By on January 11, 2016

Location Front Quarter Volvo S90 Mussel Blue

After winning the North American Truck of the Year award with the excellent XC90, Volvo is clearly on a roll. Get it? Volvo is Latin for “I roll.”

No? Never mind.

Following up the SUV is a new large luxury sedan, the S90, sharing much with the big truck.

(There once was a time when CUVs were developed from sedans. What a world we live in.)

The S90 comes standard with the T6 four-cylinder twincharged engine found in the XC90. A T8 plug-in hybrid version is optional, offering 410 horsepower.

PowerPulse Spool up

A semi-autonomous “Pilot Assist” feature is standard, which provides steering input to maintain lane alignment on the highway, coupled with adaptive cruise control.

The styling looks quite low, wide, and sleek, though the rear is much less dramatic than the rest of the car.

Location Rear Volvo S90 Mussel Blue

Important for some parts of the country is “Large Animal Detection,” which, unsurprisingly, detects and warns of roadside deer, moose, and other large animals to minimize collisions.

Interior cockpit Volvo S90

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44 Comments on “NAIAS 2016: Volvo S90 is Your Deer-detecting Swedish Executive Saloon...”


  • avatar
    facelvega

    Wow the new Continental looks a little better in these pictures, and has a way nicer interior. Oh wait.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Mmmmmmmmmmm tasty. If this proves to be a well built automobile Volvo might recapture some of the old cachet.

    Yes the rear isn’t as dramatic but it doesn’t look quite as phoned in as some of other sedans out there (I’m looking at you Ford and GM.)

  • avatar
    ClutchCarGo

    “Large Animal Detection,” which, unsurprisingly, detects and warns of roadside deer, moose, and other large animals to minimize collisions

    How soon until PETA protests Volvo’s despicable sizism in their callous disregard of the welfare of raccoons and opossums?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Why was it necessary to bring this up? The second bit, I mean.

      • 0 avatar
        ClutchCarGo

        Nothing more than light-hearted commentary on how hyper-sensitive parts of our society have become to perceived slights in the actions of those in charge. I mean, why shouldn’t your car warn you about that manic squirrel attempting to cross the road? Isn’t it as precious as our beloved moose?

        • 0 avatar
          wumpus

          Don’t drive in moose territory with that attitude. Moose collisions are often deadly.
          Deer collisions are bad enough that you want the hunting quota up, but typically only ruin the car (anybody know if you can put a “deer catcher” (like a trains cattle catcher) on a car? I had a boss who’s daughter hit one with a suburban without a scratch (thanks to the “veggie guards”). Some areas of Pennsylvania might warrant a large shield in front of your car (but take it off before re-entering civilization. Our eyes will thank you).

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          I think you found the hyper-sensitive parts of our society.

        • 0 avatar
          WildcatMatt

          A Møøse once bit my sister…

      • 0 avatar
        Marone

        Is there ever a bad time to place PETA at the butt of a joke?

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      So in Walmart parking lots will it simply lock the brakes and refuse to budge?

      I’ll show myself out.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        That problem is quite likely. Walmart parking lots are often infested with cows, pigs, skunks and other, lower forms of simian life… some of them not very agile, since they are sleepily cruising around in very slow electric Mart-Carts.

  • avatar
    red60r

    Also detects Scandanavian Elk (sorta like a cross between Moose and Wapiti). That’s why the windshield pillars have been so thick on Volvos for so many years. Tall animals are a real hazard on the highway because they come OVER the hood, rather than hitting the bumper and grille like a white-tail deer.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The interior is just so Lincoln-y. Even the vent decoration.

    I’m sure the T6 will cost as much as a loaded 5-Series, so it’ll sell well.

  • avatar
    Chiburb

    Quick question:

    Now that this has been posted, is that the end of the coverage for this car? I thought pricing was to be revealed along with availability dates, options, etc.

    Seems I saw these pictures from the December Sweden reveal.

  • avatar
    ultramatic

    Now that is a great looking Buick Park Avenue.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    The Volvo S90 is… Not… A… Truck!

  • avatar
    VoGo

    American hunters are such wussies. I mean, if they were real men, they’d go after deer with nothing more than a club or spear and a few buddies. But no, they need their fancy machine guns to kill poor Bambi’s mom. Where’s her second amendment?
    Now they don’t even have to find the deer on their own – their car can do it for them from the comfort of their driveway. Grow a pair!

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      Are you out of your mind? Please tell me your joking because there is so much wrong with this post – I don’t even know where to begin.

      1. No American hunts deer (or any animal) with a machine gun. It is illegal to use a machine gun to hunt animals. Most game laws restrict hunters’ magazine capacities. No American can buy a new machine gun, and hasn’t been able to since the 1980s.

      2. The Second Amendment has nothing to do with hunting. The regulation of hunting is within the states’ police power, except on federally owned land.

      3. From an animal rights perspective, what on Earth is wrong with you? Nobody should use a club or a spear to hunt an anima because it would cause that animal needless suffering and torment. Ethical hunting is about delivering a quick kill. If you can’t put an animal down quickly with the absolute minimum suffering, you don’t take the shot regardless of whether you have a gun or a bow. Clubs and spears are woefully inadequate when modern hunting tools are available. And I’m not even a hunter.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        1. No American hunts deer with a machine gun. No American can buy a new machine gun, and hasn’t been able to since the 1980s.
        —- Actually, any American who can legally purchase a gun can buy an Assault Rifle, which is little more than a machine gun with the full-auto mode locked out. Any semi-automatic rifle could be turned into a machine gun with just a little work by a knowledgeable gunsmith.

        2. The Second Amendment has nothing to do with hunting. The regulation of hunting is within the states’ police power, except on federally owned land.
        —- The Second Amendment gives Americans the right to own and use a firearm if they so choose. Some states won’t even permit the possession of a firearm of any type without a license.

        3. From an animal rights perspective, what on Earth is wrong with you? Nobody should use a club or a spear to hunt an anima because it would cause that animal needless suffering and torment.
        —- Prior to the introduction of guns, Man had to use whatever they could to bring down their deer (or whatever else they used as food.) Guns made the killing of animals much easier and is one of the reasons why so many predatory animals in the US are now or nearly extinct. I’m betting the vast majority of hunters using firearms could even get close enough to their prey to bring it down with a bow, much less a spear or axe. I consider bow hunters the far more ‘ethical’ hunter as their prey has a legitimate chance to escape before the hunter can get off a shot. Much more ethical than shooting one from 300 yards away with a high-powered rifle and ‘scope’.

        • 0 avatar
          Grant404

          1. Wrong. By definition, an “assault rifle” is select fire. If it’s semi auto-only, even if it’s all black and scary looking, it’s not an “assault rifle” no matter what the media calls it, in the same way that putting racing stripes, a rear wing, and stickers on the family sedan doesn’t make it a race car. Changing a semi-auto firearm of any kind into a full auto is more complicated than you imply, and it’s a violation of federal law. Since the 1934s, full auto firearms (aka “machine guns”) can be possessed by private owners (non dealer or manufacturer) only with a federal license. Also, no full auto firearm made after 1986 can be licensed, which makes the remaining pre-’86 FA-capable firearms out there very expensive.

          2.”Some states won’t even permit the possession of a firearm of any type without a license” Wrong. No state requires a license for mere possession of “any type” of firearm.

          3. Silly on so many levels.

          If you’re going to correct people, it might be a good idea to get your facts straight first.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            2.”Some states won’t even permit the possession of a firearm of any type without a license” Wrong. No state requires a license for possession of “any type” of firearm.

            —- I strongly suggest you read Maryland’s gun laws. Unless you owned or brought your weapon into the state BEFORE 1987, you need a license even to own any type of long gun that can be fired. Handgun laws are even stricter.

            Virginia requires you to have a legal license in your home state to even transport weapons through the state, no matter if ammunition is in the vehicle or not. Again, I suggest you read the laws of ALL states before making a blanket statement like yours.

        • 0 avatar
          Maxb49

          Vulpine, you obviously don’t know what you’re talking about. A semiautomatic rifle is not a machine gun. Stop making yourself look foolish. Regardless of your banal assertions, no state allows deer hunting with a machine gun.

          Moreover, using stones and spears to hunt animals is just ethically wrong and inhumane.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Believe it or not, Max, with some semi-automatic rifles such as the AR-15, all it takes is a file in the right place to make it fully automatic. It wouldn’t be hard at all for a gunsmith to modify any semi-auto into a full-auto rifle or handgun. It’s all in knowing how they work in the first place. I’ll grant most of them wouldn’t survive long in full auto, but it’s certainly possible.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            This may be off topic, but does the second amendment guarantee our rights to bear arms all the way up to the shoulder, or should we cut off their arms at the elbow? Which is more humane to the bear?

            And given that there are so many more American people than bears, is there a limit on the number of bear arms a person can get? How is that enforced – by CAFE or Obamacare?

            Thanks,

        • 0 avatar
          Maxb49

          “Believe it or not, Max, with some semi-automatic rifles such as the AR-15, all it takes is a file in the right place to make it fully automatic. It wouldn’t be hard at all for a gunsmith to modify any semi-auto into a full-auto rifle or handgun. It’s all in knowing how they work in the first place. I’ll grant most of them wouldn’t survive long in full auto, but it’s certainly possible.”

          Okay, now I know you are completely full of crap, because I am a machinist and fully familiar with gunsmithing. An AR-15 cannot become a machine gun by filing off “the right place”. An automatic AR-15 requires an entirely different receiver to fire either three round or full-auto bursts. Federal law prohibits the manufacture of semi automatic firearms that are readily convertible to automatic weapons. The “filing down part of the receiver” was a myth that was attributed to the AK-47, not the AR-15. Nevertheless, using a file on an AK receiver did not create a fully automatic weapon, it created an unreliable, dangerous-to-the-user-AK-47. You aren’t just ignorant, you’re dangerously ignorant. You can peddle your B.S. at the local hipster brewhouse, but not with me, not here.

          That’s the first issue. Second, many states ban the use of .223 ammunition (the ammunition used in an AR-15) for deer hunting. Nearly all jurisdictions limit hunters magazine capacity to five rounds. Manufacturers of semi-automatic rifles will often provide 5 round magazines for hunting, so even if automatic weapons were available for hunting, which they are not, they could not be used in that capacity.

          You need to reconsider the blatant garbage you posted. At this point, you’re either willfully ignorant or lying. Or both.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You know, there’s one statement a lot of people make about regulations such as what you just quoted:

            “Criminals don’t care about what’s legal or not. If they can get it, they will use it.”

            I have a .22 cal rifle that when I purchased it carried 15-round magazines. The law for these today is that they must carry no more than 10 rounds (some states may vary.) Meanwhile, many of these old-school magazines still exist in people’s gun racks and cabinets and a thief simply won’t care if the magazine can only hold 5 or 15 rounds. Even when these magazines are plugged to the current legal limits, a criminal could well find a way to remove that plug or otherwise bypass that limitation. I would also note that I am acquainted with one person who legally owns multiple true machine guns and HAS taken them out shooting in the past. The simple fact is that you clearly don’t understand the lengths to which some people will go to get what they want, despite the law.

        • 0 avatar
          zerofoo

          Anyone can “roll coal” with any diesel with a few modifications by a knowledgeable auto mechanic.

          Does this mean we shouldn’t have any lawfully used diesels?

          • 0 avatar
            Maxb49

            Zerofoo, that’s a good point, but the important distinction here is that anyone cannot simply have an automatic weapon with a few modifications to their common AR-15, even if made by a knowledgable gunsmith. The receivers are different, and the equipment is not readily available. The original poster Vulpine made blatantly false assertions and then moved the goalposts when shown that his/her assertions were not true.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Stop it, you guys; this thread reminds me of work.

      I’ve been unofficially advised to prioritize approving time off for deer hunting over anything except medical/surgical or bereavement. I hadn’t at first grasped that hunting is a yearly Hajj ’round these parts, and not only for men.

      Hunting: proof that we’re still mostly mostly chimps.

    • 0 avatar
      zerofoo

      Purchasing meat packed in styrofoam trays, after it’s been factory farmed, from your local grocer is somehow more honorable?

      My grandparents had a farm in Greece. While they didn’t hunt with firearms, they wringed quite a few chicken necks to survive.

      The end result is the same. We are at the top of the food chain – and there is nothing wrong with that so long as animals are killed with a minimum of suffering.

      Hunting free game with a firearm is one of the most humane ways to kill for meat.

      • 0 avatar
        Maxb49

        Everything you said is absolutely true, but our original poster won’t care, because hipsters.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          “Everything you said is absolutely true, but our original poster won’t care, because hipsters.”

          Did you know there are quite a lot of people who think beef comes from the grocery store and that no animals are killed to get it? Amazing!

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            It’s called public schooling. All things, including 12 years of “free” indoctrination, come from Massa Gommiment and those whom it licenses to provide it.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    I love the styling inside and out. I have ony one question. Why aren’t the S90 and V90 being released together? I have seen many pics of the new V90. It would be shameful if Volvo decides no to bring it here. Personally, I prefer the wagon for better versitility. Plus, the current XC70 is past its expiration date.

  • avatar
    pdl2dmtl

    I don’t get this car. Whoever has the money to buy this car wouldn’t be better off spending said money on a BMW or a Merc, if European luxury is a must?
    Second thing is: what’s wrong with Volvo dropping a V8 400HP engine in this E-Klasse wanabe and bringing to N America a 2l 4 cylinder mastodont of an SUV? Did someone say these guys are on borrowed time? This reeks of desperation.
    Not to mention design wise this car is a trainwreck. The designers of the front end never met with the designers of the rear end. Here, I said it.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I agree with you about the silliness of high power density in a small engine powering a two and half ton tank, but supposedly Volvo sold more cars in 2015 than at any time during their history. Have Chinese Volvos replaced Buicks as the cars of Chinese middle managers? Has the world’s population exploded since Volvos were last relevant?

      Perhaps I have a different perspective than many because I grew up in a deranged college town with a new Volvo dealer and a national Volvo parts business that trades in used Volvos, but Volvo 240s were one of the four most visible cars in C’ville in the ’80s. When the S60 came out, they were once again something you saw everywhere. I spent most of the past nine years in San Diego, and I’ve been back in wobbly VA for a couple weeks now. I’ve been seeing about one Volvo a week for the past several years, and nothing has changed. Whoever is buying them now, it doesn’t seem to be the people around me that abandoned them for Subarus, Priuses, and Germans.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Pent up demand after several lean years. There are lots and lots of people who really, really, really! want Volvo to be great again. It is a bit of a cult brand in some circles. And now, since every darned new car on the road is within +- 10% of every other wrt objective “greatness” (at least for the first 50,000 miles), those guys now have a chance to feel smug about driving a “great” Volvo again.

    • 0 avatar
      McDuck

      They are not dropping a V8 on this car. The engine line-up is the same one as with the XC90.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    Because between now and 2020 the EPA Co2 and gas mileage requirements, are going to be tougher. I am sure there will be penalties for low CAFE mileage and high Co2. In addition, more cars will offer plug in hybrid as an option. If Volvo wants this to be it’s big global seller, they must plan for the future, with turbos and superchargers…not resort to the OLD way of doing things.
    Don’t get me wrong, I love a V8 too. My Mercedes S Class has one, but the future is all about clean, efficient, if not powerful from turbos…4 cyl, electric, hybrid tech. The V8 will still be around…just not in a companys main car. Even the new Camaro has a turbo 4 now…as well as the Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Almost nobody bought the previous V8 S80, so they decided to make cars for paying customers, not for for internet daydreamers.

      There are lots of V8 options in this price category. Hyundai-Kia have ’em, the three Germs have one each, Lexus still offers one (I think), Chrysler has some. It’s a saturated market, and none of those options are all that popular.


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