By on March 9, 2016

2016 Nissan Tsuru, Image: Nissan Mexico

As wonderful as the American marketplace is, there’s an entire world — literally — of cars out there that we just can’t get our hands on. In TTAC’s new series, “Foreign Affairs,” we look at forbidden fruit that you can buy brand new around the world.

The Mexican new car market is remarkable. While plenty of good new cars come across the border, inciting at least one presidential candidate to threaten penalty taxes, its domestic market still continues to sell older gems, some of which are built to older safety standards. Even the Beetle was built there long after its sell-by date.

The car that fascinates me, naturally, is one I’ve previously owned: the Nissan B13-chassis Tsuru, known here in the U.S. as the 1991-94 Nissan Sentra.

The Tsuru is popular most likely due to its bargain basement cost. A basic model can run as low as $7,040 USD after promotional savings. I’m sure the model’s long lifespan has also contributed a massive secondary market in parts and spares, as this has been used as a taxi all over the country for years.

I doubt it’d be a good Uber ride, though.

Only a few major changes have been made over the years — primarily some restyling of the grille and headlamps. The option packages look a bit different than what we would typically see here, as well. The base model doesn’t offer air conditioning or power steering, but has a standard anti-theft alarm and remote unlocking. While the base 1.6-liter engine won’t be particularly quick, its light weight will at least make it nimble.

I still wish Nissan would offer something like this — since we know they will still build the basic car — with some performance features like the big SR20 engine, and sell it here in the U.S. As worn out as my 1991 SE-R was, it was still more fun to drive than any current, smaller car from Nissan.

1991 Nissan Sentra SE-R

[Images: Tsuru, Nissan Mexico; Faded Sentra, © Chris Tonn/The Truth About Cars]

Chris Tonn is a broke classic car enthusiast that writes about old cars, since he can’t afford to buy them. Commiserate with him on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

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102 Comments on “Foreign Affairs: Nissan Tsuru, Mexico...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    GTEM IS VERY EXCITED NOW.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Dat greenhouse.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Damnit why am I searching kijiji for K-Cars now?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Lol, I don’t think you need K-Car in your life.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            My lady and I are off to the Calgary Auto show tonight. I really hope they have a Forte 5 SX. Our beater Hyundai wont last forever…

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think I still like the Elantra GT better over the Forte 5. It’s more swoopier.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Ugh no. The Elantra is hideous both on its own and compared to the Forte. And only the SX trim appeals, as the lower trims have larger rounder grills and doesn’t look anywhere as good.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Maybe I just never see any Forte 5 models. Heck, I still like the Elantra Touring, they should make a new one of those.

            Dave you are definitely more than Sierra. You are also tires.

          • 0 avatar

            Forte 5 > Elantra GT in almost every measurable way. I really, really like the Forte.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Mark. are you referring to the Forte5 turbo or the naturally aspirated one?

            I’d say the Elantra GT has some charms too, though.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Hey Mark,

            We went to the auto show last night. Saw a lot of neat iron, had a ton of fun. One of the issues that my gf couldn’t get past in almost every car we sat in, is that all of these modern cars seem to have heavily slanted forward headrests. So when she sits with her back fully against the backrest, it tilts her head forward. Only a couple of cars had a headrest that was more in plain with the surface of the chair back.

            Is this supposed to be passive safety design against whiplash? Its very much more prevalent in the newer cars. The Verano for example, the headrests are much more upright and a continuation of the line of the chair back. Just makes us more frustrated that the Verano isn’t worth keeping, due to its excellence at long hauls.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think Volvo is at fault for starting the forward headrests trend (early 00s). It’s definitely a whiplash thing.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’ll fix it. GMC, GMC…

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Awww yissss. These things are an icon in Mexico, beloved for their durability, repairability, and economy. I always seek them out as cabs when I’m down there for work.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        haha

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        we were in Mexico for 12 days a year ago, on a 5 town/ruins/lagoon/jungle tour. I’d say 90% of the cabs I saw were these. The thing that surprised me was many more of them than I though would have A/C. They were great cabs, huge trunks swallowed our luggage easily.

        The thing that was really weird to me about Mexico was the car dealerships. They have 2015 models that look like they are straight out of 1988, such as the Tsuru, on sale next to what we know as the current Sentra, for example. This was very prevalent at FCA dealers, with Calibers parked next to Darts.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          And the Mitsu dealer still has Monteros!

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            To be fair those Monteros are gen IV trucks, which is a heavily revised gen III. Nowhere as ancient as the Tsuru, now if they still sold the gen II body Montero like they do elsewhere in the world, now that would be neat!

            I barely saw any Japanese SUVs down there, especially older stuff, aside from a few Xterras, gen III monteros, and a single 4Runner just like mine (evergreen pearl and the older ‘short lip’ bumper). Japanese pickups (nissans and less so Toyotas) are everywhere but the love does not extend to SUVs apparently. It’s all gen 2 explorers and ZJ grand Cherokees, as well as GMT330 and S10 Blazers/Jimmys.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh si, it’s the followup generation Montero everyone else has but us. I imagine the SUV offerings are too expensive now and/or taxed differently?

      • 0 avatar
        rocketrodeo

        How would you avoid getting one as a cab? I spend a few weeks a year in San Miguel de Allende. That’s pretty much all I ever ride in, though there are a few Tiidas creeping into the mix.

  • avatar
    sproc

    That generation of SE-R was such an awesome car for the time. I came so close to buying one new and still regret passing. The thought of tossing around a new-build one is a worthy fantasy.

    • 0 avatar
      KevinC

      I bought one new, a ’93. A local Nissan dealer had gone the “no-haggle” route and priced them ridiculously low, because despite their 4 straight appearances on the Car & Drive 10Best list, the take rate was quite low. I practically stole that thing. Loved it for a few years, though they weren’t without their quirks. One of the worst was the sheet metal – it was the thinnest and most fragile of any car I’ve ever owned. But that drivetrain & handling.. spectacular.

      • 0 avatar
        Stugots

        I own a 1991 SE-R. What a great, fun car! I searched a long time to find a low mileage, unmodified example, as I missed the opportunity to buy a new one back in 1993. (Sorry, I tried to copy/paste a photo and couldn’t figure out how.)

    • 0 avatar
      acehunter

      Still have my ’92 (purchased new, 330K+ miles)

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Was your Sentra quite leaky? I’m seeing some evidence on the driveway.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “we look at forbidden fruit that you can buy brand new around the world.”

    if there’s one thing that irritates me, it’s the mindset that there are all of these “awesome” cars elsewhere and it’s criminal that we can’t buy them here.

    I’ve been able to drive a number of these cars over the years, and I can say for the most part- *you don’t want them.* They’re cheap pieces of garbage.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I think there are a few things which are/were good or interesting that we didn’t or don’t get. The current Montero is one of them. We missed out on a lot of Defender for decades as well. There are many good JDM-only vehicles which never come here. I think Skoda (Yetti) and Seat (old Toledo) had interesting designs, but we’re stuck with lame Jettas from VAG. We miss ALL French cars unless their a low end Renault branded as Nissan.

      Overall I think the majority of what we get excluded from is trim and engine options.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “Interesting” doesn’t sell, nor does it make a car appealing. I’ve driven a Renault Duster; yes it’s an “interesting” car but you couldn’t pay me enough to live with one. What an incredible piece of junk.

      • 0 avatar
        bertvl

        >> ” We missed out on a lot of Defender for decades as well.”

        A classic case of rotten fruit – the Defender was and is an appallingly bad vehicle. I have driven a few in the UK, there’s absolutely nothing to recommend it over a Wrangler or a Land Cruiser (or just about anything if you don’t need off-road capability), but because it looks tough and you can’t get it in North America it has got an undeserved halo. Like the original Mini, it only hang around because the Brits had no money to update the thing.

        As for the Tsuru, it just looks dated and is probably a death-trap, I can’t see the point, frankly.

    • 0 avatar
      Chris Tonn

      Well, that’s what I’m trying to explore. Grass greener and all that.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Interestingly, the original SE-R was one of the few desirable cars that Japan didn’t get. Closest they got in a Sunny was a TBI SR18.

    • 0 avatar

      Some fruit is rotten, but it can still be forbidden.

    • 0 avatar
      turf3

      Yes, for example the Nissan Cedric with 3-on-the-tree transmission. Many were still in taxi service in the late 90s/early 2000s

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Wow, that’s interesting!

    Just checked Toyota’s Mexico website to see if you can still buy a brand new 1992 Camry, nope! Too bad.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    Hey now the 91 SE version landed on the Car and Driver 1

  • avatar
    ant

    I know a girl who bought one of these just after high school. It was a salvage title, as it had been in a rear-end accident, and then repaired by a friend of her family.

    She paid 4k for it, commuted to collage for 5 years whilst putting over 100k miles on it, then sold it for 2.5k, like 8 years later.

    She never did a thing to it besides tires, brakes, tuneup, and fluid changes.

    Super basic car, manual, with roll up windows, but just amazing ROE.

    Its only fault was that the back window leaked water when it rained, presumably caused by the rear end accident.

    • 0 avatar
      motormouth

      Its only fault was that the back window leaked water when it rained, presumably caused by the rear end accident.

      Should’ve put some glass in it.

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      My wife got a 93 which also came pre-wrecked even though I told her not to buy it. Looks like someone popped the driver door as it never did close right and the winder window was always uncooperative. That aside, we ran the hell out of that thing for many years. I think we put close to 100k on it (it already had 80 when we bought it) in about four years. Many years of a 160+ mile round trip commute added up fast and a cross-country roadtrip for good measure put a few more on the clock.
      The only options that car had were power steering and AC which was a step up from her previous 87 Sentra with neither. It ran and ran, it ate it’s axles on the xc trip, but that aside, required very few repairs.
      The final nail in the coffin was that it could not pass smog when we lived in Los Angeles and we were moving back east; we had neither the ability nor the desire to drag the poor thing across the country for what would be it’s fourth journey. I tried to sell it, but nobody wanted a sentra with close to 200k and a five speed to row through LA traffic. It was also broken into while parked in Pittsburgh so it had one key for the driver door and a different for the passenger door since the asshats piped the lock. I ended up giving it away to a former student who then tried to fix the smog issues (thought to be leaky valve stem seals) and spent more than the car was worth in the process.

  • avatar
    ajuscojohn

    The low price and cheap parts make them incredibly popular as taxis in Mexico, though they’re notoriously awful in a crash:

    Check the Latin NCAP crash test video for the Nissan Tsuru on YouTube.

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      Here it is: watch?v=K4h7l8DWyw8

      Unbelievable. Yeah, uhh… I don’t care how spry that thing is on the road – to quote, IIRC, Rusty Wallace, I wouldn’t get out of the electric chair for a ride in one of those. Wow.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        So what we learn here is that cars from 25 years ago are not as safe as today.

        • 0 avatar
          ajuscojohn

          … Or be careful about the cab you get into when you visit Cancun

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            So low on my list of places to visit!

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            It’s funny because I go out of my way to get these as cabs down in Puerto Vallarta (a great place to visit btw). It is just so nostalgic to get a ride in a ‘regular’ looking sedan with big windows and sensible proportions. The mechanical feel and ‘connectedness’ (read: NVH) of the experience is great. Not unlike the myriad of Ladas I get to ride in when visiting relatives in rural Russia. You haven’t lived until you’ve bounced down cobblestone streets in a ratty older Tsuru with 400k KM of Mexican roads under it. According to the cabbies, strut replacement is an annual procedure, tires oftentimes only make it 9 months.

            I’ve gone flying down crowded streets at 70mph in a newer Sentra taxi driven by a total maniac of a driver (this was after he purposely cut off another cab to get back at them for an earlier slight). I find that the guys driving the older Tsurus take it easy.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            gtem, I’ve followed your comments with interest for some time now. Where abouts in Russia do your relatives live, and how often do you visit them?

            Or, as typed with my language pack swapped keyboard, very poor knowledge of the language and NO GOOGLE TRANSLATE,
            где они живёт?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The dash came to life and ate the driver.

        Here are some more, my fav is the ambulance.

        youtube.com/watch?v=pg1onIAwpaQ

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Crap the Citroen at about 1:00 just had no structural integrity at all. But now I’m very glad to be in the back of the ambulance and not the front. I didn’t realize the Previa was so bad. Steering wheel will give you a nice smack under the chin to remind you who’s boss!

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      But..butbutbut I thought it was GM and GM alone that calously forced Mexicans to ride around in cheap death machines while Mary Barra bathes in the blood of Latin orphans and laughs maniacally. You don’t mean Nissan is… Also an evil conglomerate, do you?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        That whole spectacle was interest group created by a bunch of whiners. The legislation doesn’t require airbags, so they don’t offer airbags for everything.

        The US car market would be exactly the same if our legislation allowed.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Well, 40 years ago I rode maniacally down a huge hill going around 40 on my bike, with no helmet or protection. I also got in bottle rocket wars with my neighbors. Later I rode around with my friends drinking beer and not wearing seatbelts.

          No way I’d let my kids do any of that now. No way I’d put them in a 1990 Sentra either. Progress is good but expensive. I’ll pay, though.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ohh bike wrecks. So easy to do. I had a helmet, but they didn’t make me wear it.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            It’s a freakin’ miracle I survived until 1980…though in retrospect all the crap I pulled is probably the same crap everyone pulled back then.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Your reference to 1980 made me think of: Galactica 1980.

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          Agreed, but there were plenty here that seemed to agree that GM was building the next coming of the Pinto, Corvair, and Tatra all rolled into one.

    • 0 avatar
      econobiker

      I think the used tire places in Mexico have already mounted on wheels used tires ready to swap with the taxi Tsuru wheels when they come in for a repalcement tire.

      Every Tsuru taxi which I took never had four consistant matching color wheels except a brand spanking new one with only 8,000km on the clock.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        A few years ago I was in Playa de Carmen and would occasionally take a cab. Most of the Tsuru’s I was in were fairly well maintained like it was America in 1991 and they just came out of a Nissan dealer.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Not a fan of these except for the SE-R, which was fun to push around in a buzzy tin-can sort of way, like an Integra but with even less refinement. The feeling of cheapness was overwhelming even at the time. Mechanicals lasted, but rust ate them alive and paint, interior, and rubber parts all failed early.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      This is why you get the G20.

      ***I know the Sentra and G20 weren’t the same car***

    • 0 avatar
      moorewr

      I drove a B13 Sentra XE coupe for years. Engine was fine, compared to the Civics and Corollas of the day, and had more HP than most of them (110!). It was a very nice handling car with a pleasant interior and stereo for the era.

      Unfortunately, where it came closest to German luxury was mechanical reliability.. I had endless clutch, water-pump, alternator and electrical problems till the day I sold it.

      How long-ago was 1993? So long ago there were no airbags – instead the lap belts were supposed to be clicked even when the door was open. That lasted two seconds.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        This is definitely worth noting. In the era of 92 hp Civics 1.5L D15B2 SOHC motors with laggy throttle body injection and Corollas with 92hp 4AFEs, the Sentra came out swinging with the 110hp 1.6L DOHC GA16DE with sequential port injection, in a car weighing no more than the others.

    • 0 avatar
      Macca

      Couldn’t help but chime in here. My first car was a ’93 Sentra XE, 5-speed…the only option was cruise control. I bought it in 1999 with 103k miles and proceeded to put about 70k miles on it through HS and college over the next 7 years. Such a ridiculously fun first car. It was sprightly with a stick – I (stupidly) loved trolling ’90s V6 Mustangs. The GA16 was a peppy little engine. 16 year olds don’t (often) crave refinement.

      I sold it private party when I was in grad school for about a grand less than I paid for it and picked up a 2002 [wait for it] G20, automatic (sad trombone sound). The G was a great car for me then, but the whole part about meeting your heroes definitely applied. Most of the criticisms of the P11 versus P10 were true, however I tried to excuse them at the time. The G20 was likely close to 2 seconds slower to 60 than my old B13 Sentra, which sapped most of the fun. I sold it about 4 years later. In a world of 6 second 0-60 midsizers it would be almost dangerously slow.

      @moorewr – I recall the illustration of leaving the seatbelts clicked all the time, man that was awkward (yes, I tried it too).

      Anyway, I still miss aspects of both of these cars, but I think I’ll hold off picking up a Tsuru to relive those days.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    I would consider an “new” old car that was considered a good/great car back in the day.

    Hopefully, the mechanical bugs would be worked out, and it would be very reliable–even if it needed more frequent preventive maintenance/service.

    My top pick would be a Mark 1 VW Golf. They made them in South Africa past 2000, I wonder if they still do.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I think the only “old” (more than 20 years old) cars I would buy brand new completely unchanged is the original LS400 and the W126 or W124.

      That said I love the style of most vehicles from about ’77-’95.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      If we’re playing this game, I’ll take a factory fresh UAZ-469/3151 (continuous production since 1970) and a Lada Niva 4x4M (produced since 1977), which can still be bought brand new. Likewise I’d love to be able to buy a brand new Tsuru in the states for $7k, talk about low running costs!

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Aaaah, the Tsuru. I have that grille sitting in my spare bedroom, part of a 4-foglight bumper kit that I still haven’t installed yet.

  • avatar
    here4aSammich

    Is this “new” old car really a better choice that todays stripper Versa sedan? Yeah, from a retro standpoint I can see it. But the stripper Versa is a non-turbo’ed, non-CVT’d runner with air, Bluetooth, modern safety features, and a warranty for $12k. I’ve got a 110 mile daily commute, I’ve looked at it to replace my daily runner. Lack of cruise control seems like the downfall.

    • 0 avatar
      moorewr

      Funny, the humble Sentra XE had cruise control in US-spec. And air, and I made mid 30s on the highway.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        My ’85 Civic was pretty well equipped too.

        But if you ask me whether I’d rather have an accident in that or a new Civic…well, you don’t have to ask.

        Older cars can be charming in their simplicity, but we forget the bad stuff.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I love the 80s Civic Wagon blue and white plaid seats for charm.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            My Civic had a kind of grey and white houndstooth. Great seats. Amazing little car. If Honda dealers weren’t such utter thieves back then, I’d have been a customer for life.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            My family owned a rusty ’82 Wagon when we first immigrated, then upgraded to a slightly less rusty ’85 Sedan that we owned for a few years before getting rear ended badly. Replaced with…. a ’90 Civic Wagon. The ’85 had a neat dash layout with a ton of flat storage space up top and this huge row of air deflectors as I recall. The ’90 had a really nice tweed cloth, with high quality soft vinyl door cars with tweed inserts, and chrome door pulls. My ’12 Civic LX is a far cry from that, as is my dad’s ’07 Fit. We’re a bunch of Honda drivin’ fools!

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    $7040 still seems like a lot for a 25 year old car with 25 year old crash worthiness and no A/C or power steering. New strippo Versas are only about 3 grand more. Of course that’s 43% more if looking at proportions…

    There is something strangely appealing in being able to buy a 1991 car brand new today, though. Why troll craigslist and autotrader looking for a well preserved example when Nissan is still rolling them off assembly lines?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      In a third world country like Mexico even a $3000 price difference would be very significant.

      Probably keeps the manufacturer in the chips too. Nissan probably amortized all the costs of the car when Clinton was president…first term, no less.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Current Sentra + 2.5 from Altima + 6-speed manual = too much fun.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    My wife’s family lives in Lima, Peru. This and Nissan Versas are the official cars in that city. They must be sturdy and cheap to keep running, as I saw some that looked like 2-3 wrecked cars were just welded together to make one.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    These are very light weight. Once a Taxi Tsuru cut me off in stop and go traffic (I was merging) so I decided to t bone it and I shoved it about 30′ with a 2012 Hybrid Fusion.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I owned 2 older Sentras…’83 and ’89…they were tinny as hell. The ’83 even had rubber floor mats and vinyl seats. It also could only go about 70 MPH before air pressure pushed the upper door frames away from the body of the car, creating MASSIVE air leaks and wind noise that would deafen the driver and occupants. Not a fun car to take a trip in…

    I too would have taken an SE-R…cool little hot rod.

  • avatar
    Joss

    SER aside this generation of Sentra was the first you could get up to 70 without too much of a buzz. First NA Sentra with multi-valve & 4-sp automatic.

  • avatar
    turf3

    Oy, what a tsuru I’ve got!

  • avatar
    rocketrodeo

    While you’re looking at Mexico, Chris, check out the VW Clasico. Almost as ubiquitous as the Tsuru in the places I go in Mexico (primarily Guanajuato and environs). Jetta MKIV fans will love it.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    .

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    For those who admire the Tsuru, damn the safety aspect, I feel your pain. No, its not as safe as new cars, okay, but it represents a good car no matter that, and its still popular and being manufactured and sold today. I am not a huge fan of the Nissan Sentra. I had a 1985 coupe and drove several of the 1990s bodystyle this one still is. Its not my nirvana of compacts, and I much prefer the two door (never drove the SE-R) if I was to have one, but I more than understand yout desire to have access to the Tsuru.

    Lets be honest, by the time a 2016 Tsuru is 25 years old and thus eligable for import by non-Mexicans, itll be older and in far worse shape than this: http://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/5482833919.html Personally, I like the silver wheels, but for $7-8k, you could build a new car from that. Rebuild/replace/upgrade? the drivetrain, body, paint, interior done to your specs (vinyl and rubber or leather and carpet with sound deadner). Get the updated Tusuru grille, headlamps, etc from Mexico. I like it, itd look sweet.

    I also like the F-150 (V-6) and F-250 (V-8) trucks they built all through the late 2000s after the model (which did poor in crash tests, with airbags) was replaced in 2004 in the US (continued as Heritage for one year). It got an updated grille and headlamps that would look amazing on a 97-03 F-150, 97 F-250 light duty or first gen Expedition.

    I love the little Fiesta-based Courior coupe-utility (not based on the current Fiesta we get), although I think its out of production and has no hope of entering the US for our consuption anytime soon.

    Latin America is a haven for forgotten US cars and trucks. Ford Falcon in Argentina until 1991! 1968-72 F-series in Brazil until the 1990s as well. Both with updated styling Im envious of. Cars like the Chevy Opala and Ford Landau put the similar-sized US models to shame.

    GM’s Chevy Inline 6 contined so long, it got a Vortec head and was put in Tahoes, Suburbans and pickups until the late 90s at least! I would love to get my hands on it! AVortec Inline 6 based on the bullet proof early 6’s and not the crap that was in the Trailblazer? Yes! There is an early 1990s Chevy Suburban K1500 not far from me, Chevy 350 engine sat with water in it. Interior vinyl and rubber. Flat green exterior. 4Wd, off road tires, 3″ suspension lift, good trans/case/rear. Id put that Vortec Inline 6 in there and love it! No it wouldnt be fast, itd be great at what I want. Fast is for something not the size of a studio apartment.

    The point is, there is a tresure of awesome American (and non-American including American branded) cars and products out there.


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