By on February 17, 2016

1989 Plymouth Horizon America Rear 3/4 in California junkyard, Murilee Martin/The Truth About Cars

The Dodge Omni/Plymouth Horizon (collectively known as the Omnirizon) was based on a Simca design originally intended for European use and was Chrysler’s first American built, front-wheel drive, economy car. The Omnirizon was cheap, got the job done, and sold very well, staying in the American marketplace from 1978 through to 1990 with few major changes.

We’ve seen an early Horizon and now I’ve spotted this late one in a California self-service yard.

1989 Plymouth Horizon America Engine Bay, Murilee Martin/The Truth About Cars

By 1989, the standard 1.7-liter VW engine had been replaced by the Detroit-designed 2.2-liter engine originally intended for use in the many-branched K-Car family tree. With turbocharging and Carroll Shelby badging, the Dodge Omni GLH Horizon sibling was very quick for its time (and probably would lose a drag race to a 2016 four-cylinder Camry, but let’s not dwell on such comparisons).

1989 Plymouth Horizon America Badge, Murilee Martin/The Truth About Cars

The America version of the Horizon was a fixed-price version that attempted to steal sales from the likes of the Toyota Tercel and Subaru Justy. In 1989, the Horizon America listed at $6,595, versus $6,640 for the Misery Plus Edition™ Tercel EZ (which, admittedly, was impossible to kill), $5,866 for the breathtakingly underpowered Subaru Justy DL, $5,499 for the Hyundai Excel (which would have been used up by about 1994), or (pause for pained laughter here) $4,349 for the Yugo GV. The Omnirizon certainly was more fun to drive than most of its competition. With a new zero-option ’89 Civic going for $6,348 (if you could find one selling at list price, or even find one at all, what with the limited supply at Honda dealers back then), however, the Omnirizon comes in as the second-best econobox deal of 1989.

The pride’s inside!

Wisely, the marketers didn’t mention the Omnirizon’s red-white-and-blue French origins in these flag-waving ads.

So successful that America buys almost one a minute (it’s not clear whether that’s just business hours or 24/7).

[Images: Murilee Martin/The Truth About Cars]

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71 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1989 Plymouth Horizon America...”


  • avatar
    spreadsheet monkey

    A Junkyard find that Brits can relate to. We had a ’79 Horizon 1.5 in bronze which I barely remember as a kid. It was an OK car but my family were Ford loyalists and went back to Escorts and Cortinas after two years of Horizon ownership.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    Picked up a 1984 version for $200.00 years ago with a broken timing belt.Had the 1.7 VW engine. Replaced the timing belt and drove that car back and forth to NYC for 5 years. Sold it for $500.00 to my buddy who used it for another 2-3 year. Cheap but not a bad car for everyday use. The hatchback was handy and other then basis upkeep the car never let me down. The plastic interior was nasty but the heater worked in the winter and the windows rolled down in the summer. What more could you ask for.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    When I was a junior in high school my best friend had a 2.2L non-turbo Omni with a stick shift. For the time it seemed pretty fast, but this was the era of low horsepower cars. Like my dad’s Nissan Stanza with 99hp – hoo ya!

    One night we were bombing around in the Omni, racing other cars, and just acting like idiots. We came up on another Omni. I saw the GLH badges and told my friend not to even try. He ignored my advice. He lost that one by a few car lengths.

  • avatar
    Joss

    I recall halfway through the Omni had better competition at the Chrysler store from Mitsu badged as Dodge Colts.

  • avatar
    DownEaster

    My dad bought a new 79 Plymouth Horizon with the VW 1.7 litre engine. It was bright orange. Easiest car to find in a parking lot. We had it in the family until 1985 when on the way back from college I rear ended another car with it. It was a decent car but was built cheap. The doors would often stick and won’t open. The engine used a quart of oil every 300 miles or so due to problems with valve stems. The carb on the car had to be rebuilt and the speedometer didn’t work right. Not a bad car but very buggy. The car had a weird driving position. Still it had a good amount of power with a 4 speed. The power train in the early Omnirizons was a VW Engine and transmission. The Omnirizons used a carb but the VW Rabbits using the same power train were fuel injected. The second car my dad bought new.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    Among my many, many weird ideas for cars that I’ll likely never get around to doing is one that involves taking of these Horizons, giving it a “Euro” makeover like the kids do with old watercooled Volkswagens, and showing up at car show to troll. But then I realize that I’m an adult and I have better things to do with my time.

  • avatar
    Balto

    I’m always amazed at how clean the pick your part yards that you go to are. The ones I visit (on the east coast) have at least 6 inches of mud even if it hasn’t rained in weeks, stagnant water in every footwell and trunk, a carpet of stray parts discarded by careless pullers, and soil so permeated by fluids, hardware, and shards of plastic that plants probably won’t grow there for at least 200 years. I’m amazed there’s grass growing in that yard! I think you’ve even showed us pictures of cars in yards that are paved, I can’t imagine that luxury.

    • 0 avatar
      Ostrich67

      West Coast states have stronger environmental laws.

    • 0 avatar

      most of the yards here in AZ are in pretty good shape. Some are very clean, and I think one I’ve been to has indeed been paved.
      sometimes it depends when you go. I’ve gone a few times where there have been parts scattered everywhere making it very difficult to move. Othertimes I’ve seen employees actively cleaning parts from the walk areas

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    As I child I recall these were only sold in two colors in Indiana.

    -Light cloud blue
    -Dark red

    It’d be interesting to spot one from 1990, with the 1-year only drivers airbag. I must point out here the natural garage mate (for many reasons) for the Horizon America is the AMC Eagle Sundancer.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    You have to give Chrysler credit for one thing. Although they cut god knows how many corners making these, they still kept to their conviction that a proper car has full gauges long after anyone else did.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    I hope some L-body fanatic found this car, seeing as it has less than 27,000 miles. There were probably plenty of parts that weren’t worn out yet, including the best interior in the L-body world.

  • avatar
    JMII

    My mother had one of these in boring silver with an equally dull grey interior. It replaced a black on black VW Rabbit. She moved up to the Omni to get 4 doors instead of 2 as my brother and I were growing teenage boys and didn’t fit in the Rabbit very wel. The Omni-cron (as we called it) was the car I learned to drive in back in ’86. It was a fun little thing with the manual transmission. I remember the green dash lights. I did laps around the block getting the feel for driving. We lived in a small developement in which the main road formed a “T” with cul-de-sacs at both ends so no thru traffic. I treated it like a mini race track and used the Omni to explore the limits of understeer in 2nd or 3rd gear with the radio blasting to R.E.M. While ours was older then the model picture here, it had a nicer interior. It was a Dodge so maybe those were better versions?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      My neighbor got an ’85 Omni with a pretty basic interior, and traded it for a ’84 Horizon because his wife couldn’t drive a stick. The Horizon interior was pretty upscale by comparison. His son was still driving it in 2007.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    ‘murica.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    In Spring of ’82 I took drivers training in one, and swore I’d never buy one. It didn’t even have power steering. Yikes!

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Small cars dont need power steering. Ive had plenty without it (Festiva, Saturn SL, Hondas etc), and even once converted a Tempo GLS to manual steering using a new manual rack and Escort Pony mounts. I loved the way it felt. I like a heavier steering feel, but thats just me.

      I drove a 1996 Chrysler Concorde LXi with no power steering for 6 months, and a Ford Aerostar without it for over a year! These were the result of mechanical failures, not manual-steering conversions lol. The poor Aerostar’s system worked, but leaked horribly (as did the above-mentiined Tempo) which I never got around to properly repairing. The Aerostar had many, many more miles and was older than the stupid LH (Concorde), to be honest, I really just felt it wasnt worth fixing and drove/sold it as-is. o the contrary, I wasted hundreds of dollars fixing the LH’s system, only to have the 3.5L V-6 and the trans take a dump on me a few months later.

      I also “converted” my 1986 Isuzu Trooper 4Wd 2-door (lwb) since its pump actually broke in half. I removed the entire system. Without all those lines, pump and belt tangled together (not to mention the smog pump and its related mess I also disposed of), servicing the engine was far easier.

    • 0 avatar
      THEjeffSmif

      I learned to drive on a 4-cyl 1987 Ford Ranger with a manual 4-speed “overdrive” transmission & no power steering. It was my dad’s truck & even after he was doing better financially & had multiple opportunities to upgrade to much better vehicles, he kept the Ranger with the intentions of my use of it in my high school years. He always said it would make the perfect learning vehicle & right he was! I learned so much from driving around in that little truck in the 2 years I used it & it’s made me a better person! In the 18 years that’s passed since then I’ve appreciated every other car I’ve owned/rented/driven/borrowed.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “With turbocharging and Carroll Shelby badging, the Dodge Omni GLH Horizon sibling was very quick for its time (and probably would lose a drag race to a 2016 four-cylinder Camry, but let’s not dwell on such comparisons).”

    Maybe, maybe not. Depends on which GLH we’re talking about – there were three, actually.

    The first GLH had an uprated engine but was naturally aspirated. That one might lose to a Camry. There was also a GLH turbo, which was quite a bit quicker. Then there was the GLHS, which had a 175-hp intercooled turbo and did 0-60 in about six and a half seconds, which was astounding for its day, and would lay waste to a four-banger Camry.

    But the 0-60 times can’t describe the sheer YEE-HAH quality of the GLHS. We’re used to modern turbos, which kick in at lower RPMs for around town torque, but the GLH’s turbos kicked in like a JATO rocket after about 3000 RPM, accompanied by terrifyingly comical amounts of torque steer. It was like a rolling “Jackass” stunt.

    I actually came close to buying one of these back in the day and probably would have pulled the trigger on the GLHS if I hadn’t been an over-the-road salesman at the time – the suspension was about as compliant as a Radio Flyer wagon, and the hair-trigger power delivery would have gotten real old on a five-hour Interstate trip. Plus, the driving position in these was always weird. Probably good that I didn’t buy it, in retrospect…

  • avatar
    countymountie

    Grandpa bought a 1980 Omni after taking Iacocca up on his offer of paying $50 to drive the car. It was loaded with A/C and cruise control and a really nice interior. I wondered why he didn’t buy an X-car instead. Considering the Omni shelled the transmission at 67k, it’s hard to say a Citation would have been worse. He turned into an addict adding an Omni 024 coupe that he rebuilt a couple of times over along with a Rampage pickup.

    The first nice car mom got after marrying my stepdad was a 1983 Omni. It was a 2.2/5 speed and even though it was a stripper, it was still a decent car until the carburetor refused to stay in any sort of acceptable tune. I remember the black paint coming off the window trim and it was gold colored underneath. I would have preferred air conditioning to gold trim.

    Omnis and Horizons bring back a lot of pleasant memories but not enough that I’d really want to own one today unless I had unlimited space to make my own museum of automotive oddballs.

  • avatar

    I’m guessing that this would still be on the road if not for an accident, based on the front end damage and auto auction sticker on the windshield.

    I’m not sure what’s up with the cloth covering the taillights, though.

    • 0 avatar
      econobiker

      Madanthony,
      The cloth is a flap part of the “carpet” which was attached to the hardboard on top of the spare wheel in the trunk area. On my 85 omni 4dr I left this cover part intact when I removed the back seat and built a flat plywood deck level with the trunk area to halfway into the rear footwells. I painted the wood frame black and covered the deck with gray indoor/outdoor carpet and had an enclosed micro-van. I kept a interior matchinh gray bedsheet to cover anything I was transporting from prying eyes even given the dark limo tint i installed on the rear door windows and quarter Windows.

  • avatar
    ericb91

    I always liked the look of these little things. I saw a Dark Red one on the road in immaculate condition about a year ago. Not a spot of rust on it. Driven by a lady who was probably at least in her 80s. I’m sure it probably had less than 50,000 miles on it. My wife couldn’t understand why I was so excited about it haha.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    The first new car I ever bought. In August 1989, the local Dodge dealer was blowing these out at $6k out the door. Must have been about $5300 before taxes and fees. No P/S, no radio, and of course no A/C.

    On paper, it was a heck of a deal. The 2.2 engine was huge – most of the competition only had 1.6 liter engines. Plenty of power, but it would still pull 40mpg on the highway, mid 30s around town.

    I drove it hard. Put 60k on it in four years. Then I wanted a truck, and learned a hard lesson about depreciation of new cars. Trade-in was only $600, and I felt lucky to sell it to a pal for a grand.

  • avatar

    I had an ’83 with a 2.2 5-speed. Someone gave it to me around 1999 when my Cutlass puked its transmission. I loved it for what it was.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    pretty sure its a 1987, and not an “america” edition. the america had a bunch of standard equipment

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    These cars didnt quite get the same rust treatment as upper-level Chryslers (which had lower galvanized bodies), but they were decent econo-boxes with a bit of room in them.

    They also had a few things that most of their competitors lacked, an airbag for ’90 (along with an awful interior re-work), and TORQUE! TORQUE all around!

  • avatar
    skloon

    I remember trying to find a window regulator at pick’n’steal for one of these, there were an even dozen on the lot all of which were missing the regulator or it was broken already

  • avatar
    blppt

    If it was in running condition, you are looking at one of the best winter beaters you can pick up. I seriously have not driven a car since my first (87 Horizon 5 speed) that was anywheres near as good in the snow as this car is/was. And that includes a couple of AWD subies (99 Legacy L, ’03 WRX). The tiny tires (165/80R13, if memory serves) and good weight balance make this car great in the snow/rain.

    Plus, from 88-end this had the TBI EFI, eliminating the horrifically tempermental Holley 2bbl carb that my 87 had.

    Now, my VW CC even with my recent investment of Nokian WR-G3s cannot ascend my driveway in a light coating of snow without spinning the drive wheel helplessly. Some progress, lol.

  • avatar

    I had the GLH, but not -S, version. The 2.2 was turboed, so you got iirc 175 or so before the boost wilted because there wasn’t an intercooler. Torque steer was “pull left while gassing it”. Tires were Eagle GT, one of the first low profiles. Biggest brakes in the parts catalog. Suspension wasn’t as stiff as some claim…there was a clear attempt at compliance, or someone left the engineers alone on this one.

    The seating position was a legacy from europe, but at least the GLH cars got better seats, and the stiff chassis was a bonus. I drove the Dodge sportscar version during the same era off the K chassis and both cars had the exact same engine and running gear but the GLH was much tighter.

    There were fuel delivery problems and it liked to eat the high pressure fuel pump. The shifter was a spoon in pasta cable shifter.

    You could beat up the 320i and the 944. Camaros and Mustangs of the era were wheezy so you could always pull them.
    I even held a 911 off for a while once.

    I have always wondered why they paid shelby to check off all the big parts in the Chrysler parts catalog. I would think any motivated enthusiast intern could have done that. Slap a SuperBee sticker on and done !

    • 0 avatar
      blppt

      I think the non-intercooled 2.2 was 146hp, the i/c one was 174–same one used in the daytona turbo.

      • 0 avatar

        That sounds right. Lack of an intercooler made it a stoplight bandit that would fall over in sustained high speed high rpm running. The boost and spark would be pulled WAY back once things got hot. Today’s intercooled turbos have none of that. I’d have installed the intercooler if the car hadn’t gone away otherwise.

        The malaise era was tough for car guys. I ran a 16.1 at a drag strip with the GLH, and the announcer said “This is the fastest car Dodge makes right now”. He was right. We had some ratty musclecars, beat by four owners. The new stuff, the germans, were stupid expensive. Cheap Mustangs and such weren’t there yet. I loved the Supra Turbo, or the unattainable at the time and now iconic 930 look.

        Today, my 7.5 sec to 60 GLH is slow, and six second cars are easy. Want a 12 second quarter mile car ? You can buy it and still pass pollution. (Better than a TDi, even !!)

        We are in another golden era of speed.

        • 0 avatar
          blppt

          I know what you mean—C&D the other day called a malibu 1.5T “neither quick nor sporty” despite turning in a 8.0 second 0-60.

          When I was driving my 94 Shadow, such times seemed like a pipe dream, lol.

          Even the “dangerously slow” 2.0 base Jetta they tested a couple years back was likely quicker than that aforementioned Shadow (i think C/D got around 11.5 seconds to 60, best numbers i saw for a 94 2.2 Shadow 3spd was like 12.3 or so).

          You kids are so spoiled nowadays!!!! GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

    • 0 avatar
      Felis Concolor

      That’s one of the big differences you’ll find between the recollection by owners of the high performance variants and the normally aspirated versions; the turbo-equipped models used Bosch’s outstanding L-Jetronic fuel injection system, while the computer carbs were still in use on the pedestrian models of Omnirizon and led to a lot of ill will towards what was one of the better small engines in the 80s.

      The biggest problem area was Chrysler’s sourcing of in-tank high volume fuel pumps from at least 2 sources for the L-bodies. Mikuni units provided a much quieter whine while in operation, but their poor RF filters would fail within a year’s time which led to a lot of misdiagnosed defective HPFPs. Smart techs would always check the HVFP first just to ensure the HPFP wasn’t being starved and cavitated into failure. The Bosch sourced pumps had that staccato rattle which was annoying, but they rarely failed and kept the external HPFP properly fed.

      I just learned not to wantonly mash the throttle in order to prevent overheating the induction system and engaging limp mode: once you figured out the car behaved much better diving into a corner faster than everyone else could, then reducing throttle to induce oversteer while aiming the front wheels where you wanted to go, it was much easier to lose the other guy, especially on uphill climbs where steadily reducing atmospheric pressure began to starve the normally aspirated competition.

      I think Shelby went along because Lido asked him to, and while he may have been pointing out the obvious (“Hey, can you fit the K-car’s 2.2 in this thing? It fits? Can the turbo fit, too?”) it was also good to have him in the corner telling the bean counters to stop hindering the project; very few automakers get away with turning their bargain basement $#!+box into their highest performance offering, especially when you look at how much more profit there is in higher level option packages.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I worked for a bank courier service in college in the late 80s. They had three types of cars – mostly stickshift Escorts in both gas and diesel form (the diesels were aging out when I worked there), a couple automatic Omnis, and a single Hyundai Excel with a 4spd stick. The Hyundai made the Omni seem like a Mercedes, but I preferred the diesel Fords best of all. Such strange ergonomics in the Omni, but they did drive pretty well for what they were – also the only cars in the fleet with A/C! That Excel was just amazingly terrible!

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “Such strange ergonomics in the Omni, but they did drive pretty well for what they were”

      Thats in part thanks to VW, who Chrysler took a bit inspiration from when they made the L-Body stuff, which then became the K-Car, so on and so fourth.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I dunno about that – I would say the drive/ride in an Omni owed more to their French Simca origins than to the VWs they shared their early motors with. They had that suppleness the French do so well. At the time I was driving those cars for work, my own cars were ’85 and then ’84 Jettas. Absolutely NO comparison between them, which makes sense given the yawning chasm in price between the VWs and the Dodge.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        I agree. Two buddies of mine had these they were decent enough little cars. Better than the Sh-tvette by far. Maybe not the Escort or Rabbit tho. The 2.2 versions are actually reasonably quick, for the times anyway. The manual shifter was awful though.

  • avatar
    wibigdog

    My first car was a ’85 Omni. It was a rebuilt wreck & had constant carburetor issues. I inherited my mother’s ’89 Omni in ’93 as a high school graduation present. It’s best two features were power steering & fuel injection. That thing was a rocket compared to the constantly poor running ’85. I put almost 30k miles on it in two years. It still chirped the front tires in 2nd gear at 125,000 miles when I made a terrible mistake & traded it for a ’91 Spirit (which blew it’s tranny 10 months later, even though I still owed $4000 on it, but that’s another story). Still have the hatchback key on my key ring 21 years later.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    An attractive woman with two adorable little boys gave me a ride into town one day in a grey-silver Horizon. I sat in the back and the boy next to me said “Mr? [I was like 18 lol] I think youre too tall for this car.” I had to agree, since my head was firmly touching the roof and my knees were higher than my waste, lol. Glad it was a short trip, or they mightve needed the jaws of life to get me out!

    Years later, I drove one down the street with what was supposedly a wheel bearing issue. Turned out to be bad tires, but I do remember I wasnt as squished in the front like I was in the back, the egronomics were weird and I was uncomfortable the entire time my @§§ was in the seat.

    Not a car Id ever consider, and Im a guy who loves Ford Aspire 2-doors/Festivas! Might be shaped like an egg (Aspire) or a giant work boot (Festiva), but they have great headroom and are not terribly unplesant to drive with a manual trans.

  • avatar
    GuidoAnchovy

    I’ve got an 87 with just at 50k on it. Red with a red interior. After replacing that damned Holley 6150 (or whatever model it was) with a Weber 32/36 it runs pretty well now. If I could only get it to stop dieseling at shut off.

    • 0 avatar
      econobiker

      GuidoAnchovy,
      You 87 diesels because the A/C has died and /or the a/c belt was removed. Chrysler knew the motor would run-on so they used the A/C compressor to drag the motor to a stop by briefly engaging the a/c compressor upon turning off the car. Cut the a/c belt and the cars always run-on embarrassingly so after turning off. Supposedly non-a/c cars used a different system to stop run on.

      Former owner of 85 omni 4dr here from ’90-’95 with about 75k of my miles put on the rolled back odometer of unknown original miles.

      • 0 avatar
        GuidoAnchovy

        My AC still works and as long as I have that running when shut off it doesn’t diesel. Makes sense now!

        Not sure why it doesn’t briefly engage (when AC is not running) when shutting off, though. Thanks for pointing me in a direction!

  • avatar
    sabotenfighter

    I got an 83 Horizon for free from a friend’s parents my sophomore year of high school. They felt bad for me rolling my 1st gen Civic Wagovan and had this cosmetically damaged non-running clunker that their daughter left behind when she went to college.

    White with whorehouse red interior, 4spd manual, VW 1.7L 8V, as spartan as they come, no A/C, no speakers/stereo, no rear wiper or 3rd stop light, No tach, no meters aside from a fuel gauge and spedo, super basic transportation. They threw in a couple red doors from the junk yard to fix the banged up driver’s side. I got it running and drove it home in a day, replaced and painted (rattle can) the doors and then proceeded to make it more awesomer.
    This was around the time The Fast and the Furious came out and I happened to be pretty into WRC and PNW regional rally a fair bit, so I decided my new free car should be built up to simultaneously take the piss out of F&F types and be able to handle being jumped and driven on gravel washboard roads at WOT in 4th. I put some really high sidewall tires on it, painted big teal to blue flames down the sides, a big number 5 on the back door, blue (misaligned) racing stripes up the hood and roof, gutted and blue and white interior by Krylon, couple of 6×9 stock speakers out of my brother’s Grand Am run to a cheapo amp hooked up to my portable mini-disc player, and with the help of my dad, a very sturdy plywood roof high rear wing and Folgers can exhaust tip. I made some FOLGERS RACING EXHAUST stickers for the car as well. Eventually I got a windscreen banner that said “GHETTO SPEED” and slapped that on as well.
    That car became pretty infamous around my HS and all over town. Lotta ricers couldn’t handle me aping them and let me know often. I won a couple “Worst of Show” awards at car shows with it. About a year and a half after I started driving it the clutch fused to the flywheel while driving home from school. A buddy and I replaced it (totally ass backwards VW setup with flywheel on the transmission side, look it up) but it never ran again. I figure I must have missed something stupid like a ground somewhere or the spark control computer on the intake got borked somehow. I ended up giving up after a month of weekends fiddling with it and going to Pull N Save. It ended up having a short end of life at that very junkyard.

  • avatar

    There’s this house that I pass–somewhere in the middle of Ohio–this guy must have twenty of these sitting in the yard in various stages of decomposition.

  • avatar
    hawox

    horizon was one of the best deal on a new car.
    it was sold in 1977 here in europe and lasted many years even if evreyone knew the troubles of chrysler europe.
    the ones sold here were less powerfull, the Goes Like Hell mush have been a real bargain.
    to give some comparisons it was priced lower than a entry level golf with the 50bhp engine, like a peugeot 104 or a ford escort, or the fiat strada in basic form.

    compared to fiat, ford and others the horizon had a much better rust protection and paint. it came with headrests, antenna and radio cables, tinted glass, rear defroster…

  • avatar
    wantahertzdonut

    I never liked these. Even as a kid I felt they made the driver look down and out. But to their credit, the few that remained in NE Ohio into the 2000’s had little, if any rust. Rustproofing on these heaps was probably the one thing Chrysler did right.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I don’t get why some Chrysler stuff is very rust free – the Omni, the M-Body, later K-Car variants, while others like the Durango, Ram trucks, Magnum, Neon are terrible and rust like an ’80s Honda.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Iacocca-era and post-Iacocca. Obviously something changed with steel quality or galvanization after his administration ended.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I was trying to think of a more recent Chrysler product which does not rust. I don’t think I’ve seen a rusty Avenger so far. They need to go back to their old methods. You can find no-rust Fifth Avenues from 1986 quite easily.

  • avatar
    Chi-One

    Had an ’86 GLH Turbo. Bought with 10K on the clock. Had the presence of mine to buy the service contract as it was my DD. Most fun you can have with your clothes on! Dusted just about everything. It ate the fuel pump as was noted, struts and mounts, A/C components, lots of tires(!) They lost money on that service contract :) Great highway car, rolling in 5th at 70, goose the throttle to pass and quickly you were in triple digits. Even drove well in Chicago winters.


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