By on July 8, 2015

2015 Dodge Charger V6 AWD Rallye (9 of 13)

We just had a fight.

Scratch that. We were still having a fight. This was just the tense calm between volleys of verbal mortar fire. I won’t even tell you what we were fighting about. The subject was so stupid it would make my girlfriend and I both look like utter idiots — like those times when you shout at a character in a TV show to grow up and “just say you’re sorry already!”

Instead of doing what any rational human would do, I figured my only chance of peace was to escape the waves of relationship-drama ordnance. I grabbed the keys to this week’s Charger along with my vaporizer and fled the front line to regroup and regain my sanity.

This is nothing new for me — or us, really. We are both passionate people, even if our ancestors are from some of the most stereotypically dispassionate of Western European countries.

Over the years, I have learned to control my anger and one of my methods is to go for a long, highway-bound drive where hooning is virtually impossible. Parking lots also provide that calming effect, but my times spent in empty areas of tarmac are usually followed by repair bills and/or a visit from the local constable giving my still-sticky, partially-molten tires a long, deep sniff along with the associated hand-on-the-hood, warm-engine inspection.

Also, this isn’t my car, so I am not going for rear-wheel-peel therapy on this particular evening. A highway drive it is.

It took about 20 minutes to get from my driveway to Nova Scotia’s Highway 101 that runs from Halifax all the way down to Yarmouth at the southern tip of the province. The cruise control was set. I put the 8-inch uConnect in navigation mode. Music turned off — mostly because I left my iPhone jukebox back at home and partly because all I wanted to hear was the air rushing past the partially opened driver’s side window as I blew vanilla-flavored vapor into the atmosphere.

I could finally “space” and think about what had happened between her and I; how I could fix the situation but not look like a pushover at the same time. However, I was still angry as hell and the last thing I wanted to do in that moment was forgive her. I’m sure she still felt the same at that very moment back at home.

Highway 101 is a mix of 100 km/h highway interspersed with lower limits near towns and other areas where the blacktop narrows. It’s also quite deadly as accidents along the 101 are common and usually tragic due to a lack of division between the two directions of traffic over some stretches.

Even though my mind was elsewhere while the cruise control and lane departure system were doing exactly what they were engineered to do, I was still vigilant of the road ahead and behind. Instead of doing 120 or 130 km/h like the top 10 percent typically do along this road, I set my speed to 110 km/h to make sure the bright-red Charger would not capture the radar-measured attention of patrolling Mounties.

I was nearly 100 km (62 miles) away from home when something struck me.

For a province with an underfunded road system, I couldn’t remember hitting a single bump or pothole during the entire drive. I knew I drove the Charger’s 19-inch tires over at least a couple dozen moderate to severe “road imperfections” since starting out on the journey to sanity, but I didn’t remember them. There was no major jostling about in the seat by way of a pothole or major undulation. The Charger just plodded along, soaking up anything that would dare take my mind off driving and the relationship predicament in which I currently found myself.

It wasn’t like the car was completely transparent to the process of driving, either. Unlike the Toyota Avalon, a car that’s nearly transparent to everyone — including driver, passengers and anyone else on the street who might catch a glimpse of its Camry-esque sheetmetal — the Charger still had enough presence to keep me engaged.

“Damn, I want this car.”

What?

Did I just think that?

I have never thought that — ever — in a press car. Sure, I’ve thought, “This is a car I’d like to have if I was in the market for a crossover/sports car/minivan/family sedan/etc.” But, not once — not ever — have I thought “I want this car. For me.”

Head cleared, I turned around and made my hour-and-a-half long drive back toward home, promptly said what I needed to say and listened to what she needed to say, and went to bed for the night.


The next day started like any other — except this new “fever” remained. I looked out the front window at the Charger sitting in my driveway.

“Damn, I really want this car.”

Okay, so not this car. I want a V8. I want rear-wheel drive. I want something that this car foretells could be good.

Ready for our day, my girlfriend and I head downtown to do errands. I needed a haircut because I’m starting to earn some unwanted hippy cred. She wanted a smoothie.

Hair freshly mowed and smoothies in hand, she asked, “Do you want to go for a walk around downtown for a little while longer?”

“No, not today,” I replied. “I want to go to the Dodge dealer.”


We arrived at the local purveyor of automotive goods from Auburn Hills. The lot was stacked with minivan upon minivan, truck upon truck, CUSW upon CUSW. I parked the press fleet Charger and went inside, finding a salesman on the opposite end of the showroom looking over his inventory of Grand Caravans and Rams like a hawk that had just set out bait for a common vole.

I snuck up behind him and tapped him on the shoulder. He turned.

“Hi. Do you have any V8 Chargers?” I asked. Wow, I already felt incredibly vulnerable.

“Let me look,” he said with a grimace, probably thinking I was taking him away from good minivan-and-truck-and-Jeep selling time.

“We have a few used Chargers, but nothing new.”

“Not a single one?”

“Nope.”

He didn’t even attempt to get me in a Ram or minivan or Jeep — probably for the best.


As soon as I arrived home, I made a beeline for the computer to search for all the Chargers within a 500 km radius.

There was not a single Charger in the whole city. Halifax has three separate Dodge dealers and not a single one had a Charger. One, however, did have a V6 Challenger with an automatic transmission.

I had to search the boonies to find the first LX four door. Another V6. More Chargers popped up the further away I looked and they were all V6 powered. Except for one. It was 416 km (258 miles) away. And it was a 2014. I’m not even going to bother calling.

Just like Jack mentioned a short time ago, I am not the customer. The dealer is the true customer of the automaker. If the dealer doesn’t want to stock V8 Chargers, they aren’t going to stock V8 Chargers.

It’s also made even more difficult because nobody here buys a V8 outside of a pickup and all three dealers in my area care only about volume sellers. Additionally, timing throws another wrench into the mix.

Daniel Labre, product public relations spokesman said in an email: “It’s that time of year where we do transition from one model year to the next … so if they sold out of Chargers in that area, we do have to wait for the 2016 models.”

Considering the above, I can’t see any dealers here bringing in V8 Chargers — even for 2016.

And this is where I either fail or win, depending on your perspective: I absolutely refuse to put down over $40,000 on a car I cannot test drive first. I don’t need to drive the car I want to buy, but I am not about to take a V6 for a test drive, assume everything will be better with the V8, and plunk down tens of thousands of dollars.

So, I sit here Charger-less and waiting for the 2016 model year to roll around, hoping one of the dealers here will order up a V8 Charger so I can take it for a spin like anyone else looking to buy a new car.

It will be mine. Eventually. Hopefully. Maybe.

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154 Comments on “I Tried to Buy a Charger This Weekend and Failed Miserably...”


  • avatar
    Chopsui

    Solution: Move to Texas

    • 0 avatar

      Correction: Move back to Texas. I already lived there once and would give up my free healthcare to live there again.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        Sorry to break it to you Mark, but it isn’t anything free about your ( our) healthcare. Every time I pay the 15% tax I am reminded that the healthcare is not free. As for the Charger, I would imagine the Halifax dealers don’t want to stock up on V8s due to gas prices in Canada. I’ve been in Halifax with my job for the past 5 years and nowhere outside of Europe have I seen so many diesel cars ( mostly VW, but Mercedes as well).
        I am very familiar with the 101 because I take my 911 to go to Lunenburg but I hate the passing lanes. Once in a while I take the 103 and I keep a close eye out for the RCMP. The 103 as you know, is 4 lanes at least until Wolfville.

        • 0 avatar
          Veee8

          Toronto Star quote:

          “Ontario’s health budget currently stands at $50.1 billion. That represents 41.9 per cent of all program spending in the province and a 2.8 per cent increase over the previous year.”

          Health Care is a money pit, far from free.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I can’t think of too many things which aren’t money pits in the long run.

          • 0 avatar
            probert

            US pays more than double per capita than Canada and still hasn’t insured all its citizens – a national shame.

        • 0 avatar

          I wish we only paid 15% tax. There’s a lot of other tax behind the 15% POS tax we pay directly.

      • 0 avatar
        bucksnort

        …and the taxes you pay to get the “free” health care.

      • 0 avatar
        MoDo

        I just traded in my 2012 Charger SRT a month ago and already miss it dearly after 2 years of 100% trouble free ownership (not one warranty claim, just oil changes). If you want one, and a DEAL on one, you’re going to have to look at other provinces/cities and get a plane ticket. I also highly recommend the SRT over the R/T – mine was a beast with 18″ snow tires in the winter – truly a do everything car. Only iffy part was the low front fascia, but it was fine.

        2015’s are even rare in Toronto though, good luck in your search! The SRT is a far better deal than the Scat Pack in Canada too BTW…

      • 0 avatar
        BrunoT

        “grabbed my vaporizer”
        “grabbed the keys to this week’s Charger”
        “my free health care”

        Phrases such as these, along with several paragraphs about the writer’s personal life people at a car website are supposed to give a flying fig about.

        Boy, they let anyone write columns on the internet, don’t they?

    • 0 avatar
      Feds

      I’m reasonably well traveled, at least through the Northern Hemisphere, and I can honestly say that Halifax remains my favorite city. Right size, interesting history, amazing people, good culture. If only it weren’t so close to Dartmouth.

    • 0 avatar
      TheAnswerIsPolara

      Indeed. There are at least 5 V-8 Models here in the Austin area; all less than 40 miles from me.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    What about Challengers?

  • avatar
    Mr. K

    FWIW:

    25 miles from my suburban Philadelphia home:

    19095 zip – dont know why you must enter it 2x

    http://www.dodge.com/hostc/sni/IUD201504/results.do?radius=25&zipcode=19095&options=EZH,DFK,BP,WSA,TVJ,RA3,PR3,29N,DMM&ccode=IUD201504LDDP48A&llp=2DN&variations=R/T

    04124 zip up to 200 miles from Portland ME

    http://www.dodge.com/hostc/sni/IUD201504/results.do?radius=25&zipcode=19095&options=EZH,DFK,BP,WSA,TVJ,RA3,PR3,29N,DMM&ccode=IUD201504LDDP48A&llp=2DN&variations=R/T

    Not sure about importing a US car to Canada, but you could go for a test drive…

  • avatar
    mike1dog

    Just for the heck of it, I looked locally, in Mississippi, and found at least fifty within a hundred mile radius, with one only twenty-five miles away.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Don’t do it Mark!

    • 0 avatar

      Why not?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Well, I’m just one data point but my ’14 R/T has been disappointing overall.

        The ride is great, uConnect is great, fuel economy is great. Engine is fun (although not really any more fun that other V8 sedans). Build quality and fit & finish are Zastava-level.

        My second choice was a Genesis sedan 5.0L. Nice car, but I’m not sure if that was the way to go though either. I honestly probably would have been happiest just buying a Panther then throwing on Flowmasters, a 3.73 trac-loc rear end, some P71 parts, and saving over $10K.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Why not an SS?

    Oh, right.

    Edit: Oh, and there are currently 32 2015 V8 Chargers within 20 miles of me. The cheapest starting at $29,588.

    • 0 avatar
      mleitman

      The SS hasn’t been sold in Canada since it looked like this: http://automotivetrends.com/wp-content/gallery/2005-chevrolet-cobalt-ss/2005-chevrolet-cobalt-ss11.jpg
      It was definitely not available in rear drive format.

  • avatar
    FThorn

    I think any car guy should get out and regularly test drive a variety of cars. And poke around at playing the numbers game with a dealership and back out just to get practice. I drive a TON of cars for someone with a full-time-plus-a-half job.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I’d love to but I do not like wasting sales people’s time just to satisfy curiosity. I’d be irritated if I missed an actual sale because I was grabbing keys and explaining features and hammering out prices with some self-proclaimed “car enthusiast” who just wanted seat time for whatever reason. And I’m OK with that since these are $20K-$30K-$50K durable goods.

      The car retail system just isn’t set up to allow us to window shop. If I want that, I guess I’ll have to start a blog and try to gain access to a press fleet.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        I sometimes test drive cars on a weekday morning when the dealership is empty. I tell the salesman up front that I’m early in the process of buying a car and not ready to buy today. So far no one has turned down a request for a short test drive.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Or just get a job where you travel all the time. Hertz has quite the wide and wild variety these days.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    I live in the south and my local dealership always has 8-10 Challengers/Charger’s in stock. Typically more Challengers than Chargers. They have a pretty tight lot though and are building a new MEGASTORE across town on dealership row. We’ll see if they carry more after that. This is a good area where a wide spectrum of people make can a good living, and our winters, while not Gulf Coast mild, are not bad at all.

    Anecdotally, it’s pretty easy to find slightly used Challengers/Chargers at dealerships all over town. I figure people buy them with love in their eyes and then find that they might be a bit crude day-to-day. My local Mazda dealership had a Challenger 392 with a mere 8,000 miles on it the other day. I asked the story on it and he said that a guy bought it and then promptly knocked up his wife. Traded it on a CX-9 when she got big and round.

    Anywhere they have a real winter, you either have to be wealthy enough or willing to sacrifice to have a vehicle that you can garage for months on end and have something else to drive in the slop.

  • avatar
    Mr. K

    ¿comprendre le français?

    http://www.grenierchrysler.ca/all-inventory/index.htm?listingConfigId=AUTO-new%2CAUTO-used&compositeType=new&year=2015&make=Dodge&model=Charger&start=0&sort=&facetbrowse=true&quick=true&searchLinkText=SEARCH&showInvTotals=false&showRadius=false&showReset=false&showSubmit=true&facetbrowseGridUnit=BLANK&showSelections=true&dependencies=model%3Amake%2Ccity%3Aprovince%2Ccity%3Astate&suppressAllConditions=compliant

    • 0 avatar

      That’s a 12 hour drive, mon ami. https://www.google.ca/maps/dir/Halifax+Regional+Municipality,+NS/1245+Mont%C3%A9e+Masson,+Terrebonne,+QC+J6W+6A6/@46.0592169,-73.1995031,6z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m13!4m12!1m5!1m1!1s0x4b4513bbd026ebc5:0xcd90670d5a4a675b!2m2!1d-63.5752387!2d44.6487635!1m5!1m1!1s0x4cc8de7639b4ab77:0x71c42143e9e7cae2!2m2!1d-73.6231047!2d45.7164547?hl=en

    • 0 avatar
      Mr. K

      That’s a 12 hour drive, mon ami.

      yeah but
      1) There must be flights.
      2) What better excuse for some romance and make up sex?
      3) Quebec City is closer btw…

      You yungins, you expect your cars to start without flames shootin outta the carb and you balk at a simple little road trip…

      FWIW I just rented a 2014 RWD 3.6 Charger and was quite impressed, but the interior quality was not so wonderful – drove great, good mpg – 28 per trip computer on mainly interstate at 70-80 MPH, lots of power.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    There’s like 10 of them sitting across the street from me, Dundas and 427.

    Oh and arguing with women? Good luck with that, just go pull your fingernails off, it will be less painful and make way more sense.

  • avatar
    Acd

    So did you find out why there are no V8 Chargers in your area? Do dealers not order them? Did they order them but sell out of them? Are there AWD V8’s available? Is there a shortage due to manufacturing constraints? This article seems incomplete.

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      I am guessing that since the Pentastar V6 is so good (properly spec’d, it can have as much as 300 horsepower), demand for the V8 has declined substantially.

    • 0 avatar

      It’s in the article. A combination of three dealers who only sell volume, end-of-year change over/dealer allocation completed for ’15, and nobody here buying V8s … or big sedans.

      • 0 avatar
        wmba

        One of my best pals works at the Chrysler dealer on the Bedford Highway. In warranty. He gets to work before most people get up, and probably OKs more good-will warranty in a week than the Acura dealer next door does in a year. Drives a Sonata. Develops a scowl when you mention the words “Wrangler” and “Hard Top”.

        Despite this, as a good employee, he’s always trying to get me into a Chrysler product, so I’ve driven a few. However, they haven’t stocked, beyond one or two, any 300s, Chargers or Challengers for at least the last five years. No demand, I’m informed.

        They were all-a-twitter last week when their first Hellcat came in to be sold to a rather well-known Haligonian. As I said to him on Saturday, I’m surprised the employees recognized the car as a Chrysler product, seeing as zero of the general type sit on the lot. Just like the rest of us around here, they have to rely on pictures.

        Same problem when I went to the BMW dealer to try out an X1 xDrive 35i. None on the huge lot, ever, despite hulking X5 and X6 models. Niche models are meant to be ordered apparently, like the also missing M235i. Again, same with S3 at the Audi dealer’s new bunker-fortress outlet. But S4, yes. Hmmm.

        At least you can drive an STI and Mustang GT, the latter of which another pal had to order this Spring to get what he wanted. And you can drive Porsches and Jags, etc.. What’s missing is what the enthusiast is interested in – Mid-priced cars with some performance chops. That’s how few potential sales we represent in the local market.

        • 0 avatar
          whynotaztec

          please elaborate on the “wrangler” and “hard top” comments. I’m getting close to pulling the trigger on one and while I understand jeep is not Toyota, this made me just a little more nervous.

          • 0 avatar
            wmba

            Apparently, all’s well until the owner tries to reinstall the hard top after going topless for a while. It bolts on apparently OK, and then leaks. Customer returns to dealer and rants about leaks, etc. Warranty claim ensues.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Will they not ship one in for you to test drive, with your assurance that you’re a serious customer who wants to give them $40k if it suits?

  • avatar

    My brother’s motto for his marriage is “If you’re happy, I’m happy.”

    I’m still waiting for a Peugeot 404 station wagon in decent condition. And Godot.

  • avatar

    I don’t think ***you*** failed. There weren’t any to be had within many hours.

    Furthermore, you didn’t get nailed by the cops or end up in a ditch on your sanity drive.

    And on top of that, you patched things up with your girlfriend. Sounds like success to me.

  • avatar
    Vojta Dobeš

    There are not R/Ts in press fleets? Weird. I would get a press car (I think that if you tell them that you want to buy it and show them this article, they will find one), and then I would factory-order that.

    You North-Americans should learn to order your cars. In Europe, we do that. It works.

    • 0 avatar
      Mr. K

      I like that idea, however dealers might not – are there cars in stock in European dealers for immediate delivery?

      A big part of the US sales model for **anything** is the impulse and emotionally driven purchase…

      • 0 avatar
        Vojta Dobeš

        Yes, the dealers have cars in stock, and especially with cheaper, run-of-the-mill models, they’re kinda popular. But most people ordering anything above a base Renault Mégane will order their car.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “In Europe, we do that. It works.”

      You pay a hefty premium in Europe for your cars. No thanks.

      • 0 avatar
        Counterpoint

        I’m happy to pay a premium to get exactly what I want. The European model of ordering cars is much friendlier to enthusiasts and allows for a wider range of options. What’s a few thousand extra amortized over several years.

      • 0 avatar
        Vojta Dobeš

        No, we pay taxes on them :(

        But even so, I can go out and buy a car for $7,200 – including 21% VAT. It will be a Dacia Sandero, though.

    • 0 avatar

      Our press fleet is probably thinner than yours, Vojta. We take what we are given and don’t schedule our own cars here. There are only eight (IIRC) auto journalists with fleet access in Canada east of Quebec.

      • 0 avatar
        Vojta Dobeš

        I forgot how big Canada is. Here in Czech Republic, all the press cars are in Prague (as are 90% of media/journos – no cars are ever delivered) and press fleets range from a few units (lesser brands like, say, Fiat, often don’t even have all the models in the fleet) to a few dozen. Bigger brands (Renault, Hyundai) usually have anything new or important in all major engine options.

        And then there’s Skoda as domestic brand. I have no idea how big their press fleet is, but they have basically everything then make, usually in more examples.

    • 0 avatar
      ItsMeMartin

      It sure works and enables much more variety, but at least where I live (Poland) the American model is steadily gaining popularity. Ordering expensive cars (Volvos, the German 3) is still popular but the “cheaper” the make, the more common buying what’s in stock at the time is.
      It used to be common for an average Polish dealership to have between 3 and 15 new vehicles in stock, depending on the make’s popularity, and even then they seemed to serve as a demonstration of what could be ordered rather than take-it-or-leave-it offers. Now it is common for the big chains to have whole lots of new cars for sale. Even in my own hometown (120K population) there is a dealership that has more than 100 cars at any given time, and it’s not like it sells the hottest makes – it sells Peugeots, Nissans (perennial mid-pack competitors) and Suzukis (downright unpopular).
      Don’t know if it’s the case in the rest of Europe but the process of moving away from ordering cars is already underway in Poland, and I’m fairly sure that in the long run the prevalent model of selling cars in Europe will be very similar to what you currently have in America.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I completely agree. I am six weeks from picking up my second ordered BMW and I would NEVER buy one off the lot. If I am dropping $40K-50K on a car, I want it EXACTLY the way I want it. For any car with more complex options than an Abarth, I would order what I want. I happened to find an Abarth exactly the way I wanted it at my local dealer, but that car only came in five colors and 3-4 options.

      • 0 avatar
        limabravo

        I think a key difference is build quality. I would feel much more confident buying a BMW sight unseen than any Chrysler product. Shoot, I’d probably buy a cpo Toyota or Honda without test driving it before I’d buy a new Dodge without a test drive. Too many things that could be wrong…

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I feel your pain, Mark. I’m always looking for something that’s not volume, and while Seattle is bigger than Halifax the drive is even further if what you’re looking for isn’t in stock. (Drive to San Francisco or Denver for a test drive? Don’t think so.)

    • 0 avatar

      How long of a drive is that?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The only other large groups of dealers are near Portland (3 hours) or Spokane (5 hours), and both of those are much smaller cities than Seattle.

        The next big cities are Salt Lake (13 hours), San Francisco (14 hours), and LA and Denver (around 19 hours each).

        It really makes shopping for rare cars painful. I’m actually in the midst of shopping now and I’m having a bit of trouble.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          I’m pretty sure shopping for *rare* cares is painful everywhere outside of LA, maybe Phoenix (because LA is near AND it’s super dry and no ocean), and the dense parts of the Northeast.

          And probably relatively painful there.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            From what I read around here, it’s no problem in the upper Midwest or Florida, either.

            But most places in the US have more big cities (and more dealers and more inventory) a lot closer than 13 hours away. When I lived in DC, and was looking for the G8 GXP, I looked at dealers in Charlotte, Richmond, the DC area, western Maryland, Baltimore, and Philly. All of those places were within a day trip.

  • avatar
    Waftable Torque aka Daniel Ho

    Relationships deserve a good arms race. Remember to use stonewalling early and often. The best defense is a strong offense. Then you win! Or just buy the car. You’re going to need it. :)

  • avatar
    ptschett

    You’ll probably feel the road imperfections a little bit in the Charger R/T Road & Track Pack (yes, an R/T R&T) that’s equivalent to my car (’15 Challenger R/T, Super Track Pack). The Challenger R/T w/ STP is still comfortable but it does keep a person a bit more up to date on what’s going on at the contact patches than my ’10 Challenger R/T non-STP did.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I hear you. Canadian dealers don’t stock RWD V8 cars. Most buyers up here want AWD, and with the relatively high fuel prices, the V6 engine. The Hemi/8AT combo is worth it, though. With snow tires, they perform well in the snow, too.

    Maybe you can try a press car R/T to see if it’s everything you want if you can’t find any nearby, then get a dealer trade. There’s a nice red 2015 R/T Road and Track on the lot of a local dealer here in Windsor. Quite a few to choose from near the GTA as well.

  • avatar
    pbr

    hah. very entertaining. In return you might be amused to hear that it took me four more paragraphs to realize what you were talking about.

    25 V8 Chargers in my area, closest is 4.72 miles from my socially naive keyboard.

    • 0 avatar
      pbr

      doh. edit:
      hah. very entertaining. In return you might be amused to hear that it took me four more paragraphs to realize what “vaporizer” meant.

  • avatar
    Undefinition

    A success for your wallet and relationship, though.

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    You can get a 2015 Charger SE for under $23k, which strikes me as staggering value for money. Having rented a 2015, I would have bought this lightly used one over my Accord 6MT

    http://www.carmax.com/enus/view-car/default.html?id=11683727&AVi=0&No=0&Rp=R&D=90&zip=60453&ASTc=2015%20charger&Q=e52cc708-e477-4904-a257-cdc829f1d854&Ep=search:results:results%20page

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    Hey Mark, I found them. They seem to have all been diverted to Dallas, Texas.

    Within a 25 mile radius of my home, local dealers have 113 new 2015 Dodge Charger V8’s.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    There are 82 8 cyl Chargers within 100 miles of my So. Fl location including a few Hellcats, I tell you, this area is import heavy almost as much as California.

  • avatar
    Highway Cruiser

    Big Vancouver doesn’t have V8 R/T’s either in stock for a test-drive, except just one variant with announced price of SRT392 which isn’t fair enough to make a purchase (not sure if you’ll be able to take one for a spin). And the market of used R/T is also quite empty. So buy it from the factory or go for SRT 392.

  • avatar
    Chopsui

    Seems like a failure on the part of the regional sales manager. Shouldn’t he have visibility into a situation like that and have certain levers to pull (incentives, arm-twisting, etc) in order to get the proper inventory mix in that region?

    • 0 avatar
      Mr. K

      Chopsui
      “Seems like a failure on the part of the regional sales manager. Shouldn’t he have visibility into a situation like that and have certain levers to pull (incentives, arm-twisting, etc) in order to get the proper inventory mix in that region?”

      You know…
      Much as I would like to agree with you and blame the big bad company I just can’t. The job of the boys at Mopar and every manufacturer is to move the metal. They would rather move 5 minivans or 3 Chrysler 200’s then one Charger with a hemi in a market where they have little hope of moving more.

      Likely some, perhaps many potential 5.7 customers could be switched to the excellent, albeit no v8 3.6 by a combination of salesmanship and incentives.

      If Mr. and Mrs. X buy a v6 Charger, or Grand Caravan or a 200 or a dart or a Ram 1500 and then Mr. Y and Ms. Z both are given rides by their friends and like the whatever there is a chance they might like it and be in the market for one.

      Even if they don’t buy one they might give some good word of mouth buzz to other potential buyers. Clearly Mopar and the local Halifax dealers don’t think the potential 5.7 hemi Charger market is as large as that for other models.

      If Mopar believes that by twisting arms they can move x 5.7 v/8 Chargers, or n*x other vehicles where N>2 which would a rational actor choose to do? Yes I know the OHV hecho en Mexico hemi motor is cheaper to build then the DOHC 24v 3.6 (built in 3 plants, only 1 in Mexico).

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    Shouldn’t have to put down thousands on an order car; actually $100 should be enough. I agree about the test-drive though. I took delivery of a car that only had 20 miles on it without a test-drive once but the brakes were warped. Probably the person who went to fill it up with gas decided to wring it out.

  • avatar
    ItsMeMartin

    By the way, Mark, what do you drive? I just realized I never saw you mention that anywhere.

    • 0 avatar

      Press cars. I also have a broken Saturn Astra and a broken Buell XB9S Lightning. They’re both broken.

      • 0 avatar
        ItsMeMartin

        Assuming you bought it, moving from a broken Astra to a V8 Charger would be quite an upgrade, wouldn’t it now :)
        And since you didn’t blast the V6 engine in the review, why weren’t you interested in the Pentastar-powered versions and targeted the Hemi specifically instead?

        • 0 avatar

          Because I want the car to sound how it looks. The V6 is no slouch and it doesn’t sound horrible. But you can’t mistake a V8 rumble.

          I don’t even care about the extra 70 hp offered by the 5.7L over the 3.6L Pentastar. I want more aural theatre when I drop the hammer.

          • 0 avatar
            ItsMeMartin

            Yeah, I also assumed the proper way to buy a Charger is with the V8, even if the Canadian general population seems to think otherwise.

            I must say that I was surprised that you wanted to buy the Charger, though. The review was hardly an unanimous praise.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Sometimes a car just resonates with you even though you can see its imperfections loud and clear.

            If I were really a masochist (in terms of both budget and buying rare cars), I’d be looking for an S60 Polestar right now. That thing just talks to me, even though in all likelihood it’s a worse car than its German competition.

          • 0 avatar
            ItsMeMartin

            dal20402, I understand it perfectly myself as I’m currently desperately trying to save enough money to buy myself a 2002 Ford Mondeo TDCi (Common rail diesel)- a car with a reputation as wretched (due to the engine) as the 2.7 Sebring in the US. I know the injectors would fail at some point in the future, setting me back 150% of the car’s value. I know the dual-mass flywheel will need to be replaced within several years of me buying it, and it would cost me as much as another Mondeo would. And yet there’s nothing short of a mechanically sound Volvo 740 that would make me stop lusting after that Mondeo.

            Speaking of the S60, I wouldn’t be so sure about it being worse than the Germans. Despite the reputation for unreliability that Volvos “enjoy” in the US (strangely enough, where I live it’s just the opposite), I found that if you don’t defer maintenance too much, the modern Volvos are surprisingly tough and durable. Can’t say much about how they compare with the A4, C-class or the 3-series (I never had any interest whatsoever in the German “premium” makes) but I wouldn’t discount the S60 just yet. I’m not saying it’s better, either. One thing about the S/V/XC60 I noticed recently, however, is that they might possibly have some problems with the electrical system. During the last 3 months I saw 2 ’60-cars with burnt front halves and witnessed another one burning in my parking lot . It’s anecdotal, sure, but there seems to be a pattern there.

          • 0 avatar
            Mr. K

            395 foot pounds v 260 might be a more useful number then 292 v 370 HP!

  • avatar
    Rday

    I would suggest some serious mental therapy. Muscle cars are for men who have deficit in their sexual life or are lacking in female companionship or are still lost somewhere in latency. And anyone living in the far north needs a rwd like they need a bullet in their head.
    SO grow up, get some help and look for a real woman who doesn’t need a muscle car to make her man complete.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Jeez, I’m a total car wuss but you’re a little over the top even for me.

    • 0 avatar

      …says the commenter on the Internet.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      I love psuedo psychoanalysis from people based on what one drives or prefers to drive. Driving a pickup means you have a small penis. Driving a sports car means youre having a midlife crisis. Driving a Subaru makes you a lesbian. Driving a van makes you a pedophile. Driving a muscle car means you have a small brain (or whatever BS you said).

      How about driving [whatever you drive] and putting people in boxes based on what they drive/want to drive makes you an idiot who needs to quit trying to think about what others drive and what it (supposedly) says about them.

      Ever stop to consider that there is no underlying reason behind one’s desire to drive a certain vehicle? Maybe its okay to buy what you like BECAUSE YOU LIKE IT, not because youre inadequate or compensating or whatever. Its possible to drive any or all of the above vehicles and fit none of the “reasons”. I just dont get why people like you feel the need to label everyone. “Oh, he drives a ____, so of course _______ must be true!”

      Just what are YOU compensating for? You MUST lack something in the bedroom or the size of your [whatever] based on your need to deflect by catagorizing people based on what they choose to put in their driveway.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I live in the North, drive RWD muscle cars all year round and have had female *ahem* companionship multiple times a night, every night this week so far.

      Feels good man.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Remember in school, being told to lead the life you want, don’t fall to peer pressure, or into a mold. Yea, this is the type of person that requires approval from others for all of their actions in order to feel important.

      Doing what you want, rather than what society says is ok, makes life a lot more interesting. Having a smile on my face everytime I hop into one of my trucks is satisfying. And when I’m old, I can look back at the life I lived and be proud I enjoyed every second I was in control of.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      Muscle cars are fun, period. All the nonsense about sexual stuff or being womanless is just bullshit. What about my ex-gf, who drives a 300C with an aftermarket exhaust? I live in Northern Ohio, and will never ever buy another FWD vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      So if I sell the 427 S/C and the longhood 911 I won’t need the blue pill anymore?

  • avatar
    MeJ

    I’m curious, Mark, what was it about the car that made you think “I have to have one”. I find it interesting that the car spoke to you that way. I love it when you bond with a machine like that.
    (I’m one of guys who names his car and loved the movie Christine, by the way.)

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      I tend to personify my cars, however Ive never felt the need to name one.
      I love my Taurus. I really do. Its so much more than a hunk of metal that gets me places. I feel a sense of loss when I think about cars Ive loved in the past that I no longer have (sometimes it was my choice to get rid of them, other times not). Ive found that buying something else that reminds me of the one I miss helps a lot.

      For example, I lost my 1983 Mercury Zephyr GS because I chose to loan it to my brother and he decided that despite the fact that the ONE CONDITION of my loaning it to him was that Id get it back, he left it at a truck stop near Phoenix with the keys in it. Nothing wrong with it, didnt break down, just no longer needed. A few years later, I bought a 1978 Mercury Zephyr Z-7 and I loved it. Same Inline-6 that I loved in the 83. Unfortunantly, I was forced to sell it when I was relocating as the $250 I wasted on a rebuilt carb left it barely running (worse than before the carb was replaced).

      I still want another one. I plan to install an updated head which will allow fuel injection. I might use a 250 ci Inline 6 instead of the 200 ci. I either want a T-5 manual or an overdrive automatic, probably the automatic so I can drive it on a “bad pain day”. I want to use a last-gen Grand Marquis grille cut to fit where the stock one sits, so a brighter chrome “waterfall” with a big ole “Flying M” symbol in the middle (complete with M E R C U R Y around it). Basically I will just use the inside portion of the grille, not the “frame” it sits in on the S.S. Grand Marquis.

      I actually was looking at an 81 Zephyr GS just like the 83 (even the same color inside and out!) before I found my current Taurus. The Taurus was much closer and much cheaper. The Zephyr was on a car lot in Atlanta and they wanted about 5x what I felt it was worth. Still, I was making plans to get it when this Taurus came up and being that it had a lot going for it (right engine, right trans, good options, etc), I jumped on it.

      • 0 avatar

        “For example, I lost my 1983 Mercury Zephyr GS because I chose to loan it to my brother and he decided that despite the fact that the ONE CONDITION of my loaning it to him was that Id get it back, he left it at a truck stop near Phoenix with the keys in it. Nothing wrong with it, didnt break down, just no longer needed.”

        That’s something where the phrase “speaking terms” would disappear from my vocabulary.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “For example, I lost my 1983 Mercury Zephyr GS because I chose to loan it to my brother and he decided that despite the fact that the ONE CONDITION of my loaning it to him was that Id get it back, he left it at a truck stop near Phoenix with the keys in it. Nothing wrong with it, didnt break down, just no longer needed.”

        Wat. Was he on drugs?

  • avatar
    st3v_stuten

    This exact same thing happened to me. I drove a V6 rental, now I am hooked on getting an R/T Road and Track…

  • avatar
    pb35

    I’ve been trying to order/purchase an SRT 392 to trade my 2012 road and track in for but the order banks closed for 2015 so no SRT for me. It’s ok I guess, I only owe about 4k on the R/T so I’ll be payment free soon! My car only has 26k on the clock too.

    The allure of the SRT is strong, however. I drove a used 2014 that they had on the lot. The car was a basket case with only 23k on the clock. The rear spoiler was missing, crooked badges and a mismatched front wheel. The salesman wanted me to consider it. I wished him luck.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Forget the engine, the real reason Mark couldn’t find one is because no dealer had the 24″ Chrome Spinners he wanted. According to his review, the LARGE 19″ rims are “Too small”.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    How in hell can you folks up in the rust belt and beyond drive sedans without AWD?
    I am guessing this look includes AWD????

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      With decent winter tires AWD is not needed. We have a 2wd truck and I haven’t had any issues with snow and ice here in WI with it since putting Blizzaks on it.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Here in Maine, if the road conditions are such that AWD on a car is all that useful, you won’t have enough ground clearance anyway. And that includes butched-up minivans, aka CUVs. When the going gets that tough, I have a snow-tire shod live-axle Range Rover to deal with it. The other 355 days of the year RWD is just peachy with winter tires in the winter.

      • 0 avatar

        Did you folks get the same hellish winter we did last year?

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          We sure did. We got a BAD winters worth of snow in four weeks here. The worst storm I had 6′ drifts in my driveway.

          I can cheerfully now say that an ’01 Range Rover with snow tires WILL go through 30+ inches of snow, and will tow a well stuck snow-tire shod AWD RAV4 (idiot roommate) out of that same amount of snow. CUVs do not have enough ground clearance to be useful, might as well drive a car.

          I’m hoping to visit Halifax next year with my partner in crime. Haven’t been since college, 25 years ago. Plan to drive over and take the boat back, assuming we still have a boat… One of the most beautiful places I have ever been, and I have wanted to go back ever since.

          • 0 avatar
            Power6

            How many Inches pile up on the roads in Maine before they plow? Our outback has 8.7 inches of ground clearance. This winter, the snowiest on record in Boston, no road ever presented a challenge, not more than a few inches at any given time even during statewide travel ban. Not even a problem for my old Lexus ES never mind CUV. Thats Boston suburbs though,not backwoods Maine.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Roughly none. If there is an inch of snow on an actual road that is A LOT. Which is my whole point – the piffling extra ground clearance of the wagon on stilts is not particularly useful. I have never been on any road in Maine in the winter with a RWD Volvo, Peugeot, or BMW where I needed anything more than snowtires to feel perfectly safe.

            The trick is getting TO the road without having to snowblow or plow the driveway (pure laziness on my part). Your Outback is NOT going though 30+ inches of snow (roommate’s RAV4 sure didn’t), but my Range Rover will. Air suspension on off-road extra high, a great AWD and traction control system, and 5000lbs+ of snow crushing weight along with a great set of aggressive snow tires. Though roomie has the very same tires on the RAV4 – not enough height, and not enough weight.

          • 0 avatar
            Power6

            Yeah no doubt, have to snow blow the driveway to get the cars out. Agreed the clearance is not needed. The outback can push through a foot or maybe a bit more of new snow if we had to go to the emergency room or something but we have to clear the driveway or it would just become a refrozen mess and probably a lawsuit from the mailman. I still choose the outback keys in a storm though.

    • 0 avatar

      I grew up on RWD winter driving. My Dad tossed me the keys to the Grand Vitara (yeah, it’s an SUV, but bear with me). The only time I put it in 4WD was 1) on the highway because 4WD *gives a feeling* of more control and 2) when I was properly stuck. When the Zuki was unstuck, it was promptly shifted back into 2WD.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    We drove out to NS and around the Cabot Trail last year. Great drive. Would have loved to do it in something beside’s the wife’s Santa Fe. But I digress…

    I see some choices:

    – Go to the dealer manager (since the sales drones don’t have the authority) and explain your situation. Tell them you are expecting to buy but want to be sure by having a test drive first. They might be able to arrange something. It will speed things up if you can tell them where the car you want is located. Perhaps if you are lucky they are already doing a swap of some minivans or something and have a transport coming.

    – Plan a road trip to your closest dealer. Talk to the sales manager and let them know what you are planning. Again if you are serious and ready to make a deal, I don’t know why they wouldn’t bite as it takes frees a spot on their lot they can fill with a minivan. Might cost you a hotel stay for a couple of days assuming they can prep it for you to take home during the trip. Means the GF and you will have to drive back separate though.

    – You can import a Charger from the US AFAIK, and you don’t even have to pay the import tax (assuming they are built in the US).

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      ” You can import a Charger from the US AFAIK, and you don’t even have to pay the import tax (assuming they are built in the US).”

      If you want a warranty, you can’t do this.

    • 0 avatar

      This reminds me, I really need to write a story about the crane (bird, not machinery) I almost hit on the Cabot Trail two years ago on my R6 while traveling at a rate of speed north of 200 kph.

      Anyway…

      The dealer manager would only be able to do so much. The closest V8 Charger would have to come from Quebec which is 8+ hours away. Same applies for a road trip. As much as I like hitting the road, the last thing I want to do is a 16 hour round trip just to test drive a car.

      You assumed wrong. They are built in Canada. But I might have to make a trip south of the Mason-Dixon line where V8 Chargers are plentiful and cheap.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Has anyone driven the V6 and base V8 back to back? Is the V8 really worth shelling out the extra cash for?

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      As an enthusiast, I think it is. The extra performance and engine sountrack is worth the 2-3mpg average fuel economy difference I’ve noted between otherwise identical cars. There’s obviously the added cost of entry of about 2k as well.

      If someone prized fuel economy and lower entry price over performance, the V6 would be the better choice.

  • avatar
    derekson

    “And this is where I either fail or win, depending on your perspective: I absolutely refuse to put down over $40,000 on a car I cannot test drive first. I don’t need to drive the car I want to buy, but I am not about to take a V6 for a test drive, assume everything will be better with the V8, and plunk down tens of thousands of dollars.”

    Maybe I’m crazy, but I absolutely DO want to drive THE car I’m going to buy. If I’m dropping serious money on a purchase like a car, I want to make sure I’m not getting the car that slipped through with weird panel gaps or an annoying dashboard rattle or one of the lower power engines that still was “within spec”. In manufacturing something as complex as a modern automobile, there are so many parts and assemblies that the accepted variance is pretty significant. I’ve test driven two of the same car with the same engine at a dealer and had noticeably better throttle response in one of them. I don’t want to buy, sight unseen, that car and end up with the one with poor throttle response (and an annoying rattle that I’ll spend the next 3 years trying to nail down and fix).

    • 0 avatar

      You, sir, are the reason why I couldn’t buy a Charger this weekend.

      Because everyone wants to drive their minivan/truck/SUV *RIGHT FUCKING NOW* and take it home, it leaves no room on the lot for those of us looking for something that doesn’t sell nearly as well.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    A Youtuber I kinda follow, lives in Halifax and is in a similar situation. Although he already has a bright yellow SuperBee, there is now apparently another SuperBee in the same area, so now he wants a Charger Hellcat. Which apparently isn’t something you can just go into a dealer and buy when you live in Halifax.
    Still, as a Norwegian, who has to view a Fusion as a fullsize car, and has never owned a car with over 200 hp, I’d still be jealous if you got the V6…

  • avatar
    pb35

    It appears that the Mopar gods are smiling on me. The system accepted my SRT order today and my SRT 392 should be in Texas by mid to late August! Now the hard part begins…

  • avatar
    supernova72

    Had a similar challenge in finding a Chevy SS (not Camaro SS). This is the Australian subsidiary of GM Holden car.

    Anyoo–in Seattle WA very few on lots even though they all have the LS3 I wanted the 6MT car.

    Happened to be in Vegas last week and a Chevy dealer had one 6MT car.

    Got the test drive. Oh my—NOT a Chevy per say. The G8 guys are all over them (chevySS.net) That is a beast and blast to drive. 415HP, Brembo’s, 3.70 gears, HID, Mag ride, and loaded to the gills for $46K MSRP. Only two options available (moonroof, full size spare).

    If you get a chance a very capable “sleeper” sedan. Big debate is will there be a 2016 model. Or if so will it have the 6th gen Camaro motor.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The 2016 is confirmed. It will have an LS3, although possibly with a dual-mode exhaust system that will give it a few more ponies.

      If you have the room to let it run it’s a fantastic car, with agility really unexpected in a sedan of its size and weight. (Full disclosure: was a G8 GXP owner until two days ago.)

  • avatar
    orange260z

    I rent cars regularly for work, and can often put several thousand KMs on in a week. One benefit to this is that I get to see what it’s really like to live with the car. After all the KMs in 300s and Chargers over the past couple of years, my biggest beef was that the front doors are hard to reach from the seat when fully open (and they open nice and wide, which is great for my arthritic knees).

    When shopping for a larger car last fall I decided to “go reasonable” and buy an LX instead of a BMW 5, Mercedes E, or Jag XF. I was quite surprised to find that dealers had almost no stock new in Ontario and Quebec, and if they did they were stripped vs the V6 S that I wanted. Used, the best deals were on the V8s, with RWD V6 cars harder to find and premium priced.

    I ended up buying a year-old V6 S RWD, and have overall been quite happy with the car.

    The car feels pretty refined when going over bumps and potholes, but the manufacturing is clearly sloppy, particularly on the outside – the panel gaps are HUGE, and some welds are visible (likely due to the massive gaps).

    I have, however, had a few electrical glitches that required warranty repair – I fear that this will only get worse as the car ages.

  • avatar
    Blunozer

    Great… As a fellow Bluenoser (hence the moniker), we’re BOTH going to be fighting over what few Chargers show up in Nova Scotia next year.

    It’s weird that I’m seeing these things all over the road, yet I have yet to see one in a dealer lot.

    (BTW, the fact that you couldn’t feel bumps in the 101 is impressive. There are some truly nasty spots here in the Annapolis Valley.)

  • avatar
    CJ407

    I ordered a 2015 Charger R/T Scat Pack in B5 Blue, and I am waiting for its arrival. I test drove a few Chargers. I really liked the steering in the R/T Road and Track. Maybe I’m picky, but the steering feels like a big step up from the regular R/T and SXT. If you’re going to buy an R/T, may I recommend Road and Track or Scat Pack, even if just for the steering.

    Sadly, I saw that Chrysler is lowering the mileage on their powertrain warranty for model year 2016. Just in case anyone was thinking to wait for 2016, it might be one thing to consider.


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