living.

Unlike the “real” Prius, the Prius c isn’t a clean-sheet design. In fact, it’s just a reskin of the current Yaris with a low-power, 1.5-liter variant of the Toyota Synergy Drive powertrain. The overall vibe is less Toyota-of-the-future and more cheapest-car-they-had-in-stock.

Cheap is relative: the least expensive of the four Prius c trim levels starts at just under twenty grand. But when it comes to running costs, the littlest Prius puts up some stellar numbers. In fact, according to Consumer Reports, it’s the cheapest new car to own, period point blank. Some of that’s fuel economy, and some of it’s the relatively low cost of consumables like brake pads and tires, both of which are relatively small and cheap thanks to the little Toyota’s low weight.

The big part, however, is depreciation. CR’s “cheap sheet” is chock-full of Toyotas, because very few cars this side of a Ferrari 458 Speciale hold their value like the average Toyota does. It’s also generally true that Toyota buyers are not terribly odometer-conscious. T.C. Mits, LJK Setright’s favorite name for “the celebrated man in the street,” figures that American cars are more or less trashed at 75,000 miles but 100,000 on a Toyota is “just breaking in.” This is particularly true for the second-generation Prius, which seems to be perfectly cheerful running to the half-million-mile mark and beyond.

In fact, the way I do the math, the more miles you drive, the better the Prius c looks as an economic proposition, even when compared to other Toyotas and the Prius that doesn’t have any letters after the name. No wonder, then, that the much-maligned little Pri-Yar-us-is is finding a whole new fanbase: UberX drivers.

It was my experience with a Prius c-driving UberX serf that made me start thinking about whether or not the c was the best (meaning cheapest) possible choice for an Uber driver. But I’m not alone. The various forums for Uber and Lyft non-employees are chock-full of Prius c discussion. After all, these guys can do the math just as well as I can, and they have additional incentive to do so since their bottom line depends on it.

After reading hundreds of posts on dozens of forums, I’ve come to some conclusions. The first one is that, given a choice, almost all the Uber drivers who actually do the math and take their McContractJob seriously would choose the Prius c. This is particularly true in California, where traffic is always a factor and the ability of the Synergy Drive to sit idle in those situations means money in the bank. Some of the current Prius c drivers started out with a “regular” Prius but quickly realized that the real-world difference in fuel economy is greater than the EPA can detect in their testing.

The next conclusion? Uber won’t let you drive a Prius c in New York, where it’s specifically listed as Not Accepted. The Yaris, too, is on the banned list. (Odd detail: You’re allowed to drive a Jetta for UberX, and you’re allowed to have a Jetta GLI, but you’re not allowed to have a just-plain GLI, and you’re not allowed to have the Sportwagen.) On the West Coast, however, everything’s just hunky-dory.

Last conclusion? Even though many Uberistas are fairly itching to acquire a Prius c of their own, some of their compatriots have been “downrated” out of the business by passengers (“Pax,” in Uber slang) who despise its cramped rear quarters and mail-slot luggage space. It’s true that when I had the chance to try out the rear seat of the c for myself, I found it very difficult to fit both the aforementioned self and my trusty Waterfield bag behind the driver without introducing my knees to my teeth.

Speaking truthfully, after reading a bunch of posts by Uber drivers, I have to say that I’d rather return to my days as the midnight dishwasher at Iacono’s Pizza than rely on Uber for any sort of sustainable income. The numbers only truly work out if you’re extremely fortunate and you have some capital to invest, and even then you’re lucky to make eleven dollars an hour in the long run. You can be let go at any time, for any reason or for no reason at all. Uber itself shares no responsibility with you — not for healthcare, not for insurance, not for exotic stuff like maternity leave or bereavement.

It’s the kind of gig where you invest twenty thousand dollars in a new Prius c with the understanding that you could be stuck with a very expensive car payment and no corresponding income if you get three fat-asses in a row as “pax” and they downvote you. If you use an old car, you get downvoted and kicked out of the system. If you use a new car, you’re always on the edge of your driver’s seat hoping you have enough fares to justify your purchase.

Oh yeah, there’s also the chance that you can be beaten violently then sued by your attacker. Don’t expect Uber to lift a finger to help you when that happens, either. It’s all too clear that the “disruptive” company sees its contractors as replaceable parts, basically autonomous vehicles driven by Mechanical Turks.

I’d like to believe that there’s an upside. That you could meet interesting people, spend your days outside in the California sun, and earn fast-food money without having to touch a mop. But what kind of a life is it when the most you can hope for is twenty-five grand a year and a Prius that isn’t even the good Prius?

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69 Comments on “The Fragile Second Act Of The Prius C...”


  • avatar
    -Nate

    Pretty grim out there these days .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The v is my favorite Prius – roomy and cooler-looking. Is it kosher for Uber duty?

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      It is a favorite as a Taxi in Cali. Surely it would be fine.

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      My first Uber was a Prius V in CA. Not familiar with the pax protocol, I hopped into the front seat and befuddled the driver for a moment.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        A ton of Prius Vs as taxis in Paris too. I rather like them, and prefer their interiors to the gen III regular Prius. The V kept the gen II open-cabin concept with a very minimalist center console. With gas at all time lows, now would be the perfect time to scoop up one of these useful little wagons.

        • 0 avatar
          Quentin

          I enjoyed the one that we had. It was a great vehicle for our at-the-time newborn other than having too much glass (I ended up tinting the windows to help with the sun blasting through those enormous rear door windows).

          For my WV mountains, the v really needed the 2.5HSD, though. The 1.8HSD just didn’t have enough grunt for the 3200lbs plus 2 adults and shuttling baby gear. The rear suspension really should have been multi-link instead of torsion beam, too. The car is really too wide for a twist beam rear suspension, IMO. It was a peach for flat land and straight roads, though. Easily crested 45mpg hwy/interstate in those conditions.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I still want my Prius R… regular Prius with the 200 HP Synergy Drive powertrain, my trusty Continental DWS06s, and enthusiastic suspension tuning.

    Or I could just save $10K and get a base Mazda 3 2.0 with a tune.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I still want my Prius R… regular Prius with the 200 HP Synergy Drive powertrain, my trusty Continental DWS06s, and enthusiastic suspension tuning.

      But would it be “grounded to the ground”?

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      >> I still want my Prius R

      If you want a performance hybrid, go for the Koenigsegg Regera. It’s only a $1.9 million dollar upgrade over a Prius and you get 1489 hp with a 0-249 time of 20 seconds – and you’re saving the planet. :^) Electrically controlled wings keep it grounded to the ground.

    • 0 avatar

      I like the the Continental DWS as well. Cheaper, lighter, longer lasting, and better in the snow and rain than the all season Michelin Pilot. The only downside is a tiny bit less dry traction. PS. I know they are not snow tires.

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    If one’s sole reason for buying a car is to become an Uber driver, then it’s probably not a good choice.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      It is a heck of a feather in Toyota’s cap that, almost no matter the particular use cases, whether hauling Talibaners and their beltguns around in air strike territory, serving as taxicabs in third world countries, driving people around on African safaris and ferrying stunting lunatics to the poles, or hauling them around (sub)urbanity for hire; those who do it for a living, and in several times the doses of more regular carbuyers, almost always end up gravitating to Toyotas. Even Honda could only dream of that kind of an endorsement.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    I was just comparing Uber (and other ‘mobility solutions’) drivers to contract employees on the manufacturing line making 10 bucks an hour cash…

    Everyone favors those who can race the fastest to the bottom. Everyone will be taking a Lyft to Walmart, riding in Chinese made Buicks, buying textiles woven in some third world pollution hell hole, surfing reddit on their Chinese electronics, buying Mexican General Mills cereal and outsourced Chinese owned Smithfield bologna…

    …because that’s what their contract job will afford them.

    OR, they will buy all the same horsesh1t above, because that’s what got their 401(k) to it’s levels and what their tax dollars pay to silence the unemployed masses.

    At least hipsters are informed consumers. The rest of the consumerist Western world can suck my 4sshole.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I really wish I could get my kids to figure this out, so they would get off the X-Box, get a decent education and work hard. But I suppose it will take them a decade of banging their heads against the wall before they get it.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        my old man had me work in a meat packing plant. I could be considered a kid by most on here. It took a divorce, and years of living abroad before I realized that my xbox had been broken for 4 years and I didn’t even notice. Before, I had escaped my crummy marriage and sh1t job into 1st person shooter games.

        You can still have a decent job and afford the luxury of being blind to the world. It’s just you’ll get paid double for your ‘forced time awake’ 40 hour weekly shift.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        Who gave them the Xbox?

        I never understand why parents will give their kids stuff, then complain about the kids using it.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Don’t mince words, what do you *really* think?

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        lol, if I typed what I really was thinking, I would either get banned, or offered a ‘Why your favorite product sucks’ weekly column at whatever the male, manufacturing version of Jezebel is.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          DW seems to have that column daily however I feel as if we’d get a more intelligent and Dennis Milleresque response from yours.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I have content for your “male, manufacturing version of Jezebel”. I was 15 the first time I worked in an auto plant. I spent almost every Saturday and Sunday morning during high school snapping chalklines and sawcutting concrete. My dad said that going to the Temples of Manufacturing and working for him for free would do more for me than going to church.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      “You say you want a revolution…”

    • 0 avatar

      Preach on brother!

    • 0 avatar
      whynotaztec

      Too bad I didn’t read this before the polls closed in MA, I would have written in tresmonos

  • avatar
    jimble

    I’d be shocked to see something as small and crappy as a Prius C as an Uber in DC. But I have noticed lately that the quality of the Ubers I’m seeing is going down, and quickly. They used to all be very new and very nicely maintained Camrys. Now you never know what you might end up with.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      The quality of how Uber drivers “drive’ sucks in Chicago—-they all think they’re “professional” with the big “U” in the back until they cause a pileup.

      I saw a guy with an old ass Subaru Outback the other day as a Lyft driver with rear shocks that were clearly worn out. By how the car stayed in motion in the rear for 10 seconds after hitting the bump I’d say they should have been replaced 5 years ago. As if cabs are any better, but I try and flag down a newer looking minivan (Scored a T&C and Sedona the past 2 weekends) or Camry.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      There is a distinction between Uber and UberX. UberX was rolled out to compete with the Lyft concept of ridesharing just being a cheaper alternative to taxis rather than something born out of a black car service with luxury vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      I’m surprised that’s been your experience in DC. I think the “worst” UberX vehicle I’ve had here was a slightly tired 3rd gen Acura TL, but it was still clean and seemed fine mechanically. Camry Hybrids still seem to dominate, though (I’m assuming because of Uber affiliated financing). Regardless, having the worst taxis in the industrialized world makes almost anything better by comparison.

  • avatar
    EMedPA

    Amen, Tresmonos.

  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    Buying a PriusC just for Uber purposes seems kind of dumb… The rest of the time you have to drive around in a pretty expensive yet very very crappy little crap can… Cross shopping the Fit and the PriusC was hilarious night and day difference to the point, the little bit of increased economy wasn’t worth the over all crapness that the PriusC offered.

  • avatar
    dwford

    I couldn’t imagine a Prius C for Uber duty. I get the low gas costs thing, but it is just not large enough. Better off finding a nice used unloved hybrid car like a Hyundai Sonata or maybe a Ford C-Max. You’d get most of the gas savings without your passengers hating you.

  • avatar

    Was going for a Prius C this past winter until unexpected medical problems killed the cash I’d saved to buy one.
    I was looking at a Fit and a C,but going for a 2015 C after 2016s were out had local California dealers offering $2,000 off the price off the top,there’s a $1500 Cali rebate and I would have seen a Fed tax credit of $2000+.And that was before trade-in of my old Saturn,w/one dealer offering $3400.

    Have a co-worker doing UBER on weekends in West Hollywood vicinity w/a regular Prius and about half are women.
    Note California has now changed their rebate rules and individuals w/income below $35k/yr can now get a $3,000 rebate.

    • 0 avatar

      35K a year in California? Is that like 15K in Ohio?

      • 0 avatar

        For California energy efficient cars the cutoff for the $3000 rebate on hybrids($5k on all electrics) is 300% of Federal minimum living wage. Starting this yr,very high incomes don’t get the rebates.

        Suto,
        Pretty much.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      What are you talking about? To the best of my knowledge, there are no state or federal incentives for hybrids without a plug. If you were talking about a Volt, that would be different, but your rear seat passengers would still hate you.

  • avatar
    mason

    This article reminds me of the whacked out Uber driver in Kalamazoo.

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/02/21/us/michigan-kalamazoo-county-shooting-spree/

  • avatar
    Dingleberrypiez_Returns

    “I’d rather return to my days as the midnight dishwasher at Iacono’s Pizza than rely on Uber for any sort of sustainable income.”

    Yep. People are finally wising up to this. Everytime I see an Uber driver, I think one or more of the following 1) they’re dumb; 2) they’re being taking advantage of; 3) they’re not fit for employment ANY where; or 4) they’re rich and just doing it for shits and giggles.

    • 0 avatar
      MattPete

      Spot on.

      I’m glad to see that I’m not the only person who feels this way.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Live by the gig economy, die by the gig economy. If Uber cuts its rates too low it will find itself with a driver shortage within days. I think that may already be happening in certain markets. Uber waits have gotten a bit longer around here recently. Taxis are looking more attractive, especially if your trip starts downtown.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Or they see it the way a small business owner sees his credit card. Get money now (fares), with the full understanding it’s going to cost you money later (depreciation, maintenance, consumables), albeit with the possibility of writing some of that off on taxes (prorated business expenses), on the assumption you can make wise enough use of the money you get now to outweigh the additional money later.

      So if you are an individual with substantial credit card debt at 20% interest and student loan payments you can’t make (go to college without being rich and get one serious illness and this could be you too!), driving for Uber as a side job on top of your regular job is utterly sensible. You pay down that high-interest debt and avoid murderous and inescapable default on those student loans.

      This is also why people deliver pizza on the side, or work as strippers for that matter. No shame or stupidity to it, really…

      • 0 avatar
        orenwolf

        Nailed it. This is exactly what I’ve seen from many UberX drivers out there. Supplementary income with no boss to tell you when to work – you do it when you want (or when surge prices are high and you’re asked to come out).

        Can you make a living as an UberX driver? Sure. But I don’t think that’s the primary use case. Supplementary income is.

        I’d think you’d be better off as an Uber black driver if you want to make a living, personally.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “Buy a car just for Uber”? No.

    But on the aside, “The Prius V, on the other hand … well, let’s just say that it isn’t flying off showroom floors. The Prius C has been just as unpopular with buyers ” … odd, we must be in an odd Prius bubble here in Portland (which I totally believe), because I see quite a few Cs and a decent number of Vs, in amongst the normal Prii.

    (GCBC shows the C at 38,469 for ’15, the V at 28,290, and the Prius at 113,829.

    28,290 is not a giant sales amount – but it’s outselling the C-Max, note.

    Almost 30,000 cars for the least popular body on the Prius is *still* decent sales.)

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Jaeger

      I can’t see buying a car just for UberX use making a lot of sense. I think if you already need a car for other purposes and you select one that is suitable for UberX use then sure, using some of your spare time and an otherwise idle asset to earn some extra cash probably makes sense for a lot of people.

  • avatar

    I don’t always like JB but when I do like JB, I drink Dos Equi…..I mean I really Like JB.

    Great article, I rode with an UberX driver in Tampa a while back in a Civic hybrid, he told me with the rate cuts he was taking home just over minimum wage. He was an accountant and used it to fill his time between clients but told me he was likely going to stop soon as it wasn’t worth it.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    I live in Toronto, currently a hotbed of Uber controversy. I am a Uber fan and regular user, mostly when I don’t feel like fighting for parking with my new shiny Mazda6 (which I LOVE, btw).

    We have a LOT of options here. In order of cost:

    UberX (normal car)
    Uber Select (‘fancy” normal car)
    Uper access (accessible car)
    Uber Taxi (basically taxi brokerage, you pay metered taxi rate)
    Uber (black car)
    Uber SUV (livery SUV)
    Also UberEats, which is all day food delivery, but not relevant to this discussion.

    I usually spring for Uber select when the wait is comparable to UberX, because I like legroom and comfort when I travel, and the price is very slightly less than a taxi, but you end up in a Model S or BMW/Mercedes or equivalent. If I’m heading out w/my partner, I’ll usually spring for a full-on uber to be “fancy”.

    There are a seriously massive number of honda civics in Canada, and there’s more than a few of them in UberX service. Tiny. I imagine I’d feel the same in a Prius c as well.

    My parking-mate at home has a Prius c and loves it, though he only seems to drive it solo.

    Vancouver is almost all normal-sized Prius models, and they make great taxis, lots of space and carge space. It’s too bad that they aren’t a cost-effective option for UberX.

    That being said, the vast majority of UberX drivers I’ve run into use UberX as a second income or a way to save up for something specific (tuition or a vacation, etc)., and like being able to jump in only when they want to (or when surge pricing is up and uber begs them to).

  • avatar
    Drew8MR

    Folks really care about what car their Uber is? Dude is shuttling me between bars, he could be riding a Honda Cub for all I care. Got alot of stuff? Call a real cab then.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Base Prius C is $19.5k. Base Yaris 4-door automatic is $16k.

    According to fueleconomy.gov, the Prius C costs $300 less per year in gas.

    Over 10 years, the Prius C will use $3000 less in gas.

    Pay an extra $3500 to save $3000?

    That makes sense to someone. I am not that someone.

    • 0 avatar
      brenschluss

      In both cases, however, you must drive a Prius C or base Yaris for 10 years.

    • 0 avatar
      Varezhka

      Well, I think base Prius C is better optioned than the base Yaris.
      Additionally, a Prius C will worth more than a Yaris come time to sell (unless you drive your car till it dies, in which case both cars will last well past 10 years).

      • 0 avatar
        eggsalad

        I’m not so sure about resale value on any Prius. Ten years is 120-150k miles. Prius batteries seem to start becoming an issue around 150-180k miles.

        What it the value of a low-end hybrid that’s going to need a $2k battery within a couple years of the 2nd owner’s purchase?

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Lots of Prius owners get well over 200K on their original batteries and have great resale value. The C is a little soon to know for certain but it should be similar in both cases.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Having had a rental-spec Prius C as a rental recently, I very much doubt the Yaris is any worse. The absolute WORST rental car I have had in many years, and I rented a beat up Hyundai Accent from Advantage with 50K on it over the Christmas holidays (for $13/day)! What a complete and utterly hateful crapcan of a car. And I actually appreciate the bigger Prius for what they are, and got my Mom into a Prius V. The C is just a step too far down the slippery sloap of cheap. Except they actually cost a small fortune!

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    WHO HOO! My 1985 Isuzu Impulse can win a traffic light sprint against at least one 2016 production car – LOL

  • avatar
    tedward

    The prius c is the worst, actually modern, car I have ever driven and, by a country mile, the most fuel efficient four wheel vehicle I have every been in. It would give me a chubby too if I was driving slobs around for a take home in the 30 cent per mile range.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I actually was not that impressed by the fuel economy of my rented Prius C. 300 mile round trip, Interstate and rural 2-lane, with a few days of around town driving netted 45mpg. And utterly not hooned in any way, because that would be completely pointless. Not NEARLY efficient enough to put up with the sheer hatefulness of the thing. My Mom’s Prius V would have done nearly as well, and been infinitely more comfortable for not a lot more money upfront.

      If I were a fleet manager I would LOVE them, but only if I never, ever had to drive the miserable things. Same way I feel about Panthers actually. But those are actually kind of fun in a deeply ironic sort of way.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        That’s about the worst possible kind of driving for a Prius. You would have been a bit more impressed when the thing returned the same 45 mpg driving a quarter mile at a time in Boston.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I would expect it to return more like 55mpg+ in an urban setting. And I still wouldn’t care, because it is not enough better than a regular Prius or a V to make up for what a truly awful little crapbox it is. And I LIKE tiny cars. It is a car without a single shred of joy in it’s being.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Time for a new addition to the Prius line, the Prius crossover based on a Prius c (a Prius on stilts). At some point Toyota will release one.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Is the Uber bias against “old” cars that strong? Would people be that unhappy riding in the typical estate sale $4000 Buick LeSabre (3800 of course)? You can’t justify 20 grand in capital on a low paying deal like this.

  • avatar
    madman2k

    I drive a 2010 Prius (regular one), and used to drive for Uber.

    I quit shortly after they dropped the per-mile rate from $1.20 to $1.00. The propaganda sent out to drivers always talks about how your earnings will increase because more riders will be using it at lower rates.

    Complete BS. It’s a luxury, and the same people who use it at $1.00 a mile, would have used it at $1.20 a mile just as often.

    In fact, the cost of the Uber to and from the bar/club area is probably the cheapest expense of the night out on the town. Even with a moderate surge, which can easily be avoided by leaving shortly before closing time.

    Several months after I stopped driving, they cut the rates again, from $1.00 to 70 cents a mile.

    Glad I’ve got a good day job to pay the bills. Now for extra cash I deliver food with Postmates for similarly low money but on the upside Postmates allows tips, and early adopters of the service around here tend to be generous.

  • avatar
    djoelt1

    My family owns a Prius C and we waited until it came out to replace an older car.

    We also own a 1995 BMW M3 Lightweight.

    The Prius C is like a go kart. Fits our three kids just fine. I routinely get over 60 mpg. Our first one was totaled in an accident, and the insurance payout was enough to buy a new one with $1000 left over.

    We make a lot of money but don’t want to spend much on cars.

    What’s not to like? I can pass just about any car on a two lane freeway on-ramp because I know how to drive. The car is so small you can squeeze past cars making left turns so I always get places quicker than in a bigger car. It’s white, just like an appliance. I can go about 450 miles on $16 worth of fuel. When gas prices reach $4 per gallon, I will be able to go that 450 miles on $32 in gas.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      You really need to try a Fiat 500. The mpgs won’t be as stellar, but the grins per mile are off the charts even for the base version. I LOVE tiny cars and I found the Prius C to be absolutely hateful. No steering or brake feel, no grip, no go, lousy seats, unrelentingly depressing interior, and loud and unpleasant sounding at that. the only things it does is not use much gas (but not less than better alternatives) and probably not break much. As I said in another comment, a perfect fleet car, if you are the fleet manager and don’t have to drive the thing.

      But if you just love it, good on you! One of my car salesman buddies always said there is an @ss for every seat. He managed to sell a mustard yellow on poop brown velour Buick Century once…

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    Save your money and learn how to drive. It is amazing how just planning trips, knowing the routes you take and the stop light patterns (and then anticipating them) and driving at speed limit and driving by keeping an eye on what’s behind you how well you can do with mileage.

    My Escort that is supposed to get an average of 34 mpgs has given my a hundred thousand miles plus of 43 mpg average. I do bits of hypermiling but I never impede the flow of traffic. But I will not speed and enjoy infuriating Toyoduh and Honduh owners who insist on tailgating me at posted speed limit in the slow lane. I know these are the two worst brands – it happens so frequently with those brands (mazda owners are now number 3) – idiots who are too lazy to pass on the left deserve to be made angry.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Just traded out my ’13 “c”.
    I seriously loved the car save for one thing. Why the hell Toyota chose to give it the super stiff suspension and consequent harsh ride is beyond me, particularly considering my 2000 Corolla which has a few inches shorter wheelbase, identical weight, and provides a far smoother more comfortable ride.


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