By on January 20, 2016

20160111_211232

Once more into the breach, dear friends / Or close up the segment with our heavily-rebated dead.

This is the third time I’ve encountered this generation of Ford Focus SE, having enjoyed the car on its press preview and suffered through an overheated PowerShift sedan in Florida traffic a year later. Now I return once again to this vaguely-Germanic ground, this time for a 448-mile odyssey through the Michigan winter.

Since we last met, the Focus SE has been given a thorough and comprehensive revamp, from the new global front end to what looks like an all-new interior. The price has also been favorably adjusted. Is it enough to put the aging Euro-compact back on your personal radar screen?


20160111_211249

If you equip your 2016 Ford Focus SE the way my rental was equipped, you’ll be looking at an MSRP of $20,485 and a post-rebates price of $18,735. Why are there rebates on a brand-new car? Ask Lee Iacocca, why dontcha. Of course, you’d be a fool, or a rental company, to order the car the way this one was equipped. It has one major option: the $1,095 “PowerShift” dual-clutch automatic.

The weather I encountered on my annual trek from central Ohio to the Detroit Auto Show, which never exceeded 40 degrees F and frequently hovered in the high teens, didn’t give the PowerShift the chance to show its proverbial ass by overheating or stuttering. It’s possible those problems have also been worked out for warmer climates, but I wouldn’t bet on it. Interestingly, the way that you interact with the troubled transmission has been significantly changed in this post-facelift car. The choice of “PRDNS” has been changed to “PRNDL,” and the plus-minus rocker on the shift lever that used to offer “Tiptronic” control is now a one-way button that activates a “hill descent mode.” Why’d Ford take manual control away? Did they get tired of clueless customers poking the button by accident, or does the transmission suffer and misbehave even more when you’re calling the shots yourself? There’s a clue in the option packages, which we’ll discuss in a moment.

It’s better to save the $1,095 and get the entirely competent five-speed stick. You could spend the money on any number of better options: the $1,095 Sport Package, which gives you big wheels, ground effects, a leather wheel, and — surprise! — paddle shifters for PowerShift-equipped cars. Or you could take a $645 cold-weather package, or an $895 moonroof, or even the $95 keyless-access keypad, friend to runners and cyclists everywhere, that allows you to leave your keys in the locked car. Alternately, there’s a $1,995 luxury package that makes significant upgrades inside and out to the appearance and comfort of the Focus.

For $495, you could also select the 1-liter EcoBoost triple and a six-speed manual. That’s certainly a unique option for the segment and it might help the Focus address one area where it continues to refrain from impressing: fuel economy. Despite driving at or below the speed limit most of the time due to conditions, I only averaged 33.8 mpg for my trip, numbers easily achievable by a Camry or Accord from the next class up. It’s also possible that the Focus feels a bit more sprightly with the flat torque curve of the turbo 1.0. The 160-horsepower 2-liter direct-injection Duratec four that comes as standard equipment never feels particularly eager to do its job and it can’t motivate this sedan as well as Toyota’s Iron-Duke-esque 2.5-liter big four does the Camry.

20160111_211300

Of course, this generation of the Focus has been a “tweener” of sorts since it was introduced, bridging the size gap between its predecessor and the Camry/Accord class that serves as default American family transportation the way the Focus has served as default European family transportation since it was called the Escort. The interior, therefore, is spacious and usable for four people and it’s in no way tiring on long trips. There’s been a lot of thought put into the way the Focus works, and it’s apparent in everything from the positioning of the primary controls to the little upswept tip on the turn signal that helps your hand find and operate it quickly without fumbling.

20160110_145233

Ford continues to punish customers who don’t spring for the SYNC3/navigation combination by giving you a tiny LCD recessed into a sort of poverty cave above the center console. Buying navigation requires that you take the PowerShift and the upscale interior trim, for a combined price bump just south of $4,500 — so if you’re going to sensibly spec-out your SE, you’re going to be stuck with the mini-screen. At least everything works well, including the Bluetooth integration. The four selector buttons that operate many of the features are placed at the bottom of the poverty cave, which makes them slightly non-intuitive for new owners, but you’d figure it out eventually.

Thankfully, the old center-console arrangement, seemingly meant to ape the buttons on the Vertu Constellation phone that was for a brief while de rigeur for British celebrities and athletes during the pre-smartphone era, has been replaced by a sensible grouping of climate and radio controls. The A/C, long a Euro-Ford weak point, didn’t have to do very much during my trip, but the heat and defrost functions were slightly better than what I’ve come to expect from my Accord.

Wind and road noise are also better than what you’d get from a Honda or Toyota. That, combined with the artificially-heavy steering and stout but un-eager chassis, effectively defines what the Ford brand currently means in sedans: an upscale feel at the expense of agility and charm. An Accord feels like a Lotus Elan after you’ve been in the Focus for a week or so. Even an Altima or Camry would feel light on its feet by contrast. This is a serious business Euro-car that takes virtually all of its inspiration from the big German marques. The playfulness of the original Focus has been thoroughly baked out through two new platforms and a couple of facelifts. What remains is a sort of front-wheel-drive take on the Mercedes W202 C-Class.

Equipped the same way as an Accord LX or base Camry, this is about a nineteen-and-a-half-grand car with a stick-shift. That’s a $3,000 savings over the Japanese midsizers. This is what you give up: space and pace, resale value, a bit of long-term durability, and a bit of fuel economy. This is what you get: a slightly upscale feel, less road noise, and a more relaxing driving experience.

Truth be told, the Focus SE only makes sense if you send this sedan back to the dealership and build the Focus the way it was meant to be built: as a hatchback, with the upscale SE trim package, the winter package, and the navigation. When you do that, you have a fully-equipped five-speed, 2-liter hatch with everything from dual-zone climate control to reverse-parking sensors, for a post-incentives $22,275. This is enough car for almost anyone, offering all-weather capability, plenty of room, and the aforementioned vintage-Benz sense of freeway solidity. That is a great car, and our putative Continental superiors must agree as they tend to take their Foci/Focuses in that spec.

This dual-clutch sedan, on the other hand, is merely a good car. And there are plenty of good cars out there. Which is why I was happy to give it back and return to my Honda. As a post-rental bargain-basement buy, on the other hand, it makes a lot more sense. I just wish it had a conventional automatic. This is a car that specializes in quiet competence, which is a very Ford-ish virtue. It deserves a transmission that feels the same way — and so do you, dear reader!

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

169 Comments on “2015 Ford Focus SE Rental Review...”


  • avatar
    philadlj

    Some people hate the “floating tablet” look of many Mercedes and Mazda nav/infotainment systems, but the “poverty cave” is far, far, worse. And hilarious!

  • avatar
    Thatkat09

    I might be the only one but after the refresh, I think I prefer the way the sedan Focus looks over the hatchback. With the Titanium wheels I think it looks upscale.
    When I rented one about a year ago, it definitely felt more solid and composed than its competitors like Jack wrote. I had two major issues with it though, the terrible auto transmission(worst ive ever driven, felt like it was about to fail and leave me stranded) and the horribly cramped interior with crummy rear leg room. If I were 40 pounds lighter, never needed the back seat and could get a stick on the Titanium trim it could have been an option when it comes time to trade in my Optima. Good write up Jack.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      That’s the part of this write-up I don’t get at all. The Focus is a subcompact compared to the best in the compact class cars from Honda and Toyota. The back seat is a parcel shelf, since anyone small enough to fit in it would require a child seat that won’t.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        I didn’t understand the tweener size comment either. I never rode in the 2nd generation, but a buddy had the first generation Focus for a long time and I don’t remember it being any smaller than the current one. Corollas, Jettas, Sentras, and Darts are limos in comparison. Even in the front of the Focus I think the massive dash and console, as well as sparse headroom makes for a cramped cockpit.

        Even if this Focus splits the difference between its predecessor and a midsize, I think it is a misleading comment. This car is in no way spacious for its class.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Agreed, this was rather strange statement by Jack. The Focus is a portly thing (in Cruze and Dart territory), but has the tightest cabin in the entire C class. This is what doomed it for me when I was considering a 5spd SE back in 2013 (ended up with a Civic). I do like the sound of how quiet and stable it is on the highway, my Civic is lacking in this department.

        The presumed price of $18k+ doesn’t sound right either. There are LOTS of incentives to push these Foci, as sales have stalled out in the face of low gas prices. I’m sure you could scoop up a fairly basic SE for $15-16k no problem.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          SE Focii can be had for $15,000 plus TTL easily in the metro Detroit area, and about a grand less if one is a Ford employee or, now (1st time), a friend (non-family member) of a Ford Employee under the A Plan code program.

          There is NO doubt that many compact and subcompact cars are piling up high & deep in the current era of low fuel prices.

  • avatar
    MBella

    I’ve had a few of these as rentals. Overall the car is decent, but the transmission is awful.

    As for the tiptronic mode, I think you get it on the higher trim packages.

    • 0 avatar
      GermanReliabilityMyth

      I honestly can’t recall the last time Ford made a decent transmission in the last several decades.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        6F and 6R are both good transmissions. HF35 is an excellent transmission.

        • 0 avatar
          GermanReliabilityMyth

          I’m not familiar with the 6R, but isn’t the 6F the one that was co-designed with GM? There’s a slew of complaints about valve body issues with that, including lost gears, hard shifts, morning sickness and premature failure. It was the one reason I didn’t consider the Fusion it was mated to and instead considered a Fusion Sport (for its Aisin transmission) several years back.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The data suggests that it is a reliable transmission. There were some early issues but I wouldn’t run away from one. The biggest issue now is programming. I don’t like the programming on some of the four pot turbo vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            there was a problem with the calibrations for 2010MY Fusions/Milans which led to transaxle failures.

          • 0 avatar
            larrystew

            The Powershift may be reliable, but it is very inconsistent. My clutch seal has been replaced, my clutch pack has been replaced with the F-revision, and I’ve still had random issues. It shifts beautifully when cold, but when it warms up, watch out. It will stutter and grind as if a 6-year-old were driving it. I’ve had stuttering so bad, it wouldn’t accelerate. Given a different situation, I could’ve been hit from behind or from the side. Ford needs to institute a buy-back program for those affected.

      • 0 avatar
        VolandoBajo

        My 4R70W is going strong coming up on 200K miles. The AOD behind my 88 Thunderbird held out for going on 300K miles. Both were being driven by a V8 mill, back through tall rear end gear ratios, so they presumably had a bit of torque put to them throughout their lifetimes.

    • 0 avatar
      paxman356

      Yeah, I’ve had a few pre-facelift rentals, and some had hill-climber, some had tiptronic buttons. I never got what the hill-climber button actually did, or mine wasn’t working.

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    Poverty cave. I like it. Very appropriate. I suppose the poverty cave leads to the shame shaft.

  • avatar

    The biggest boner with that car is that stupid PowerShift gearbox, which is harsh, sloppy, chattery, and apparently elicits such frequent ire from customers that Ford has a flyer that the local dealer’s service department has xerox’d and lazily hands out to Fiesta/Focus owners, a flyer that explains how the harsh, sloppy, chatteriness is 100% normal. I have a copy of that to explain to my customers, too, along with informing them that Ford DOES warranty that transmission above and beyond even the extended powertrain coverage.

    Anyway, the Focus may not be the best buy new, but its a helluva buy slightly used, especially the hatchback.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Just get a C-Max instead.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’m warming to the C-Max as well.

      • 0 avatar

        C-Max = fat Focus hatch with better vis, cargo room, more features, more refinement, and just as cheap (surprisingly).

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          I’m guessing the C-Max has a (far?) more reliable drivetrain too: port injection vs direct and (if I understand it correctly) a Prius-style planetary gear CVT vs a DCT.* I don’t have data to back up that guess, but (a) a friend’s Focus has needed several reflashes for its transmission software and (b) I see a lot of C-Max cabs in service.

          – – –
          *Yes, I know you can get a manual. Most buyers don’t though.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            My C-Max has been more reliable than my Focus ST, but two data points do not a statistically significant survey make. I would expect the 2.0L port injected engine with battery pack and HF35 transmission to be more reliable than any Focus. I would certainly tell people to buy it over an Powershift Focus.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            the C-Max is hybrid/PHEV only in North America; so you get the HF35 eCVT. in the rest of the world, non-hybrid C-Maxes get the goddamn DPS6.

          • 0 avatar

            Funny thing is, Ford considers the CVT unit to be part of the hybrid drive system, meaning it’s covered under the extended 8yr/100k-mile warranty on the hybrid components. So…bonus warranty!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            There’s no actual CVT unit in a Ford or Toyota hybrid. It’s a planetary gear set, with the constant variability achieved by running one of the electric motors at an arbitrary speed (the other is directly connected to the wheels). Mechanically, it’s simpler than any conventional automatic or CVT. It’s easy to warranty, and I’d take it over a PowerShift in a heartbeat. Either a manual Focus, or a C-Max: those are the choices.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The Church may have to add C-Max to it’s list of used car endorsements.

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            Amen. Especially if it gooses the dismal trade-in value of my C-Max so I can swap it for a 2017 Bolt.

            If not, I still love my C-Max, despite the mandatory software flash to improve MPG at the expense of refinement, and despite the fact mine was built during the window when they had some bad transmission bearings…powertrain warranty in CA on a hybrid is 100k miles, maybe more, so I’m not too concerned. If I could do it again I’d order the Sony stereo, though.

        • 0 avatar
          tonycd

          Sincere question: Why do I see nothing but obnoxiously high asking prices for C-Max on cars dotcom?

          Is this just a case of dealers trolling and customers who have to come in and take a hard line on their offers? Is it something about the nature of cars dotcom generally that I don’t understand (beyond the universal truth that car dealers will always ask for too much)?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Hard to find a good example of a lightly used Focus with a manual, though…especially around here.

  • avatar
    ajla

    This is one car where the manual transmission is just about mandatory.

    For all their other faults, FCA at least realized their DCT in the Dart was trash and replaced it with a conventional auto on nearly every trim.

    For some reason Ford dug in their heels and kept the Powershift in the Fiesta/Focus.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    The poverty cave will be filled in next year as all Ford vehicles will come standard with Sync3.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    18 grand+ for a poverty spec powershift saddled Ford Focus bland, compact car that will bore even an actuarial to death.

    Easily 23 grand or more for anything decently equipped.

    Ford is absolutely smoking crack on pricing when Toyota is giving modestly equipped, much larger Camrys away for LESS money in real world pricing, as is Nissan with the Altima, and Honda with the base (but not stripper) Accord LX.

    Even GM seems to get this segment and is blowing Cruzes out for around 15k similarly optioned as this Focus (and $90 to $120 per month leases).

    Ford has an out of control pricing problem across the board, but especially at the CUV, SUV and truck level that defies logic and any sustainable business model – is it any wonder Ford just announced that non-family members qualify for A Plan (true employee pricing) for the first time in its history?

    My doctor actually mentioned that his daughter was Kuomintang the nee Ford Explorer and was shocked by the Ford pricing, and ended up in an Audi “for not much more.”

    Ford better count the days it has left to get rich pricing on blue oval commuter vehicles, because they’re going to see a significantly and adversely impacted margins when the next true cyclical downturn (closer at hand than many choose to accept) happens.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Ford would rather put someone in a Fusion for $10 more a month or an Escape for $20 more a month.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      “My doctor actually mentioned that his daughter was Kuomintang the nee Ford Explorer”

      WAT

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I think DW had a stroke.

      • 0 avatar
        paxman356

        Kuo·min·tang

        [ˈkwōˈminˈtaNG, -ˈtäNG, ˈgwô-]

        DEFINITION

        a nationalist party founded in China under Sun Yat-sen in 1912, and led by Chiang Kai-shek from 1925. It held power from 1928 until the Communist Party took power in October 1949, and subsequently formed the central administration of Taiwan.

        It looks like he edited/reposted that below as this:

        My doctor actually mentioned that his daughter was looking at the nee Ford Explorer and was shocked by the Ford pricing, and ended up in an Audi “for not much more.”

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Should read –

        “My doctor actually mentioned that his daughter was looking at the new Ford Explorer and was shocked by the Ford pricing, and ended up in an Audi “for not much more.”

        At least Ford hasn’t stooped so low as to build an increasing number of vehicles in CHINA and export them to the United States like some other “American Automakers” *cough* GM *cough* (including Buicks and Cadillacs).

        F’ing autocorrect.

      • 0 avatar
        PeriSoft

        “My doctor actually mentioned that his daughter was Kuomintang the nee Ford Explorer”

        This is one of the best TTAC threads I’ve read in ages. What kind of stuff is Deadweight usually talking about that his autocorrect figures that Kuomintang is the *most* likely option?! I love it!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      That’s either one awesome “damn you autocorrect” or DW was temporarily inhabited by the soul of Gen Chiang Kai-shek.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        He does get mad about The People’s Republic. Maybe he IS the ghost of Chiang Kai-shek. Has anyone seen both DW and ol’ Chiang in the same place at the same time? Didn’t think so.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Yeah, auto correct got me.

        Autocorrect is as annoying as Ruggles

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          That’s exactly what Kai-shek would say.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            One can’t get anything remotely approximating decent Chinese food in metro Detroit.

            Dammit.

            (Thinking about fire-stoked wok Chinese dishes now).

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Hong Hua in Farmington Hills or Shangri-La in West Bloomfield.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I’m putting Hong Hua on the “to eat at” list.

            Thanks, Jim.

            The best Mexican food I’ve had thus far in U.S. was in Tucson.

            The best Chinese food I’ve had thus far in the U.S. was in NYC (had it in three Chinese cities, also).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Jim is right. Hong Hua is very good.

            And the reason why the best Mexican food you’ve had in the US was in Tucson is because it has the best Mexican food in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            the most interesting Mexican market I’ve found is in Melvindale, on Oakwood just in the shadows of the Marathon refinery.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Tucson & Nogales (this side of border) both had amazing Sonoran style Mexican food; so good that it ruined anything found elsewhere for me

            Similarly, there is some amazing Chinese food (authentic) available in NYC – better than in Seattle by 100 miles, I’M) (one of the benefits of a city with so many authentic & salt-of-the-earth Chinese immigrants & their children).

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            ” best Mexican food in the US.”

            Amen, bball!

            For your next travel/vacay, I highly recommend Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico.

            We spent more than two weeks there over the holidays and loved it. Very inexpensive if you eat what the natives/locals eat.

            Would have stayed longer but capitalism beckoned at home.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Seattle is the place to get Vietnamese food, but not particularly Chinese food.

            In general our food scene hasn’t kept up with our growth, sadly. Tech bros and good restaurants don’t seem to go together. To get good Asian food, go north to Vancouver — I’d put Vancouver’s Chinese up against New York’s without a second thought. To get good Western food, go south to Portland, which has a food scene that’s just insane given the city’s size.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Given that one could be forgiven for thinking they landed in an Asian nation when landing at SEATAC (50% minimum of passenger traffic is Asian), one would think they could would find incredible Asian I Japanese food there, but after a half-dozen trips, I’ve yet to strike ethnic food gold in the Seattle or metro Seattle area.

            I’ve found some very good breakfast places, though, for some reason (Seattle seem to take breakfast seriously)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Maybe it was all the wine I had that day, but my favorite Chinese place is in the East Bay Hills of the Bay Area. It was probably all the wine…

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The best Asian food I’ve found in Seattle is sushi and Indian food. There are two legit first-class sushi joints in the International District, across the street from each other (Fuji and Tsukushinbo). There’s a lot of excellent Indian food across the lake in Redmond, which is where the families of Microsoft H-1B workers have concentrated themselves (and is also a 10-minute drive from where I live). There is also more than serviceable Thai food, with one particularly good place (May) in Wallingford.

            But for some reason the Chinese food and the non-sushi Japanese food have never hit the spot. The best Chinese place I’ve found so far is La Bu La in Bellevue (also close to where I live) and it’s only okay. It gets three stars if the best Chinese places in Vancouver get five.

    • 0 avatar
      ringomon

      Sorry guys Hong Hua is just barely okay if you’re into the authentic stuff.

      Best China in Canton, Empire Dynasty or Taste of China in Farmington will get you the real good stuff. Got to order off the Chinese menus though.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Best China and Sze Chuan are both good. Neither is my favorite, but I won’t say no to a meal at either.

        In Oakland County there seem to be more excellent Thai places than Chinese places. I really like Bangkok City @ 10/Telegraph in Southfield.

        • 0 avatar
          ringomon

          My issue with Hong Hua is the service and the pricing. Works best for large groups and expense accounts. I prefer the hole in the wall places personally.

          I was surprised when I first moved to the area how many Thai restaurants there are. The opposite Thai to Chinese ratio of most Midwestern cities it seems.
          I’ll have to try Bangkok city. Thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I do too. The only time I’ve been to Hong Hua was in a work group that I wasn’t paying for.

            Bangkok City usually has a line for a table at lunch time. Call for take out, get there before noon, or go after 130.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            people here seem to gravitate to Bangkok 96 (Telegraph just south of Michigan Ave.) but I’m not so hot on the place. The Siam Spicy restaurants are my preference.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    18 grand+ for a poverty spec powershift saddled Ford Focus bland, compact car that will bore even an actuarial to death.

    Easily 23 grand or more for anything decently equipped.

    Ford is absolutely smoking crack on pricing when Toyota is giving modestly equipped, much larger Camrys away for LESS money in real world pricing, as is Nissan with the Altima, and Honda with the base (but not stripper) Accord LX.

    Even GM seems to get this segment and is blowing Cruzes out for around 15k similarly optioned as this Focus (and $90 to $120 per month leases).

    Ford has an out of control pricing problem across the board, but especially at the CUV, SUV and truck level that defies logic and any sustainable business model – is it any wonder Ford just announced that non-family members qualify for A Plan (true employee pricing) for the first time in its history?

    My doctor actually mentioned that his daughter was looking at the nee Ford Explorer and was shocked by the Ford pricing, and ended up in an Audi “for not much more.”

    Ford better count the days it has left to get rich pricing on blue oval commuter vehicles, because they’re going to see a significantly and adversely impacted margins when the next true cyclical downturn (closer at hand than many choose to accept) happens.

  • avatar
    dwford

    It seems that every car has a “poverty cave” on the base trims now. Even my GMC Sierra with the 8″ screen has at least 2″ of black plastic on either side of the screen, all surrounded by the silver trim, as if the designers pre-planned for a larger screen down the road.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Not sure about the rest of the Honda family, but Honda leaves manual control out of the Odysseys shifter too. Only a button to lock out 5th and 6th gear. This is very annoying, as I have always found Hondas grade logic to be lacking in every product I’ve experienced it in. Perhaps removing control was one tool for helping longevity of the “glass transmissions”. By far the worst feature in the Odyssey is its transmission, as it seems to be with the Focus.

    By contrast,my Mazda 5 has a very intuitive grade logic control, perhaps the best automatic I’ve ever experienced AND a manual mode. Due to the lack of power, it needs a good transmission, but I’ve rarely been unhappy with it’s performance for 8 years and 50k mostly city (with lots of hills) driving.

    I had an 01 Focus ZX3 with a stick and it was a decent car for me. Not without issues, weird issues like the drivers seat frame breaking and the antenna lead corroding. But for a car that was so bad for others (and lots of recalls), it was decent ride (and fun) for 4 years. Funky New Edge styled interior and all.

  • avatar
    Coopdeville

    “Once more into the breach, dear friends / Or close up the segment with our heavily-rebated dead.”

    I honestly can’t decide if this is pure genius or groan-worthy. :) Given your long documented troubles with securing reviewable cars, Jack, you might also consider the spurning of your dull revenge route. Either way, well played. Bis!

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’ve been shopping used Focuses (Flybrian’s right, they’re a huge bargain) and don’t know if anyone knows the answer to this…

    On 2013/14s, it seems like the automatic is set up differently based on trim level. On basic trims the shifter has the standard “PRNDL”, but on the upper trim levels it shows “PRNDS”. I’ve gleaned that the upper trim levels have different Powershift setup that does away with the wavering feel of the older units. Are there actually two different Powershift setups? Seems that’s the case.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Yes, there are two set ups. You have to check an option box on the SE or go for the Titanium trim to get the “SelectShift transmission”.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        So what does the Selectshift do for you?

        FYI, I drove a 2015 recently with paddle shifters and those worked VERY well. But they were asking too much for it.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Gives you the ability to manually go through the gears via paddles or a rocker switch that was on earlier cars.

          Ford finally got their paddles right. On my wife’s MkT the paddles both shift up and down depending on if you push or pull them. Right side and left side do the same [email protected] thing.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Yeah, the paddle system on the ’15 I drove worked very, very well.

            Interestingly enough, Toyota has an excellent paddle shift on the Corolla, but that thing’s a dog no matter what way you slice it.

            I’d rather have the manual Focus but those aren’t easy to find around here.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “For $495, you could also select the 1-liter EcoBoost triple and a six-speed manual. That’s certainly a unique option for the segment and it might help the Focus address one area where it continues to refrain from impressing: fuel economy.”

    I agree its unique but downsizing the motor in order to meet decent fuel economy? In the sweet 16 (28 is calling 2016 “the sweet 16”)?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      After having driven one with the 1.0, I can tell you that you have to rev the piss out of it to get any power. So, I bet that if you drove it to maximize economy, it’d probably do quite a bit better than the 2.0, but that’s now how your friend and humble narrator drives. The two or three extra MPG doesn’t sway me. The way I drive, the 2.0 is the better option.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      I’ve driven a 1.0 Fiesta (and a non-EB 1.0 Ka) and 3-cylinder engines never sound very happy about the job they’re asked to do.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I only sampled it in the Focus, and the refinement level was perfectly fine (the Focus is very refined in general, so no surprise there). I also liked the torque off the line. But, man, once you got past about 3,000 RPM, all the engine made was noise.

        It’d probably be OK for the max-mileage folks – in the lower rev ranges these drivers live in, there’s plenty of low-RPM torque thanks to the turbo. But for the way I drive, it would not be good. I’ll give up a few MPG for a car that I like driving.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    For $22k+ I’d save some money and buy an ST.

    http://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/655133215/overview/

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      This is a good answer.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’ve been tempted by the ST as well but here’s what worries me: the number of slightly used ones I see for sale with low miles. What gives?

      • 0 avatar

        Many I’ve seen are repos, which I guess isn’t completely surprising. That or people thought it was something it wasn’t, which is also not surprising.

        I could’ve picked up a yellow ’13 w/30k and structural damage for $9k at FAAO yesterday, but the ‘burnt valves/smokes’ and AS-IS announcements scared me.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Sounds like someone had some fun.

          I’d love to pick up a lightly used hot hatch or compact, like a ST, GTI or WRX, but a new one isn’t in the Divorced Single Dad With Alimony Payments budget. I’d hate to be the guy who buys one used after some dumb kid tried restaging his favorite scene from “Fast and the Furious” with it and then got it repo’d.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        It is not all things to all people like the GTI. It has a more harsh ride, the Recaro seats are either love or hate (plus they are huge and take away rear seat room), and people buy them with summer tires in places that snow.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          But thank god the Recaro’s are optional, and I’d say that far more idiots try to drive their Mustangs in the snow while wearing summer rubber.

          • 0 avatar
            burgersandbeer

            Recaros are optional in theory. Only the ST1 does without them, and I think that is hard to find on lots. If you want any of the features in the higher trim cars, you are stuck with them.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          You’d have to have winter tires for a ST here in Colorado to make it a viable proposition – I had an ’05 Focus ST that I put performance tires on, and it was USELESS in the snow. Plus they only lasted around 20,000 miles. Spending big money on tires for an inexpensive car got old REAL quick.

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      Other than the Recaro’s another huge issue with the Focus ST is the enormous turning radius. 40′, same as a Chevy Silverado. Have fun making 3 point turns to get into parking spots in your compact hot hatch.

      • 0 avatar

        It *IS* a surprisingly hefty car to maneuver, incongrously so given its size, like the PT Cruiser.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Maybe those wide tires have something to do with it.

          • 0 avatar
            Ubermensch

            It’s a combination of the wide tires and the quick steering rack. It is seriously a bit of a deal breaker for me. One of the main things I like about small cars is their maneuverability, without that you might as well get something larger.

      • 0 avatar
        Timothy

        NOOOOO SHIT! I knew about the horrible turning radius before I bought the car. It is without question the thing that drives me to drink when it comes to the car. Boston parking with that turning radius is damn near impossible some times.

        Also… wtf Ford… no backup camera and site lines like those of a submarine. Ugh.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      There are some cars I just won’t buy used, which means I’m very unlikely to buy them at all. Any turbo hot hatch (or WRX) is at the very top of that list. Abusive owners can easily necessitate many thousands of dollars in eventual repairs within a few thousand miles.

  • avatar
    Cole Grundy

    Great photo

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So if Toyota’s 2.5 is Iron Duke-esque, does that make the Camry the modern day Chevy Celebrity? :-P

    Re: Hatchback – as a hatchback is how god intended the Focus to be enjoyed.

  • avatar
    merkidemis

    I had a 2012 SE and it was a piece of crap. Mechanically, fine, but otherwise assembled with hopes and prayers instead of anything resembling a fastener. After 20,000 miles I had rattles all over the cabin, including a maddening one in the driver’s seat belt height adjuster that buzzed in my ear every time I drove the damn thing. 4 trips in for service couldn’t fix it. There were rattles behind the radio, plastic cowlings under the windscreen that warped, letting water run who knows where. Clunks from the front passenger side wheel that was deemed “normal” by Ford (and no, not just the dealer). Even when I got it trim was hanging off, which should have been a sign to flee. I would NOT recommend these to anyone looking for a quality car.

  • avatar
    Charlie84

    As long as we’re (hypothetically) forsaking resale value and a bit of long-term durability, why not just buy an MQB Golf? $22,625 will get you a similarly-spec’d example, minus the nav but plus a giant moonroof. If it’s Germanic highway character you’re after, I guarantee the VW will trump even the Focus. Plus, that 1.8T should be a more willing partner AND a normal torque-converter automatic will please the non-enthusiast.

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      Unless you have a problem giving money to a company that has proven to lie through their teeth. I know I do. If VW is willing to cheat the way they did on the diesels, what else could they be lying about?

      • 0 avatar
        Charlie84

        “Unless you have a problem giving money to a company that has proven to lie through their teeth. I know I do.”

        Agreed. Despite having good ownership experiences with three VWs now, I’m not sure if I can bring myself to buy another in light of the scandal.

        As if being a VW fan wasn’t already frustrating enough, it’s just like VW to give me a reason to avoid their products just after debuting the best Golf ever.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Ubermensch,
          Please provide a list of the carmakers that never lied to customers. That never changed a part, but not the part number, to avoid a large recall. That never participated in the Holocaust and whose founder didn’t flirt with Nazism. That never got fined by the NHTSA for dragging its feet on recalls. That never created controversy due to unintended acceleration.

          I’ll wait right here for that list.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Stutz Motor Company
            Cord
            Duesenberg
            Tucker Corp
            Muntz Car Company
            Gordon-Keeble

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Touchee, 28CL

          • 0 avatar
            Ubermensch

            Didn’t expect to see Godwin’s Law in this thread.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            This is strange to say to a user named Ubermensch, but I think you need to reread the actual text of the Law:

            “As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1.”

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            You didn’t. It wasn’t a comparison of current activity or person to Hitler and the Nazis. It was a reminder that VW isn’t the only carmaker that’s made mistakes.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Vogo

            Thanks for humoring me, but your point is valid. I cannot think of a mainstream automaker which at least has never lied to its customers about anything, the rest of it is very GM or VAG specific obviously.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Hi Bertel!

    • 0 avatar

      …and if you’re going to do that, you might as well lease a Jetta S for $7/mo and submit-a-5-star-survey for a down payment or however they’re begging you to take a Jetta these days.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Charlie, isn’t the Golf’s automatic a DCT? If so, that autobox has also reportedly been a troublemaker.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Just because you can squeeze your family into a Focus sedan doesn’t necessarily mean we expect it to compete with the Accord and Camry. Squeeze your family into a Civic or Corolla and then report on how the Focus stacks up. For buyers ready to drop a few extra grand on an Accord or Camry, the Ford dealer will be very happy to present a Fusion.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Focus to Fusion = $8/month more on a lease. That’s it.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        It’s a no-brainer to go Fusion just for the transmission, size and safety alone.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          You might even save $8/month on your insurance with the larger, safer Fusion.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          The Focus drives very nicely indeed…but the current-gen Fusion drives magnificently. Take a sweeping offramp without slowing down, in even the cheapest Fusion, and it feels like a whole other class of car. The Fusions also seem to be screwed together better than their smaller brother, and while their longer-lower-wider chop-top styling attacks headroom, it is generous to legroom.

          The Fusion is a bitch to park though — that length — and its slow-responding conventional automatic sucks as much as the dual-clutches of the Foci do, just in a different way.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      Squeeze is an aptly chose word for putting more than two people into a Focus sedan. With the front seat more than half way back the rear seat is very tight and class trailing. An Elantra, Dart and the new Civic feel positively cavernous in comparison. There is no way I could live with one of these unless it was a hatch because if a simple decent sized box can’t fit into the trunk what can.

  • avatar
    09box

    I wouldn’t snag one of these new. You can find the hatches used with under 50k miles for $11-$12k now.

  • avatar
    bk_moto

    One note; the PRNDL vs PRNDS is not a new change. My company car 2012 Focus SE has the PRNDL shifter with no “tiptronic” capability and only the hill descent control button on the shifter.

    I looked into this a while ago and the answer had to do with trim level as to which cars got tiptronic and which didnt, but I can’t recall the specifics now nor can I be bothered to look it up again.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Poverty cave situation is at least somewhat rectifiable by the ability to throw in a double DIN aftermarket radio.

    That super high compression 2.0L takes to modifications pretty well. Not too expensive to get to 190-200 crank HP. So there is that too.

    Still though I think this segment’s driver’s car is the 3. Shame they went all German here. I know the feeling. The new Golf I rented had hella straight line speed, grip and stability but was as boring and inert as fck. I enjoyed it but I was happy as hell to get back into my Civic.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      My rational brain finds the Golf to be the best car in this class – it’s not exciting to drive per se, but it’s effortlessly fast, and the refinement is exceptional for this class. Nothing it competes with even comes remotely close – it’s almost like a $20,000 Mercedes. Plus the hatchback makes it amazingly practical.

      But the 3 definitely appeals to my inner Juan Fangio. Even the base models are a hoot to drive.

      I don’t know what year your Civic is, but I drove a ’15 and it was definitely a long way down on my buy list. The powertrain was awful – low torque + CVT = unpleasant and buzzy all the time. Shame, because it was a nice little car. Hopefully the new one’s better.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Yep- mini S-Class is exactly the descriptor I came away with when I was done with the new Golf. The new 1.8T is brilliant; the ride is quiet and composed; the handling has high limits and low drama. It’s the kind of car that would be great for commuting in slow traffic or taking on long road trips. Just didn’t excite me though.

        My Civic is an 09 EX sedan… critical point here is it has the manual transmission, which completely changes the character. I would never buy an automatic 4 cylinder Honda… they are always horrible. My Civic drives a lot like my old DWB Accords. Engine doesn’t have much punch but it is fun as hell to work with the stickshift. Handling is pretty good for a stock budget suspension… trail braking and the tiniest hint of lift off oversteer are possible; I do plan on upgrading it though. It definitely doesn’t have that low center of gravity feeling of old DWB Hondas but it’s a lot more engaging than the Golf. Probably internet blasphemy but I found it a bit more fun than an MK5 GTI too.

        The new Civic is just too big. I’m fully put off by it. It’s the size of an early 00s Accord. For me it has to be the 3, which bums me out as it doesn’t have anywhere near the aftermarket support or the capability to add an aftermarket stereo. Plan now is to slowly build the Civic up and just drive its little wheels off, or just move to a 9th gen Si.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yeah, if they’d offered a manual in the EX I drove, it’d have been a dramatically better car.

          Biggest problem with Honda automatics is that Honda engines trade torque for high-end power, which is great with a manual (and Honda manuals tend to be first rate), but no torque means they’re deadly slow off the line with an automatic. That was the case with the Civic I drove. Plus that damn CVT couldn’t figure out whether to upshift or downshift, so it just shifted all the time. Really unpleasant.

  • avatar
    theroadmaster

    To be fair, none of these cars roll out the door for $18k. Here in Texas basic SE’s can be had in the $14k-$15k range, and loaded they are still under $20k, though at that point you may as well go for the Titanium and the full European suspension. The DCT does blow though. The manual transmission does wonders for the little MZR motor, though the 1.5T/6AT combo from the Fusion would be really lovely.

  • avatar
    Menloguy

    I really wanted to like this car and was seriously considering the Focus as a replacement for my aging Accord. I could live with the audio info screen recessed in the poverty cave but some omissions on the SE sedan model like the absence of a footrest surface, lack of overhead grab handles for rear outboard passengers, no overhead map lights right behind the rear view mirror (it only has a centrally mounted dome light) and inadequate storage for small items made me consider a Jetta instead, which has all of these things even on its base S model at a similar price point. The on/off button in the HVAC button cluster in the Focus is kind of redundant; in most cars, the HVAC is turned on by simply rotating the fan knob.

    It is also important to note that the opening for the trunk on the Focus sedan is very narrow, the one-piece rear cushion folds down only little more than half way and the opening between the cabin and the trunk is impeded by a metal stamping with blunt edges. Cost cutting is also evident where the seams between the outer and inner door panels are not sealed as in most other cars, which can accelerate corrosion in this area.

  • avatar
    Freddie

    Regarding PRDNS vs. PRNDL, when I’m on a long steep downhill I see lots of brake lights. I don’t think most people even understand how/when to grab low gear — they didn’t teach that to my teenage son in driver ed.

    • 0 avatar
      turf3

      Are you talking about manually downshifting an automatic on downgrades? Sorry, no one does that except in the mountains. Anyway, most automatics provide lousy engine braking. The reason you see lots of people using their brakes is because most cars in the US are automatics now.

      Anyway, I think the concept of engine braking even in standard trans cars, for the normal driver in normal circumstances, is way overrated. Yeah, so you’ll wear out brake pads faster by using the brakes rather than downshifting and using engine braking. Yeah, on the track this is probably important. In daily driving, sorry, I don’t buy it. And, have you priced a clutch replacement vs. a brake pad replacement?

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      Yeah, the reasons to use engine braking in the mountains disappeared along with horrible drum brakes. It’s not 1950 anymore, people; you don’t have to go down long hills at 30mph in first gear!

  • avatar
    turf3

    Re: “Poverty cave” – at least you can buy it without the stupid navigation doohickeys. I suppose at some point, when everyone in America has every wall of their dwelling covered with TVs, it will become mandatory to have a 24″ touchscreen in every vehicle, with all functions controlled by Micro$oft software – but till then I applaud every automaker that continues to offer the option of buying a car rather than a mobile video game console.

    Re: Transmission: it’s clear that a lot of people don’t like the dual clutch transmission, and it appears there may be reliability issues too. What I can’t figure out from either the article or all the comments: is a conventional automatic transmission available?

  • avatar
    cdnsfan27

    I was looking for a cheap commuter car and bought a CPO 2014 Focus SE 5T with the sport package and the moon and tune package. Love the car and am getting 29-31 MPG in mixed driving with a heavy foot.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Jack,
    Thanks for the amusing if depressing review of a rental Focus SE W/auto. Why depressing? Because I just read about DDM wetting himself because he floored a Hellcat in track mode on a wet road. Old school rodders and modders are rolling their eyes all over the country. And you’re driving a Focus SE…
    I’m going to go read the R&T COTY again now.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Sir, for you here’s a video of me catching a pair of 392-driving journalists in a V6 Chally, from half a track back.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OugStRF3RM

      This year I’ll be bringing you reviews of everything from the McLaren 675LT to the Kawasaki ZX-14R.

      Thank you for your support :)

      • 0 avatar
        Charlie84

        “freondude100 1 year ago
        Sorry but no way a V6 Challenger will beat a SRT8. It’s nice to be proud of your car but you must realize there are limits to achievement. Go on a SRT Experience and you will know what I mean.”

        Comedy gold.

  • avatar
    kit4

    The transmission in these is only eclipsed by the 200’s tranny in how many complaints it got at the rental counter. The 2015 interior update with knobs!! And better, easier BT pairing are welcome changes.

  • avatar
    Paul K

    “…build the Focus the way it was meant to be built: as a hatchback” I never understood the hatchback fetish. Hatchbacks are an either-or bodystyle: either passengers OR luggage, because storage space sucks unless you fold the seat down. Sedans are much better when you have both passengers AND luggage, because of that thing (trunk) typically sticking out several inches further than the back of a hatchback. Wagons are the only better solution when carrying both.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      That was true before the trunks of cars became taller but shorter, and also when sedans were tall enough in the back to seat adults comfortably. And since there is no Focus wagon in the US (barring the Escape), the hatchback will have to do.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I’d say the Focus hatchback is a far better design than the sedan anyway. And…PLEASE, FORD, CAN WE HAVE THE FOCUS WAGON?

        http://motrolix.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/2013-Ford-Focus-ST-Wagon-720×340.jpg

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    I also rented a Focus last yr to drive in the middle of the hot Fl summer and did not experience any DCT issues, but I came away impressed indeed. The most satisfying US badged car I have ever driven, great road manners and really good MPG’s despite having the a/c on all the time.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Would not buy the focus or fusion at any price, the seats are ridiculously narrow. I hate that nearly all new cars have shrunken seats.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Maybe the seats are the same, and it’s the driver that’s gotten bigger? :P

      Not you personally, just people in general. And/or as people demand quieter cars, the doors get thicker for more sound deadening. Take out that sound deadening for bigger seats, and people complain that the car is noisy.

      And we don’t have any sedans that are more than 72″ wide, but plenty of CUVs, SUVs, and pickups.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        Big consoles. Thick doors. And room for side airbags have shrunk seats. I hate narrow seats. I want to sit between the bolsters not on them. I am only 190 lbs. I work out a lot so i have big thighs and glutes, but still, most car seats are ridiculously tiny. Go look at an 82 rolls royce like my neighbor has, the seats are like living room wing backs.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Really? I am, shall we say, of ample girth and the Focus’ seats suit me just fine. Maybe you’re thinking of the last gen.

      Now, if you want narrow seats, try a Subaru Impreza.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        The Focus redefines the term “penalty box”. I have had the opportunity to drive a fleet Focus with the ever shifting automatic. I do agree with Jack that a manual would be much better, but not because of the acceleration but because of the constant shifting of the automatic. Also the windows are just like slits, the seats are hard and uncomfortable, and it is hard to see the temperature control nobs at night due to their lack of lighting. I would vastly prefer a Honda, Toyota, Hyundai, and Kia. The more I drive the Focus the more I think it sucks. I also have a C-Max available and the difference between the C-Max and the Focus is like night and day. C-Max is a decent car and is fairly comfortable. The ride height and the visibility are very good in the C-Max. I have never driven a Cruze but it is probably much better than the Focus. The Focus is the car that the Ford Aspire aspired to be when it grew up. Need I say anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        Subaru seats are awful. Especially the head rests

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    It’s one thing for premium brands to bundle the nav with other options to jack up the price, but adding 25% to the msrp is brutal.

  • avatar
    otaku

    Ahoy, Jack.

    I seem to recall you mentioning a while back that your mom owned a Focus sedan from the much-maligned 2008 thru 2011 era and that you were someday planning on posting a review detailing how it handled the mission of long-term, high-mileage ownership. Did that ever materialize?

    I would be interested in reading your overall impressions compared to this recent experience with the 2015 rented version. Obviously, the newer model is more refined and feels more sophisticated/expensive, but what about the drawbacks (if any) in practicality, comfort, durability, etc.

    I already know, for example, that you’re not a fan of the dual-clutch tranny, but what about the added complexity of direct injection, the higher weight of this newer chassis, or the conversion to electric power steering? Do any of these create more drivability issues or longevity headaches than they were worth?

    As the owner of an ’08 model myself, I was just curious.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    re: poverty cave

    We are in 2016. Look in your pockets or desks. You all have smartphones and tablets with large HD color screens.

    So why does Ford give you a 3.5″ screen from 2006? Surely every car sold in the US should have a large screen that is comes with your average $99 tablet?

    And navigation these days, is effectively free. I have three phones, an iphone, android and a microsoft lumia. They all have free offline gps.

    Another way to go about this is to have a moulded bracket and micro usb cable on the dash where you can plug in your tablet.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Having driven an older generation one when we were car used shopping a few years ago and then driving a 2014 last summer, I was surprised how much smaller the new ones feel inside.

    • 0 avatar
      DweezilSFV

      That’s because they are. Rear head and legroom are both worse than the previous model. The original Focus offered excellent room in back.The new ones have devolved in people packaging efficiency. I’d never even consider a Fiesta. And neither with that awful automatic.

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    I bought two PowerShud-d-d-er cars, the Focus and the Fiesta. Both are good cars except for one thing, the PowerShud-d-d-er transmission. They herk, jerk, lurch, gronch, grab, and shud-d-d-er. Both have been pulled and rebuilt. That made them better, sort of like a shud-d-er. Not the worst car I have had. That award would still go to a 1990 Range Rover. I gave the Focus to my son. He says that when he lets friends drive it, they think they have blown the transmission. Is there a worse transmission in a modern car? I will never buy another DCM again.

  • avatar
    Jeff Snavely

    I had 2013 Focus SE hatch, manual, no other options that I got for only $12,995 new (DC area) making it a no-brainer purchase. I did end up selling it after about 7 months but only because I always have my eye on something else and I wanted an auto my wife could drive.

    Loved the Focus — great mileage (40+ on the highway), nice easy clutch and shifter, great handling, great solid feel, great seats, great style inside and out.

    It’s too bad Ford prices the car so high and then has huge incentives and discounts — people write it off vs. the competition but it can be had so cheap that it’s a steal.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    http://www.vertu.com/us/en/collections/aster/shop-collection/

    At LEAST $5,000 – for a phone. I had no idea such a thing existed.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Seth Parks, United States
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Kyree Williams, United States