By on January 7, 2016

IONIQ A Leap Forward for Hybrid Vehicles (3)

Hyundai on Monday revealed its 2017 Hyundai IONIQ ahead of its official reveal at Geneva in March and my goodness it’s already yelling at me.

The hatchback has been in the works for some time by now, which we already knew. Hyundai cleared up some of the technical details that we were waiting on — but not its fuel economy, apparently.

Sheesh.

For starters, the Ioniq (I can’t caps anymore, sorry) is powered by Hyundai’s all-new 1.6-liter Atkinson-style cycle engine and a lithium-ion polymer battery that produce 103 horsepower and 42 horsepower respectively. Hyundai didn’t specify what the total combined output of the Ioniq could be, so we’ll have to wait on that because apparently the combined horsepower number maths harder than just adding the two together.

According to Hyundai, the internal combustion engine is the world’s most heat-efficient engine — although Toyota cited the same 40 percent thermal efficiency figure when it unveiled its new Prius engine.

The Ioniq’s power is shifted through a six-speed dual-clutch transmission because CVTs are just plain silly. Hyundai said the transmission has been optimized for the hybrid system, and transmits more than 95 percent of the power to the wheels.

In addition to powertrain improvements, the automaker detailed weight savings in the car. Hyundai said an aluminum hood and tailgate helped to cut roughly 25 pounds from the overall weight of the car, in addition to extensive use of high-strength lightweight steel.

IONIQ A Leap Forward for Hybrid Vehicles_interior

Inside, the Ioniq looks like a Hyundai — good or bad.

The setup looks fairly plain, and we already know that it’ll sport Apple’s CarPlay. Compared to the 2016 Prius, which I drove last year, the Ioniq looks fairly sleepy, but far from brash like higher trims of the Prius.

Hyundai didn’t specify how much, or when the car would go on sale. We know it’s coming this year, but now at least we know what it looks like and some of what’s underneath.

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46 Comments on “Here’s The 2017 Hyundai IONIQ to Take On The Prius...”


  • avatar
    dwford

    Looks good. While Toyota turned the Prius up to 11 (maybe even 12) with really questionable styling, Hyundai has taken the mainstream route and designed a good looking car inside and out. I like it.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      The unspoken understanding is that the 2017 Prius looks like a graphics card rendering accident (as one Jalopnik commenter eloquently put it) because its unique shape helps it to achieve industry-leading fuel economy in the real world. However, I’m sure many people—myself included—would be willing to cede a *few* MPG for better styling and probably a lower cost of acquisition. Those people would do well to take a good hard look at the Ioniq.

      • 0 avatar
        kit4

        “However, I’m sure many people—myself included—would be willing to cede a *few* MPG for better styling and probably a lower cost of acquisition.”

        No. The primary reasons hybrids are successful is due to the high MPG, which the Prius handily dominates, and the non-mainstream styling that is unique. The Prius will only get stronger with the new model, regardless of how you or internet fanboys who have no merit and are not target market feel about the styling.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Normally, that would be true…and in particular, the previous two generations of Prius have been palatable and well-styled. But I think Toyota is really pushing the limits on what its customers will accept in order to have superior styling.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You had a BMW X5, and you like the GX with V8. You no Prius customer! :)

          • 0 avatar
            kit4

            People on the Internet howled at how “ugly” the previous Prius’ looked and yet it sold well. This new one will be no different. For every one person put off by it, there will be another who thinks it looks cool and futuristic, which it does.

  • avatar
    madman2k

    I like it a lot better than the gen 4 Prius, so this is much more likely to replace my gen 3 Prius.

    Unless I can live somewhere close to where I work and commute on a bike, then the wife can have a 3-row or a bench-seat crew cab truck and it’ll be our only vehicle.

    Then I can save up for a Miata!

  • avatar
    VW16v

    It looks like a real car over a Prius. Does not have that retirement granny look.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    So Hyundai basically copied the Prius drivetrain, but thinks they can steal sales from Prius because of CarPlay/Android Auto, conservative styling and a transmission that doesn’t drone on. If they can match or beat the Prius price, they could have a winner.

    Oh, and they need oil to rebound from its recent record lows.

    I’d be interested in knowing if the Ioniq can offer better acceleration than the glacial 0-60mph time of the Prius.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      They didn’t copy the Toyota HSD. Sounds like they adapted the setup from the Sonata hybrid and stuck it in a gen2 Prius-clone body.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The hybrid system in the Ioniq is quite different from that of the Prius, however, what is more interesting are the PHEV and EV variants.

      In particular, if Hyundai can get the electric range of the PHEV version over 30 miles w/o too much of a price premium over the hybrid – might just jump-start PHEV sales.

      Think Kia is doing the smarter thing by going with a crossover body-style even if doing so loses some efficiency.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        It’s not going to “jump start PHEV sales”. Gas is too cheap and people don’t care. The C-Max Energi’s transaction price is actually cheaper than the C-Max Hybrid when you factor in the tax credit. People just buy F150s and Edges instead.

  • avatar
    sproc

    Nice! If drives anywhere near as well as the Accent and Sonatas I’ve driven lately and puts up mileage numbers anywhere close to the Prius, this should be a serious contender. It’s vastly better looking from any angle. Great job on the hatch.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “apparently the combined horsepower number maths harder than just adding the two together”

    Because the quoted figures are peak power, at a different rpm for each one. The combined peak will be whatever the highest sum for a given rpm is.

    • 0 avatar
      never_follow

      I thought the whole magic of EV motors was that they had a basically flat power curve? Or am I totally misunderstanding things?

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Power curves are much flatter than an ICE, but not always dead level. Depends on a lot on the construction of the motor(s) and the particulars of the control electronics.

      • 0 avatar
        jdogma

        Many (not all designs, and there are many) electric motors have a flat torque curve that goes quickly to 0 at some higher rpm. HP = Torque (lb/ft) * rpm / 5252,so you can see that the power curve corresponding to a flat torque curve for a motor with 100% of its torque at 0 rpm would actually be a straight line with 0 hp at 0 rpm.

  • avatar
    Ben

    it looks nice, much more appealing than the new Prius.
    it’d be on the replacement list for our ’05 Sportage, except apparently no hatch.

  • avatar
    James2

    I had to Google to find a picture of the front end, which is pretty much Elantra-esque, but Hyundai will hopefully find plenty of buyers who were Struck Blind by the pure ugliness that is the new Prius.

  • avatar
    gasser

    This car will do well in California. Gas this AM is $3.19 a gallon, with oil at an 8 year low.

    • 0 avatar

      And the Ca State Legislature is seriously considering raising the gas tax to pay for our miserable roads.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Been there, done that. Won’t go to roads, its all about ACA medicaid expansion imposed on the states (which is essentially a welfare cost mandate.)

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          California is a rubbish place! The weather does not make up for the disadvantages, which is everything but the weather.

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            Californians run the world’s seventh largest economy, driving development of everything from electric cars to nanotechnology to biomedical research to the internet you currently enjoy trolling. State-bashing is tiresome, let’s give it a rest.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            HotPotato, “State-bashing is tiresome”.

            Maybe others don’t view CA as their nirvana, the way you do.

            I was born and raised in Huntington Beach, CA, but I have no desire to ever go back and live in CA like so have many others who are now cashing out and moving elsewhere, i.e. Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, and other places.

            I was blown away by how many ex-pat Californians I met over the Holidays, who now live in and around Ensenada.

            Maybe Corey is not as well off as you are.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The Peoples Republic of Kalifornia will be crushed under its own weight when and if several key industries which do produce something tangible relocate, are supplanted, or unable to produce (thinking farms in the recent drought). Favorable weather and student pipeline via places like Stanford or some of the UC schools play a major role in keeping those techy industries.

            FWIW in my only visit eleven years ago aside from high prices then and tweakers around Stockton, I had a very positive experience there and enjoyed seeing everything from Sacramento to El Dorado area to Lake Tahoe and back in an ’87 Civic. The state had some real natural beauty.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Industries leaving CA is already happening. ttac covered Toyota’s exit pretty well.

            From personal experience, my former son-in-law was a corporate attorney for a business that moved production from CA to a Maquiladora in Mexico near the Texas border while relocating their corporate headquarters to Texas just across the border from the Maquiladora.

            My former son-in-law was not a keeper and has been unemployed since 2012 when his company made him a free agent, living with his mom in Bel-Air, and working out of her house on immigration cases.

            My daughter who was married to this loser, divorced his sorry @ss, packed up her kit and kaboodle, moved to El Paso, TX, and has lived happily ever after.

            My bother who lived in our parental home in Palos Verde sold the house, cashed out and moved to Ensenada, Mexico, like many before him (i.e. my grandson’s in-laws from Fallbrook).

            We should not condemn people like CoreyDL for voicing their views because maybe they can’t escape their situation for any number of reasons.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            What situation am I in which I need to escape? Ohio? Home ownership? The burden of owning an old Cadillac?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Maybe you’re happy where you are.

            But it is obvious that you tell it like it is in CA for many people and others like HotPotato don’t share your sentiment and wish to limit your freedom of expression about your discontent.

            Like I said, I was born there. I was just there in Dec 2015 and Jan 2016 passing through Lindbergh Field on my way South and what I saw in San Diego did not appeal in the slightest.

            That said, I still have three blood-relatives who live in CA and they have said the exact same thing you said earlier.

            Their predicament is, they cannot leave for a number of reasons.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I like it more as more images emerge. I’d have a hard time choosing between the drivetrains.

  • avatar

    The first thing some “pro” will want to do is claim it doesn’t drive as well as (insert name here) and quote its skidpad numbers.

    I’ll never allow myself to be forced into a soul-less econobox, but if I ever needed a soul-less econobox (right now) I’d take an ioniq over a Bolt or a Prius.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    Prius has had a most reliable record during its time in the US. I doubt Hyundai can achieve the same.

    • 0 avatar

      I currently have a fully loaded Hyundai Azera on lease which I don’t talk about (it goes back this June).

      The lease was 3 years.

      We haven’t had a single problem with the car.

      My only problem with it ever was driving it home from Sansone Hyundai, NJ, the windshield kept fogging up for some reason.

      Otherwise: the car has been perfect and I feel vindicated staking my money on one. I now trust Hyundai. Granted it was only a 3-year lease and not a 6-year finance, but the overall luxurious feel of the interior and features left me very satisfied.

      The next lease: either a Genesis or a Sonata.

      I’m thinking I may go with the Sonata since it’s so much larger (more comfortable than the Azera in my opinion. But the Genesis makes more sense for my Uber.

    • 0 avatar
      callmeishmael

      Why? It’s not as if the technology used in EVs is vastly different from one car to another. They all use lithium ion batteries, solid state controllers and DC motors with samarium cobalt magnets. Everyone is pretty much in the same place at the moment.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        What? No…not at all. They use squirrel cage ac induction motors. They use igbts to do the DC to ac and variable frequency drives to controllers rpm. No precious metals or exotic materials required. Basic simple ac induction motors, I work with them nearly every day.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Prius will deliver better mileage but the Ioniq will cost 95% as much.

    The Korean Kurse shall not be lifted.

  • avatar
    C P

    Still don’t see a lot of 10 year & older Hyundai’s running about. The style nice cars. But there’s always an issue.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I like the design here. Considerably better looking than the new samurai-attacked Prius.

    Maybe integrate the pull area of the hatch a little better, the dark space under the logo is clunky looking.


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