By on January 11, 2016

17FusionSport_01_HR

Answering the question no one seemed to ask, Ford decided that its revised Fusion needed a boosted six next year and a wide menu of trims and powertrains to kill ‘em with quantity. When it goes on sale later this year, the Ford Fusion will come in no fewer than five different powertrain options: a 2.5-liter four, a 1.5-liter turbo four, a 2-liter turbo four, a 2.7-liter turbo six and a 2-liter hybrid four paired to different sized batteries.

If you’re not lost yet, there’s a new trim-topping Platinum class with Cocoa wood, 19-inch wheels and only the finest Venetian leather from the uplands of Venetia. Or something.

The new Fusion V6 Sport will boast a 2.7-liter turbocharged mill that cranks 325 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque when it goes on sale in the summer — fully 85 more horsepower than the 2-liter turbo four. The V-6 sports sedan, which is available in all-wheel drive only, will almost certainly tempt 6 seconds in a 0-60 mph dash, because there are no trails of rubber long enough when you leave the office.

Is this the new SHO?

Ford also said that recalibrated electric motors in its plug-in hybrid sedan will power that car for 19 miles on electrons alone, before switching over to its 2-liter four.

17FusionSport_09_HR

The new car will also sport the newest iteration of Ford’s SYNC, which will include Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Despite the hubbub leading up to the North American International Auto Show, the Fusion Energi’s batteries seem largely untouched. A 7.3-kWh Li-ion pack is still included in the plug-in version of the sedan, the same size and battery capacity as the outgoing model.

And if you’re looking for more autonomous features in the Fusion — especially considering Ford just announced it was expanding its fleet of self-driving Fusions — you might want to wait longer: Ford didn’t announce any new features above lane-keep assist for the 2017 model.

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81 Comments on “NAIAS 2016: 2017 Ford Fusion Is the New Domestic Mid-size (Ass) Hauler, Fo’ SHO...”


  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    2.7T AWD Fusion?

    …I need to buy more lottery tickets.

  • avatar
    derekson

    Just like I said in the other thread, this was the model that was spotted in spy photos the other days.

    Definitely a great move by Ford to make this model. The Fusion chassis is a much better platform for a sporty car than the Taurus.

    Wow, according to Autoblog this Sport will start at like $34.5k. This is an awesome car for that price. Well done, Ford!

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      $34.5k seems too good to be true, but yeah, if is, that’s pretty great. I wonder about the option level on that, though, since it was easy to get a Titanium AWD far past that level when I was shopping last year. I test drove one that stickered at $39k! Nice car, though…

  • avatar
    raph

    Sweet! Too bad I don’t have a good reason to get one of these over a Mustang. It would definitely be a worthy successor to the V6 SHO in the 90’s. Also it would be nice if they added some sizzle to the steak by adding some Brembo binders.

    It wouldn’t do much for braking performance but it sure would go well with that hair dried bent six.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Nice. Finally a Fusion that won’t get its lunch eaten by a V6 Accord or Altima. Fusion 2.0 – no Eco, no Boost.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    So the V6 Fusion wasn’t a lie. Impressive. I also like that Ford removed the capacitative-touch buttons on the center stack in favor of conventional ones. And the rear fascia no longer looks like some alien creature. Of course, the UI theming on the gauges no longer matches that of the infotainment system now that they’ve moved to SYNC3, and I think that’s a pretty ridiculous oversight.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I wouldn’t lie to you Kyree. Too bad it doesn’t have the contrast piping that you liked on the last Fusion Sport.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Right? That was such a classy touch.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          My parents have a 2012 MKZ with the “Sport Appearance Package”. It has the nicer charcoal leather seats with Cashmere piping. It is pretty classy.

          That package also gives body colored door handles, nicer wheels, better headlamps, some better trim accents, and a different suspension.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Parchment leather with navy piping, or black seats with graphite piping, or peanut butter with forest green.

          All of these things are winning. I want to be able to Vanden Plas any damn car I please.

          Also agree RE: body color handles with just a bit of chrome. Not full chrome, and not a chrome handle-behind like the new ML has available.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Peanut butter with forest green.

            OMG, yes. That’s one of my favorite combos. It remind me very much of Bentley. I’d probably order a new Bentley Mulsanne in that color combo.

            As far as the chromed negative space on Mercedes-Benz door handles…they’ve been doing that for years. I see it a lot on the GL-Class. I think it’s hideous.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Stupid question: Does AWD solve issues with torque steer in transverse FWDs?

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      It depends. If it’s just a part-time, Haldex-type system that only engages the rear wheels when the front wheels slip and you need more traction, then probably not. If it’s a smarter full-time AWD system that engages the rear wheels to some degree at all times, then yes, it can….although not every transverse-engined car with lots of power has a torque-steer issue.

      I hope that this Fusion Sport will come with something like the Focus RS’ GKN Twinster AWD system. But it sounds to me like it’ll just be a sedan version of the Edge Sport, which also has the same 2.7-liter TT V6 + AWD combo…and that’s not a bad thing at all, because I hear the Edge Sport is a blast to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        Kyree…was wondering why I have never experienced torque steer in any of my ecoboost cars.
        The 2.0 FWD Escape would at least have it…but never.
        The 3.5 MKS has plenty more power and I have never experienced it here as well…and I certainly have pushed the gas hard on occasion.

        Now my Tiguan has it non stop and takes some getting used to. Same with the GTI I tested a few times.

        I read somewhere ford addressd this with some tech. Not sure if programming or front end design.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          That’s because more people complain about torque steer than have experienced it.

          Torque steer is a change in front-end geometry when the front lifts on acceleration. It’s related to bump-steer (which most people also don’t understand). It’s not technically limited to FWD cars, but design compromises linked to having front CV joint and rotors crammed near the pivot point make it more likely. Some really old FWD designs like the Citroen DS avoided the whole issue by having inboard brakes (and no power), leaving plenty of space in the hubs for CV joints.

          Manufacturers can minimize torque steer by playing with front-end geometry and suspension travel. For instance, Honda/Acura front suspensions used to have a distinctive curved arm at the top which moved the upper pivot point out (it’s usually at the upper strut mount in a MacPherson setup).

          In this day and age, I suspect that the amount of torque steer you experience is strictly a matter of budget and customer expectations. Ford probably spends a little more there, and a little less elsewhere, because their American customers (and journalists) can’t stand even a little tug at the wheel. VW’s customers presumably have both hands on the wheel and would rather see their money spent elsewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I drove a Dodge Omni GLH Turbo once.

            THAT is the definition of torque steer.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            thanks.
            Makes sense then what I read about Ford messing with the front end to prevent, or slow this.
            I myself never worried about it…and for some weird reason, seemed to actually enjoy it and work with it.
            What REALLY bothered me much, much more is the turbo lag…which none of my ecoboost engines have but the VW has in spades.
            This is much worse and wish VW would spend some time working on as long as they as putting the money elsewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The old SHO, this Fusion’s spiritual ancestor, emphatically had torque steer.

            The first time I hit the pedal in first gear after buying my ’89 — on an uphill onramp — I would up halfway onto the shoulder before I was even able to correct. I should emphasize that before that purchase I had never driven a powerful FWD car.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            And now, it’ll happen again in the Legend!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Actually not, surprisingly. Mash the pedal and (if you can avoid spinning the tires) you get surprisingly little torque steer. It’s the best-mannered FWD car I’ve owned.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Awesome. The 2.7 gets my F150 down the road with authority. This thing is going to be a hoot!

  • avatar
    shaker

    Well, since gas is cheap now, I guess that a car that goes like stink, and drinks fuel like it’s 1999 is a good move.

  • avatar
    That guy

    Per car and driver, the 4900lb 2.7L F150 runs the 1/4mi in 14.3 at 95mph and the 4400lb 2.7L Edge does it in 14.2 at 98mph. If this car weighs in at 3900lb, it should run in the 13s and top 100mph trap. Not bad for a $35K AWD sedan.

    I think this car’s real competitors are the Charger RT and the Maxima.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Cue BTSR’s “told ya so.”

    What next, sage prophet? Can you will us 8 years of a Trump presidency??

  • avatar
    ajla

    Wow, Ford actually increased cylinder count and displacement in something.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Oh dear, that 2.7T is going to be seriously tempting. I know that an AWD turbo V6 version of a family sedan that can be had with a humble 2.5 Duratec & plastic wheel covers isn’t entirely sensible, but I’m certainly not repulsed. Considering how quickly that engine scoots an F150, this is likely to be a very quick car.

    The 4 exhaust tips look a bit…showboaty. A Q50 is fast with only 2.

    Is that a rotary shift knob on the console? Why?

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    What I said should have been the SHO all along. Ever since the bigger Taurus came out as the last SHO I have complained the Fusion should have been it.
    The 3.5 should simply have been a V8 replacement…not a SHO. Just like in the MKS.

  • avatar
    Tomifobia

    And the center stack looks like it’s going to be robbing the same amount of knee room. Pass.

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    This looks to be an excellent car and a great value. I see the Acura TLX as a prime competitor, and it could steal some sales from the V6 AWD version. Acura needed to raise its game anyway, and I hope they respond with something in line with Honda’s performance heritage.

    In concept, the Fusion Sport is nearly perfect for me, but without MT I’m not seriously tempted.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      “I see the Acura TLX as a prime competitor, and it could steal some sales from the V6 AWD version.”

      Yup. I was probably going to end up with one by default, but I wasn’t that excited about it. This is much more interesting. Unless Honda can come up with a Type S or whatever with their V6TT and some decent brakes. You’ve got about 2 years, Honda.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    holy shit that’s gonna be an awesome car. budget BMW 3 series. I’ve had rental Fusions before and those had handling and steering more like my old e46 than an F30 did. Unfortunately I’m sure it will slurp the gas and I doubt it will be available with a manual :-(.

    • 0 avatar
      Nedmundo

      You nailed the downsides for me too: fuel economy and lack of a manual. I’ve also been underwhelmed by the F30 3 Series, and agree Ford’s steering is generally better.

      BTW, fuel economy is one area in which Acura’s TLX excels. Even the V6 AWD versions crack 30 mpg on the highway, and the four cylinder cracks 35. The I4 isn’t that powerful, but the 8DCT makes the most of it, and is way cooler than any conventional automatic I’ve tried.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    OK, maybe I missed it somewhere in the article and or comments (admit I did not read the press release) but…..

    any chance for a 6MT??

    My guess is no, but I can dream

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    “If you’re not lost yet, there’s a new trim-topping Platinum class with Cocoa wood, 19-inch wheels and only the finest Venetian leather from the uplands of Venetia. Or something.”
    ——————

    What, no Corinthian leather?

    Oh, that’s right. That’s Chrysler’s thing.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Wonder if that engine will show up in the Lincoln MK/Zephyr/whatever it’s being called this week.

    And if Ford is serious about selling this as a performance model, I’d suggest ditching that tiny little digital tach.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Ford can somehow do this with the Fusion, but the Regal couldn’t have a turbo-6 becuase of reasons.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    I dont much care for this version of the Fusion, but I am in favor of this concept over all.

    More cylinders! More boost! More driven wheels!

  • avatar
    iMatt

    Sweet car, still can’t stand the instrument cluster though. The giant speedo in the middle combined with the puny digital tach seems like it’s directed at the “how many cupholders does this thing have?” crowd. Just like a 2002 Chevy Venture.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    What’s that little digital display showing “0” in front of the shifter (under the radio, by the AC adapter)?

  • avatar
    goldtownpe

    Camry V6 already breaks the 6 seconds mark in 0-60mph dash.
    http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/toyota-camry-se-v6-road-test-review

    I would expect 300+hp and AWD to be in the low 5 second range.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    “will almost certainly tempt 6 seconds in a 0-60 mph dash” So, still slower than the V6 versions of the Accord, Altima, Camry and 200, but much more expensive?

    • 0 avatar
      johnny_5.0

      C&D did 5.6 to sixty in a 4,400 lb Edge Sport with a slightly weaker tune of the same engine. They did 5.7 to sixty in a 3,400 lb manual 2016 Accord coupe. They both did the quarter in 14.2 but the Accord trapped 4 mph faster as you’d expect with a thousand pounds less to motivate. Still, even if this thing tipped the scales at 4,000 pounds it should be comfortably in the mid to low 5 second range.

  • avatar

    How are the Fusions holding up? My father in law’s 2013 Edge Titanium is looking a bit ratty and he doesn’t even have small kids. My next car will be in the garage for 10-12 years, so this is a concern of mine.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    I like the exhausts – a subtle hint at the Q-Ship you’re driving. A dual dial gauge cluster would be much better in a “sport” version of the car and since it’s a parts bin piece no reason not to offer it here. Loss of shift lever is more progress, but at least the dial is better than the oversized, cheap buttons used in Lincolns. Now if we could only get the Mondeo Estate body in this sport trim (and preferably brown paint)…


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