By on January 12, 2016

2017 All-New GMC Acadia Denali

Revealed overnight before its in-person, on-stage performance at the 2016 North American International Auto Show, the 2017 GMC Acadia will gain a new, 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine with start/stop tech and lose nearly 700 pounds of heft.

The former Lambda-based crossover also sees a significant realignment in size thanks to a switch to the new Chi platform that underpins the new Cadillac XT5. The Acadia’s wheelbase shrinks by over 6 inches, length by 7 inches, and width by 3 inches.

2017 All-New GMC Acadia Denali

The new four-cylinder engine spits out 190 horsepower and 194 lbs-ft of torque, while the larger 3.6-liter V-6 engine is pumped up to 310 horsepower and 271 lbs-ft of torque this time around, besting the same-sized mill in the current Acadia by 29 horsepower and only 1 lb-ft of torque. Six-speed automatic transmissions will send power to either the front or all four wheels. GM estimates fuel economy for front-wheel-drive models at 22 mpg city, 28 mpg highway for the 2.5-liter engine and 17 mpg city, 25 mpg highway for the V-6.

Inside, the Acadia will seat five, six or seven passengers, depending on trim. Newly designed second row, split-folding seats offer better access to the third row, even when a child seat is in place. That third row splits 50/50 and can fold flat into the floor. Both seats can be folded down from the rear of the vehicle, making available 79 cubic feet of volume for cargo.

2017 All-New GMC Acadia All Terrain

The top-trim Denali model will be joined by a new All Terrain trim for 2017, bringing the Acadia in line with other GMC models. A full bevy of active safety equipment will also be available, including, GM states, a “rear seat alert that can remind the driver when an item may have been left in the second- and third-row seats.” (In this case, “the driver” can be replaced with “absent-minded parent” and “item” can be swapped for “child.”)

As with all GM vehicles these days, OnStar is standard and 4G LTE and Wi-Fi hotspot is available on the 2017 Acadia. GMC’s redesigned and re-engineered crossover goes on sale this spring.

 

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72 Comments on “NAIAS 2016: 2017 GMC Acadia Saves on Fuel, Spends on Gym Membership...”


  • avatar
    That guy

    I am a little surprised they went that much smaller while keeping the three row configuration. However, they likely did that to further differentiate it from the Yukon as they were pretty close in physical dimensions.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      The reason the Lambdas were so successful was that they were perfectly sized. GM just destroyed their best feature, and then stuck in an I4 so you know it will be underpowered.

      GM just sold 50,000 extra Pilots annually for the next 7 years.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Isn’t this now Honda Pilot sized?

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          The Pilot is very space efficient for its size. Do you notice how none of the pictures GMC released show the third row? I think it’s reasonable to interpret that the new Acadia’s third row is a lot smaller now.

          • 0 avatar

            The new Pilot is the practical choice, but an absolute farce to look at. Enjoy the ride, just don’t cruise abreast of a polished fuel tanker or a glass office building.

            But if the Acadia no longer offers the interior volume equivalence…?

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        I’m guessing this will just be a repeat of the Malibu fiasco.

      • 0 avatar
        Richard Chen

        The Traverse reportedly will also have a longer, as in current length version.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        I was thinking that. They were very large, and that space was a key feature I thought.

      • 0 avatar

        You nailed it. My wife drives an Enclave and it is the perfect size. The cargo room behind the third row is a lifesaver on road trips. Now they have made the interior smaller, I doubt she will go for the new model.

        The lambda triplets were the just right combo of everything our family needed. She was really looking forward to moving up to the new model. Hopefully when they debut the Traverse and Enclave they will have a bit more room, but I doubt it.

        I sent her a link to this just now. Her response: “meh” and then “It looks like the love child of a Durango and Acadia.”

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Agreed. This is a mistake. It’s the Malibu refresh all over again, the next one will likely be rushed out and stretched more. This is a mistake.

    • 0 avatar
      Hector0330

      The reason they went with a smaller Acadia is that they are trying to get a new crossover to fit between the Acadia and the Yukon.
      In my opinion, I thought the Acadia was already close in size to the Yukon and it would’ve been better to leave the Acadia the same size, and slot a new Ccrossover between the acadia and the Terrain.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        I get the logic that the current Acadia and Yukon are similarly sized, by my sense (unconfirmed) was that they appealed to different types of buyers (BOF vs. unibody).

        How is this not redundant with its showroom buddy that new Buick crossover from China?

        • 0 avatar
          Richard Chen

          The Envision lacks a third row, being another 10″ shorter and 3″ narrower.

          I’m presume the Chi platform dimensions and weights were set back when gas was over $4/gallon.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Exactly! Especially since the mid-size Terrain is going to be downsized to compact for 2018.

        The way I thought it would’ve worked before:
        Compact Terrain
        New mid-size CUV
        Full-size Acadia
        Full-size BOF Yukon

        But now it looks like it’ll be:
        Compact Terrain
        New mid-size two-row CUV?
        Mid-size three-row Acadia
        New full-size CUV?
        Full-size BOF Yukon

        Too many question marks right now.

        • 0 avatar
          clivesl

          Dr. Z,

          It would seem this will now be the mid-size offering. It looks like they will offer it as a two-row with tons of room or a three row as an option.

          Are there plans for a legit minivan sized unibody from GM?

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    That’s a nice, useful hatchback.

  • avatar
    shaker

    That 2.5 is a good engine (was adequate in my last car – 2013 Malibu), but they’re just asking a bit too much in a (especially loaded) family hauler.

    This needs a version the 2016 Malibu’s hybrid system as the base drivetrain.

  • avatar

    I think this seems more in line with an Envoy replacement than the last one was.

    But this that really necessary?

    The Lambdas’ biggest asset is its general size, offering similar if not superior volume to a Yukon without the unnecessary heft.

    Not sure what they’re going with the hitherto slam-dunk high transaction price package they had with the current Acadia.

    I sure hope they know what they’re doing because GMC consistently brings in more profitable conquest sales than likely any other SUV – dare I say any other vehicle in general – in the GM stable.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Reserving judgement until pics of the third row up with cargo space confirmed surface. But I fear too that the cargo room is gone especially with 6 in less wheelbase and that long nose.

      I’ve noticed that except for the big BOF beasts and vans/minivans most car dealers won’t show you a picture of the third row up and hatch open. Third row folded and hatch open, yes.

      • 0 avatar
        heoliverjr

        Cargo space does not compare to the outgoing Acadia, the 2017 Acadia is more of a Terrain replacement than an Acadia replacement(same wheelbase, new Acadia is an inch shorter than the Terrain and only 2.5 inches wider). Hoping to see the new smaller terrain and the new fullsize CUV by the time the Chicago and New York shows are over or I’ll be very confused about what GM is doing with their CUVs.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          The specs I’m looking at say the new Acadia is seven inches /longer/ than the current Terrain, which would make sense if it’s a three-row vs. a two-row midsize.

          But otherwise, I think that prediction is correct.

          • 0 avatar
            heoliverjr

            You’re right, thanks for pointing that out! My eyes were playing tricks on me! I was making the Terrain 195.3 instead of 183.5 or the 2017 Acadia as 183.6 instead of 193.6.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          Look to the dimensions of the Envision for an idea of the size of the next Terrain and Equinox.

          It’s worth noting that the wheelbase of the new Acadia is the exact same 112.5 inches as the new XT5. It is a few inches longer to accommodate the third row.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            108″ WB? That’s squarely between compact (no more than 106″ and mid-size (about 110-113″) in my book. Yes, I still group vehicles based on their wheelbase.

            At any rate, that’s a good size IMO. So GM will have five sizes of CUV? Subcompact, compact, midsize, three-row midsize, fullsize?

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Did you hear that. Thats the sound of your customers not coming back…I have relatives that buy the Enclave for two reasons, size and style. If they end up like this they will not buy it.This is significantly smaller.

    As a current CX9 owner I was looking for something to grow into. I am disappointed that the redesign of the CX 9 didnt go up in size as I had hoped. Now this thing is closer to my CX9 than I want.

    I really hope that Ford changes its mind about the Flex and keep making it.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Or at least, the next-gen Explorer will take on some of the traits of the Flex–namely, the better third row.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I can see a successor to the Flex being a stretched Edge with different styling. From everything I’ve heard, and Derek corroborated way back when, the Explorer is going RWD. That could change, but Ford said they will have four all new SUVs in the next few years. Bronco, EcoSport, Flex replacement, and MkT replacement are my best guesses.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Oh, it will be RWD-based for both the Ford and Lincoln for sure now? I thought the platform was going to be interchangeable, with RWD-based AWD for the premium Aviator, and FWD/FWD-based AWD for the more pedestrian Explorer.

        Bringing a (new, safer, of course) EcoSport over here is a smart move by Ford, maybe even smarter than the Bronco (*braces for pitchforks*). Subcompact CUVs are where it’s at right now.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I’m not 100% sure yet. Last I heard, the Explorer was going to be RWD. Derek reported that as well. D6, or whatever the platform will be called, is flexible enough to allow what you are describing.

          If Ford builds a CD4 crossover for the US that is larger than the Edge (like the Chinese LWB Edge), it would make sense that the Explorer is RWD. The 2017 NAIAS should be full of bigger reveals at the Blue Oval.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      The Enclave and Traverse will be closer to their current size. They moved the Acadia to the SWB Chi like the XT5. The first two will be LWB Chi along with the Caddy XT7.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Who needs a third row, people with 3+ kids? Maybe GM is acknowledging that new-car-buying society has left that behind.

    Big dogs? Buy our BOFs.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Why, if the Acadia is considered a “mid-sized crossover” is it so much smaller than its mid-sized cousin, the Colorado? Or rather, why is the mid-sized Colorado so much bigger than the Acadia even in 2WD versions?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      How can you tell without any official dimensions having been released?

      • 0 avatar
        suburbanokie

        Dimensions from press release:
        Wheelbase (in / mm) – Length (in / mm) – Width (in / mm) – Height (in / mm) – Turning radius (ft / M) – Curb weight (lb / kg)

        2017 Acadia 112.5 / 2857 – 193.6 / 4917 – 75.4 / 1916 – 68.7 / 1745 (w/o mast, w/ roof rack) – 38.7 / 11.8 – 3956 / 1794 (est. – FWD)

        2016 Acadia 118.9 / 3021 – 200.8 / 5101 – 78.9 / 2003 – 72.6 / 1844 (w/o mast, w/ roof rack) – 40.4 / 12.3 – 4656 / 2112 (FWD)

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Now I feel like a dweeb. Thank you. (No, seriously, thanks for digging these up, but I should’ve done that myself).

          So, to reiterate:
          2017 Mid-size Acadia FWD:
          OAL: 193.6″, longer than the current Terrain/Equinox
          WB: 112.5″, same as the current Terrain/Equinox
          H: 68.7″, slightly taller
          W: 75.4″, slightly wider

          2016 Mid-size Canyon 4×2 crew cab/short bed:
          OAL: 212.4″
          WB: 128.3″
          H: 70.4″
          W: 74.3″

          The new mid-size Acadia is not appreciably smaller than the mid-size Canyon, except, of course, in length and WB, which are not comparable.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Because a mid-sized truck is not comparable to a mid-sized crossover/SUV, especially when trucks come in different wheelbases depending upon whether they are single, access or crew cab models. Besides, mid-sized crossovers/SUVs span from comfortable five-seaters with average cargo room (Murano, Santa Fe, Edge) to three-row vehicles with adequate space for a third row (Pilot, Pathfinder, Explorer, etc.)

    • 0 avatar
      heoliverjr

      Noticed that too, I blame it on the pickup bodystlye, went searching for specs on the Colorado based Trailblazer and its actually smaller than the 2017 Acadia so mid-size pickup to midsize – suv/cuv comparisons might not be accurate.

      EXTERIOR DIMENSIONS LT LTZ
      A Overall length (mm) 4878
      B Wheelbase (mm) 2845
      C Front overhang (mm) 948
      D Rear overhang (mm) 1085
      E Vehicle height (mm) 1833 1845
      F Vehicle width (mm) 1902 (excluding mirrors)

      (Specs from the 2015 Holden Colorado 7 brochure).

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    One thing the current Acadia and the other Lambdas have going for them is that they are downright cavernous, due to the fact that they were designed like minivans. This new one gives that up. I don’t know if GM is trying to place a crossover between this and the Yukon, or what, but it’s notably smaller.

    The new champions for third row comfort, then, would be the 2016 Pilot and the Pathfinder.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      http://www.autonews.com/article/20160112/OEM03/160119908/1115

      “The 2017 Acadia is the first vehicle to be built on the next generation of GM’s so-called Lambda platform, which also underpins the Enclave and Traverse. It’s unclear whether those nameplates will also be downsized when they are redesigned, which is expected in 2017.

      Sources told Automotive News last year that GM plans to build two versions of the Traverse: a long-wheelbase model that would be about the same size as the current Traverse, and a short-wheelbase model to create a new midsize entry similar in size to the redesigned ’17 Acadia.

      Aldred said the addition of a longer Acadia down the road is not in the plan for now.”

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        With the Enclave in the same GMC/Buick showroom as the Acadia, I think it makes sense to make one a SWB and the other LWB, personally.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Oh, I never thought of that possibility!

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            The only problem with that is the fact that the Buicks look so much more feminine. That is fine when you have the same sized vehicle with a GMC badge in the showroom like they currently do.

        • 0 avatar
          heoliverjr

          Ditto, but I actually find it hard to believe GM would actually do that, could it be a new GM indeed?! And just from a technicality standpoint saying a longer Acadia isn’t planned isn’t the same as saying a new longer vehicle with a new name isn’t planned. But the mention of it fitting between the Terrain and Yukon does imply the Acadia will be there biggest CUV time will tell.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Well the interior looks vastly improved, though that wood panel is quite awful and 1978 Chrysler looking.

    But I don’t get the c-pillar upswept kink, it’s very out of place and has no reason to be there other than reducing glass area and visibility.

    And I’m -still- not sure shrinking it is the right idea. Seven inches of length is a lot to lose.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    190bhp AND 190ft-tq is kinda impressive out of a four banger but how heavy is this thing? 4500lb?

    • 0 avatar
      heoliverjr

      The weight they put in the press release is 100lbs heavier than a FWD, 4 cylinder Terrain. I forgot that exact number I just remember the difference between it and the Terrain.

  • avatar
    Dan

    So GM has transformed their three row crossover from something which people bought in favor of a Highlander because it was bigger into something which people will only buy in favor of a Highlander because they’re stupid.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Wow…

    Better looking than the God aweful current gen, but how the heck is the original Acadia still the best looking?

    And an NA 4 cyl? Just brutal. The 2.4 is just adequate in the Canyon. These will be terrible.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Oops, I meant Terrain

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Even as someone who believes new cars are overpowered, the I4 Equinox/Terrain is pitiful. Keeping up with highway traffic, most of the ones I’ve driven average about 20mpg, worse than either the Traverses or Silverados I was driving under similar conditions.

      Of course, the Terrain is as overweight as it’s underpowered.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        The I4 Terrain also suffered from absolutely terrible transmission logic. If it could have at least picked and held the right gear sometimes, it might have been better

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I hate the Terrain.

          It’s right up there on the list of “garbage which is overpriced” with the GL and any used X5.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            The GL is a good value now that they call it the GLS. That ‘S’ makes it worth $15k more than the Volvo XC90 right there.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m glad you understand it as well!

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            I think (annoying power train aside) an I4 AWD SLE Terrain is a good deal. Lots of room, decent economy, decent price, just an engine that sounds like a dying cat gargling rocks. The SLT V6 is way overpriced and the Denali is an insult

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I just think the price starts out too high for the interior quality (which would only be perhaps marginally better than the Equinox version). And the cartoony body doesn’t work for me. It’s like the PT Cruiser of the CUV world!

            (I4 AWD SLE base $28,310)

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    This is actually a smart introduction. The Buick Enclave is sold in the same dealerships as the GMCs. If the buyer needs the same size as the old Acadia, he/she can be steered to the Enclave. In the meantime, GM gets experience building on the new platform before using it for the high-volume Chevrolet. Also, GM can attract buyers who want something smaller but with 3 rows. These would be the same buyers who bought the Buick Rendezvous, a car which was popular in my area but apparently not so popular nationally.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      I agree with this take 100%. Personally I see a lot of Dads driving Acadias in comparison to Enclaves. So I think shrinking it a bit is a perfect fit. As you said, the Enclave will be the LWB version and close to the current size (probably similar interior room with more efficient packaging). This differentiates the two cars in a way besides the badge and styling, which is IMO a good thing.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I think I saw more Rendezvous (the plural is spelled the same, but pronounced “ron-day-voos”) after it was discontinued than anytime during the model’s run.

    • 0 avatar
      heoliverjr

      Could also been seen as Risky both the Enclave and Acadia sale well but the Acadia sells more than the Enclave does and the styling differences could be a turn off to some people or just the Buick brand itself. On the other hand Encores and Enclave’s make up 60% of Buick sale so it might have to be left alone for the sake of Buick leaving GMC to do the one to shrink.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    General Motors:. “We sell a lot of even our aged Lamdas because they are large inside, have a pleasant 3rd row, and have standard V6 power….

    …let’s make them significantly tighter insider, with an unusanle 3rd row, and stick a 2.5 liter 4 banger in them, with annoying start/stop feature, for 2017.”

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Committee meeting, Ren Cen – Lambda Replacement.

      Big Boss Man: “Smithers! What’s something people like about our Lambda triplets?”

      Smithers: “Well, Sir, they do like the cavernous interiors. They are basically minivans but don’t tell the public that.”

      Big Boss Man: “Can’t have that! Cut 6 in out of the wheelbase and put the third row up against the rear hatch!

      “Jones, what else do people love about them?”

      Jones: “Well, Sir the standard nearly 300 hp V6 has given them a perception of value.”

      Big Boss Man: “Well too bad! We’ve got excess capacity at the plant that builds the 2.5 ltr 4. If it is good enough for the Impala it is good enough for these.”

  • avatar
    zip89105

    This is really good. Everyone I know gets 14mpg city in these. What caused the weight loss? Military grade aluminum?

  • avatar

    Not for nothing, but my 31 year-old girlfriend who makes good income, is educated, and is in a professional career field would buy this over the current Acadia because – while she loves the current one – it’s too large.

    And she’s wanted an Acadia since day one in 2007.

    So maybe I’m wrong.


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