By on December 29, 2015

2016 Chevrolet Colorado Diesel

After delaying its Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon diesel trucks for a “final validation” issue, General Motors said Tuesday that the trucks would be on their way to dealers.

“The highly anticipated 2016 GMC Canyon diesel has begun shipping to dealers. We look forward to getting these trucks in the hands of our customers and appreciate their patience,” GMC spokeswoman Kelly Wysocki said in a statement.

Earlier this month we reported that people who ordered the truck — in some cases as far back as August — said GM was delaying delivery. A GM spokesman said the trucks were delayed due to a “final validation” issue. GM didn’t specify what the “final validation” issue was with the trucks, nor did they say why they were delayed.

When it announced the truck last year, GM said it would deliver those trucks by Fall 2015. The diesel-powered truck underwent additional testing by environmental officials before receiving its certification in November.

A spokesman for GM said the delay was not related to the trucks’ certification by the EPA, but did say that the delay only affected diesel-powered trucks.

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26 Comments on “General Motors Says Diesel Canyon and Colorado Are On Their Way...”


  • avatar

    Yay!!!

    Global Warming

    70° Christmas

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Parsing these statements, it sounds like the EPA certification was OK, but there was an engineering validation issue peculiar to the diesel that needed resolution.

    Could have been anything, but it probably wasn’t emissions related. Fair enough.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Agree, I would say it was not emissions related

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        RobertRyan,
        I do believe the US is at the same point in the phase of diesel where Australia was in the early eighties.

        Within 5 years I’d like to think most any pickup on offer in the US will come with a diesel option. This will be a far cheaper way than hybrid or EV pickups for the medium term.

        Heavier vehicles seem to profit from a diesel more than a light small car.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Big Al from Oz,
          From memory that was pretty rapid. Even the old British trucks had petrol,engines at one stage

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            RobertRyan,
            Diesel really started in the late 70s in Australia but didn’t get a foothold over petrol utes until 1981.

            I think the farmers and miners got a rebate on diesel in 1981 and they bought lots of small Asian diesel utes for the farms. They then replaced the old Bedford, Dodge (with 318s), Fargos, IH, Fords, etc. Most farm trucks back then would of been around the size of a F-450/4500. The all ran petrol.

            Then within a decade all the farmers had a Landcruiser/Patrol for the wife, a diesel Japanese ute and Izuzu, Hino, Mitsubishi MDT for a truck. All diesel powered. Oh, most all farmers had a Holden or Ford car as well for church and used the ute to go to the pub after dropping into the stock and produce.

            Then the virtues of diesel became recognised by the off roaders. I remember the big craze of 350/351 conversions for FJ 40s. When the diesel Landcruisers hit the scene V8s died in the ass.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    Even though the 2.8 diesel is limited to the crew cab, I’m happy to see them hitting the sales floor.

    Within a year or two we’ll know whether or not the extra $5k is worth it. I hope it succeeds, just to shake up Toyota’s complacency.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “When it does, the diesel version will carry a price premium of $3,730 over comparable models equipped with the 3.6-liter gasoline V-6.”

      I didn’t think it was anywhere near 5K. And unless the motor turns out to be a complete disaster you’ll probably get 1/2 of that back or better when you sell. The premium for a dirtymax HD over the gas in my 2004 Sierra on the used market right now is a good $3K.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Toyota maybe looking at it’s new 2.8 Diesel, rather than the gutless 3.5

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    These trucks even come with an exhaust brake. Very cool! I predict GM will sell everyone they can build at top dollar for quite sometime. The other two gas engine options aren’t anything special IMO which will help. They should have stuck the new 4.3 you can get in the FS trucks in it. Then they would have had a gas truck with a truck engine.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    If they sell the chassis cab with the diesel, fleets will love it. Smaller truck for smaller jobs that uses the same fuel as the bigger trucks, it’s a win all around.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Fleets are often too cheap to step up to the diesel. There is a reason why the Ford 6.2L and GM 6.0L are fleet kings.

      A $3000+ premium over the V6 isn’t exciting for fleets. This will be a premium lifestyle truck for individual consumers. And that’s okay. It will be good in that role.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Not state DOT and big landscaping fleets, apparently…

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Well that was an example in the HD area.

          The diesel is crew cab only. GM knows fleets don’t really want the diesel.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            When I asked someone I know that owns a towing company why they were running the 6.0 gas vs duramax in their 1 ton tow trucks this was the answer I got:

            Cheaper to buy.
            Cheaper to run/operate.
            Worth more when it’s time to sell.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I’m with you on the first two points, but everything I’ve heard/read/experienced says that you get back proportionate to what you put in when you resell a diesel HD. If the diesel is an $8000 investment new, and you’re selling the truck for 1/3 of its MSRP, you can expect over $2500 extra vs. a gas.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            I think when your talking about a used wrecker(commercial vehicle) that has over 300K on it and your not sure how it’s been taken care of people get nervous. You can replace a gas engine a lot cheaper than a diesel. That was a few years ago and I haven’t stopped in lately to see if they are still running gas in their smallest(1 ton) wreckers. Everything thing else they have is diesel.

            If you look at one of my other posts you’ll see I stated that w/my 2004 Sierra HD gasser, the diesels seem to carry an easy 3K premium on the used market, even with higher mileage.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        bball,
        I do think they will be sold to fleet operators.

        My nieces boyfriend/partner is second in command of a County’s water and sewrage department. He stated they have already organised diesel Colorados to replace the existing Dakotas.

        I would assume GM will only release the higher end pickups initially to gather as much cash as possible.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          In the US, it will be a crew cab only. The price will start at $33000 for a 2WD LT. Fleets, in general, are not buying that when they can get a Silverado WT with the 4.3L for under $25K.

          I think the Colorado is a fine truck. However, the diesel version is not a value for fleet customers.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Then why do fleets operate diesel trucks in logistics?

            Fleets that do expect a considerable amount of work and durability/life out of a working pickup would find a diesel attractive.

          • 0 avatar
            rjanuary

            For government/fleet sales you can get a diesel extended cab in WT trim.

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    Even though I’m a car guy and a city boy, I really like and want one of these diesels.

    Based on that alone they should do well.

  • avatar

    GM designers and engineers do a superb job. too bad the marketing staff is inept.

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    Hopefully they’ve changed the buttons on the steering wheel to BUTTONS instead of membrane switches, which I could foresee fritzing-out the day the warranty is up!


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