By on February 24, 2016

2017 Audi Q7 Front 3/4 Exterior, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

2017 Audi Q7 3.T

3.0-liter DOHC V6, supercharged (333 horsepower @ 5,500-6,500 rpm; 325 pounds-feet @ 2,900-5,300 rpm)

Eight-speed ZF automatic, Quattro AWD

19 city / 25 highway / 21 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

19.5 (Observed, MPG)

Base Price: $55,750*

As Tested: $78,825*

* Prices include $950 destination charge.

We recently reviewed the 2016 Volvo XC90, the long overdue redesign of Volvo’s family hauler. First introduced as a 2002 model, the XC90 was a teenager by the time it was finally replaced. Oddly enough, it’s a similar story with the Audi Q7.

In response to Volvo’s then-new XC90, Audi began development of the seven-seater Q7 in 2002, which later hit the market in 2005. It received a facelift in 2009, but the basics of the slab-sided Audi remained. Eleven years later, and at around the same time as the new XC90, Audi has finally reinvented the Q7 as a sort of soft-road A8 Avant.

Can it compete against the new XC90 for the hearts and minds of luxury-minded families?

Exterior
You’d be forgiven for thinking this Q7 is yet another refresh of the original model, as its resemblance — the result of Audi’s “brand unifying styling” — exhibits historical roots. Even complete redesigns have to stick to the “one sausage different lengths” design philosophy.

The Q7’s grille and headlamps are more angular than before, giving the front end some needed masculinity, and the tail lamps gain Audi’s new Y-shaped light pipes. The overall effect is a sharpening of the attractive lines found in the 2016 model without breaking any new ground.

It’s not just sheetmetal that Audi replaces for the new Q7. The seven-seater is built upon Audi’s new MLB 2 platform, which was created for the Bentley Bentayga and the majority of Audi’s future models. Although the big Bentley is the largest expression of MLB, the Q7’s 199.7 inch length is notably longer than the BMW X5 and just four inches shorter than an Escalade.

2017 Audi Q7 Interior, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Interior
While the outside is a variation on a theme, the interior goes all-in on the latest gadgetry — from an available full-LCD instrument cluster to a large touchpad for “finger writing” entry and more active safety gadgets than I care to name.

The overall look is a little busy compared to the minimalist Volvo or even the X5. The dash is bisected by an enormous bank of air vents styled after the Audi 5000 that stretch from the gauge cluster all the way to the passenger door.

2017 Audi Q7 Interior Rear Seats, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Audi’s new front seats are more comfortable than the base thrones in the BMW or Mercedes, while the up-level seat beats the competition’s premium options by a hair. That said, the new seat design in the XC90 trumps this comfort, whether we’re talking base or optional seats.

Where the Q7 shines is in its second row. It’s enormous. Sporting a 40/20/40-split design like we see in the Volvo, the seats offer a smidge more room and my backside found them more comfortable. The trade-off is a third row that’s less comfortable than the XC90, although it is a substantial improvement over the cramped way-back in the X5.

Solidifying the Q7’s status as the luxury alternative to a minivan, you’ll find five sets of latch anchors for child seats. In addition, the second row is wide enough to strap a Graco Classic Ride 50 seat in the middle and still flip/fold the outboard seats to hop in the rear. That’s important since moving the second row out-of-the-way is a more involved two-step process than the one-step fold/slide mechanism we see in comparable Volvo, Acura, and Infiniti models.

2017 Audi Q7 Apple CarPlay, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Infotainment
2017 takes MMI to a new level. Using the same 12.3-inch LCD disco dash as the TT, the Q7 adds an 8-inch LCD front and center. Audi decided to limit some of the “virtual cockpit” features seen in the TT, but the system functions similarly overall. The LCD cluster offers a wide-screen map view with Google satellite imagery and infotainment readouts, but system and car settings have to be adjusted with the display in the dash.

Perhaps the biggest change is the addition of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto support. Without a touchscreen, these interfaces work a little differently than in mass-market sedans. As a result, it actually feels less polished than the implementation in the 2016 Accord.

Audiophiles will be happy to hear that the base audio system is a well balanced, 10-speaker setup with a standard CD player. Our tester had the mid-level, 19-speaker Bose branded system, which adds speakers in places you never thought you’d find them. This isn’t the top-end system. That’d be the insane 23-speaker, 1,900-watt Bang & Olufsen system for a cool $5,000 over the Bose system.

2017 Audi Q7 Engine 3.0L Supercharged V6, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Powertrain
While we have been told that a 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder engine will eventually be the base engine, the only engine at launch is a 3.0-liter supercharged V6. Cranking out 333 horsepower and 325 lbs-ft of torque, it tops the 3.0-liter turbo in the X5 and the turbocharged and supercharged four-banger in the Volvo. Mated to a standard ZF eight-speed automatic and Quattro all-wheel drive, the Q7 will tow up to 7,700 pounds when properly equipped.

2017 Audi Q7 Driving, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

Drive
With 333 horses under the hood and a ZF transmission coordinating the power delivery, you’d assume the Q7 would be sprightly, and you’d be right. Our tester scooted to 60 miles per hour in 6.1 seconds, easily besting the six-cylinder X5 and base GLE while tying with the lighter, nine-speed equipped MDX. What may surprise you is how close the 2016 Volvo XC90 came — just 3/10ths slower.

Audi’s Quattro integrates the center and front differentials into the transmission case, the side effect of this is that the entire engine and torque converter ride in front of the front axle. This placement means that the Q7 carries a greater percentage of its weight on the front wheels than essentially every rear-wheel-drive competitor and, interestingly enough, the new XC90 as well. However, don’t confuse front-heavy weight distribution with front-wheel-drive power bias. This AWD system sends the majority of the power to the rear wheels unless needed. The XC90 can never send more than 50 percent of its power to the rear wheels unless a front wheel slips, and the new SH-AWD system in the MDX is far less aggressive at sending power to the rear than it was before, which now defaults to a front-wheel-drive bias unless you’re really pushing it hard.

2017 Audi Q7 Wheel, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

When the new Q7 was launched, Audi trumpeted a significant 700 pound reduction in curb weight. However, by the time the Q7 made it to America, it gained about 275 pounds back, putting the 2017 model a cupcake away from 5,000 pounds. That’s a significant distance from the new XC90 at 4,394 pounds, or the MDX at a comparatively slim 4,286. Although the Q7 has a strong rear power bias and our model came equipped with optional rear-wheel steering and wide 285-width tires, the Q7 still felt large and heavy on winding mountain roads. Our model was equipped with the optional adaptive air suspension which, like all air suspensions, makes the Q7 feel “boatier” than it otherwise would. In contrast, the front-wheel-biased Volvo feels nimble and better balanced in neutral handling situations. On the flip side, the rear-wheel steering makes easy work of parking lot maneuvers that would be multi-point turns in the Volvo or Acura.

The EPA rates combined fuel economy at 21 mpg, which is essentially the same as the XC90. However, likely thanks to the weight and the general drivetrain design, we averaged 19.5 mpg — below what we saw in the Acura or Volvo.

At $55,650 to start (inclusive of a $950 destination fee), the Audi is $100 more than a base X5, but is far better equipped. In addition to the standard third row, the Q7 also features standard leather seats, all-wheel drive and three zone climate control, making it nearly $5,000 less than a comparably equipped BMW. The delta between the Q7 and the new three-row Mercedes GLS is likely to be $10,000-$15,000. The Q7 is faster to 60 mph than the comparable Germans as well.

2017 Audi Q7 Rear 3/4 Exterior, Image: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars

On the other side of the segment, the Acura MDX is a significant discount over the Q7, but ZF’s nine-speed auto is far less polished than the eight-speed in the Q7. The MDX also feels less premium in general. Although a comparable MDX is a $9,000 discount over the Q7, the Audi is nearly $9,000 nicer.

As expected, the toughest competitor for the Q7 is the new Volvo. The XC90 T6 AWD is $4,000 less than the Q7, is nearly as fast, is a hair more efficient and has a more comfortable first and third row. The XC90’s design also strikes me as refreshing in a sea of complicated Germanic themes. While the Q7’s drivetrain is more my cup of tea than Volvo’s high-strung four-pot, the Volvo’s more nimble dynamic, more polished active driving assistants and lower price tag keep it in the top spot for me. Second place is not a bad finish for the Q7, but our tester pushed the $4,000 delta between the Audi and Volvo to $10,000 without adjusting for the leather dashboard and door panels you find in the Swede. With that kind of price difference, the Q7 may be the discount German, but the Volvo is the all around better people hauler.

[Images: © 2016 Alex Dykes/The Truth About Cars]

Audi provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review

Specifications as tested

0-30: 2.3 seconds

0-60: 6.1 seconds

1/4 mile: 14.3 seconds @ 97.7 mph

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80 Comments on “2017 Audi Q7 Review – The Three-Row Flagship...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Alex, how about for three row SUVs you include a shot of cargo room with all three rows in place? Few dealer even include shots of that when putting ads online.

    Thank You.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      As a 3 row crossover owner, this is significant. We cross-shopped most of them when we ended up with our Santa Fe last year, but I will say for cargo capacity with all seats up it’s almost laughable. The only option that had any appreciable space with all 3 rows up was the Mazda FWIW.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Looks like the CX-9 and the Highlander are about equal on space with rear seats still up.

        http://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/2f/af/84/2faf843ac164d0e41b893662c8711835.jpg

        http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41jA5DWZISL.jpg

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Lol, $79,000. Seriously, you’re now well into Cayenne territory. And at that level, you might as well Range Rover or Land Cruiser as well.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The GX460 is last place in comparison tests but first place in my heart.

    • 0 avatar
      EAF

      Isn’t the MDX $49k? How is the MDX quicker to 60mph without a supercharger?

      “Can it compete against the new XC90 for the hearts and minds of luxury-minded families?” Maybe. Purses and wallets = definitely.

      Look at the ECM location, that’s exactly where I’d place it if it were waterproof.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        If you ask me, the XC90 splits the difference between soft crossovers like the Infiniti QX60, Buick Enclave, Lincoln MKT, et al..and the athletic world-class crossovers like the X5 and this Q7. To some extent, so does the MDX, although less than before. The reason I say that is because the XC90 and MDX can be had well-equipped for less than $60K…but display most of the same athleticism as their “more-prestigious” counterparts. Volvo’s new decision to go four-cylinder-only means that its cars have shorter front overhangs and look RWD, even though they still have transversely-mounted engines. This is evidenced in the new XC90, S90 and V90.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        The MDX is less, but it’s 3rd row is for little people only. It’s the smallest 3rd row in any of the SUV’s we tried when we looked last year.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          In my experience, pretty much everything short of a full-sized BOF SUV can’t seat a properly-size adult in the third row with any kind of comfort. Really, the shorter-wheelbase GM BOF SUVs are also too small, because the solid rear axles take away from head and legroom.

          • 0 avatar
            vvk

            > In my experience, pretty much everything short of a full-sized BOF SUV can’t seat
            > a properly-size adult in the third row with any kind of comfort.

            We may have different definitions about what “properly-size adult” means but I find the third row of my Chevy Traverse to be quite roomy and comfortable on long drives. In fact, I prefer the third row to the front passenger seat. It is also very possible to have three adults sitting in the third row and be reasonably comfortable on shot trips.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            I forgot about those. The Lambda crossovers are practically minivans from a usability standpoint, their third rows are quite comfortable. They’re actually more useful than the SWB Tahoe, Yukon and Escalade, especially if you don’t need BOF construction or towing brawn.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            The Lambda CUVs whoop the Explorer when it comes to third-row comfort, but the Flex matches them.

            It’s less the BOF and more the live axle that hurts GM’s SUVs in the third row. An IRS Expedition or Navigator gives you some legroom up and down, but a SRA means you’re sitting on the floor in a Tahoe.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I only like the upper trims of the Enclave out of any of the Lambdas, because it’s pretty brougham.

            http://imganuncios.mitula.net/2014_buick_enclave_leather_brighton_tn_4800049441396964446.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        legacygt

        The 0-60 times in this review get a little too much emphasis. The differences between the cars referenced are minimal. Nobody is pushing these things of the line anyway and it’s a good thing because cars like the Honda Pilot are right in the same neighborhood. You wouldn’t want some reader to spend all that money on the Q7, think they got “the fast one” of the class, and then get dusted off the line by a FWD Pilot. Car and Driver tested the FWD Pilot at 6.2 secs and all the other non-luxury 3 row CUVs aren’t far behind either. My point isn’t to praise the Pilot but to remind people that the premium charged for these luxury vehicles may be justified by many features but acceleration isn’t really one of them.

        • 0 avatar
          EAF

          “…the premium charged for these luxury vehicles may be justified by many features but acceleration isn’t really one of them.”

          Why did Audi add a supercharger?

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            Parts bin engine. It’s available in the S4, A6, A7, and A8 on top of the Q7.

            I actually don’t believe Audi even offers an NA V6 in anything anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      Well, technically it IS a Cayenne… But yeah, the Escalade is a Chevy so…

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        It isn’t a Cayenne. The Cayenne on MLB Evo (MLB 2) isn’t out yet. The Cayenne still rides on the SUV exclusive platform (PL71) originally developed for it and the Touareg, later adding the Q7 on a longer version to accommodate the third row.

        The Q7 and Bentayga are the only CUVs on MLB Evo to be released yet. The only other car on the platform that has been released is the 2017 A4.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “air vents styled after the Audi 5000”

    Hmm? My 5000 had three central vents. No trip computer option like pic below.
    (http://germancarsforsaleblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/5Q3.jpg)

    However I see now you meant the original 5000, that one nobody thinks about in the US.
    (http://germancarsforsaleblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/5s3.jpg)

    Also the blue neon lights clash with the brown leather and is not a good look.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Nice job. The video really gives me a feel for this vehicle.
    I am impressed by the luxury and the gadgetry, but the prices are, for me, unreachable.

  • avatar
    an innocent man

    They left one of these unlocked on the dealer’s lot this past Sunday. I’m usually a fan of Audi’s interiors, but I didn’t like it one little bit. “Busy” doesn’t begin to explain the mess inside of this thing. And an 85G sticker.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    I’m pretty sure the “center vent” in the new EU market Passat is faux, but at least it looks much better integrated into the dash design. The Audi version in this and the 2017 A4 is much less clean looking. I also agree that Audi’s new interior design language in this car and the A4 is overly busy, although it’s still ahead of the Japan 3 at least.

  • avatar

    I have a feeling an XC90 won’t break as much/as hard, so that one gets my vote.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Nice review. Brilliant looking suv. Options of $20k seems a bit crazy. But, this is no Acura or Infiniti. Looks like you get what you pay for. You won’t see to many q7’s in the nursing parking lot of a hospital.

    • 0 avatar

      In the leafy green burbs, the Q7 is only trumped by Range Rover or an X5. Top five in the near lux mommytrux sweepstakes.

      No one cares about engines, 0-60, etc. What sells is a third row, a backup camera, and enough bling on the outside that the neighbors know it is the new one.

      Mom Status, as viewed on the school run of exclusive communities North, east and West of NYC.

      MB ML, Audi Q7, BMW X5, Range Rovers, Escalade, full-on Suburban Q60 is outlier choice. Not much Lexxi.

      Volvo XC, Acura MDX, GMC SUV, Audi Q5 and the BMW X3.

      Honda Pilot, BMW X1 (cheap leases), Buicks (not that I see any), the SRX (ditto).

      Minivans of any type.

      You can show up in this, or the last, generation of any category. You can’t be two out, even at the top.

      You don’t see much CUV…either big trucks, or cars, but that is another rant/post..

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    A cupcake away from 5,000 lbs, or a beefcake? It is quick for it’s weight.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      That’s actually pretty light for something that large. My X5 weighed in at just over 4,900 pounds, and was significantly smaller.

      I think the European brands certainly thrive on making it so that you can just about double the price of the car (especially the Porsche Cayenne, whose prices range from $60K to well over $160K). I configured a new Q7 on Audi’s website, and by the time I was done, it was north of $95K. But, I realize that I could have one with most of what I wanted for $65K or so…same as a new X5.

      What does irritate me, however, is when the Euro luxury automakers make a lower-spec car feel needlessly cheap. BMW’s Sensatec leatherette, for example, is horrible and doesn’t hold a candle to the V-Tex leatherette in my Golf SportWagen (which, ironically, isn’t available in any guise with actual leather). Lexus has also started making lower-spec cars feel cheap, and I don’t appreciate it.

    • 0 avatar

      You need a GVWR of 5000 lbs or over so you can deduct the expense under a “farm equipment” loophole.

      The last gen Volvo XC was just under that, unless you bought the fully optioned up version, which magically hit the 5k number. Likewise, the SRX is over 5k, but till recently, the MDX just missed that target.

      This is a real world “write off” vs. paying with after tax dollars, which in most of the households means a third more income to pay the vehicle off. This is how a luxo truck displaces the luxo sedan or wagon that would otherwise be bought. While yet another head-slapper, it means that GM sells an Escalade to someone who might otherwise end up with an E class…so there is a good reason from an auto industrty lobbyist perspective.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I kept thinking except for 0-60, a minivan would be a better choice. Then again I can’t think of any luxury brand minivans.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The good to great, as opposed to bare minimum Sienna style, awd, and bigger tires with more wheel clearance, sets these apart. They’re kind of optimized for (sub)urbanites who have a condo at a ski resort. While deriving most actual sales from those who like driving around looking like they do.

      In Europe they are quite sensible. In Japan, pointlessly over engineered for speeds noone realistically drive family cars at. And, at these prices (purchase and potential repair), in America, unless space constrained, why one would not instead buy a Minivan or proper car for day-to-day, AND a $12K under sticker Crew Cab for weekends at the slopes, beats me.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Vehicles like this are all about prestige, and a minivan has none (or less than none). The test is: how will the owner feel while waiting in the line of cars to pick the kids up from school?

      In the wealthier parts of my town the acceptable vehicles for that purpose amount to the following:

      MDX
      RX350, RX450h, GX460, LX570
      ML-Class, GL-Class
      Range Rover, Range Rover Sport, Land Rover LR4
      Q7 (maybe Q5 for a parent of one)
      X5
      Tahoe, Suburban, Yukon (not Escalade)
      QX80, maybe
      New XC90, most likely

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “The test is: how will the owner feel while waiting in the line of cars to pick the kids up from school?”

        LOL!

        That’s about what I see but less Range Rover and more R Class (believe it or not). And now there’s a Ghibli and a Panamera added to the mix.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        I know a guy who replaced a Yukon Denali with a Q7. He’s got three large hockey-playing teenagers, so he needs the space. Hockey practices take place regardless of weather conditions, so he didn’t want a minivan.

        He loves the Q7, thinks it’s better in every way than the Denali: drives nicer, uses less gas, better interior.

        It’s not my type of car, but I can see why people like them.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          I’ll take our Odyssey with Blizzaks over a Q7 any day of the week in winter weather. Especially filled with hockey players.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            That works, kind of, unless everyone else in your town drives a lifted pickup. Including the plow guys. Leading them to not even notice the ground is white, until it reaches 10 inches. And then, when they do notice, they throw salt on it, so everything turns into slush. That inevitably clogs up all space under the Ody’s wheel wells. And then, when the temp drops overnight, you’re left with a cold, hard zero inches of suspension travel….

            Truth to be told, the latest, fuel conscious, Ski Wagens, are seriously compromising wheel clearance for aerodynamics, as well (Europeans actually plow their roads regularly in the winter…). Leaving half price 4Runners, Tahoe/Sequoia… and crew cabs even more sensible.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        If rich people in Washington state don’t buy the E-class wagon then who does?

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          No one, judging by the sales numbers. It used to be a vehicle of choice for the very rich but at some point in the last five years that ended.

          Edit: Also forgot the always-aristocratic Land Cruiser. Higher trims of the JGC should also be a “maybe.”

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Rich people who are past child-rearing years. Still very much the default wealthy grandparent hauler in my corner of the country. All over the place in the best places. New and old.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Minivans will make a comeback in your town as well. At least if the tradition of everything spreading from SoCal’s entertainers and outward still holds.

        Here’s the driver: Women in wealthy/high status parts waiting ever longer to have kids. Often until even being able to have them is a bit of a crapshoot. Many can’t, and are freaking out about it. Hence, showing off that you “made it,” and is a “woman that can have it all” gives status. Hence Odyssey Touring-Limited-Elite-Edition, with the world’s most Swedish child seat, and a 32 inch entertainment system to keep Little Miss Magic Of Fertility Treatment occupied during her formative years.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    Do they even hint at the diesel version like the previous generation? Or is that verboten until the whole TDI debacle comes to an end?

  • avatar
    GS 455

    I test drove a 2017 Q7 Technik last week. In the flesh the exterior looks rather bland but the dealer only had white and black models in stock. The interior looks better in photos but less impressive in person. The Audi Virtual Cockpit can supply a lot of information but it can look too busy. I was impressed by the outward visibility including to the rear, the Q7 proves that structural safety doesn’t have to preclude being able to see where you’re going. The only other SUVs that I’ve driven with decent visibility are the Lexus GX 460 and Ford Flex. The Q7 had the Bang and Olufsen 3D system and it was impressively clear and open sounding on classical music but a bit too lean in the mid and upper base for rock and pop and not worth the $5000 CDN. It had the air suspension and in Dynamic mode the ride was firm and steady with decent absorbtion of bumps and potholes on some of our crappier roads. It rides better than the MDX which feels busier and more jittery but I prefer the ride of the MKT EcoBoost which is softer and more isolated from road defects. (I know these aren’t competitors but I’m just giving some reference). The salesman encouraged me to go to an empty parking lot and do doughnuts to try out the 4 wheel steering and I have to say it’s a very odd sensation; it almost feels like the car is spinning. It certainly makes parking in tight lots easier but I don’t know that I’d want the added complexity. The roads very covered with hard packed snow so I really couldn’t test acceleration and handling adequately but in normal driving it felt like a tall wagon. My bottom line feeling was that it’s very well executed but not really worth the price.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    “….just four inches shorter than an Escalade.” Holy cow. That just seems massive to me.

    “This placement means that the Q7 carries a greater percentage of its weight on the front wheels than essentially every rear-wheel-drive competitor” –plus– “putting the 2017 model a cupcake away from 5,000 pounds” Sounds like a car ready to understeer and plow and similar to historical Audi dynamics.

  • avatar
    Brock_Landers

    Interesting, my opinion about Q7 vs X90 driving characteristics is the exact opposite. I drove them back to back and I feel the Volvo feels quite more cheaper on the road. Volvo basically is a semi-premium brand, and it always has been most evident with all the previous models too vs competition in road feel, steering feel, body control, steering precision, engagement etc. Same thing with new XC90. It felt a bit vague and lacked road-feel. On a straight road it was perfect. Quiet and smooth. But soon as the road started to get even little bit twisty (even mild highway bends) then Volvo lost its composure. I too like the design of the Volvo more, new Q7 looks awkward and weirdly dis-proportioned. BUT. Audi drives miles more like a true luxury suv. Precise, composed, good feedback from steering, minimum body-roll etc. Unlike Volvo, when behind the wheel it truly feels like a high end drivers SUV.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      This is what I’ve read in any other review that compares the two as well. The seats in the Volvo are a bit comfier, it may ride a little nicer, but it doesn’t handle nearly as well or as car-like as the Q7. Alex’s views seem contrary to pretty much anyone else I’ve seen opine on the two vehicles.

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    Is it just me or is the Q7’s headlights a nearly complete carbon copy of the XC90’s?

  • avatar

    I just got a brand new JEEP SRT in Silver (Hellcat Jeep wasn’t ready yet and our Model X order is nowhere to be seen yet).

    I may take a look in person to see the Audi Interior for myself but the lack of a touchscreen is a SIN in 2016. Anyone try using MMI or Comand lately? They are horrible and distracting.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Didn’t you already have a JGC SRT? Is the new one meaningfully different?

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I think touch screen is overrated. I recently drove a brand new BMW 228 coupe with idrive. I loved the big screen perched right on the center of the dash and the iDrive controller was effective and easy to pick up. I could drive and control the main screen with little effort and without lowering my vision.

      Yes touch screen is nice. Two of my cars have touch interface. But with the newest BMW version, I never even noticed and it certainly was no distraction. Lack of touch is certainly no sin.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        BMW has really perfected iDrive in the latest version. I can’t help but feel that the next one with gestures and a touchscreen (shudder) is going to ruin it.

        I absolutely detest touchscreens in cars. They all suck, without exception.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Actually, when I had the X5, I preferred iDrive’s rotary joystick controller thingamabob to the Golf SportWagen’s touchscreen. It is difficult to stab the right button on the touchscreen while driving at even modest speeds. I would concede that it’s only because the Golf SportWagen has a small screen…but I’m driving my best friend’s 2015 Mustang EcoBoost Premium today—which has a sizable touchscreen—and even *it* is hard to use.

      I vote controller versus touchscreen; plus MMI is excellent. There are some companies, like Mazda, that give you both…but Mazda locks out the touch screen while you’re driving, anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        This Is Dawg

        Wait really? Is this only on Mazdas with the control knob? My ’14 is touchscreen only, and it doesn’t lock me out (thankfully). It does prevent new phones from pairing while in Drive though.

        Does anyone know what the small dark square is on the inside of the wing mirror in the action shot? Is that some sort of blind spot indicator? Something to do with heated mirrors?

    • 0 avatar
      darkwing

      Heh, as always, a slave to mass-market fashion.

    • 0 avatar
      JD23

      Nearly none of the premium brands offer touchscreens. From personal experience, both MMI and iDrive are far easier to use while driving than a touchscreen.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Last-gen Q7 owner here. Mine has the same 3.0T as this one, it’s one serious GEM of an engine. Smooth as silk and more punch than the 5.3L in the Tahoe that preceded it.

    That being said, I am quite disappointed overall with this new version. The interior is a bit nicer, but it’s a net loss. I don’t like the new style, it looks like someone deflated a 2015 Q7. The older style looked tough, athletic, it had some off-road pretense. I really don’t like the decision to move it to the new platform either. I LIKED the fact it was built on the Cayenne platform, now it shares digs with the piddling A4.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    The shape doesn’t say “SUV” to me. Rather, it’s an all-wheel-drive station wagon with a couple of extra inches ground clearance.
    .
    .

  • avatar
    manny_c44

    In Europe this sits even lower and basically just looks like a huge wagon, I like the style a lot. But then again s4/s6 wagons are even nicer.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    The new Land Rover LR4 (Discovery) is going to be launched in about 5 months time. It will be interesting to see how it compares. For me the Q7 lacks a personality. The Volvo has it but just lacks slightly in a few too many departments. I suspect this is where the LR4 will score.

    That said if it were my money on the table i’d be tempted by Jaguars new F pace

  • avatar
    415s30

    The lights on all of these new cars, especially this one, are way too bright. Even the tail lights are blinding. In the rain getting down to the Golden Gate bridge these things red light are pretty dangerous to lower cars. The headlights are so fucking bright, where is the regulation on this??

  • avatar

    Some of these pictures are giving me a very in depth look into the Q7 here. I especially think the picture of the boot is particularly impressive – I mean, just look at all of that space! All I hope is that with most 7-seaters, that it’s easy enough for passengers to get on back to the 3rd row, otherwise it kind of makes the car rather lose it’s value as a people mover.


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