By on March 6, 2016

Donald Trump, Image: Image: Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Donald Trump, while on the campaign trail in Michigan, is still promising to apply a 35-percent import tariff on vehicles built by Ford if it continues with plans to expand operations in Mexico, even though Trump wouldn’t have the authority to implement a tariff as president, reports The Detroit Free Press.

“We are going to do something that is going to (be) great (and) a very big beneficiary is going to be Michigan,” Trump said while speaking to supporters at Macomb Community College on Friday. “The car business is being abused more than most other businesses. … Mexico is becoming the new China.”

And we all know how much Trump looooooooves China.

From The Detroit Free Press:

In a speech full of references to Michigan’s dominant auto industry and the threats posed by foreign competition and outsourcing, Trump whipped up the crowd at the college Sports and Expo Center in Warren, saying he was “100% sure” a Trump presidency would keep Ford Motor Co. from opening any future plant in Mexico. And he suggested that was just the start for his negotiating better business deals in the U.S. and around the globe to create and save jobs.

(Emphasis mine.)

“Within 24 to 48 hours I will get a call from the head of Ford and he will say, ‘Mr. President, we have decided we’re going to build our new plant in the United States.’ … That’s 100% sure. … They’re going to say, ‘We’re moving back. You want us to move to Michigan?’ And I’ll say, ‘Yeah.'”

However, even as commander in chief, Trump wouldn’t have the legal authority to apply tariffs to Mexican imports protected under the North American Free Trade Agreement. All tariffs, which includes those applied against automotive products defined in the agreement, were lifted by January 1, 2008 or earlier.

Following the speech, Ford reconfirmed its plan to invest $9 billion in U.S. facilities in the next four years.

The latest volley aimed at Ford is a continuation of threat made in June 2015, when the Republican presidential candidate hopeful said, “Let me give you the bad news: every car, every truck and every part manufactured in this plant that comes across the border, we’re going to charge you a 35 percent tax — OK? — and that tax is going to be paid simultaneously with the transaction. They are going to take away thousands of jobs.”

During the same speech on Friday, Trump condemned Japanese imports, even though a number of Japanese manufacturers have set up assembly facilities within the United States.

“I want those cars made in Michigan. The Japanese can do them, but let them make them here,” he said.

This comes after another false claim made by Trump in June 2015, where he stated you can’t find a Chevrolet in Japan.

[Image: Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)]

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287 Comments on “Donald Trump Still Doesn’t Understand How NAFTA Works...”


  • avatar
    -Nate

    Considering all the money he’s lost , it’s not surprising he doesn’t understand basic business .

    He panders to the droolers , haters and mouth breathers .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      taxman100

      You’re right – nothing says intelligence and sophistication like allowing your country to have systemic trade deficits for decades and running you blue collar jobs out of the country, unfettered allowance of illegal immigration, and flooding your country with workers from everywhere else in order to keep white collar wages down too.

      Free trade is one thing – what the United States practices is crony-capitalism trade that benefits multinational corporations and other entities.

      The last year we had a trade surplus with Mexico was 1994 – in the last decade we have averaged over $60 billion a year trade deficit. Now that is sophistication!

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Slow down, taxman,
        No one is saying that trade deficits are a good thing – but if you want to deal with them, you have to understand the treaties in place. Seeing Trump shows so little interest in learning how relations with other countries actually work – it’s quite scary.

        • 0 avatar

          “No one is saying that trade deficits are a good thing”

          You are wrong – Paul Krugman, Nobel laureate and darling of the left, says that exact thing. And it is a good thing since you live beyond your means as long as the rest of the world has even bigger deficits which is given.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        “what the United States practices is crony-capitalism trade that benefits multinational corporations and other entities. ”

        Entities as in, Those making billions off of new York real estate sold at sillyprices to banksters…..

        The Trumpster is one of the cronies. And furthermore, that is why, and entirely why, he has the money to independently fund a run for president. Not because he is “good at making deals” in some abstract dense. Hard to make much in the way of deals, when you don’t even bother to know the very basics of what it is you are purporting to “negotiate” over.

        As long as it’s all talk and banter, who cares. But if the clown genuinely believes in his own BS, as he well may, he will no doubt continue the unbroken record, going back to Jefferson, of Presidents being worse at it, than the already bad one preceding him. And the equally unbroken record of the decline accelerating with every one of them, as well.

      • 0 avatar
        ScarecrowRepair

        Yes, sophisticated claptrap like there even being such things as trade deficits. They don’t exist. The figures quoted are artificially created by ignoring specific kinds of trade.

        The truth is easy to know if you think for five seconds. Every dollar sent overseas from buying imported goods MUST come back to the US unless the foreigners are stupid enough to shred them or light cigars with them. And they only way those dollars can come back is to buy US goods. There is no such thing as a trade deficit. It is a figment of accounting to scare simple minds and collect votes and power.

        It’s incredibly basic economics, not to mention common sense. Anyone who screams about trade taking away jobs is an unthinking alarmist.

        • 0 avatar
          taxman100

          Actually, they are using those dollars to buy U.S. government debt, or oil from Venezuela, or any other item they may want. Since Mexico buys $200 billion of U.S. assets, but sells us $260 billion (leaving out the drug trade), and has for years, clearly Mexico, China, etc. they finding better uses for those dollars. Even the dollars returned to U.S. corporations via buying their goods are finding better uses – stock buybacks, paying out bonuses to executives, lobbying D.C., etc.

          There is no requirement they be returned to the United States in any manner other than their own choosing. If you want to say the value of those dollars live in perpetuity, in a theoretical sense you are correct.

          “Free trade” is just another tool created as a way to allow the United States government to continue to rack up huge budget deficits. That value can also be destroyed via being held on the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve, which can only release it thru inflation.

          That is the reason Trump will not be elected President – the entire rickety system is dependent on a massive transfer of wealth to Washington D.C., via trade, inflation, etc., which is why every establishment member in “both’ political parties want him out, and by any means necessary. Trump may be a jerk, but he is merely a canary in the coal mine for what will be coming in the next economic downturn.

          When it was only working class people being hurt, not enough people cared, but now that the system needs to eat white collar middle-class/upper middle class jobs to survive, people are starting to take notice. I’m getting closer to retirement, so I only have skin the game for about another decade. It is the younger generations that get the luxury of a lifetime of comparatively lousy pay and benefits, higher taxes, etc. to what I got when I was in in my 20’s. The benefits packages and perks from Corporate America are a joke today for anyone outside the C-suite.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        The US uses the surpluses it runs on capital account and in trade in services to buy goods from other countries, which adds to the prosperity of Americans. This has been the case for decades, and continues to be.

        As a percentage of GDP, manufacturing has been at about 12% for a number of years. The value of US manufacturing output (measured on constant dollars, so as to remove inflation) has almost doubled since 1990. After a drop in the 2007-2009 recession, the value of manufacturing output has risen every year since 2009, and is now at a record high level.

        Manufactured goods also make up the great majority of US exports.

        The nature of manufacturing in North America has changed, and become much more sophisticated. This reduces the number of “production” jobs, but demands higher skills in those production jobs. It also creates many more jobs outside of actual production, which promotes growth in those areas.

        Yes, that is sophisticated. Unlike your thoughtless rant, and the lies and stupidity coming from Trump.

        • 0 avatar
          ScarecrowRepair

          The change in manufacturers echoes the previous changes in farming. Used to be 90% of the population was farmers, now it’s less than 1%. Losing manufacturing jobs while retain manufacturing value is a good thing because it’s what allows other industries to hire. Making it policy to retain the same number of manufacturing jobs would stifle progress and keep the economy in the doldrums. It would be exactly as smart as requiring 90% of the population to work in agriculture.

          It’s called creative destruction, and it’s the only way an economy and its society can progress.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Ugh….Why do people keep saying that Free Trade isn’t Free Trade? This is exactly what Free Trade looks like. You lower trade barriers so that larger players who have capital can invest in foreign territories to exploit their workers at a lower cost while not dealing with first world environmental concerns. If you don’t want free trade, stop asking for it.

        Crony capitalism is a made up term by the right to avoid discussing the fact that neoliberalism in economics (what we call Free Trade’s broader economic model) is the right-wing’s bread and butter. Changing that model depletes their billionaire beneficiaries and denies them a core election dollar donor.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          US foreign policy is based upon the access those “larger players” have to foreign property, resources and workers.

          The moment a foreign government puts the brakes upon unfettered profiteering to help its country or workers it is treated as a direct threat to the USA. We then see coup’s or outright military intervention.

          Trump can say all that he wants but no one with real power is going let him do anything that stupid (unless they can profit by it).

          Trump is preying upon the fears of the populace. It makes for a cheep campaign. He is living proof that there is no such thing as bad publicity.

      • 0 avatar
        aajax

        If you want to pay American prices for everything made in Mexico, fine. I sure don’t. Freedom means being able to trade with anyone you want to trade with without government interference. Our wealth is measured by what we can purchase, not who we give a job to.

    • 0 avatar
      TomHend

      Nate, your head will pop open in November when Trump wins 60-30.

  • avatar

    That’s because he thinks that it may explode in his face. You know, oil production.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Regardless as to how/what one feels about Trump, way too many people, including journalists, are missing the larger narrative regarding his ascent and the possible ascent of a much broader populist movement that his candidacy possibly foretells.

    This is not an opinion about Trump being smart/dumb, moral/immoral, etc.

    The shrinking middle class and rapidly growing working class (that is, people who used to make what was considered to be middle class wages, but now literally make just enough to disqualify them from EBT/SNAP, medicaid, aid to families with dependent children, and the other major forms of social welfare) are coalescing into a new group of voters who despise both the Republican AND Democratic Establishment, viewing them as being both equally beholden to Wall Street, corporations and the multiglobalism that can be demonstrably proven to be one of the big factors in driving down their wages, standard of living and other former larger share of the American-GDP and even GNP sourced pie.

    In other words, it doesn’t matter what Trump says at this point, and whether what he says on policy is legal, technically correct,or even, in some instances, logical.

    Trump is the one candidate with name recognition who is easily vaccuming up a groundswell of support of tens of millions (soon to be maybe over 56 million OR MAYBE even 60 million votes in a general election if he wins the GOP nomination?) of middle and working class people in the U.S., who are merely convinced that the elites have gained absolute control over both the Republican & Democratic Parties, and will vote for anyone who now convinces them that they represent even a shot at improving their livelihood by reversing what I would refer to as –

    – their downhill economic fortunes ever since Bush I set up China’s MFN status AND NAFTA on a tee for Bill Clinton to implement both with a necessary assist from a Republican Congress –

    – while we had a multi-trillion taxpayer financed bailout of big banking & Wall Street signed off on by both major parties in the wake of 2008, that truly did overwhelmingly enrich those who held the bulk of financial assets (versus labor) –

    – and the fact that ongoing trade pacts such as TPP are being furthered by both Republicans and Democrats alike.

    If people are debating Trump’s specific comments at this late stage, they’re missing the entire point that is a grass roots movement that was already fomenting, and that his candidacy just happened to immesh itself with in terms of timing.

    I do not believe it to be hyperbole or an exaggeration to state that there’s a real possibility that a large plurality or even MAJORITY of adult Americans who now have grave doubts about the legitimacy of BOTH the Republican and Democratic Parties in the sense that they may spew different rhetoric on social wedge issues from time to time, but in deed and fact, collude on almost all other issues, including matters concerning globalization and its relationship to commerce and the ever decreasing worth/value per unit of American labor’s worth.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      “…Trump is the one candidate with name recognition who is easily vaccuming up a groundswell of support of tens of millions ”

      No he is not.

    • 0 avatar
      Von

      Spot on, politicians on both sides have failed us for the last 30 years (hmm, almost as long as GM’s been on the downhill, coincidence?). A vote for trump is a message that we want someone/something that works for us. A trump presidency will likely be terrible, but not getting the message across that we want change is worse still.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      DW, as always, you offer great insight. But at this juncture it is highly unlikely to me that Trump will get the GOP nomination. The GOP is apoplectic about not being able to control their candidate/nominee since Trumnp is self-funded.

      Anything is possible of course, but so unlikely that even Las Vegas is not willing to offer wagering odds on the likelihood of a Trump GOP nomination.

      As an Independent I have no dog or pony in this show, but I do believe that Hillary will be elected POTUS in Nov 2016 even though the ONLY candidate with actual governing experience still standing today is Kasich of Ohio.

      Oba will simply pardon Hillary for her sins like Ford pardoned Nixon and all will be well again in the kingdom.

      I have enormous respect and admiration for Donald Trump and his accomplishments but Trump is all about and only about Trump, not about we, the people. Never has been. Never will be.

      Talk is cheap. Playing on the people’s anger just a cheap but effective tactic. It won’t get him elected POTUS, with or without the GOP nomination.

      I’ll be voting for Gary Johnson again this go’round.

    • 0 avatar
      gasser

      DW, usually I dont’ agree with you, but today you and I are spot on. A declining middle class, (both in numbers and buying power) the incredible inequality of wealth demonstrated in cities like New York and Los Angeles (generated, in part by very favorable tax arrangements) and a seemingly totally unresponsive political system by both establishment Democrats and Republicans, has propelled Trump to the forefront. Massive donations by corporations to the political system has so skewed the playing field that there is a pervasive feeling of disenfranchisement by voters. Trump has realized this. How else does one explain that in the same year we see both Sanders and Trump running outside of their established party pathways?

    • 0 avatar
      zososoto

      Well said DW.

      I was raised by conservatives, and people would consider me liberal according to my beliefs. However, I have no loyalties to any political party, sports team, brand, or religion. That list is not coincidental.

      I support Bernie Sanders. He seems to be a mostly honest and ideologically consistent politician that fights for what many people can agree is right. I am surprised and ecstatic that he exists in the first place, and that he has made it as far as he has. Two years ago, my cynicism would make me doubt that his campaign could even be possible.

      However, I am also excited about Donald Trump. He has proven himself to be a very effective human being. His manipulation of the media, gop, and the conservative base has been masterful. He has also positioned himself in open defiance of our oligarchs. He said “they lied about iraq” (had to walk it back the next day). He said the fed needed to be investigated. He reminded everyone that Saudi Arabians were behind 9/11, though he couldn’t mention them by name. Newt Gingrich said, live on fox news, that the elite didn’t like trump because he was not part of their SECRET SOCIETIES, and he had not taken the INITIATION RITES, and they can’t control him. https://youtu.be/dO-NA73FsW8

      Though I find his rhetoric troubling for various reasons, I have been telling my friends that I am open to the idea of supporting trump in a trump vs hrc ballot. They did not take it very well. I find it amusing either way because I’ve been on both sides. Liberals think they’re smarter than conservatives, and conservatives think they are more intelligent about the real world (street smarts). I’m fine with discussing trump’s many flaws, but to decry him because “he’s an idiot!” or “he’s evil!” is indicative of fear and cognitive dissonance griping the mind, not reason.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        Its been often said that the GOP base would rather have Hillary as Prez rather than Trump for obvious reasons. At least Clinton is establishment and she represents the status quo for the next eight years. The GOP base will continue to make money under Hillary. Under Trump? Who knows. Spin a dice.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Spot on, DW.

      Trump knows damn well he can’t slap a 35% tariff on Mexican made Fords unless Congress signs on. He knows damn well he can’t build a giant wall between here and Mexico AND force Mexico to make it (what’s he gonna do – threaten to nuke Mexico City?). He knows damned well he can’t start forcing Muslims to register.

      But he’s smart enough to know that there are tens of millions of Americans who only know that all this xenophobic nonsense (and make no mistake, the stupid “35% tariff” stuff is all about Mexico, since he’s not saying that the same tariff would apply to Canadian-made cars) sounds great. To these folks, he’s “speaking the truth,” even though there’s no “truth” to any of it – it’s all just nonsense that sounds good to people who don’t know any better than to buy into it. It’s little different than the nonsense spouted by the “know nothings” 150 years ago. Same garbage, different target (Mexicans and Muslims instead of European immigrants).

      Trump is, if nothing else, a consummate economic insider. You don’t make as much money as he has without knowing exactly how things work economically. In this light, his followers’ belief that he’s an “outsider” is almost comical. Trump knows damn well he’s blathering but is willing to let people buy it.

      Sad, really.

    • 0 avatar

      Brilliant post DW. People are fed up with PS and empty promises. Eroding middle class ends up with one of the options – far right or far left. That’s what happened in Russia and Germany and in both cases communists and nationalists fought each other in civil war or street fights and one side took over to the detriment of another (death camp). America unlike Germany or Russian empire is a democratic country and things proceed here in much more milder form but the essence is the same.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “People are fed up with PS and empty promises.”

        Unfortunately that’s a lot of what Trump is selling…or do we REALLY think he’s going to be able to force Mexico to build a huge wall on our border?

        The people who are fed up aren’t realizing (or are too fed up to realize) that Trump’s promises are probably emptier than the broken promises they already bought into.

        • 0 avatar

          Mexico vitally depends on US. US can force Mexico to do anything. But real solution is bringing standard of living in Mexico to international standards i.e. expanding middle class. That was the role of US in the world, not building walls.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Jean-Marie Le Pen & Geert Wilders (right-wing Dutch politician), as well as many European right wing/nationalistic politicians are trying to cite Trump as an example of a broader pushback by the grass roots against further globalization –

        Si j’étais américain, je voterais Donald TRUMP… Mais que Dieu le protège !
        — Jean-Marie Le Pen (@lepenjm) February 27, 2016

        I hope @realDonaldTrump will be the next US President. Good for America, good for Europe. We need brave leaders. pic.twitter.com/FWJSaQdClM
        — Geert Wilders (@geertwilderspvv) December 7, 2015

        What we have here, possibly, and especially if Trump is the GOP Nominee and garners somewhere in the neighborhood of 57+ million (anything more than 59 million puts him in a position to beat Clinton) votes, is the making of a rejection of ongoing, further globalization by huge swaths of people in Europe and the U.S., especially if BREXIT HAPPENS (Brits vote to leave the EU).

        It matters not whether Trump is sincere, accurate, truthful, etc. – it lends further confirmation to the real possibility that the massive globalization that has taken place since the early 1980s is seeing wholesale rejection now by large pluralities or even a majority of many westerners.

        This nationalism will affect commerce, military cooperation, migration and many other substantive matters.

        • 0 avatar
          wmba

          Well said DW.

          What everyone forgets in these free-trade deals is the dispute resolution mechanisms, wherein some panel or other decides whether a country or country’e company has broken the rules and needs to pay some foreign company for “lost” profits, called ISDS. And there’s nothing any Supreme Court can do about it, or Trump stamping around like a wounded rhino, since it is an over-riding feature of the deal inserted by our global corporate dictators to make sure we all become good little serfs. All countries lose sovereignty over certain aspects of what they thought was their own business.

          If there was ever a reason to not ratify the TPP free trade deal coming up, there’s the best one. Right now this aspect is flying under the radar, because guess who owns the MSM? Right.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            6 corporations own every network, cable outlet, newspaper, radio station, magazine, etc.

            6.

            *With the exception of PBS/NPR, which interestingly, now get more funding from corporations than individual donors.

          • 0 avatar
            aajax

            The TPP dispute resolution mechanisms are aimed at preventing nationalistic boobs like Trump from interfering with our right to trade freely and are very well thought out. Unless national security is involved, no one should have the right to interfere with my trading with whomever I want. Otherwise that just becomes one more thing for politicians to sell to the highest bidder.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      DeadWeight – I do agree that he is surfing the waves of electoral discontent.

      Even if he does get elected, he will just go down in history as one more politician that promised the moon and delivered a pebble.

    • 0 avatar
      wstarvingteacher

      I am reminded of the Jerry Clowers (sp?) tape about being in a tree with a coon who was clawing him badly. He urged his companion below to shoot the coon and was told that he couldn’t safely do it. Clowers responded that he should just “just shoot on up here, one of us needs some relief”. I think this election is clawing me to death and hope that someone just shoots up here because I need some relief. I started being pretty disgusted about 14-15 years ago and as DW says (much more eloquently than I) I trust neither party.I consider myself an independent but I do have one candidate who doesn’t disgust me. Since he would some of you, I won’t mention his name.

      I think we are probably the laughing stock of the planet right now. Election years always seem they will never end and (although I hadn’t thought of this before) I guess they are all leap years so longer than usual. What a dog and pony show.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        I garrontee you……

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Ross Perot was short, skinny, had big ears, and spoke with a southern drawl, but Perot was amazingly clairvoyant in his predictions about what implementation of NAFTA would reap.

        • 0 avatar
          Robert.Walter

          If GB can make an EU brexit, why can’t the US make a NAFTA naexit?

          It would seem that treaties that don’t serve should be renegotiated or abrogated.

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          The reality is that NAFTA, WTO and other free(r) trade agreements have been a benefit to the US, not a detriment. The data from independent studies bear this out, but the deniers don’t want to recognize it.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Even given benefit to the currency, Fedgov, or economy, eviscerating US industry has not been beneficial to the American people as a whole.

            Continually growing population + fewer real jobs = ?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            People keep bemoaning the loss of “good jobs”, especially those in manufacturing. Jobs you could get and make $60-80K annually, but did not require much in the way of education, initiative or creativity.

            Let’s be honest: those jobs are GONE, and they aren’t coming back. Today, people need to have:
            – work ethic, including the willingness to work 80 hours some weeks to get the job done
            – in demand skills
            – industry knowledge
            – ability to communicate effectively

            I frankly don’t meet a lot of people with those qualities who lack for work or decent pay. So when I evaluate politicians, I am looking for those who will provide a foundation for increasing our supply of these workers. Which translates into a rational tax policy that favors productivity, focus on education and willingness to be honest about building a culture of hard work and commitment to community.

            Kasich, Sanders, and occasionally Rubio often touch on elements of this. Nobody seems to have put it together, though.

    • 0 avatar
      01 Deville

      Great post! Much better than Cadillace stalker trolling.
      I wish American Public was aware of the con job being played on them, but most of them are enjoying their $300 TVs from Walmart made in China.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Trump is smart enough to play the white supremacist card to get elected. Trump is just a progressive in sheep clothing.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Great post DW. Makes a lot of sense to me and well reasoned. I don’t pretend to be an expert on trade agreements so I must ask a perhaps obvious question. Why couldn’t he repeal, renegotiate or even breach NAFTA?

      I’m not saying that’s a good idea or that I like Trump. But when you base an argument on Trump not being unable to lawfully do something because it is provided for by what is, essentially, a contract, it seems kind of unconvincing in light of practical realities. Companies, people and governments break and renegotiate contracts all the time. And under U.S. law, trade agreements aren’t entitled to Constitutional protection. They are considered the same as any law, meaning they can be modified or repealed. I mean, Bush did it unilaterally with the ABM Treaty in 2002, and the courts declined to interfere. Jimmy Carter did it too, and the Supreme Court declined to intervene. See Goldwater v. Carter.

      What’s Mexico going to do if the U.S. decides to repeal NAFTA? Even if international law offers some recourse, who will enforce it?

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        I also don’t agree with DW too often, but this time I do. I’d like to add that one other reason the Donald is resonating with some people is that he appeals to those who have been sampling the future of the world and don’t like what they see. The don’t like gay marriage, the fact that white males will no longer be in control, the continual erosion of the traditional family model, less religion, an on and on. Frankly, all of these candidates – on both sides – are very poor choices. None are even remotely centrist. I find it hard to believe that any of these people resonate with the majority of the voters. None appeal to me, that’s for sure.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Trump, being the person with name recognition at this time in American History who has tossed his hat into the political ring in a populist format, is tapping into two very fundamental/strong prongs of American middle class/working class anger & backlash:

          1) Economic globalization and anything-but-free free trade agreements that have deeply cut and continue to deeply gut (in structural, permanent ways) the economic health of perhaps as much as 70% of the 158 million Americans who are classified by the BLS as being employed full time:

          2) Political correctness and politicians who reference the best interests of the global community as taking precedent (implicitly; look at how much the U.S. has spent on overseas military interventionism since 1988 versus domestically on infrastructure projects, as just one of many examples of this implicit preference for things global).

          Trump is a larger, louder Ross Perot, who also speaks to political correctness and not just non-free free trade, and who has historical math and data to cite (which Perot did not as NAFTA & China’s MFN status had yet to be implemented), which is why he probably can turn Perot’s 19% of the popular vote back in the late 80s into potentially a very large plurality or even majority of the vote if this election does not feature a 3rd party candidate, and why Trump can ruin the Republican Party’s chances of a presidential win and absolutely guarantee massive Democratic gains in both chambers of Congress if the GOP goes down a brokered convention path.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            I think Trump will end up running as an independent, with Hillary and the Dems being the ultimate beneficiaries. Due to the millions being poured into discrediting Trump now, coupled with the caucus system, I think Cruz will be able to keep it just close enough for them to end up with a brokered convention, which will allow the GOP to run Cruz or an establishment candidate like Romney or Walker.

            I’m not a political junky but it seems obvious to me that the smart thing for the GOP to have done would have been to rally around Trump and then rebranded itself as the party of discontent that has made this extreme necessary after 8 years of Obama. They then could have focused on establishment candidates in Senate and House races to counter the Trump presidency and hopefully kept him in check.

            But they have decided to go balls out anti-Trump, which is splintering their own party and bringing out even more disaffected voters in support of Trump.

            That’ll hand Hillary the White House, because Cruz is a Christian right winger who won’t fly in the Blue States and won’t have the disaffected votes to counterbalance that. Trump will surely pull those away with an independent candidacy. If the GOP decides to deep six both Trump and Cruz, Cruz may well take the conservative votes in an independent bid of his own and the GOP could end up bringing up the rear in a four person race.

            The ripple effect will be Republicans taking a beating in other offices. That’ll give us a complete Democrat domination and four years of the wealth gap increasing, continued entitlement programs, increasing taxes, and trade deficits. And, very likely, amnesty for illegal immigrants who, rightly or wrongly, have also drawn the ire of the 70% you speak of.

            What’ll be interesting to see is what happens after that. I also think that Trump is foretelling something big that’s going to happen within the next 4 years or so. He’s a blowhard and a loudmouth, but too many people are voting for him to simply dismiss this or simply focus on what a douche Trump is.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            superde –

            Cruz will get CRUSHED by Trump in Ohio*, Michigan, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, California (super delegate rich), Washington, Colorado, New York (super delegate rich), and many other northern and western states, as Cruz’s main strength (and limiting one, the) is a narrow appeal to hardcore evangelicals, whereas Trump is tapping into much broader socioeconomic and global concerns& anxieties middle and working class people of moderate religious persuasions and affiliations (the majority of GOP voters in these delegate rich states) have.

            I honestly believe Cruz will do really badly vis-a-vis Trump in nearly every state I’ve listed above, and that Cruz may even lose other southern states to Trump, in addition to Florida, such as Mississippi, etc.

            I don’t understand how Cruz doesn’t falter tomorrow and on May 15th, to be perfectly honest, and see his delegate deficit with Trump worsen substantially.

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            DW…just another question. What makes a delegate super?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            That’s right, DW,
            Unless Cruz or Rubio are able to win in Florida, Illinois or Ohio next Tuesday – all winner-take-all states, Trump runs the table.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Republican Party doesn’t have super delegates; only Democratic Party does.

            I should written “delegate rich super states” instead above, meaning California, Florida and New York, which have 172, 99 and 95, respectively.

            Here’s a list of total delegates by state re GOP primary/caucus states:

            http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P16/R-Alloc.phtml

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            DW – I respect that view and it certainly is logical given how Trump is performing but I don’t think that’s a given, that Cruz will get crushed. If things continue to where they’re going, yes absolutely. But the Republican establishment is pulling out all the stops to discredit him now. And they will be able to find plenty of ammo, from the race card to his business deals and practices.

            It would be difficult for anybody to withstand such an attack. But assuming that he can, you think the GOP will stand behind him? I think they’re starting to go too far for that, which will mean they will put up a stooge and Trump will run as an independent. I don’t think they absolutely have to pick him even if he gets the most delegates yes? What are your thoughts on that?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Economic globalization – the USA has been forcing the neoliberal Milton Friedman model of economics on multiple countries. The result is similar to what we see occurring in the USA. Government and their services gets hollowed out and contracted out. Capitalistic unfettered “free” trade gets implemented and workers and the middle to lower class lose jobs and income. Education and any “social” benefits get chopped or dropped.

            Eventually people complain and start to fight back but hey, the Patriot act and similar “security” initiatives have that covered.

            Damn hard to talk about this stuff without sounding like one is part of the tinfoil hat crowd.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “Government and their services gets hollowed out and contracted out.”

            I would have to disagree with you there Lou_BC. In America, government and their services are invasive, overwhelming and stifling.

            Ask anyone who ever ran a business in America.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @HDC-

            “I would have to disagree with you there Lou_BC. In America, government and their services are invasive, overwhelming and stifling.”

            I’m not talking about small businesses. When Bush II was in power both Rumsfeld and Cheney refused to divest themselves of shares and resign from corporate boards. Both profited immensely. Haliburton for example was given “cost plus” contracts during the Gulf War version II and they still get similar contracts.

            Pundits used to say that a revolving door existed between corporate America and Government. Some experts are now saying those revolving doors have been replaced with archways.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      You have a lot of details but I will say it in a simple way. Historically, we have plenty of examples, when governments become detached from the people, one of 2 things happen – full blown revolution or election of a radical. when I say radical, I don’t mean extremist, just someone with completely different message. Russia, Germany, Iran, Italy, China. You can probably point into any place on the world map and see this happened. And America is not immune from this.

    • 0 avatar
      TomHend

      Exactly, go to Conservative Tree House, this guy (and it is not a Trump owned site says the author)has been 100% correct about Trump since last June.

      Also known as The Last Refuge

  • avatar

    #1 THE US ECONOMY RISES AND FALLS ON THE JOB MARKET

    #2 America has fewer than 321,000,000 people and it’s attempting to compete against Asia’s 3,000,000,000+ living in poverty, working class, who is able to do our manufacturing jobs and our low-end work for 1/10th the cost of hiring an American.

    AMERICANS CAN NOT COMPETE WITH SLAVE LABOR.

    Labor in Asia is CHEAP.

    With the loss of our low-end factory jobs, we now see more “Flints” and “Detroits” and “Down south depression” There is nothing to offer these people but WELFARE.

    As a Republican I HATE THE WELFARE STATE.

    COMPETITION is what makes America stronger.

    WELFARE is a lack of competition and a race to the bottom.

    #3 THE BIGGEST LIE TOLD is that ur economy s made stronger by CONSUMER SENDING.

    The only thing that grows an economy is PRODUCTION.

    Our economy (as of now) is based on DEBT. America is exporting worthless dollars in exchange for manufactured goods (from Asia mostly) and it’s coming back to us in the form of INFLATION.

    #4 Donald Trump is a PROTECTIONIST and ANGRY at what he sees is the ripping off of the American people.

    #5 Student loans have put the generations below me so deep in debt that they’ll be INDENTURED SERVANTS unable to afford a house or a car for the forseeable future. Gains they make when their parents die will be eaten up by personal debt. INHERITANCE…what INHERITANCE?

    I am VOTING TRUMP 2016

    Watching Bernie Sanders COMMUNIST campaign BURN TO THE GROUND – and then watching Hillary ABANDONED by Bernie’s COMMUNIST SUPPORTERS will be the highlight of my year.

    Perhaps even more exciting than driving my new HELLCAT.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      #1: No. We live in capitalist economy, which rises and falls on the value of our capital.

      #2: No. Labor competes on value, not cost. For Americans to have good jobs, they need the skills valued by employers.

      #3: No. US debt as a % of GDP, including QE, has been essentially flat the last 5 years, ever since we exited the Great Recession

      #4: No. Trump isn’t angry. He’s clever. Clever at taking advantage of the anger of the fools who support him.

      #5: Student loan debt is indeed an issue, one that both Sanders and Clinton have actual plans to address. Trump has not even offered one of his small hands to people indentured by student loan dept. But that is who you support.

      Your understanding of politics is on par with your understanding of climate science.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy

        @VoGo: Trump’s appeal to his base is by channeling their feelings not with a plan for governance. Neither the gaffes, flip-flops, factual debunking or even his public flirting with authoritarianism can extinguish the appeal of this emotional connection.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        “#1: No. We live in capitalist economy, which rises and falls on the value of our capital.”

        Which is, as it has been for decades, entirely un-measurable, with all the financial and regulatory shenanigans that has been put in place in ever more brazen Hail Marys aimed at propping it up. All that has been accomplished, is a head fake that “we” are wealthier than our future income flows would dictate, hence can spend more. While in the process transferring what remains of “capital” from those who could make use of it, to those who are connected and clueless. As in, transferring ownership of a plot of fertile land and a tractor from a farmer to Donald Trump and a leasing company. Because, after being handed a billion or more of fresh print by the Fed, the latter can afford to “value” the “real estate” and “capital” higher…

        “#2: No. Labor competes on value, not cost. For Americans to have good jobs, they need the skills valued by employers.”

        Employers need opportunities to utilize the skills available. Employees to utilize the skills they have, in addition to improving, tailoring them to current needs. Meaning, fewer restrictions, less drag. Not ever increasing subsidies to reliably state apologist public sector union hacks, camouflaged as “student loans.”

        Take away the need of productive American labor to support a superstructure bent on building expensive bomb craters in Pakistan, handing 6 figure “pensions” to yahoos suckered by a previous generation of snake oil salesmen, making payments to banksters on “homes” that would cost a fraction were it not for Fed machinations and zoning nonsense, and general budybody idiocy dreamed up by the well connected and unproductive…… And while aging Americans may still have issues competing with 10 times as many, younger Asians, the situation wouldn’t be nearly as grave. Nor the problems widespread enough to underwrite a Donald Duck presidency.

        “#3: No. US debt as a % of GDP, including QE, has been essentially flat the last 5 years, ever since we exited the Great Recession”

        Government debt, for bomb crater construction etc. way up. Debt backed by “home value” chimeras, allowing already top 10% wealthy geriatrics to do nothing productive whatsoever, steady. Corporate debt for buying back stock, way up. Corporate debt used to fund actual capital improvements in private, competitively exposed, industry…… Since the frac boom, basically non existent. Which sort of debt “may” help support good, sustainable, productive jobs again?

        “#4: No. Trump isn’t angry. He’s clever. Clever at taking advantage of the anger of the fools who support him.”

        Even a broken clock……

        “#5: Student loan debt is indeed an issue, one that both Sanders and Clinton have actual plans to address. Trump has not even offered one of his small hands to people indentured by student loan dept. But that is who you support.”

        Student loan debt is a problem specifically because it is treated specially. Just like mortgages. Such that, it can grow beyond what it would have were things not so. Neither Clinton’s nor Sanders\'(though he at least probably means well) plans will do anything about that. All they are proposing, is putting other people on the hook for the loans, in addition to those the banksters can now come for.

        All possible “solutions” to student debt, would lead to noone lending money to anyone aside from the occasional Ivy League STEM student, at current tuition rates and recoverable returns to college education. Any “plan” that does not result in that, is not a plan. Just more shenanigans to hand banksters more money. Taken from those who don’t go to college. Or, do go and get a STEM degree at Ivy schools. The former are much more plentiful, are waking up to where it’s heading, and vote Trump.

        “Your understanding of politics is on par with your understanding of climate science.”

        And he ain’t the only one…..

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Stuki, interesting essay. You should submit it to the WSJ and/or Trump Magazine for publication.

          (I’m serious!)

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          “We live in capitalist economy, which rises and falls on the value of our capital…”

          I would argue that the ability of the US to sell bonds with exceptionally low interest rates, denominated in dollars, in very large numbers for decades (and the ability to repay those bonds) is the very measure of the value of our capital.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        #6 I don’t want to hear word “Clinton”, period

    • 0 avatar

      Where is that Hellcat engine made again?

      • 0 avatar
        Funky

        I know that I am pointing out the obvious (everybody here knows this) but somebody has to; the engine is built in Mexico. My Jeep Grand Cherokee had the Hemi engine. It ran properly only after I paid a very good technician at the local dealership to tune it properly (it did not run properly straight from the factory). It should have run properly from the start (since I bought the vehicle new; but it did not).

        • 0 avatar

          HELLCAT shoulda been build here in Murica

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Mexico is America. well, America’s.

            NAFTA says anything built in Mexico is considered “Murican”.

            No one in the USA ever looks north when bitching about NAFTA.

            You have all of these Anti-NAFTA/Mexico types bitch/moan/whine about the loss of American jobs but they conveniently ignore the fact that they are supporting NAFTA and Mexico when they buy stuff Hecho en Mexico.

            Gotta have that HellCat or Ram truck.

            You’ve made a lot of holes in that flag you happen to be wrapping yourself in.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “Watching Bernie Sanders COMMUNIST campaign…”

      And with this, BTSR confirms in five words that he has no idea what communism actually is.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        FreedMike – all of that cold war rhetoric lives on.

      • 0 avatar

        SOCIALISTS are people who are TOO STUPID to realize they are COMMUNISTS.

        THEFT is THEFT.

        If I work for something, NO ONE SHOULD BENEFIT BUT MYSELF.

        PERIOD.

        I’m not “part of the world”.

        I’m NOT part of the “international community”.

        I’m in this FOR MYSELF.

        NO – THERE WILL BE NO RIDE SHARING IN “MY HELLCAT”.

        You go buy your own.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @BTSR – coming from a guy who said in another thread that they were a sociopath.

          • 0 avatar

            At the end of the day… Regardless how you feel about my political commentary …I AM.

            I AM and will continue TO BE.

            if you want to waste time with rebuttals, have at it.

            I STILL AM.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “I am”

            That could be viewed as being stolen from the Bible Exodus 3:14

            or

            Molson’s Canadian “I Am” commercials.

            BUT

            since you are a YouTuber I’d have to say the later.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            “if you want to waste time with rebuttals, have at it.”

            The beauty of posting pure, unadulterated bluster and BS is that it really can’t be “rebutted” or disproven.

            Thus, BTSR “wins” every argument…because he blusters the loudest.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Lou_BC,

            I thought BTSR’s “I AM” comment was a reference to Descartes’ “I think therefore I am,” stripping away the unessential predicate.

            Could have been a misspelled Popeye reference too, who knows?

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          BTSR is a classic example of the sheep that follow Trump. In fact, other than his race, he could be the poster for the typical Trump follower.

          ….No one in the USA ever looks north when bitching about NAFTA…..

          They shouldn’t. Canada is pretty much an even playing field. Mexico is not.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            heavy handle –

            Descartes’ “je pense, donc je suis” or Cogito ergo sum.

            Je pense – I think

            Cognito – I think

            I’m not seeing cognition.

            “I AM and will continue TO BE.”

            Exodus 3:14

            And God said unto Moses, I Am That I Am: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I Am hath sent me unto you.

            Delusions of grandeur in this case is a better fit.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Well, glad to see BTSR has now corrected his inflammatory rhetoric to call Sanders a “socialist” versus a “communist.”

          I call that progress.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    If you went to a Trump speech from the mid-late 80’s it would be verbatim just with Japan replacing the countries of Mexico and China.

    • 0 avatar

      Take a look at Robocop 1, 2 and even 3.

      They saw this coming.

      Japanese takeovers of American corporations via Ziabatsus.

      What they couldn’t have seen was the rise of China – but even the writers of the 90’s saw it coming once they entered the WTO.

      There seems to be a collaborative effort to make America WEAK and RELIANT on 3rd world countries.

      When America battled the Soviet Union in the Cold War, we reached the moon FIRST. NASA created jobs that could not be outsourced – as no other country could do the jobs we were doing.

      NOW LOOK:

      We can’t even get a Space X off the pad and back on without exploding.

      TRUMP has my vote. I just have to wait for the poll to open.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Robocop is the new Nostradamus.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Robocop????????????

          Can someone say, “ZERO CREDIBILITY”

          “There seems to be a collaborative effort to make America WEAK and RELIANT on 3rd world countries.”

          If there is profit to be made!

          Someone who alleges to work in the financial sector should have some rudimentary understanding of that point.

          Homeland security exists to protect whom from which treat?

      • 0 avatar
        Whatnext

        What is interesting is how much hue and cry there was over Japanese economic ascendance and the manufacturing success that forced voluntary auto quotas. yet when when China came along, barely a peep. And yet Japan was a democratic ally, and China is a totalitarian foe. Very strange…

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Whatnext – there is a big difference between Japan and China in relation to trade.

          Japanese goods are made mostly by Japanese companies in Japan and exported to the USA.

          Chinese goods are made mostly by USA companies in China and exported to the USA.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        “We can’t even get a Space X off the pad and back on without exploding.”

        With 22 Falcon 9 launches and only one total failure (all 21 reached orbit), Math really isn’t your strong suit is it?

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          yeah. *Nobody* has landed a rocket back on the ground after carrying out an actual mission. SpaceX has been intelligent enough to make landing the booster stage always a *secondary* goal, to be attempted once the primary mission (which they get paid for) is successful.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            >> yeah. *Nobody* has landed a rocket back on the ground after carrying out an actual mission.

            Yes, they have.

            “SpaceX landed the Falcon 9 first stage in a real mission that included the deployment of 11 Orbcomm satellites by the second stage.”

            http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/219824-spacex-makes-history-successfully-lands-falcon-9-rocket-following-orbital-launch

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “Take a look at Robocop 1, 2 and even 3.”

        Yeah, they all featured privatization of public services, like police. Now, gee, BTSR, what side of the political aisle has been hell bent on this for decades? Why, it’s YOUR side. Amazing, no?

        But I’m sure the irony of that is lost on you.

      • 0 avatar
        DougD

        Wasn’t the NASA space program helped along by German scientists from the Nazi missile program and British/Canadian engineers from Avro? Collaborative effort man, none of this would’ve happened if they’d built the Arrow…

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Paperclip

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          The Arrow, as pretty and capable as it was, was a dead end. The Russians built the MiG-25 Foxbat (which was very similar to the Arrow in capability and mission) and discovered that it had no real function in a world of high-altitude missile anti-aircraft defense and distinct lack of high-altitude supersonic bombers to intercept.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yup, the “high-altitude missile anti-aircraft defense” also caused the demise of the XB-70 program, after both of the prototypes crashed.

            And out of that the Triad philosophy was honed utilizing MIRV ICBMs, LR Bombers with Nuclear Cruise Missiles and Submarine-launched Nuclear BMs, alongside the local tactical B61 nuclear delivery systems of Germany, Holland and Belgium F104G aircraft.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            “..after both of the prototypes crashed”

            Not quite right. Air Vehicle 2 was involved in a mid-air collision while on a demonstration flight with several century-series fighters. An F-104 lost control and struck the XB-70 causing it to lose control and crash. One of the two pilots was killed in the crash. The other XB-70 is at the Air Force Museum in Dayton.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Thanks, I stand corrected. I was stationed in Germany when all this went down.

            I did see the footage of the F104 losing control in the vortex in a movie shown at Commander’s Call.

            A long, long time ago in a place far, far away…….

    • 0 avatar
      Von

      I don’t think trump cares where the jobs go, he uses immigrant labor in his own businesses as much as he can to save cost.

      He’s just using base public sentiment, he’s got his own game once he’s POTUS.

    • 0 avatar

      Trump still references Japan eating our lunch in speeches/debates. I’m not sure if he doesn’t realize that the Japan of 2016 isn’t the Japan of 1980, or if he just figures his audience doesn’t.

  • avatar
    Whittaker

    Treaties can be re-negotiated, mitigated or broken.
    To imply otherwise is to not understand history.

    I am not a Trump fan.
    But considering his resume, it is likely he is setting a hard line against Mexico to leave himself room to negotiate back to a less harsh position that gets him some of want he wants…more manufacturing in the US and the resulting jobs.

    • 0 avatar
      xtoyota

      All Trumps needs to do is get a law passed that penalizes American companies who builds off shore …a special tax on the products built off shore … this would not affect any trade agreements.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Um, no.
        xToyota, the core of trade deals is agreement to lower tariffs on imported goods. If you start violating that agreement, then the other nations will all retaliate, reducing exports.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Bottom line, Trump is the White man’s Obama. Instead of Black Panthers have been traded in the kkk. Both great salesmanship that knows their buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      He’s fighting the tide. American manufacturing jobs are disappearing because of automation, not cheap foreign labor. China itself is losing manufacturing jobs, because machines are cheaper than labor.

      Smart economists and politicians focus on setting the foundation for growth in the high value jobs of the current century, not the last century.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        It would violate both WTO and NAFTA, for starters. And due to its openly discriminatory nature, it would likely violate US domestic law, as well.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “American manufacturing jobs are disappearing because of automation, not cheap foreign labor.”

        It’s both. But in any case, there isn’t anything that anyone can do about it that wouldn’t compromise the GDP golden goose that keeps the US at the top of the economic heap. We’re exporting inflation, and all American consumers benefit from the ability to acquire cheap goods.

        • 0 avatar

          At the same time, the increasing complexity of vehicles means more parts than ever before being made by more and more auto and auto supplier workers. As efficiency drives down the need for labor, the complexity of vehicles drives it up.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Cars are somewhat different because labor doesn’t contribute that much to the cost of the car (although there are still incentives to reduce labor costs because the money that can be saved should end up in the bottom line.)

            Also, there are still enough regional differences in tastes and preferences that it makes some sense to build locally. The world car mostly isn’t.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “the increasing complexity of vehicles means more parts than ever”

            That’s only true for ICE vehicles. EVs eliminate quite a few parts. If their share of the market increases, there is a point where some suppliers would be hit hard.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          …We’re exporting inflation, and all American consumers benefit from the ability to acquire cheap goods…..

          They do initially, until the amount of people who can afford the goods begins to decline due to their jobs disappearing…not everybody can work in a service economy…a strong economic model provides employment for all skill levels, not just the most highly trained and educated.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            golden2husky – “a strong economic model provides employment for all skill levels, not just the most highly trained and educated”

            …….shudder………..

            Sounds socialist to me.

            or is that Communist?

            Paging BTSR

            Paging BTSR

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      It’s more likely he’s setting a hard line against Mexico to pick up votes from people who don’t know any better than to buy into his B.S. The guy knows he won’t be able to deliver on any of the blather he’s running on.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    The list of policy topics that Donald Trump bloviates about where he is either ignorant and/or lying would make for a very long post.

  • avatar
    50merc

    Mr. Stevenson is one of those journalistic Pecksniffs who hope to alter public opinion by leaping onto something Trump has said that is incorrect, foolish, ignorant and just plain bombast. It doesn’t work.

    Trump is riding high because of his attitude, not his erudition.

    This is the year of the Howard Beale voter: “I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take it any more!”

    • 0 avatar

      I’ve got no skin in the game. Check my passport.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        Ultimately we all have skin in the game, literally. The world is a different place with Trump being the most powerful man in the world.

        Guy doesnt know what the nuclear triad is but he’ll be quite happy to use it, against the families of terrorists even.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Mark Stevenson – indirectly we have a lot of skin in this game.

        I saw a newscast where three political pundits were asked, “What would happen to Canada if Trump gets elected?”
        One said his import duties and other policies if implemented would cripple Canada at best and at worst trigger a new global depression.
        Another said that if elected it is highly unlikely that anyone would actually let him implement anything he has said. IIRC the other felt that a mixed bag of tricks could occur.

        Generally speaking, building walls literally and/or through trade tariffs isn’t going to be good for Canada.

        Indirectly if the guy decides to get aggressive in the Middle East with full scale war that instability would put upward pressure on oil prices.

        • 0 avatar
          mikey

          Do we have skin in the game ?

          “Living with the you {the USA} is in some ways, like sleeping with an elephant. No matter how friendly, and even tempered, is the beast, if I can call it that. One is effected by every twitch , and grunt.”

          Pierre Trudeau

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @mikey – great quote.

            We now need to play: The Guess Who’s American Woman.

            American woman, said get away
            American woman, listen what I say
            Don’t come a-hangin’ around my door
            Don’t wanna see your face no more
            I don’t need your war machines
            I don’t need your ghetto scenes
            Coloured lights can hypnotize
            Sparkle someone else’s eyes
            Now woman, get away from me
            American woman, mama, let me be

            Ironically that song predates NAFTA.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Right, because Howard Beale would have made a fab president.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The guy makes promises that he can’t keep, and you can safely assume that much of what he says is a lie. In other words, a born politician.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      the real problem with that is most of what he says he’ll do, the president has no legal authority to do. He says he’ll slap punitive taxes on Ford for building cars in Mexico? Might want to look into “bill of attainder” before believing he’ll do that.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      The only promise that Trump has made that is likely to come to fruition is the elimination of the Federal budget deficit and national debt.
      He’s already done it four times, and just needs to find the proper jurisdiction of Bankruptcy Court.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    It’s a shame he can’t just say, “It’s 2016!” and smile at the camera for every question.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Darth Trump is better.

    youtube.com/watch?v=KU_Jdts5rL0

  • avatar
    zip89105

    Donald Trump only understands how the Bankruptcy Court works.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    Don’t worry, with his great depth of knowledge about policy and respecting women by having his mother carry on a public affair with Ted Kennedy while his father was prime minister, Trudeau Junior will explain all of this to him.

    At least Canada has shown America something about electing a national head who is a complete empty suit.

    • 0 avatar

      I wonder if any Canadian journalists have the chutzpah to ask Justin Trudeau what it was like growing up with him mom trying to be one of Mick Jagger’s groupies.

      • 0 avatar
        Kevin Jaeger

        His mother’s antics were legendary, which go politely unmentioned among Canadian journalists.

        Not only that, but during the leadership contest Justin Trudeau was debating another woman whom his father used to bang (Deborah Coyne).

        You’d have to have a leadership debate between Monica Lewinsky and Chelsea Clinton to reach a Canadian-level circus act.

        • 0 avatar
          TonyJZX

          This smacks of classic “whatabout-ism”.

          American politics is the ultimate in clownshoes right now but hey, what about them damn Canadians… the difference is that whatever shenanigans occurs with Trudeau doesnt have a bad effect on the Canadian populace. One wishes they could say the same about their American counterparts.

        • 0 avatar

          Don’t bet against Chelsea – she looks presidential to me.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        How are any of these comments relevant to politics?

        Why should anyone care about who his mother or father slept with?

        Oh, I forgot, the self proclaimed moral majority likes that sort of thing. I’m sure google will find you the type of porn that will float your boat.

        Justin Trudeau was astute enough to effectively outflank the far left and capitalize upon conservative fear mongering. The Conservatives tried a watered down version of Trump like fear mongering and it failed.

        Despite his name, he was a political outsider.

        That is all Trump has going for him, he is a political outsider.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Why would you attack Trudeau for the antics of his mother? I haven’t met too many 7 year olds who control their parents’ actions. You might as well blame Mitt Romney because his father was so slow to embrace muscle cars when he ran AMC.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Well, I think he could conceivably do something like this without imposing a tariff. Either through the US corporate tax code (like a huge overhaul of the DPAD, etc.) or by imposing longer, tougher inspections on imports in the name of safety.

    • 0 avatar

      Japanese Inspection?

      Big John: If you two wanna turn yourselves into a greasy spot on a country road somewhere, go right ahead. I don’t give a shit and I don’t think anybody else does, regardless what they say to your face. But you two monkeys are not going to do it on my racetrack. Now y’all heard of a “Japanese Inspection?” Japanese Inpsection, you see, when the Japs get in a load of lettuce they’re not sure they wanna let in the country, why they’ll just let it sit there on the dock ’til they get good and ready to look at. But then of course, it’s all gone rotten… ain’t nothing left to inspect. You see, lettuce is a perishable item… like you two monkeys. You trade paint one more time, you so much as touch, I’m gonna Black Flag the two of you, and take apart your racecars for three-hundred laps. Then, if you pass inspection and you put your cars back together, I might let you back into the race. Now, just to show there’s no hard feelings we’re all gonna go out to dinner together.

      Cole Trickle: Well, I’ve got other plans.

      Rowdy Burns: Yeah, so do I!

      Big John: Well, you’re gonna have to change them. And not only that you two are gonna drive to dinner together.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Cruz said it right in the debate the other night*:

    “Detroit is a great city with a magnificent legacy, that has been utterly decimated by 60 years of failed left-wing policies.”

    *Disclaimer: The author of this post is less intelligent than VoGo or Pch101. Please do not infer anything from this post until VoGo and/or PCH101 have had a chance to respond.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “*Disclaimer: The author of this post is less intelligent than VoGo or Pch101. Please do not infer anything from this post until VoGo and/or PCH101 have had a chance to respond.”

      I busted out laughing when I read that!

      Thank you for the humor.

      Remember to be kind to your web-footed friends for a duck may be somebody’s mother.

      Ditto with the Zika-ravaged brains among us.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      You’ve consistently proven yourself a dolt, we don’t need Pch or VoGo to validate that.

      Frankly, the core issue of Detroit’s loss has been the increasing loss of it’s single-industry base mixed with a gutting of the city center. It has nothing to with left or right, it’s just an issue of what happened to Gary, Indiana, in a very red state, or any of a hundred boom towns built on oil or mining. When you focus on one industry and that industry withdraws people tend to go with it.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’d be wary of personal attacks in otherwise accurate point on the need for economic diversification.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          “Diversification” is expensive. We don’t want it.

          I’m guessing that if you had to pay $2,000 for a computer or a basic refrigerator that you would be unhappy, accusing The Evil Slave State of trying to destroy We the People™ with inflated goods prices.

          Or if we tried to temper that with a high sales tax/VAT that reduced consumption that you wouldn’t like that, either.

          Well, the trade off for that is a trade deficit that exceeds that of every other nation that carries a trade deficit combined. Be happy that a computer is priced cheaply enough so that you can complain about it online.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      It’s not exactly an honor to be stuck in the head of a self-professed wanker.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The author of this post is less intelligent than the typical Trump supporter.

      There fixed it for ya.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      How exactly did Detroit’s government convince GM to lose two-thirds of its market share in the US? How did Detroit convince Chrysler to short change customers on product quality for decades, destroying their reputation? How did the Detroit mayor get NAFTA passed? How did the Detroit mayor convince states in the South to be anti-union?

      The plain fact is that there are huge macroeconomic trends which have been working against cities like Detroit. Certainly, local government could have done better, but placing the blame exclusively on them is hardly insightful.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        the other thing is people don’t want to admit that white flight played a huge role in Detroit’s rapid decline. When people leave en masse like that, the economic toll is disastrous. Property values drop of a cliff, businesses close, and the only people who still live there are people who can’t afford to live anywhere else. and as we’ve seen time and time again the world ’round, crime is bred from poverty and disenfranchisement.

        meanwhile, the people who left take potshots at the city from the suburbs, in the vein of “see? we told you it was bad!” they refuse to admit that things got so bad largely because *they* left and took all of the “money” with them. And then, when the black middle class starts to grow, these same people move farther and farther away because it’s a crime against humanity that black people might want to live in a nice neighborhood.

        any of you who grouse about how my generation (and the ones following) are so terrible compared to yours, you might want to open your eyes and own up to all of the messes you made and are leaving us to clean up. A non-zero part of me is eager to see the day the Boomers finally disappear.

  • avatar
    mcs

    No problema, Ford can just ship their cars through one of the hundreds of tunnels the Mexicans will build under any wall the US builds along the border.

  • avatar
    markf

    Nice to see this site sink into the Anti-Trump fever swamp. Counting down until I see the first Hitler/Nazi Trump comparison comment.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      But it is only tangentially related to cars through the inference that many of them are built in Mexico, even though many cars are also built in Canada.

      Why Mexico gets the brunt of the hate I don’t understand since Canada is much more of a trading partner and the US deficits with Canada are just as staggering.

      And on the whole of things, NAFTA has been good for more Americans than it has hurt – by increasing their living standard and allowing them to afford goods that they could not afford if made in the US.

  • avatar
    Kevin Jaeger

    Mark, in your lifetime has it been the normal practice for Presidential candidates to limit their comments to policies within Federal jurisdiction and within the limits of Presidential authority?

    Would policies on Education, gun control, health care, greenhouse gas emissions, and alternative fuels for vehicles fall within those parameters?

    Maybe he should just stick to easy things like promising that the oceans levels will no longer rise, like the current president.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    My problem is that after eliminating the candidates that promise things a POTUS can’t deliver, I’m left with…

    (Crickets chirping.)

    Trump supporters are a bunch of window lickers though; amiright?

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” – George Carlin

    “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.” Winston Churchill

    If you had the opportunity to travel back in time and kill baby Hitler or baby Trump, how could you not do it?

    • 0 avatar
      zososoto

      Trump isn’t Hitler. Equating the two indicates a staggering amount of cognitive dissonance.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      If I could go back in time and kill one person it’d be Hitler.

      If I could go back in time and kill two people they’d be Hitler and the guy who invented the tie.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        The necktie has no one inventor. Its roots can be found in kerchiefs worn around the neck by mercenaries in the early 17th-century. Looks like you’ve got a lot of Croatians to kill.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      Yes, because saying dumb stuff is morally equivalent to stuffing six million jews into gas chambers in an attempt to eradicate the entire race and launching a war that resulted in the deaths of somewhere between 50-80 million people. Trump could build his wall, deport every last person in this country illegally, and completely stop any muslim from entering the country and while this may make him a terrible person, it would not even put him in the same Universe as Adolf Hitler and there are a variety of factors that ensure the US Government will not become the Third Reich.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      If you truly were career military and couldn’t afford anything you were doing it wrong. I grew up in a single income family. My father was career enlisted in the Navy and while we were not living like the Kardashians I was always comfortable and never lacking. The US Middle class was built on actually making stuff here. As for the cheap gas…well I gather you served before all of the middle eastern wars. I would happily pay much more if it meant Me or my children never had to go back to any of those places. But hey, you got yours so to heck with everyone else.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        I was career military, served June ’65 – Jul ’85. Retired as a MSgt. But back then we didn’t get paid what they’re getting paid today.

        Of course you are right, I got mine and really don’t give a rat’s @ss about anyone other than me and mine.

        Our Wal-Mart lifestyle allows us a lot more things that helped us live a better and healthier life. The comment from theoldguard brought back memories of our sparse lifestyle prior to Jul 1985.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          ….I got mine and really don’t give a rat’s @ss about anyone other than me and mine….

          And THAT, folks, pretty much sums up a conservative. Sad. I care about me and mine, but also care about others and the world that supports me.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            golden2husky, I WAS a conservative AND Republican for my twenty years in the military, but registered as an Independent in July 1985.

            I started life out in a union Democrat household in Huntington Beach, CA, but realized the error of my ways when I got my first real job and saw all that money being taken out of my measly paycheck.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            highdesertcat – same old rhetoric.

            Your posts put you far to the right of centre.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Lou_BC, we each are what we are. I am a product of my life experiences. Those experiences shaped my value system. That’s what I live by.

            An Independent does not have to be in the political center. An Independent does not swallow the party line but thinks for themselves. Chooses for themselves.

            I vote for the best candidate, the most qualified, without regard to party.

            In this American election cycle, I don’t care for any of them although I recognize the most qualified with actual governing experience to be John Kasich of Ohio. But he’s not my guy.

            So, yeah, in a nutshell, I only care about me and mine. Yet I give freely of my time to volunteer activities like Sertoma, Lions, Elks, VFW, Moose, etc.

            The two concepts are not mutually exclusive.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Godwin

  • avatar

    David Gelernter, who is a pretty smart guy, thinks the Trump phenomenon is mostly about political correctness, in all its manifestations, and people rebelling against it. I agree that’s a factor, but there are other factors including the decline of the working class (and attendant increases in opiate and meth addiction as well as suicide in middle aged white men). There’s also a bit of a cult of personality going on, and there’s no question that creepy neo-Nazis have glommed onto Trumpmania though the comparisons of the Donald to der Fuhrer or il Duce aren’t apt.

    For the most part, I get the impression that Trump’s supporters are not ideological conservatives and they’re certainly not libertarians (though they’d like to be left alone by the nannies). They don’t mind big government as long as they’re the beneficiaries.

    As far as a hypothetical Pres. Trump telling Ford they’ll build their next factory in the U.S., George Will says that Trump would have a hard time passing an eighth grade civics test. Regarding just how much a U.S. president can do by fiat, I doubt that Trump even knows about the Supreme Court telling Harry Truman that he couldn’t nationalize the steel industry in peace time.

    I think the Michigan primary this Tuesday will be telling. Remember all those “Macomb county Democrats” who voted for Ronald Reagan? I think those folks represent the core of Trump’s support. Technically, Michigan’s presidential primary is a closed primary, but it’s not restricted to those registered as Democrats or Republicans, you just ask for whichever party’s ballot you wish to vote on. How Trump’s supporters turn out in Michigan will be interesting.

    Trump’s recent debate performances haven’t been good and in addition to Rubio and Cruz going after him directly, Trump’s also been targeted by the Republican establishment. That may be having an effect, as late deciders in yesterday’s primaries seemed to have been moving to Cruz. Remember, almost 2/3rds of people who have voted in primaries and caucuses have voted for someone who wasn’t Donald Trump.

    Ohio and Florida will be key primaries. If Trump wins them, it’s probably over. If Kasich and Rubio can hold their home states, it will go to the convention because Trump’s path to enough delegates gets iffy. FWIW, Cruz thinks he can close strong in Florida – they’ve opened up ten campaign offices in the state. That’s a bit of a risky bet because if Cruz ends up taking away votes from Rubio without surpassing Trump, that just makes Trump’s path to the nomination easier.

    If it ends up being Trump vs Sanders I’d say that we’ve reached peak idiocracy.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      I’m not as sure as you are when comparing pre-election Trump to pre-election fascists, but agree our Constitution isn’t weak enough to permit the next stage. The Republican primaries shift gears on the 15th when they go winner take all. So far 35% is just 35%. I predict it goes head to head just before the 15th in an attempt to stop Trump. This assumes Republican power brokers prefer Cruz to Trump, so I may be wrong.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        The pundits say that the Republican power brokers rank-preference order is:
        1) Rubio
        2) Trump
        3) Cruz

        Having listened to a near-victory speech in which Cruz tried to be humble about being chosen by god to be a winner, I see where the pundits (and the Republican power brokers?) are coming from… Getting a guy who thinks he’s god’s chosen messenger to play along with politics as usual would be tricky.

      • 0 avatar

        The Republican power brokers aren’t thrilled with Trump, but they’re terrified of Cruz. At this point they’d prefer Rubio, but they could live with Trump (but then, they could live with Hillary Clinton as president too as long as they keep their sinecures). Trump will make deals. Cruz seems to be pretty consistent in his ideology. I think the Washington establishment may dislike him more because they think he’ll stick to his principles than because of his constitutionalist ideology.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Neither of those reasons is why DC insiders (GOP even more than Democrats) hate Cruz with the heat of a thousand suns. There are two real reasons.

          One reason is that they see his scorched-earth political strategy as not in the best interest of the GOP. By following it when there is a Democratic president and a Democratic filibuster in the Senate, the GOP loses a lot of leverage over the last-minute deals that end up getting passed to prevent Armageddon.

          The other reason is both more straightforward and more important: Ted Cruz may be one of the most unpleasant a$$holes ever to walk the planet. Pretty much everyone who has worked with him has confirmed it — on the record to reporters.

          My wife is a former GOP congressional staffer who is very plugged in to GOP establishment thinking. They can’t stand either Cruz or Trump (and if either one is nominated my wife is debating whether to stay home or vote for Hillary), but most of them would rather have Trump than Cruz because at least he says he’s willing to make a deal.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Of all remaining 4 GOP candidates, Cruz fares the worse in a head-to-head matchup with Hillary Clinton.

            Cruz’s main appeal is to hardcore evangelicals, and I predict that he’ll falter badly in the west, in the delegate rich states of Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Florida, and in the super delegate rich states of New York & California.

            Cruz’s candidacy is actually the one most misaligned with the GOP and GOP-leaning voters, as well as Reagan Democrats.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Dark horse candidate: Johan de Nysschen.

            Discuss.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            That’s a very Rust Belt-centric view, DW. On policy, Cruz is very well aligned with GOP voters in the south.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Dal,
            You’re right. However, The South really doesn’t matter in Presidential campaigns. Excepting Florida, Republicans own it.

            The winning party will maximize its alignment with voters in Florida, Ohio, Virginia, Wisconsin, Colorado and Indiana. I don’t expect Cruz to do well in those states.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Dal, yes Cruz won Texas (his home state), but Trump won South Carolina, Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Tennessee and Virginia.

            Trump also since won Kentucky, and is well-positioned to win Florida and, possibly, even Mississippi.

            Trump is not only winning GOP contests in more moderate states, but taking a lot of southern states that Cruz should have been able to count on if his message was connecting with the current electorate mindset.

            Trump is being lifted by a wave, Reagan-type base of support, which can’t be orchestrated by political planning, but is the result of historical watershed moments.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            VoGo, that’s a good point. But Trump is only helpful to the GOP in some of those places. He’ll do well in Wisconsin and Ohio (with a chance of stealing Pennsylvania and Michigan), but he’s pretty much guaranteed to turn over Florida and Colorado to the Democrats, along with North Carolina and maybe even Georgia. Something like a third of Hispanic Republicans will vote for Hillary if he’s the nominee.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @dal20402 – the only Christians Trump will attract are whites.

            We have seen a shift in the “moral majority”. There has been a decline in the number of Caucasian people calling themselves Christian. In the black community those numbers have been stable. 17% of the USA population is Hispanic and most are Catholic Christian.
            Pope Francis’s visit to the USA was because of that growing Hispanic populace.

            He isn’t too fond of Trump either.
            “A person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not of building bridges, is not Christian. This is not the gospel,”

            Trump has alienated 17% of Christians in the USA by his rhetoric. If they go out to vote they will effectively negate the angry white male Christian vote.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “For the most part, I get the impression that Trump’s supporters are not ideological conservatives and they’re certainly not libertarians (though they’d like to be left alone by the nannies). They don’t mind big government as long as they’re the beneficiaries.”

      I think they’re basically angry white folks, and that’s not an ideology.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        FreedMike – I kinda think that “angry white folks” is an ideology. BTSR has climbed aboard that train.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Right, Lou, but an ideology stands for something, whether you agree with it or not. Being angry signifies nothing.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I mean, say what you want about the tenets of National Socialism, Dude; at least it’s an *ethos.*

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            FreedMike – great point. Anger isn’t an ideology.

            “Angry white folks” might be the sign of an ideology or the sign that they are fed up with current political ideology.

            Anger is a sign and/or a symptom of a greater disease.

            What is that greater disease?

            I believe that since there is a constitutional separation of Church and State there should be a Constitutional separation of Business and State.

            The anger lies in both sides selling out to the Corporate elites.

            The leaders of the USA need to read the Gettysburg Address.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Trump’s entire strategy centers around winning over Reagan Democrats (a large swath of working class and middle class whites), who will drag many more ideological conservatives to vote for Trump is he’s the nominee, as there’s no way these people will vote for Hillary Clinton, and also know that sitting out the election puts Clinton in the White House.

      There’s also a huge base of anti-pc’ism types attracted to Trump, particularly in southern and Mexican border states.

      Many pundits who believe Trump can’t defeat Hillary Clinton are discounting many cultural factors that turn into millions of accretive votes for Trump in a Trump vs Clinton election, and even Nate Silver completely underestimated Trump’s potential and essentially admitted his statistical analysis model needs heavy tweaking to account for Trump’s potential.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        DW, getting a majority of the Republican vote. But if all Trump gets is the Republican vote, then he can’t win, because it accounts for about 30% of voters nationwide.

        Take a look at the last two elections – whoever wins the female and Latino vote takes the White House. And guess what two blocs Trump has done the most to energize against him?

        Trump also solves Hillary’s main issue (assuming this email thing blows over, which I think it will), which is that the left wing of the Democratic party is not energized for her. Well, Trump will fix that issue – they’ll be energized to support Hillary for no other reason than to oppose Trump.

        This guy will be a get-out-the-vote machine for Hillary. You heard it here first!

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @FreedMike – I agree.

          Trump has pissed off Christian Hispanics, women, Muslims,and African-Americans. His attacks on John McCain should alienate servicemen as well. He has even targeted the disabled.

          Democrats have tried to stay clear of saying they want to run against Trump for no other reason than that being a free ride.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Trump may pick up a bunch of angry white people in states like Ohio and Pennsylvania, but he’s also going to lose a ton of Hispanics that normally vote Republican in places like Georgia, Florida, Arizona, Colorado, Texas, and North Carolina.

        Here’s the very most Trump-favorable outcome I see for Trump vs. Clinton:

        http://www.270towin.com/presidential_map_new/maps/qxZzL.png

        That’s pretty close, but Clinton wins. And I think it’s optimistic for Trump to say he wins PA, AZ, OH, MI, and even GA. He runs about 15 points behind a generic Republican among Hispanic voters.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      “If it ends up being Trump vs Sanders I’d say that we’ve reached peak idiocracy.”

      I don’t know, could get Kanye West 4 years from now.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      The attacks on political correctness (PC) and the Republican embrace of these attacks fascinates me.

      What is PC? At its heart, it means updating our language to remove racist, sexist or homophobic bias.

      What does it mean to attack PC? Essentially that you want to stop beating around the bush and embrace racist, sexist and homophobic language without fear of being embarrassed for it.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        +1

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “What is PC?”

        Political control of language and expression of ideas.

      • 0 avatar
        darkwing

        Well, if that’s its goal, then the PC movement fails on its face — it’s dramatically increased the amount of racist, sexist, and homophobic language being thrown around.

        But we both know that’s not its real purpose. Rather, it’s the manufacture of outrage as both a positional good and a strategic tool. And at that, it’s strikingly successful.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Darkwing,
          You just manufactured outrage by blaming PC for manufacturing outrage. Are you capable of self awareness?

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            If you’re going to bother trolling at all, at least have enough pride in your work to do it properly. The mimicry trick is laaaaame.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            If I were mimicking you, I’d make a lot of unsubstantiated allegations that made me look like a tool of the Republican establishment claiming to be anti-establishment.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “What is PC?”

        the way most people use it, it means “I’m mad because someone told me I shouldn’t say certain things.”

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          And almost always those “certain things” are blatantly racist or sexist things.

          The most common situation where I hear complaints about PC amounts to this: “I want to make a grossly inaccurate generalization against (racial or gender group), but can’t because I know it would offend those dastardly PC people.”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2014/01/05/260006815/the-ugly-fascinating-history-of-the-word-racism

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      I’m rare to agree with you but I find the analysis you posted (or wrote yourself, hard to tell where Gelernter ends and you begin) is pretty accurate. Most of Trump’s strength is coming from a moderate left position on economics, he swings neoliberal on some issues but is basically making blustering speeches with the idea of promoting an economic view every candidate in the Republican party has denounced since Reagan.

      The problem with the analysis is much of the anti-‘PC’ argument is really veiled racial animosity and sexism. They hate being told not to be ignorant scum and that’s been the core of the anti-‘PC’ movement from the start, a tact toward sounding less like David Duke and more like David Brooks to hide the core underlying feelings. Dog whistles abound in Republican speeches and Trump has pulled back the veil on much of that.

      That being said, Trump is going to be the nominee. Late breakers in Louisiana were heavily in favor of Cruz but also mainly above I-10. A colleague ran the local auto-caller poll for the primary and most of the respondents that were undecided broke for Cruz and most were in evangelical country. It’s a clear corollary. The problem for Cruz is that once he lives the bible belt and some mountain west states he’s really chasing votes he can’t get. Kasich is going to grab Ohio but can he get the upper-midwest? Not likely. I would love to see a brokered convention just to make the Democratic victory that much sweeter but I’ve got zero doubts that Trump is the nominee. He needs 47% of remaining delegates to win the nomination. If he wins California he’s almost 25% of the way there and he’s an odds on favorite by a wide margin.

      Sanders is facing an uphill battle but only because he has had such a huge media blackout against him. It’s kind of interesting to watch an active force try to slow his agenda down though I will say if he loses he’s already won the war. Guys like Ronnie are a dwindling force and people like HDC aren’t going to be around in 20 years. Trump is their last ditch effort to elect a right-winger before the country gravitates towards western European socialist democratic ideologies.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        If you’re referencing my comments, I had no idea who Gelernter is/was until Ronnie mentioned his name this afternoon, and I still have yet to read any of his commentary.

        So, what I wrote thus far is my original thinking (although as gleaned & distilled through much political background commentary heard/read by various and often conflicting voices).

        I still maintain Democrats are short-sighted to discount how strongly Trump will match up with Hillary, as Trump really will energize the GOP base given Hillary’s very high unfavorable rating (though this could cut both ways if blacks ans Latinos tun out in large numbers – which would be the historical exception, and not norm).

        Trump will be competitive with Hillary in northern AND southern states, while also competing well in many western ones (California may just be a huge shocker in the way Reagan succeeded there).

        As I stated before, anything that turns Nate Silver’s model upside down is nothing short of a phenomenon that requires major recalibration, as the Trump movement is now so requiring.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          DW is 100% right about this. The people who support Trump (and many who support Bernie) are into an outsider and are into economic populism.

          Hillary Clinton is the consummate insider and she is 100% Wall Street too.

          This grouping will defy conventional leftist vs. rightist voting breakdowns.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          Be my guest to swing the election, remember that Trump’s very anti-minority is going to invoke a larger minority response. His strongman arguments are classic Italian fascism and while it sells well in Peoria he isn’t moving the needle in many other places. If you REALLY believe he can grab California you’re smoking something I wouldn’t touch with a ten foot poll. That’s like claiming that Clinton’s going to grab Alabama and Mississippi…

          http://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/2016-swing-the-election/

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            What’s the difference between fascism and the communism you prefer again?

            Mega challenge: Do not use the phrase “right wing”.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later –
            “What’s the difference between fascism and the communism you prefer again?

            Mega challenge: Do not use the phrase “right wing”.”

            Sounds like fun.

            Some sources put Mussolini as the original fascist. I found a translation of his “manifesto”.

            “…Fascism [is] the complete opposite of…Marxian Socialism, the materialist conception of history of human civilization can be explained simply through the conflict of interests among the various social groups and by the change and development in the means and instruments of production…. Fascism, now and always, believes in holiness and in heroism; that is to say, in actions influenced by no economic motive, direct or indirect. And if the economic conception of history be denied, according to which theory men are no more than puppets, carried to and fro by the waves of chance, while the real directing forces are quite out of their control, it follows that the existence of an unchangeable and unchanging class-war is also denied – the natural progeny of the economic conception of history. And above all Fascism denies that class-war can be the preponderant force in the transformation of society…. ”
            http://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/mussolini-fascism.asp

            “Communism is a socio-economic structure that promotes the establishment of a classless, stateless society based on common ownership of the means of production. It encourages the formation of a proletarian state in order to overcome the class structures and alienation of labour that characterize capitalistic societies, and their legacy of imperialism and nationalism. Communism holds that the only way to solve these problems is for the working class (or proletariat) to replace the wealthy ruling class (or bourgeoisie), through revolutionary action, in order to establish a peaceful, free society, without classes or government.”
            http://www.philosophybasics.com/branch_communism.html

            “Unlike the communist system, socialism encourages the reduction, not complete elimination, of class structure. Along the political and economic spectrum, socialism lies somewhere between capitalism and communism, and does not promote a complete lack of government, but instead urges the formation of an environment of sharing and equality among its members.”

            https://blog.udemy.com/socialism-vs-communism/

            Mussolini himself says that fascism is the complete opposite to Marxist socialism. Pinochet’s Chile was listed as a fascist regime. They were neoliberal and based market/business policy upon Milton Friedman’s model. To put a more modern spin on it;George W Bush, Dick Cheney, and Donald Rumsfeld were Friedman free market proponents.
            Hitler’s Germany on the other hand has been labeled socialist due to their “National Socialism” and name: National Socialist German Workers’ Party. They rejected most of Marxist communist ideology. They tend to be listed as a form of fascism.

            The compass in most sources I have looked at put fascism and communism at polar opposite ends.

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    Sixty years ago, most everything in our grandparents homes was made in USA. Today, almost nothing in our houses is. Is this a problem? Can a country have a strong economy without making “stuff?” Trump is at least talking about this question. No one else has. Is the truth that USA will never be a strong manufacturing economy unless we go to 3-dollar-an-hour wages? If so, it would be good if we were informed of that. Clinton and Cruz can disabuse us of this fantasy.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Sixty years ago my parents couldn’t afford anything, no matter where it was made, because they were LEGAL immigrants and dirt poor.

      Until July 1985 I couldn’t afford much even though I was in career military service because everything cost more than I could afford.

      I didn’t start making real money until after July 1985 and because of all the cheap imports I was finally able to upgrade my lifestyle.

      Having seen both eras, I prefer the era of NAFTA and cheap foreign-made goods that allowed me to raise my lifestyle.

      I’ll take TPP and cheap gas, too!

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        It’s refreshing to hear someone actually praise the free market for what it is and does.

        A lot of the people who say “free market” in public couldn’t tell a the difference between perfect competition, and an oligopoly with an information asymmetry, if their lives depended on it. Which it kinda does.

      • 0 avatar
        theoldguard

        Interesting analysis. I too was career military. 25.3 years active duty. Best decision I ever made.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Zekas

      highdesertcat: And all those cheap imported goods you’ve bought have meant that the only job I could find was peasant worker at Walmart for minimum wage.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        highdesertcat is about the only one who will say it… china and canada and mexico are better and cheaper at making a lot of stuff than the US

        it is unsustainable for Americans to be making a lot of these items and its pointless to force American manufacture when they clearly arent competitive.

        In fact there’s a term for state forced manufacture of uncompetitive goods and its certainly aint capitalism. And you see the hardline capitalists here like BTSR vote for someone who wants to put a 35% tax so that Trump can provide illusory jobs to Americans?

        Its ridiculous.

        Americans should do jobs that they’re best at doing and its not making iphones or tvs or air conditioners or…. arguably, cars.

        If you’re in a precarious job then get out. The govt. should not be protecting jobs that are uncompetitive.

        If American cars were so great you’d be purchasing American cars and yet… you’re not.

        I too remember when the only goods you could buy where domestic and I certainly didnt like saving up several weeks pay for a TV or a fridge. I like my China made made crap. People dont want to admit that their lives ARE better by the fact that they’re surrounded by cheap reliable but easy replaceable China crap… like this Lenovo laptop I’m on, the china Motorola phone I have and the china no name $200 40″ TV I’m watching.

        Would I go back to a IBM $7,000 laptop or a $2,000 Motorola brick phone or a $2,500 RCA CRT TV? Nah. Bring on the China crap.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “cheap reliable but easy replaceable China crap”

          Reliable?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            28, I read this as we live in a society of “easily and readily replaceable inexpensive goods.” Who cares if it is reliable? All products fail, some sooner, some later.

            For me it sure is a far cry from the S&H Green Stamps my mom and dad had to save in order to get that little “extra” they craved but could not afford to buy.

            Most of the ttac B&B don’t even know what S&H Green Stamps were, but those stamps sure helped a lot of poor people like mine.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          TonyJZX – The only thing I can think of that Canada can build better and cheaper than Americans is lumber.

          Our beer is better but probably not cheaper ;)

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Jeff, you’re collateral damage. More Americans have been helped by NAFTA than have been hurt.

        You can be retrained, if you want to be.

        I don’t even want to get into how many new skills I had to learn along the way to eke out a living. And those real world skills were light years removed from the MBA, BSBA and MicroSoft Networking endorsement I already earned.

        But you gotta go where the money is. I did. And it paid off for me. Big time!

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          I love how people just casually hand-wave things away and say “well just get a different job” like it’s as simple as going down to the job store and picking another one off of the shelf.

          Or “you can be retrained” like it’s a zero time and cost thing. someone trying to live off of minimum wage isn’t going to be able to afford to pay for schooling, not to mention the time to attend it.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            A lot of Americans had to readjust their lives, most recently after 2008, and many have succeeded, some failed. I have had to readjust and realign my life numerous times between July 1985 and Jan 2015 when I finally quit working. I’ve been there and done that. So have many others.

            There are millions upon millions of jobs going unfilled in America, if only so many Americans weren’t too proud to do them.

            We have such a labor shortage in Amrica that we have to import people from around the globe to do them. H1B anyone?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Getting another job is a pain in the a$$. Even if you are employed.

            I’m two weeks in to being unemployed. I’ll get a couple job offers this week, but you are right, there is nothing easy about leaving one job for another. I’ve saved money, have a wife that makes almost as much as I do, have family that can help if needed, and it’s still stressful as [email protected]

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “There are millions upon millions of jobs going unfilled in America, if only so many Americans weren’t too proud to do them.”

            oh for god’s sake, can you knock it off with this BS rhetoric? Jobs are going unfilled because they demand specific skills, and not everybody has those skills. You’re like some dimp I was in a conversation with a few years ago online, I was worrying about being laid off in the automotive collapse of 2008 and there not being any other jobs for me to find. This jerk said “What do you mean there are no jobs out there? Right by me (in New York) there’s openings for 20 Java programmers.”

            Like that’s helpful. I’m a mechanical engineer, WTH do I know about Java programming? and don’t give me this “re-training” BS, by the time I could learn enough about Java to be able to do those jobs they’d have long since been filled.

            and stuff the “jobs Americans are too proud to do” nonsense. Those jobs- if they exist- are minimum wage (or lower, paid under the table) and aren’t livable.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            HDC-

            You’re [email protected] right I’m too proud to work for minimum wage at a fast food place. I make as much from unemployment as I would from one of those garbage jobs. Plus, the opportunity costs ivolved with me taking a $hit job and giving myself less time to find a good job are staggering. It’s not like flipping burgers is going to pay my mortgage.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            bbal, I understand. We have had this conversation at other times. And you’re right, you get more money from unemployment compensation. This works for you. Others figure it the same way as well.

            I did not have that “unemployment” safety net because I retired from the military at $805 per month. Can’t qualify for unemployment compensation.

            I had to take a different approach. I had to find a way to keep money coming in, while at the same time trying to finish the house we were building in the desert.

            JimZ, you’ve obviously never been hungry enough to learn new skills. And I’m cool with that. To each his own.

            I never saw myself as a bricklayer, tile layer, house painter, carpenter, plumber, electrician, landscaper, general contractor, truck driver, and the other myriad of work-adventures I became proficient at. But I had bills to pay and four kids to put through State college.

            But here I am. I’m done. You can stick a fork in me – I’m done! And proud of it. I don’t regret any of it because it is not about how much you make.

            It is about how much you get to keep. And I got to keep all of it.
            ———————–

            JimZ,I lost my internet connection… just got it back.

            I wanted to add, being a ME hit close to home for me. One of my brothers is a ME but when let go after his job moved to a Mexican Maquiladora in the late seventies, he sold new cars in LA and then bought the dealership.

            That’s how I got drafted into the new car retail sales game, way back in the eighties. And that’s how the other brothers eventually switched from CE, EE and BCS to owning and running auto dealerships.

            Really!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            HDC-

            The caveat to all of this is that I treat finding a job as my full time job. I spend most of my day applying for jobs, interviewing, taking job assessments, and doing stuff around the house. I’ve found that people don’t want to hire me for jobs that are a step down from what I had. I’d take a $20K paycut to start working tomorrow, but employers know I won’t stay because someone will hire me for way more. I’ve had recruiters tell me that I have too much experience and I have too much industry knowledge for various roles.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            bbal, I completely understand and I think that you’re smart and resourceful enough to determine a successful course of action for your situation. Looking for work is a full-time job in itself.

            And as I said before in another thread, you have my sincere best wishes for a speedy resolution to your situation.

            I’m not making light of anyone’s plight but I had to adjust to what was doable in my realm of possibilities living where jobs are scarce. And it was tough.

            I didn’t have any “savings” to fall back on. My wife’s income consisted of sales commissions every time she closed on the sale of a house.

            So we lived from feast to famine. Mostly famine.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @bball – Sorry for your troubles. Sometimes you have to take a step back and enter a new field. Maybe temporarily, maybe not. Markets are always changing, so even if you put yourself in a position where you are in high demand, it’s still a roll of the dice, long term. Or simply start your own business. Good Luck either way.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            JimZ – retraining is easy if you go from McDonald’s “May I take your order please” to Walmart, “welcome to WalMart” greeting.

            The lower third is too busy surviving to retrain.

            You don’t move up the pyramid stuck at the Physiological level and can’t really get any Safety.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Agreed, it’s a shame that so much manufacturing has gone overseas. But isn’t a lot of that inevitable? I mean, when my grandparents were my age, we had just won WWII and every other industrialized economy on Earth that competed against us was basically in shambles. No wonder we made so much stuff here – how would we import stuff from, say, Japan when the country was basically a smoking pile of rubble?

      And if the rise of industrialism was inevitable, then it was inevitable everywhere, not just in Europe, Japan, the Soviet Union and the U.S. It was foolish to believe countries like China, India, Mexico, Brazil and others wouldn’t eventually industrialize themselves.

      Problem is, we acted as if we were the only game in town for far too long. We got too big for our own britches. It was inevitable that the former industrial powers from before WWII would rise back up again, and it was also inevitable that undeveloped countries would develop.

      So, yeah, it’s a shame, but isn’t all of this kind of inevitable?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I’d gladly take a $3/hr job, before begging for money from friends, family, strangers or government. If all employers are willing to pay me is $3/hr, that’s all I’m truly worth. And I’ll take it.

      Let the market find its own level. Besides, it wouldn’t be a permanent job anyway. Just a stopgap between being broke/unemployed and permanent type of work, if not a “career”. I’d be my fault for not making myself valuable to employers, if not “in demand”.

      The minimum wage is just one of the many reasons the US is hostile to employers. You can’t blame them for running.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I am not willing to work for $3/hour instead getting money from the government or someone else. $3/hour is bull$hit. That’s $24 a day, $120 week, $6240 a year. That job would cost more to work than you would get in salary. That’s a stop gap for no one. Go [email protected] yourself if you fault people for now wanting to work for $3 an hour.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        If you define yourself by how much you’re paid, then a) you’re foolish, and b) you’ll never possibly be paid enough.

        Now, if you make five hundred bucks a month and your rent is 35% of that, then you have an argument. All you need is a time machine so when you’re done making your $3 an hour, you can go back to 1950 at the end of the day, and pay your circa-1950 living expenses on that. With the time machine, you’re golden. But in the real world of 2016, bball is on target – expecting people to work for three bucks an hour when that’s maybe a fraction of what they actually need to survive isn’t “responsibility” – it’s basically higher-paid slavery. We don’t need to put up with that.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          “It’s basically higher-paid slavery. We don’t need to put up with that.”

          It’s worse than that. It’s slavery where you gotta pay for food, rent, health care, and transportation. It’s the stuff that the dreams of 18th century plantation owners is made of.

          I could go back in time as a consultant and sell that system to a bunch of Col Sanders looking dudes.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        If we allowed $3/hour pay, people in those jobs would have a credible case against their employers under the 13th Amendment. Remember that most people in low-wage jobs have very little leverage: if they quit or get fired, they are immediately homeless.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        that’s a dangerous mindset, because if they could get away with it they’d pay you $0/hr. or you get BS like this:

        http://www.reuters.com/article/mexico-walmex-idUSN0546591320080905

        Yay, let’s go back to company scrip!

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          “I can’t afford to die. I owe my soul to the company store.”

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Sixteen tons by Jimmy Dean.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Where can anyone “live” on minimum wage anyway?? It’s hardly enough to pay rent, feed yourself, utilities, never mind support a family. And good luck getting full-time hours with that minimum wage.

            $3/hr beats the hell out of $0/hr or $0/day. If it’s a manufacturer/service that can pull up their operation, and do it in Mexico, China, etc, they should have a “minimum wage” wavier/exemption, provided they offer at least 8 hours a day, if the employee wants the hours. If they show up right on time, and the employer can’t provide 8 hours of work, they still get 8 hours pay.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DenverMike, TV news shows Obama telling us that the American economy is booming, there is virtually no unemployment in America and that the demand for labor is driving up wages.

            There are no more minimum-wage jobs in America!

            Every employee works 40hr weeks, and brings home enough money to pay for mandatory Obamacare.

            In celebration, we jacked up our rental rates by 5% – 10% effective 1 Jan 2016.

            Obama is right. We’re bringing in more money than ever before.

            Hallelujah! Praise Oba and Amen.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “I owe my soul to the company store”

            You beat me to it.

            “I’d gladly take a $3/hr job”

            That statement usually gets made by those that are in a position to never have to.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I’m not sitting around waiting for a phone call. I hope to never be in that position, but I know I’ll never seek government assistance while I have an able body and mind. I’ve done it before and regret it to this day. I hated the feeling and it lead to no good.

            OTOH, every crummy job I’ve taken, opened the door to an exponentially better job “within”, or in a totally unrelated field. Seems like the best employers aren’t sifting through applications, but rather recruiting straight from the hard workers they come across, serving their food, ringing them up, washing their car, pumping their gas, etc.

            Everywhere I’ve worked a low paying job, the great job offers are nonstop.

            I see too many workers in minimum-wage jobs with sh!tty attitudes. They no doubt blame everyone else for the position they’re in. Their attitude is probably what got them there AND keeps them there.

  • avatar
    jimbob457

    Ahh… I have found the TRUMPIAN thread.

    TRUMP has found a new theory of free trade popular in the EU. Free trade is a two way street. Dumping the job of a 50 year old skilled worker is not just an accident with no consequences.

    Everyone in the real world knows about ‘barriers to trade’.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This popcorn tastes off to me. Like this story about Trump (mostly about Trump) really has no place on TTAC and feels like click bait.

    It also runs against the grain of what our EIC said the direction of the site would be. Not my call, just saying what I see.

    I come here to largely get away from politics, and as much as I don’t want to see the Battle Axe, I don’t want to see this small penised Ompla Loompa on TTAC either.

    Ugh – I’m throwing this bowl of popcorn out.

  • avatar

    We survived Obama (I hope so) an we will survive Trump too. EU and NATO may not survive though -the foundation is already cracking.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Both Trump and Sanders are appealing to those from OWS and Tea Party movements who continue to feel betrayed by bought government. Trump and Sanders appear to be version 2 of those populist movements, and if neither succeeds in becoming president in November, there will be a version 3 representing the growing frustration with the Dems and Reps. The big 2 only represent those who write big checks, despite their proclamations of being for “working people” or the myriad of other nonsense they spew when trolling for votes.

    Whether you agree or disagree with their politics, Trump and Sanders have effectively tapped into that frustration and are benefitting from it.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Both sides of that frustration coin are scary for different reasons.

      One leads us down a path of government largesse and taxation that will likely kill our economy.

      The other is a nationalist with no clue of how the Constitution works, with a fascist tinged message.

      One group wants to make us a nation of safety zones and avoiding trigger words and everyone feels special, the other group is trigger happy and angry.

      This isn’t going to end well – and in other news, the barbarians are not at the gates, but they are mounting.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        The comparison of Trump and Sanders seems unfair. With Sanders, you know exactly what you are getting. For his entire life, he’s acted from his core of ethics to help those less fortunate. You can disagree with social democrat policy — that’s your right — but he’s run a clean race, funded by small, individual donors, consistent with his morals.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Bernie to his credit is the polar opposite in many ways to his opponent.

          My administration may not even behead him and merely give him the “death or exile” trial.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Fallacy. He has benefited, whether he wants it or not, from tens of millions of Super PAC money from the likes of Crossroads USA and Conservative 45, who have been running pro-Bernie ads and anti-Hillary ads in key markets.

          Crossroads USA ran $4.8 million in pro-Bernie ads in Nevada. Bernie has plenty of skeletons in his closet where he has not been true to his values.

          One can look up his words, thoughts and deeds on Sierra Blanco as one shining example of the real Bernie. A career politician not in it for the people.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Sanders never solicited help from these right wing hate groups, and surely will suffer their wrath if nominated. To blame someone who campaigns cleanly on policy for Republican dirty tricks is absurd.

            Sierra Blanco is a red herring. Vermont Yankee struck a deal to store radioactive waste in Texas. Big whoop.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          How is it unfair? Both Trump and Sanders have tapped into populist anger and frustration: cost of education, declining middle class and employment issues, obvious government corruption are the big noteworthy examples but hardly the beginning of the list.

          Sanders has done a great job at articulating the problem…. much more so than Trump has, but to DW’s point, Trump has done a great job at emotionally connecting with people’s frustrations.

          Stylistically they’re different, but their support is coming from a very similar place.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Good points, jkross22,
            The difference is that Sanders has put forward a series of policies, consistent with decades of hard work on behalf of his constituents to address these concerns. And Sanders runs against an experienced politician who would call him on any BS.

            Trump merely traffics in anger, to great effect. His opponents are newbies, overwhelmed by schoolyard taunts like, “little”, low energy” and “lying”.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Trump v. Sanders…

            Yup it is ultimately two sides of the same basic coin. Their answers may be different but the rage that gives rise to them is the same.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Exactly, jkross. You can agree with what Sanders proposes, or reject it, but there’s no denying the proposals are actual plans, versus Trump’s endless blather like “I guarantee you the president of Mexico will build that wall.”

            And you don’t see him making penis size a campaign issue either. I’m still shaking my head over that one.

            I don’t agree with Sanders and won’t support him but I do appreciate the campaign he’s running.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Freedmike, I agree 100%. The contrast between the Democratic and Republican debates this cycle is really quite amazing.

            The GOP is defaulting back to anger and d!ck-measuring competitions because it’s become clear that their traditional policy proposals are unappealing to something like half of their voters. The sooner they devise a real policy platform that actually addresses their voters’ economic issues while still enabling those voters to avoid voting for Democrats with whom they have nothing in common culturally, they quicker they’ll recover. But until then, we get things like “I’m gonna get Mexico to pony up… somehow… trust me… really.”

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            I disagree with Bernie Sanders on everything. There’s literally nothing from a public policy perspective that I agree with him on. Yet I’ll vote for him if I get the chance.

            I hope that more people approach elections with a different expectation. It’s much more important that someone who hasn’t sold himself to the highest bidders wins… someone with leadership experience, successes and temperament than someone who I necessarily agree with on abortion or ACA or who I want to have a beer with.

            When I bring this up with loyal party Democrats and Republicans, it’s like I’m speaking Cantonese. And that’s the problem.

  • avatar
    Jeff Zekas

    Fact: the middle class is declining. Fact: NAFTA led to auto jobs moving to Mexico. Fact: the new jobs being created since the crash are mostly low paying. Trade with China has meant cheap clothes, but also, that textile factories in the U.S. have closed. Cheap steel from China has meant that U.S. steel jobs have disappeared. No, I don’t like Trump. But he speaks to the fears of blue collar workers. The fact is, the only folks who have benefited from free trade and the new economy is the One Percent.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Trump promised my Rotary club that if elected he’ll deport everyone under 50.

    Go Trump!

  • avatar
    redapple

    Deadweight is correct.

    What happens when trade is UNFAIR ???

    The American Foundry Society brought a lawsuit in 2004 to the Fed Trade Comm. AFS said China is dumping castings in the USA. They offered the example of a 10 pound aluminum casting selling in detroit for $10. Aluminum was selling for $1.08/pound. So the casting had about 11$ of aluminum in the casting. This is before you add in melt loss, dross, scrap, revert etc….. 11$ in CHINA Not including freight, overhead. labor, cores, molding, cleaning.

    Obvious severe dumping.

    FTC said ‘ no standing ‘ to the AFS. Case dismissed.

    The fix was in !

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    All in all the commenters here are quite civilized and present well reasoned comment.
    One exception I will not name however, is voluntarily wallowing in an Ailes/Limbaugh/orthodox right wing ideological fantasy world, but that comes as no surprise cindering their previous posts on automotive subjects.
    Thanks Gentlemen(women?) for the great read!

  • avatar
    mikey

    Yes ttacgreg….I agree. I’m not an American but I have been following the election with interest.

    Yes this has been a great read. “Dead Weights” first comment explained more to me , more than I have ever learned watching, and listening to the pundits at CNN, NBC and Fox.

    I just have one question about the how the American political process works. What is the difference between a “state primary” or a state Caucas . ? Do they both carry the same weight

    • 0 avatar
      clivesl

      Mikey,

      From your perspective the main difference is in method. In a primary you go into the booth and pull the lever. In a caucus, you meet town hall style and publicly declare your support.

      There are obviously other differences behind the scenes, but that is the big one from your POV.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        @clivesl…Thank You…..As a Canadian , I have to disagree with Mark, we do have some skin in this game.

        From an automotive stand point, Toyota, Honda, Ford, GM , FCA, and whole lot of 2nd, and third tier suppliers have manufacturing facilities here. I’m going to say 70 percent of production is destined to south of the border.

        The economies of our two countries, are very much intertwined.

        I have neither a vote, or opinion, in the US election. That being said, this was a very interesting article, with some excellent informed comments.

        Kudos to TTAC for running it.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Based on what happened here in Colorado, the caucus system needs to go away. Many of these caucus places were so crowded that voters were turned away. That’s not how we should be voting for candidates.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        This is an interesting point & is being raised more frequently lately not just about caucus states, but the electoral college –

        -which had as its goal, by the signatories to the Constitution, a way to act as a check/brake on literal democracy rule.

        The U.S. is a constitutional republic, and not a pure democracy.

        Playing into this larger paradigm is the ongoing discussion of a GOP “brokered convention,” which I still maintain will not happen assuming Trump wins more delegates than anyone else (it will lead to an implosion of the GOP base via civil war, and not only guarantee a Hillary Clinton win, but GOP losses in both the House & Senate).

        Expect more establishment types (and media moguls like Murdoch) to get behind Trump if he wins 3 or 4 out of 5 of: Florida, Pennsylvania, Michigan, New York and especially, Ohio.

        There’s now a behind the scenes war brewing between Sessions & Romney.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          He’s not winning Ohio unless Kasich gets out after Michigan. He should win Michigan, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania though.

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          “The Y,S is a constitutional republic, and not a pure democracy”. Nonsense.

          North Korea is a constitutional republic. So is China. The US is a democracy, whose government is elected by the people in free elections.

          The electoral college was not born of some noble purpose. It was an expedient compromise between the slave states, which wanted the President to be elected by Congress, and northern proponents of popular election.

          The slave states would not agree to popular election for fear it could lead to the federal government giving the vote to slaves in what would be the only national election. The north was adamantly against the “shenanigans” that could occur if Congress was empowered to elect the President.

          The resultant compromise was the electoral college, selected (not necessarily by election) on a state-by-state basis.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            In a pure democracy, the candidate receiving the most popular votes wins, which would make the electoral college moot.

            I’m not sure how you can refute this point or the role or purpose of the electoral college, let alone claim that the US. is not a constitutional republic vs a pure democracy?

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            There is no such thing as a “pure democracy”. The US, like most Western countries, largely practices representative democracy. The voters elect those who sit in the legislature. Some states allow a measure of direct democracy through the citizen initiative or Proposition system.

            The electoral college broadly fits this framework, albeit not perfectly. But, as I noted, it was an expedient compromise from the beginning, and has become more democratic over time (all electors are now popularly elected, which was not originally the case). In all but 4 elections, the winning candidate for President has also won the national popular vote.

            Any rational justification for the electoral college disappeared a very long time ago, but it lingers on because the politicians like it. Effectively, it means they can limit their campaigning to the 7-10 states that are competitive, and ignore the other 40+.

          • 0 avatar
            derekson

            “In a pure democracy, the candidate receiving the most popular votes wins, which would make the electoral college moot.”

            That isn’t pure democracy. It is a pure Democratic Republic.

            A pure democracy would have citizens voting directly on issues without a congress, etc.

  • avatar
    skitter

    Since this is already a melee with lots of controversial comments, I just wanted to say:

    Dear TTAC,

    We will never be friends on Facebook.
    That time is past.
    Stop asking.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Rumor has it…

    http://docquery.fec.gov/cgi-bin/forms/C00431171/1047622/

    Now, go forth talking heads!

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    SO..we is the article about cars anyway..lol..

    I am Neoconservative and all of the candidates scare the hell out of me.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    There was a good radio piece on the Marketplace radio show today about how Mexican manufacturing wages are now effectively something like 40% lower than Chinese wages. They interviewed a lady who made high-tech fiber-optic parts in a maquiladora (Mexican factory) for a US company. To stay warm in winter, her family had to burn wood in a barrel in the house. And even that bundle of wood cost literally half a day’s wages. She and other workers tried forming a union to ask management for better pay. They were all fired. Totally illegal, but the government is weak and consequently so is the rule of law in Mexico, so “chanza gorda” for justice. The wealthy elite and the drug cartels–but I repeat myself!–rule the place.

    It’s not just manufacturing. Indian programmers work cheaper than you do. Chinese engineers work cheaper than you do. Software can do what entry-level lawyers used to do. And the Internet has made it possible to eliminate middlemen such as franchised car dealerships–whew, at least there’s one upside!

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Approximate pay of a Mexican auto worker doing work formerly done by U.S.workers whether in assembly plants are automotive (or other) component factories is around $3.50 per hour (vs $18 to $22 per hour for just wages in U.S. plus additional $12 to $18 per hour for health care/retirement plan/other benefits).

      Mexican industry has been boosted be peso devaluation (now 18 pesos to 1 USD; formerly 9 to 1).

      Average pay for similar worker in China is $800 USD per month. But even at this relatively low wage, and coupled with China’s rapidly cooling economy, other Asian nations such as Vietnam and Thailand are seeing Chinese factories (also Japanese ones such as Denso & Mitsubishi) set up shop instead of in China, because wages are closer to USD $550 per month – so the race to bid lowest labor is hot & heavy in southeast Asia (this spells deep trouble for South Korean mainly unionized auto workers now making roughly $18,000 USD per year when including benefits).

      As for politics, Trump will sin Ohio by a comfortable margin, and win by 15 to 20 % points in Florida, then going on to win in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania & New York.

      He then will have by far the most delegates in 3 days (probably well over 700), and mathematically will merely need to win 40 to 45% of remaining delegates in two man race with Ted Cruz (Cruz will then need to win 65 to 70% of remaining delegates just to catch up to and tie Trump).

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Trump definitely has tapped into the discontent of America’s workers all across the political spectrum and created a movement.

        But the GOP is in total disarray and looking for any means to deny Trump the nomination.

        Trump personifies the end of the historical GOP, and the GOP knows it.

        I think Hillary will be the next POTUS because every woman eligible to vote in America will want to see that first woman POTUS.


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