By on March 21, 2016

2017 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

Volkswagen has revealed the production version of its 2017 Golf Alltrack, a wagon for people who worry they won’t be able to clear that shallow ditch in a regular Golf.

Based on the Golf Sportwagen, the Alltrack pairs that body and drivetrain with 4Motion all-wheel drive, lower body cladding, and close to an inch of extra ground clearance.

The Alltrack gets a more aggressive facial treatment than its vanilla brethren, with honeycomb mesh filling the grille and lower fascia, plus standard foglights.

The all-wheel drive system in the Alltrack uses a Haldex-5 coupling that sends 50 percent of the engine’s torque rearward if the vehicle detects front wheel slippage. Electronic differential locks send power to the opposite end of the axle for individual wheel slippage.

Very adventurous owners will inevitably test the Alltrack’s hill descent control mode, which we assume should only be attempted on slanted meadows, or in, say, San Francisco.

Powering the Alltrack is Volkswagen’s well-regarded 1.8-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, making 170 horsepower and an increased 199 pounds-feet of torque. Offered initially with a six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission when it goes on sale this fall, a six-speed manual will be offered later.

The usual safety features come along for the ride, but high-end items like automatic emergency braking and adaptive cruise control are listed as optional equipment.

Volkswagen hasn’t released fuel economy figures for the Alltrack, but the two-wheel drive SportWagen is rated at 35 miles per gallon on the highway for the automatic transmission model and 36 mpg highway for the manual.

[Images: Volkswagen of America]

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102 Comments on “2017 Volkswagen Golf Alltrack: Hit the (Minor) Trails and Bring the Family...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    What manner of wagon is this?

  • avatar
    92golf

    I really want one of these. With a six-speed stick and the TSi engine.

    It would fit pretty much every use I am likely to want a vehicle for.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      If it’s like the current Sportwagen, it will be a 5-speed stick and will only be offered on the base trim.

      • 0 avatar
        moorewr

        The news out of VW specifically mentions that it is a six-speed.

        As to trims.. well, it’s VW’s first crack at trims in the Diesel-scandal era, so it will be interesting to watch. Diesel manuals always came in higher trims before.. including the GSW SE and SEL.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    XC70 owners rejoice.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    What a novel idea to try and build a vehicle to compete with the Outback and Crosstrek. Hopefully after a year VW will be discounting $4000 to $6000 off the Alltrack like other currently built products in their lineup.

    • 0 avatar

      Yes, it’s only about ten years too late.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Toyota has the resources to built a Subaru Outback competitor. Odd no one has tried to build something for this market.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          There are some niches that are small enough that most carmakers just don’t bother competing. Toyota “owns” the AWD minivan market, mostly because Honda and FCA don’t see enough sales to do the engineering. Similarly, Mazda owns the small convertible sports car market and Dodge owns the large, inexpensive RWD sedan market.

          Occasionally you’ll see someone come in and try to compete (e.g., Solstice) but for the most part, they don’t bother. Now, if VW sells the hell out of this, you’ll see more players, but until then, they’ll let Subaru own it.

          The small/midsize pickup market will be interesting to watch over the next decade. Will GM stay in the fight? Will Ford join, or will everyone go home and let Toyota dominate? Unclear.

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          Toyota already tried as did Honda. Toyota Venza, 2008 – 2015. RIP. Honda Crosstour, 2010 – 2015. RIP. Both based on their respective mid-sized sedan as is the Outback.

          • 0 avatar
            fiasco

            I wouldn’t call the Venza and Crosstour trying…the Venza looked like what the Buick Rendezvous should have, and the Crosstour looked like a Prius got ahold of Lance Armstrong’s stash. Did either have a stick shift?

            The Outback has gotten huge to the point where my 13-year-old Legacy wagon (jacked up on King springs) looks Impreza sized. If somebody placed a firearm at my melon and said I had to sign paperwork on a new car to replace my (rapidly deteriorating) Legacy, I would probably choose a Crosstrek.

            The VW is intriguing, but I’d need it in brown with a diesel…oh, snap.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            You can’t even get the regular Golf SportWagen in brown (but you could on the Jetta SportWagen). I know because I wanted mine in brown; they didn’t make it. My next choice was that cerulean blue, but there were none. So I had to go with grey.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Shame they don’t offer the Golf in that shade of metallic brown, it is an excellent color. Combined with the two tone black and light tan interior, the Jetta Sportwagen looked like an expensive vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            Venza, Crosstour were both poor attempts against the Outback. Very bulky vehicles and little sport. For the most part those vehicles were purchased by the over 65 years of age crowd. Subaru Outback hits a bigger age bracket.

        • 0 avatar
          wfishes64

          Toyota owns Subaru. The need may not be immediate.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      Volkswagen’s price slashing could stand to be less annoying.

      Hearing a radio ad several times a day that repeats “A new Jetta for $139 a month” six times in 20 seconds is enough to drive a man insane! I don’t f*cking WANT a Jetta, especially not a 1.4T Jetta that probably has little to no options!

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Yeah, local VW dealers have dozens of 2016 Jetta S with manuals for $13,700 and Passat special editions for $16,500. I’d hate to have purchased one of those vehicles in the past two years.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Also seems like it’ll cut into the Allroad’s market.

      Or at least force them to compete on price a little; as much as I love the Allroad in concept I can’t imagine buying one, at current prices.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    An Outback’d version of VW’s wagons would have been a great idea, I dunno, a decade ago?

    I guess I have to give them some credit for finally seeing the light, but I wonder about their future in the US at all at this point; it may be too little, too late.

  • avatar
    moorewr

    Hey, look, a manual AWD wagon. Let’s not quibble over details here, let’s pop the champagne.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Impreza – made in Japan (for now anyways)

      • 0 avatar
        moorewr

        Wasn’t claiming the Alltrack was the only one. Although the Impreza is a bit smaller in the trunk department.

        • 0 avatar
          PeriSoft

          My mom has a stick Impreza wagon. The interior is abysmal, just absolutely awful. The headliner is made of cardboard. It makes her 2002 Forester look like an S-Class, it makes my 2.4 Sonata look like a Viper, and it makes my dad’s 350Z look like a 60 foot tractor trailer.

          Goes in the snow, though.

          • 0 avatar
            moorewr

            Yeah. Subaru interiors are just.. not good. The BRZ is the only one I could live with.

          • 0 avatar
            PeriSoft

            It’s strange. That Forester – it wasn’t upmarket (rough carpet, hard plastics) but it felt solid and looked right. The textures were good, the fabric was great, the switches worked well. It was inexpensive but honest. The Impreza is just cheap, cheap, CHEAP. Even the shape of the moldings screams, “We don’t care!”. It reminds me of ’70s Detroit.

            I mean, OK, here we go. Here’s the center console on the Impreza:

            http://file.kelleybluebookimages.com/kbb/vehicleimage/evoxseo/xxl/9804/2015-subaru-impreza-cup-holder1_9804_066_640x480.jpg

            …and here’s the Sonata (this one has contrast stitching because SPORT but aside from that is the same as the base model):

            http://image.motortrend.ca/f/83600817+w640/2015-Hyundai-Sonata-Sport-20T-center-console.jpg

            The MSRP difference between these cars is 2k; the practical price difference seems to be close to zero (despite their being in different classes). Subaru really needs to do better.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Perisoft,

            I think with the Impreza being built in Japan and all the extra AWD hardware vs. other compacts while staying price competitive, something had to give! If you looked at older Impreza MSRPs from the 90s and adjusted them for inflation, the features you get on a new Impreza as standard would put things in perspective. Same applies to the Camry. The interior quality and attention to detail of a 1992 Camry LE would really astound many people used to modern cost-cut interiors, but then you tell them they’d be paying $31k inflation adjusted dollars for a car with cloth and a cassette player and no Bluetooth, they’d lose interest quickly.

            Having said all that, I was astounded at the richness of most of the interior materials, including the cloth seats of a Lafayette-built Outback 2.5i premium that I test drove last fall. They really must not have very high margins on these things as they try to expand their sales across the country, at the expense of per-unit profit. That’s my theory anyways.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            All Subaru interiors were total crap until 2015. Now they’re better. At least on-par. But not spectacular.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’d argue Subaru interiors were decent/good for a while in the early 00 era, though the shapes were funky. They cheaped them after that quite badly.

          • 0 avatar
            Advance_92

            The interiors took a real dive after 2007. The dashboard of my 05 is very pleasant.

  • avatar
    mike1dog

    I imagine we’ll see these twenty-five years from now on bringatrailer. They seem to like obscure fragile european four wheel drive wagons.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    That’s a really nice looking utility-wagon. Too bad it’s a VW.

  • avatar
    jimble

    Looks pretty slick but “close to an inch” of extra ground clearance barely seems worth the effort when the Subaru alternatives have ground clearance rivaling some serious SUVs.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Exactly what I was thinking. As if VW is betting most prospective buyers will see AWD and plastic cladding and immediately stop comparing. This is bound to be a far better drive than a Forester or Crosstrek XV, though.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        In all fairness, that’s probably exactly what will happen. Of course, people who buy Subarus…typically buy more Subarus. The brand has a very loyal customer base. So VW will be hard-pressed to tap into it, and will likely need to attract new customers.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          What do we want to bet they price it too high? It’ll sell about as well as the A4 Allroad.

          If you want something a decent size, get the Outback. It’s larger and cheaper.

          If you want to spend $45K, just get the XC70, it’s larger and better.

        • 0 avatar
          360joules

          Kyree is correct on Subaru loyalty. Bought my mother’s Forester which is her third Subaru. Leafing through my stepdad’s folder of receipts was interesting on a car with mostly highway 110k miles manual transmission. 2010 only model year hydraulic clutch resulting in $960 clutch replacement? 3 CV joint replacements. Starter. Head gasket. Water pump – not part of timing service. All on a car driven in temperate left coast environment and well maintained by my accountant stepdad.

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      VW may be right on that note Jimble, most folks never take their outback anywhere near a trail. Everyone who wanted a AWD brown wagon with a stick sign up now, as a VW wagon owner I say it will not be worth the extra inch of clearance and there is not much need for awd. I am sure VW will price it to be pricey as well. I think a Passet wagon with AWD would have sold better, kind of a larger outback, cheaper XC70.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I might might be cynical, but I doubt a lack of ground clearance will drive away that many buyers. It looks like it’s got capabilities, which seems to be enough for most of the market. It’ll outsell the regular Golf SportWagen at least.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I almost agreed to GTI but then I saw “Made in Mexico”. Can’t do that

    • 0 avatar
      moorewr

      Nothing wrong with VWs from Puebla. Well, nothing wrong beyond VW’s list of sins, but, hey, a Mexican GTI is a real GTI.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Not big fan of cars assembled by people without middle school diploma

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          And apparently, not a big fan of learning about the Mexican workforce, either. As it turns out, Mexico graduates engineers at one of the highest rates globally. An Economist poll found Mexican workers to be amongst the hardest working. And the quality of VW product from Mexico has actually exceeded that of German made VWs.

          But feel free to get your news from Trump brochures – it’s really working for you!

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            No Mexican can match dedication of Japanese. Europe? They all on dope over there, or Somalian immigrants. No wonder. I wouldn’t buy made in Europe either. Japan-1, Canada-made Japanese designs-2, US-made Japanese designs-3.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Slavuta,
            That gold medal in your avatar – was it awarded for racism?

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            I’ve learned Spanish when I was 35. I speak to Mexicans their tongue. But I also understand and said this before, and 10 or more years before Mr. Trump made it part of his campaign, that I will not buy a car made in Mexico or China. China even more so. i see it as insult that American company closes its doors in US, builds cars in Mexico and brings it back here. I never was opposing our companies building things outside US. But I said – one condition – sell it outside US as well.

            As far as education, only recently full education is required in Mexico. And yes, I believe that to build a good product you need to be able to process information. And the only way to learn it, is through rigorous education process where you have to solve thousands of problems related to math, chemistry, physics and biology. So when you work at the factory, you can identify a problem and solve it if required. Do you know what quality worker is? – is the one who goes from assembly line to engineering department and tells them, “look guys, here is what is wrong in assembly line and here is how you should fix it”. To be like that, you need to develop such thinking.

        • 0 avatar
          RideHeight

          “people without middle school diploma”

          Pretty much describes the hourly/daily workforce of pre-WWII America. They built some good stuff.

          I would of course prefer those jobs to be in the US but it’s not the Mexican workers’ fault we got abandoned.

        • 0 avatar
          moorewr

          Statistically speaking, Puebla is as good as any VW factory in the world. It’s no Westmoreland.

  • avatar
    jimble

    No doubt the VW will ride and handle a lot better than a Subie. Since I traded in my old Jetta wagon on a Crosstrek I really miss the VW’s driving dynamics. What I don’t miss (in addition to the repair bills) is scraping things off the underside of the car on a semi-regular basis.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    This Alltrack seems like a nice enough piece. But I’ll stick with my Forester.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    Can’t be no worse then the repair bills on a Subaru. Been there done that.

  • avatar
    FromaBuick6

    I’m guessing there’s about half a dozen potential for this thing in the USA. The other half dozen buyers were holding out for the TDI version until the scandal broke; now they’ll never darken the door of a VAG dealer again.

    Wouldn’t the money spent adding Haldex AWD to a niche model Golf been put to better use on a new CUV that isn’t laughably overpriced for the North American market? Or, I don’t know, not cheating on diesel emissions?

  • avatar
    mason

    This needs a TDI and it would be f*king awesome.

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      Yeah, that was my thought as well, but it remains to be seen whether VW will be able to make an EPA compliant TDI without totally neutering the damn thing.

    • 0 avatar
      TDIGuy

      There was much excitement about that amongst the TDI fans when the Alltrack was first announced. However VW already said they won’t bring the TDI Alltrack to North America because they (ironically) can’t fit the emissions equipment in with the suspension of the US version. In Europe they use a different suspension layout so there is room for the urea tank.

      Just think, we almost had the unicorn. (brown, AWD, wagon, manual transmission, diesel)

    • 0 avatar
      tekdemon

      Please, as if it needs to be any slower (I own a TDI and unless you really want to ruin the air around you even worse there’s no way this will ever have acceleration times even close to being sporty with the 2.0 TDI in it).
      What this really needs is the 2.0T motor instead of the 1.8T, since the 2.0T has way better limits and doesn’t suffer from as many issues these days while the 1.8T is blowing up it’s rear main seals all the time.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    It’s not as though non-Subaru wagons in this vein don’t already exist, guys. Audi’s (A4) allroad and Volvo’s V60 Cross Country come to mind. And the Ford Flex sort of qualifies, since it sits higher than a normal wagon and also offers AWD…but doesn’t have the faux-rugged cladding.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      V60 CC makes me mad because it costs the same as the XC70. A4 Allroad makes me mad because it’s entirely too expensive and not that good, and we should get the A6 Allroad version other countries have.

      Like Flex too, but with the lack of “utility look,” I don’t think it can compete against those other ones.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I had to check the sizes – the GSW is actually in a size class with the Outback and XC70 [maybe 6cf smaller than the XC70, IIRC]; the Allroad and V60CC or XC60 are a size smaller, like I *thought* the Alltrack/GSW would be.

      Too bad the Alltrack will cost too much to be really competitive, almost certainly.

      • 0 avatar
        moorewr

        The allroad is one size up from the Alltrack. Alltrack/GSW/Golf are MQB, so the same platform as the Audi A3.

        Alltrack/GSW are in between the Impreza/XV and the Outback for usable space…

        I expect the Alltrack to come in a bit above $25,000 base, and that’s actually pretty appealing to me. The Volvo and Audi are way more expensive.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          Yeah, vw’s price bogey has to be the outback at 26-ish. If only bc there is no other wagon out there that isn’t a premium brand. Look, the gsw starts at around 22 with fwd, so they’ve got around 4k to add haldex and some trim embellishments. Should be pretty easy actually, provided they maintain their current trim ladder.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            My GSW is a loaded TDI SEL. The only thing it doesn’t have was the Driver Assist package, and it MSRP’d at over $32K (no, I did not pay that much).

            Given the fact that Outback is a full class-size larger and has a long Legacy (see what I did, there?), I don’t know how VW expects to compete. This is clearly still a wagon, not a crossover, and so the only thing it will do is attract the small number of customers VW was missing that wanted an AWD wagon.

            Pointless.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        No, the Golf SportWagen (which I have) is decidedly compact. That puts it in a class with the A4 Avant / allroad, V60 / V60 Cross Country and 328i / 328d wagon, in terms of size.

        The XC70 and Outback are mid-sized.

        • 0 avatar
          moorewr

          Nice! I got as far as test driving a GSW TDI manual before the stop-sale. Gave up waiting and bought a GTI two weeks ago. Je ne regrette rien…

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Haha. I wouldn’t regret it, either (yes, I had to look that up and translate it). I kind of regret not buying that blue Golf R that was in the showroom when I bought my Golf SportWagen TDI.

    • 0 avatar
      Advance_92

      The Outback is pretty massive these days; it’s got to be bigger than a Golf wagon, isn’t it? No manual option, either, and an AllTrack Golf should still come in below the A$ (I mean 4) and similar Volvos and I think the lack of a manual in the US affects them all.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    I am guessing this was a pretty easy raid the parts bin project while the badly needed SUV is a much bigger undertaking but I think is on its way here assuming VW stays in the USA which I think they will, know how about plaid seat on a higher trim GTI.

  • avatar
    Acd

    VW should have built this years ago. The next release should include a front wheel drive version without the extra AWD pieces, weight and cost for those buyers who want the look but whose idea of off-roading is driving up a gravel driveway once in a while.

    • 0 avatar
      srh

      This car strikes me as exactly designed for those whose idea of off-roading is driving up a gravel driveway. And there’s nothing wrong with that. For a few weeks each year I need AWD and a bit of extra clearance to drive up my gravel driveway.

      If it really hits 35-36 highway MPG with a moderately sporty feel, that sure beats the ~28MPG I observed in my wife’s Outback 3.6R.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        That’s the FWD mileage rating. The AWD will -not- be as good. AWD is always a decent mileage penalty.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        There’s also (in some markets – often ones where Subaru sells well, here in the NW, Colorado) where there’s a fair amount of dirt-road driving for recreation.

        Not really “off-road”, but soft-road, sometimes with mud, where a bit of extra traction can save a lot of aggravation…

        (Though note that with the 1.8T it’s not going to be nearly as powerful as the 3.6R – the 2.5 is the comparable engine in the Outback.)

  • avatar
    Jimal

    Volkswagen desperately needs AWD cars in places like New England and the mountain west, where Subaru has been cleaning their clocks. Before Dieselgate this car was highly anticipated by dealers and customers. Now? I don’t know if it is going to do much to stop the bleeding, whenever it actually starts arriving at dealers. Too little, too late.

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    I was interested in one of these, and then I read that towing is not recommended…which is strange, because the Jetta SportWagen had a 2,000 pound capacity.

    Given my limited need for the load capacity of a pickup (occasional trips to the home center and nursery), I’m seriously considering an AWD wagon or CUV and a light trailer when it comes time to replace my Ranger, and it looks like I’m back to looking at the Subaru Outback or Forester. The things I carry aren’t heavy, but they are large and flat (like sheets of plywood) or things I don’t want inside of a vehicle (bags of manure).

    I know it’s been covered on this site ad nauseum, but it’s frustrating how manufacturers slap a “towing not recommended” label on their vehicles in the US, while the same vehicles get a rating in Europe.

    • 0 avatar
      vtnoah

      I think you will be very happy with the utility provided by a Forester or Outback. Lots of cargo space for stuff you want to carry in the car, can tow a somewhat decent load when you don’t. I’ve got a 2011 Forester that I’ve owned since new and it’s great.

      • 0 avatar
        moorewr

        ..and the Forester still comes with a manual (in some trims)! Just have to give up on nav and the turbo.

        Just checked – highest trim is 2.5i Premium. Ugly, but very functional.

    • 0 avatar
      formula m

      Honda CR-V has lots of space and can tow your trailer

  • avatar
    hybridkiller

    Wow, a whole extra inch of ground clearance, huh? Impressive… /s

  • avatar
    kurtamaxxguy

    Pity VW didn’t offer a version of the Golf R’s engine in the Alltrack so it could better complete with the Forester XT. The XT’s has some WRX creed and scoots around quite well. Unfortunately, its new FA engine’s not trouble free (4 engine reprograms and now a left bank valve job within 3 years (all under Subaru warranty, fortunately)).

  • avatar
    NickS

    I’d have preferred a passat version of this, but regardless, whatever VW brings here it had better come with AT LEAST 5/50 warranty on it, and VERY competitive pricing. And let’s face it, even if they offer 5/50 (as if) there is 10/100 offered by other brands today. So yeah, no bueno, VW.

    The whole “drives great, but it sucks to be you when some critical internal component fails/wears out after warranty” just won’t work in this market.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    Obviously we are not a fan of VW here but this looks like a great alternative to the Tiguan. I worry a bit about approach angles but eh… this thing is fine.

    Say the 1.6 turbodiesel from the commericial vans, 7 spd DCT, maybe a chip and we are good to go.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      The 7-speed DCT is, IIRC, a dry-clutch unit. I don’t know that it can handle the torque of the diesel. The only vehicle it’s in, in North America, is the Jetta Hybrid…which has the 1.4T

  • avatar
    brettc

    Well there it is, straight from VWoA. So it seems as though it’ll actually exist on lots at some point soon. I would be interested in one if VW hadn’t been dicking their TDI owners around for the past 6 months. Oh well.

    Good luck, VW. Hope you sell a lot to offset the buybacks you’ll need to do.

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      “…if VW hadn’t been dicking their TDI owners around for the past 6 months.”

      I guess it’s a matter of perspective. Personally I don’t feel dicked around at all – I still have a car that I love, plus an extra 1000 bucks and 3 years of roadside assistance that I didn’t have before. And of course there’s still likely to be some class action settlement candy to come.
      I recognize that I’m probably in the minority here, but I’m pretty sanguine about the whole thing.

  • avatar
    gyang

    Looks like a more fuel efficient alternative to the Tiguan.

  • avatar
    tedward

    This is interesting for a number of reasons. I saw this car last year and they were showing a German model with a torque converter 6 Speed, basically a base wagon with auto. Switching to dsg and a 6 manual means vw is mixing r drivetrain bits with the 1.8, something only audi has done so far with the a3. Until I read this I was only interested in the eventual normal ride height version expecting the manual there. It might be my next family wagon.

    The euro car also had the fold away tow hitch. Regardless of vw’s ratings I see jsw’s and gsw’s all the time with installed hitches.

    Also 35/36 mpg is epa rating on the fwd car with the 1.8, we’ll see if that is the case with more tire exposed, awd, and the shorter ratio 6 Speed transmission. I’m skeptical.

    Why the comment hate on this vs the outback? It’s smaller, but it will have a much nicer interior, a way better engine, better gearbox by far, and easily outhandle the outback. Demuro rightly called out the outback as worse to drive than most cuv’s despite its wagon shape.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      “Switching to dsg and a 6 manual means vw is mixing r drivetrain bits with the 1.8”

      Excellent commentary as always. The Haldex AWD is–beside this new Golf Alltrack–unique to the R within the Golf range, but the 6-speed manual and the optional DSG are not. Those are also the two transmission options for the TDI versions of the Golf and Golf SportWagen. My own Golf SportWagen TDI has the DSG.

      Then again, seeing as how they’re not making any TDIs right now, technically it *is* just the Golf R that’s using those bits.

      I do think it’s silly that the standard 1.8T Golf and Golf SportWagen have a 5-speed manual instead of a 6-speed, and you can only get it in the base S trim…because the 1.8T is a *very* good engine. On the—now non-existent—TDI, you can get a 6-speed all the way up to the fully-loaded SEL trim with Driver Assist and Lighting Package (good luck finding one spec’d that way, though).

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        Kyree

        Yeah I was considering the transmission plus haldex as one unit. At least for homologation purposes. This bodes really well for future awd vw’s. It might even mean they are shedding the 5, although I doubt that.

        I had an opportunity to ask someone who would know once and they claimed the difference between the two transmissions was several mpg (in the 5’s favor), but this was at the beginning of the mkvi generation. I believe the 6 has longer ratios now. The golf twin channel turbos have a wider powerband than the old borg Warners did, so that might be a factor in the switch. Also vw has shed the 2.5 and 2.0 so I bet fleet mileage isn’t really a concern if it ever was.

        VW should make a gti wagon variant or offer the 1.8 6 Speed at se trim. Tdi’s available or otherwise. It almost smacks of protecting the tdi by keeping the 1.8 down the way they do it now.


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