By on January 23, 2015

BMW i3 and Volkswagen e-Golf DC Charging

There won’t be 1 million EVs on the road this year like President Obama wanted. Not even close.

 

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64 Comments on “While You Were Sleeping: January 23rd, 2015...”


  • avatar

    #1. Stop building small cars.

    Use the Malibu, Sonata, Azera, Impala or Charger (no pun intended). Or any car that seats 4 comfortably as your template.

    #2. Keep the prices affordable. Rather than building unique cars, use existing platforms to build plug-in hybrids with 100 mile EV ranges or better.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      “#1. Stop building small cars.”
      That’s the funniest thing I have read all day. Thanks big truck YouTube guy.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        He’s right with regard to EVs. A mainstream EV in a decent size is much more attractive than one in a B or C segment econobox configuration.

        • 0 avatar
          th009

          It all depends on who your target customer is. In the big cities (where range is much less of a problem, too) a compact size, such as that of the i3, is actually a plus.

          • 0 avatar
            George B

            Wouldn’t the actual target customer need to own a house with a garage for his or her EV? I can’t imagine talking the landlord into adding a high current 240V circuit to a rental property. I would expect the actual target customer to be someone who has a house in an inner suburb or college town.

          • 0 avatar
            th009

            Or lives in a building with a parking garage (and charging capability).

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            >> Wouldn’t the actual target customer need to own a house with a garage

            You don’t need a garage. They sell weatherproof chargers – I have one. You can also get an adapter for an electric dryer outlet. I have a mobile level 2 charger that can attach to 120v (up to 20 amps adjustable), 240v dryer, or an RV NEMA 14-50 RV outlet. I can level 2 charge at almost any campground if I want.

            A renter with a 120v 20 amp circuit and the right charger could charge a Leaf from 50% to 100% in just under 7 hours. That’s a real number I pulled from my car notifications last time I charged plugged into a 120v/20 circuit. That should be doable for an overnight charge.

    • 0 avatar

      “Stop building small cars” is about on the same level as “Build an EV Hellcat”

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Tesla has the right idea about EV marketing: stop focusing so much on environmental virtue and start promoting the driving advantages of EVs.

    I don’t understand why no one else markets their EVs or PHEVs as “quietest and smoothest in class,” or performance EVs as “instantly responsive.” Talk to actual EV owners and these things are all you hear about.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Most automakers are building them as compliance vehicles that lose money. Not much point in marketing a money loser.

      Nissan is the one major automaker that actually wants to turn a profit on volume. But the car itself isn’t much to write home about and sales are lagging (optimistic) projections.

      Tesla builds a car with a really big battery that loses money, and hopes to make up for it (some day) with (some) volume. There is a reason why major automakers don’t take this same approach — they don’t like losing money on purpose unless they have to.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Those automakers are being forced to change their views about “compliance cars”. With nine more states adopting California’s 15% law, they’re going to have to make nearly 5x as many and the OEMs can no longer afford to lose money on them. But if they really want to market them, they need to emphasize things like ride and performance while eliminating the high cost of buying gas.

        As for the Tesla, on a car-by-car basis they aren’t losing money; the car is selling for more than it costs to build it. The company is taking those profits and putting them right back in for expansion and development of new models. That’s the only reason they’re not showing profits. Business Management 101.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          As usual, you show your lack of understanding of anything related to finance, economics and, well, life in general.

          (Big hint: Tesla has inflated gross margins, which end up being netted out in SG&A. Direct sales cost the company a fortune.)

    • 0 avatar

      The 60KWh is too expensive.
      The P85 is too expensive.
      The P85D is more expensive than a Mercedes S-class which is THE BEST CAR ON THE ROAD.

      Driving advantages less than 5% of Earth’s population will ever find out about.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “The 60KWh is too expensive.” — Too expensive for whom? A lot of people are driving them.
        “The P85 is too expensive.” — Too expensive for whom? A lot of people are driving them.
        “The P85D is more expensive than a Mercedes S-class which is THE BEST CAR ON THE ROAD.” — Apparently it’s not, since the P85D can outperform it AND break the safety-testing hardware that crushes it.
        “Driving advantages less than 5% of Earth’s population will ever find out about.” — Or 95% as vehicles gradually switch over from gasoline drive to electric drive one way or another (including HFC in this comment).

        • 0 avatar

          Oh, don’t be so hard on BTSR.

          Seriously, re your last point, that switch is not going to begin to happen until recharging time falls below 15 minutes (without harming batteries unduly) and range gets reliably beyond 200 miles or so for vehicles that provide the same amenities at the same price as gasoline vehicles.

          Or until gasoline gets REALLY expensive.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Seriously, re your last point, that switch is not going to begin to happen until recharging time falls below 15 minutes (without harming batteries unduly)…”
            — The Model S can get 100 miles in about 15 minutes…

            “… and range gets reliably beyond 200 miles or so for vehicles that provide the same amenities at the same price as gasoline vehicles.”
            — None out at the moment, but Chevy is promising the “Bolt” and Tesla is promising the Model III in two years with at least that range and price level.

            “Or until gasoline gets REALLY expensive.”
            — Which I believe will happen sooner than most expect. Probably before the “Bolt” and Model III arrive.

          • 0 avatar

            Even if I could afford an S, and even if there were ample superchargers between Boston and Albany via the backroads, and between Boston and DC–my two most frequent road trips–the 100 mile recharge in 15 minutes wouldn’t do it for me. Plus, that kind of recharging is hard on the batteries, which already are not nearly as durable as TEsla would have you believe (a lot have been replaced by TEsla after several years). Moreover, 70k, which will get you a low range Tesla, is way beyond what all but a very small % of the popualtion will pay for a car. And the 265 mile version costs 95k.

            I’ll believe the Bolt and the Model III when they’re out and have been tested by independent sources. (Elon’s record on timing is not exactly encouraging.)

            I don’t think REALLY expensive gasoline is imminent in the US (but I wouldn’t bet on that by buying a fuel inefficient car at this point).

            But I do think that there’s still much that can be done to reduce ICE gas consumption.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The charging-time thing is overblown.

            From listening to people talk about EVs you’d think they spend their entire lives doing nothing but cross-country road trips. They don’t. They spend most of their lives commuting and driving around their local areas. And for that application the EV is actually more convenient, because you never have to make time to stop at the gas station — you recharge at home while your car would be sitting anyway.

            As more people actually use EVs they will figure out that they can cut out the gas stops from their daily grind. Multi-car families will retain one gas car for their road trips. Many single-car families and people will rent for road trips. It’s not a big deal as people make it out to be.

            I agree that ~200 miles of range is important, because you need a full day’s typical driving without a charge and without getting anywhere close to running out of range, but I don’t agree that fast charging is the be-all and end-all.

          • 0 avatar
            Toad

            Every electric car article on TTAC gets the same responses: a few true believers cannot understand how the masses resist enlightenment, charging times are not really a big deal, most people drive less than the daily range of EV’s, etc.

            None of that matters to most car buyers. Sometimes life does not work within the restrictions of current EV limitations: your kid gets sick and needs to go the the emergency room NOW; you have to unexpectedly drive across town or across the state; you know that your significant other or kid will never remember to plug the car in at night; you know that YOU will sometimes forget to plug the car in; etc, etc, etc.

            The vast majority of us know that life usually does not go according to plan. When you spend $30k+ on a car you want it to work all the time, every time. EV’s just don’t fit into the worst case scenarios that happen all too often.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The forgetting to plug in is the biggest issue I see at this point. I think it will be solved by a system that uses GPS to figure out it’s at home and makes noise if the keyfob starts to walk away from the car without the charger being plugged in first.

            “Life does not work within the restrictions”: That is why EV range needs to be 200 miles when almost no one except for freak ultracommuters drives more than 100 miles on the busiest day. Kid gets sick in the evening? Your battery’s probably “only” charged to 120 miles. You can make it to the clinic and back quite a few times.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @david holzman

            >> that kind of recharging is hard on the batteries, which already are not nearly as

            Not so much with newer batteries. I have the latest production battery from Nissan and I’ve put 76 quick charges into it in 6500 miles. It’s still at 100% health according to the CAN readout. There has been government testing that shows even the earlier batteries are minimally effected. The tests were performed by the Idaho National Lab. Here’s the data: http://avt.inl.gov/fsev.shtml

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @dal20402

            “The forgetting to plug in is the biggest issue I see at this point”

            I get emails from my Leaf if I don’t plug-in when I’m near a “preferred” charging station.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          One point that people miss is the fact that electricity is ALSO a resource with LIMITED supply. There are poorer countries that have routine brownouts as an attempt to ration electricity. England will be facing that problem soon.

          Back up electricity tends to come from gasoline or diesel powered generators.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            We are talking about the US. If there is demand for more electricity than the current grid can provide, it will be profitable to build more natural gas powerplants that are far more efficient than ICEs in cars.

            (The UK will also find a way one way or another to build more plants despite building conditions considerably more difficult than we face here.)

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @dal20402 – I find it hypocritical of greens to talk about running electric vehicles when most of the USA’s power plants are hydrocarbon fuel powered.
            Coal 39%
            Natural Gas 27%
            Nuclear 19%
            Hydropower 7%
            Other Renewable 6%
            Biomass 1.48%
            Geothermal 0.41%
            Solar 0.23%
            Wind 4.13%
            Petroleum 1%

            I found an article that stated that a typical IPhone consumes more electricity than a mid-sized fridge.

            “This year PJM, which has 62,566 miles of high-voltage transmission lines serving 61 million customers in 13 Eastern states and the District of Columbia, says it’ll see a historic amount of electric generating resources retired – 11,769 megawatts to be exact.

            A full 41% of PJM’s electricity is generated by coal, by the way.

            In contrast, only about 3,800 megawatts of new generating capacity is expected to be added in 2015.”

            The current infrastructure in the USA will need updating to keep up with demand and experts are also concerned about vulnerability due to direct and indirect threats.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            HC-powered powerplants are more efficient than individual ICEs in cars even accounting for transmission losses. Even a relatively old coal plant beats car engines, and a modern natural gas plant is more than twice as efficient. Almost all new capacity will be natural gas.

            And if you get a comprehensive electric car infrastructure in place then cleaning up your grid (say, adding more solar, wind, hydro, or nuclear) also cleans up your transportation emissions with no additional costs.

            The iPhone vs. fridge thing must be a dumb conspiracy theory. My iPhone has a 1560 mAh 3.8-volt battery. That’s 5.45 Wh. Let’s assume that the charger is only 30% efficient, and each full charge takes about 16 Wh from the wall. I charge my iPhone a maximum of twice a day, usually less. So 32 Wh/day. Then let’s say the charger burns 1 W in waste at all times, for another 24 Wh/day. In the very worst case that’s 56 Wh/day to power my iPhone. My fridge uses more than 56 Wh in a few minutes with the compressor on.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @dal20402 – the cell phone energy consumption costs go beyond the actual device i.e. cell towers/repeaters, WiFi connections, central servers etc.

            The actual device in your pocket isn’t a large consumer of direct power but all of the infrastructure that supports it is.

            As far as generating power, my first point was about the fact that electrical power is not infinite and as evidenced by other countries problems, we in North America aren’t far off from experiencing similar problems.

            Predictions are that the UK aren’t too far off for experiencing brownouts.
            How long do you think it actually takes to build new power generating facilities?

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            “…the cell phone energy consumption costs go beyond the actual device i.e. cell towers/repeaters, WiFi connections, central servers etc. ”

            I suppose if I were to rattle off the entire supply chain for a single gallon of gas, from the well to the nozzle that goes into your tank, I could argue for a $100/gallon price.

            False equivalency.

            EV’s are already 50% more efficient than equivalent ICE cars, and with intelligent adoption and use *right now* could significantly reduce our need for fossil fuels. With the advancements that are soon to occur, they’ll only get better.

            I’m not saying that there should be any sort of “mandate”, but early support by forward-looking governments must continue for a time to allow EV makers to sell enough EV’s to justify investment in the next generation’s improvements.

            As to the stagnation of the power grid – EV drivers will push for change, and these profitable companies will have to upgrade the infrastructure (long overdue).

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @shaker:

            Based on what I’m seeing around my own region, there appears to be significant infrastructure upgrade of the power grid going on now. I’m not exactly sure what the power company is doing, but one of the main high-tension routes going past my town has service trucks at nearly every tower and they look prepared for some relatively heavy-duty work possibly in the form of adding to the tower structures.

            @ Lou-BC: There are some richer countries with that issue too, as indicated by California’s need to perform ‘rolling blackouts’ to reduce demand. It’s not so much that it’s a ‘limited resource’ so much as it has been energy companies too conservative and too “reactive” vs “pro-active” in generating more. Please note that most of the renewable energy companies are not the same as the conservative fossil-fuel companies. States like California could benefit significantly by adding multiple molten-salt solar generators and eliminate an enormous amount of water consumption by switching away from coal and natural gas.

        • 0 avatar

          #1 A $70,000 car is more than twice as much as “the average American” can afford to finance (> $30,000)

          #2 $70,000… LOL.

          #3 Range Anxiety is a problem because superchargers aren’t ubiquitous and TESLA’s battery-swap stations may never be.

          Granted, the average American isn’t driving extreme distances daily – but they certainly don’t have $70,000 and up to simply drop on one.

          What percentage of the population actually spends more than $70,000 on a car? I get my info from FORBES.

          #4 I’d have to be the dumbest liberal greener on Earth to spend $135,000 in order to “save money on gas”.

      • 0 avatar
        Eric 0

        The P85D would be more aptly compared to the frightfully aspirational forthcoming S63 AMG, which it will outperform decisively.

        One day Soon bigtrucksreview will drive a Tesla for himself, and we will never hear from him again. He’ll be laying by the side of the road in a fetal position. grinning and muttering: “….So..much…..t-t-torque.”

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          He did drive one, and that’s pretty much what happened.

          Now that the memory has faded, he’s back to wanting big fire breathing sedans. Because acceleration is apparuntly the only thing that matters about cars….

          (Of course his model fails to explain the existence of the 99% of vehicles on the road that are more practical than the Mopar SRT series!)

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    RE: Alfa Sales

    “About 150,000 of the 400,000 annual global sales goal for Alfa Romeo are expected to come from North American consumers”

    HAHAHAHA

    Yes please give to me the vaporware sedans and full line up comparable to BMW by 2018.

    HAHAHAHAAH

    “He said it was not that long ago that the Germans “used to look at Alfa with envy.””

    I think here he has confused the meaning of “envy” with “pity,” or perhaps “disdain,” or “disregard.”

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      “That day will return, he said, thanks to 800 engineers working in “bunkers” on future Alfa Romeo vehicles.”

      800 is really not very many for designing and building modern cars. BMW and Audi will recruit about that many *additional* engineers every year.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Oil prices have never affected my total miles driven. Growing up and even now, my friends have always been very spread out, plus we like to leave the city for recreation. 30000 kms a year as a minimum generally. Oild prices never played a part in the decision making.

    Do people actually say “I’d like to go to that event but its across town and gas prices are high.” ? That sort of thinking is insane to me.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    no matter how tempting lower gas prices are, we need to continue to conserve and avoid another spike in oil prices as long as possible. CVT’s DCT and smaller engines should continue and be developed and we should not fall into the OPEC trap again.

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    EVs really do drive wonderfully, I’ve testdriven Tesla, Volt, Leaf, and just did a 3-day with an i3-ReX.

    Not only are they just plain quieter, its the responsiveness on the power: no lag, no nothing. So even a slow EV is fast off the line, and feels faster than it does. Fast EVs like the Tesla are really just brutal.

    The i3 is “midspeed”, ~8s 0-60 with the extra weight from the range extender. It is, without a doubt, slower to 60 than my S2000. But it feels as fast, because there’s no shifting, no lag, just press and go.

    At 70-80, the i3’s acceleration is way less than the S2000 if I downshift the Honda to 3rd, but even then, the instentaniousness is wonderful.

    As for the comments on size? Nope, nada, sorry. You want good packaging: the Leaf is probably the best example: you have a small car, but 4 doors and nice room on the inside with the tall/upright position.

    In fact, this is because if pure electric like the leaf or i3 style range extending, your overall drivetrain package is MUCH smaller: a flat floor-pan of batteries, and a lump in the front/back for the electric drive.

    I’d certainly rather have an i3-ReX over the comparably priced (after tax credit) 320i.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    If only we could just solve the battery issues, an EV would be a no-brainer for many drivers.

    • 0 avatar

      given where the cost of oil is undoubtedly going in the long run, it would be a no-brainer for almost all drivers.

      And if we could just move the earth another few million miles out beyond it’s current orbit, we woudlnt’ have to worry about global warming. (Seriously, I don’t think solving the battery issues is nearly that unlikely, but I don’t think it’s a foregone conclusion that ti will happen.

      I do’nt get how the people who are boosting sales of gas guzzlers can think gas prices are going to stay where they are for any length of time. H. sapiens–big brains, don’t know how to use ’em.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbob457

      If wishes were horses, then beggars would ride.

  • avatar
    TR4

    How many miles has the President racked up in EVs?

    • 0 avatar

      The Pres used to drive a Xler 300C muscle car before he was outed, while running for Pres the first time

      “President Barack Obama ditched his personal car for a politically correct vehicle during the summer of 2007, shortly after being outed for contradictions between his public exhortations and his private behavior. “While foreign competitors were investing in more fuel-efficient technology… American automakers were spending their time investing in bigger, faster cars,” Obama scolded in a May 2007 speech before the Detroit Economic Club.”
      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/the-candidates-choice/

      • 0 avatar
        MrGreenMan

        Is it wrong to feel cheated that we didn’t get the Mr. Obama who would drive a 300C with the big hemi? How plastic does a politician (of any stripe) have to be to ditch a car he clearly liked for some brief campaign “optics”?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Even the most optimistic EV fans never believed the million-car target was achievable in 2015, so this shouldn’t be news to anyone.

    The article repeats the meme that EV sales are suffering due to cheap gas, but this is false: “http://insideevs.com/monthly-plug-in-sales-scorecard/”

    While I am reluctant to call every plug-in an EV, here are the sales numbers for all plug-ins (US sales):

    2011: 17,080
    2012: 52,607 (up 308%)
    2013: 97,507 (up 85%)
    2014: 119,710 (up 23%)

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      The Leaf actually outsold some conventional ICE cars like the Toyota Venza. Sure, the Venza is not exactly a sales superstar, but it’s progress.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Agreed. I wish there would be enthusiast-oriented plug-ins cheaper than a Model S. I’d buy one in a heartbeat. I really like the new Volt, but it’s too slow.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        The i3 is about two seconds faster 0-60 than the Volt. Might not meet your other enthusiast (or otherwise) criteria though.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          To be perfectly honest, it’s too ugly and conspicuous. If it were less conspicuous, I’d be interested. If it were both pretty and less conspicuous, I might already have signed a lease. I know, superficial, but it’s just too much ugly for me to bite off.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            It’s ugly and conspicuous because automakers are still designing for the “look-at-me-I’m-driving-an-environmentally-conscious-vehicle” crowd. They don’t realize how small that market is. The combination of aerodynamic and conspicuous is what produces ugly cars. If only somebody would put an all-electric drive train into a 1973 Dodge Dart Swinger!

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            I sometimes refer to my Leaf as the white frog.

            It has some bad angles, but the driving experience won me over.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Aerodynamic is just fine with me. Giant color blocks, random blue trim, and a greenhouse that looks like it has tumors aren’t.

          • 0 avatar
            05lgt

            @lorenzo
            I’d be even happier if they would put a Hellcat drivetrain in a ’73 swinger (with modern HVAC and infotainment). That would be a brick with juice.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Why electric cars remain a niche. 1) concerns about battery life/replacement cost – which is seen by the generally poor resale values on EVs. 2) short range that gets shorter with age – start with 80 miles and after 5 years you are down to 50-60, lose 20+% range in cold weather or using A/C in warm weather, 3) long refueling time – even 15 minutes is a long time to wait when a regular car can get 300 miles of fuel in 5 minutes. 4) high purchase price unless heavily subsidized – wealthy EV buyers get money from the government while schools, programs for the poor, etc. get cut, and government deficits are exploding. 5) lack of EV models in the size and type preferred by most buyers – i.e. CUVS, pickups, mid-large sedans – which are not produced because they would require huge Tesla sized batteries and Tesla sized prices. Sure the government can mandate the car makers to produce them, but they cannot be profitable unless they become popular with the general public. I am sure the Obama is frustrated by the fact that the laws of physics and chemistry (which govern battery development)are so slow to respond to his EV mandates.

    • 0 avatar
      Carilloskis

      @ Stingray65 I agree on the limited models available for EVs some of us don’t want a small car with lets be honest the most hidious styling. Some of use the cost of the ev doesn’t save any money what so ever. At my last job I live 1.5 miles from my office the 4 years I was there I comuter around 2000 miles. In that same time I have put 80,000 on my ford raptor. A good 1/3 of those miles where off road or in the snow. Through in a few road trips, travel to ski areas with the truck loaded down with ski gear, helping people move etc. There are very few times that I would have been able to use an ev. $20,000 for a used volt or leaf buys me 80,000 miles of range for the raptor that I need 2/3rds of my driving @ $3.50 a gallon and 14 mpg not to factor in the increase in my electric bill, insurance tires registration etc. I would never brake even on an ev as I would still need a 4×4 truck.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    “There won’t be 1 million EVs on the road this year like President Obama wanted. Not even close.”

    This just won’t do. We need a federal law slowing down gasoline pumps so it takes an hour to fill your ICE car. That an a 50% surcharge on any new ICE vehicle should really get the EV marketing going.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I sometimes read a certain green car website because it’s downright entertaining to watch them guys. This article over on that site had one response that said the government should “force people into electric vehicles”, that was a pretty good one.
      Not as crazy though as one of the editors that edited someone’s post because they (sarcastically) said that Global warming was fake. He said it was against the rules because the site didn’t allow opposing opinions like that or some BS.
      I read both of those on the front page yesterday if you want a good laugh.
      I wouldn’t think this would be considered advertising as I didn’t directly say the name, and the site is mentioned in some of the stories here.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “the site didn’t allow opposing opinions like that or some BS”

        I won’t visit a site that condones censorship of that kind

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Even if I disagree with something I’ll still read it, hence me being on a green car site(I don’t post, I just read). There’s still a chance I’ll learn something I didn’t know. It really p’d me off, I’d rather see an argument get torn down with somewhat intelligent debate than be deleted/censored because it doesn’t support an agenda.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Exactly! If I’m not sure how I feel about a topic I like to read the debate. If I’m only getting one side I’m not learning a thing

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            About that…

            I know of some political sites that do the same thing… and they’re not “liberal” sites.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Doesn’t change the fact that it’s wrong and shouldn’t be done. One place censoring an argument doesn’t make it right for another site to do the same. And it certainly doesn’t change my opinion whether the site doing the censoring is left or right of center.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I’m agreein’ Hummer. I’m agreein’.

  • avatar
    Czilla9000

    Obama may prove to be off….by just one year or two. We could have 1 million EVs total in 2016.

    According to the article there are 280,000 EVs sold/leased. Of those 120,000 were sold/leased in 2014. That’s HUGE – it means about half the EVs ever sold occurred in 2014. If the base keeps on doubling at that rate we’ll have 500,000 or thereabout EVs sold by the end 2015. And then the much ballyhooed 1 million EVs by the end of 2016.

    My only car is a Nissan LEAF, and it has not been as restrictive as you would think. Also I rent – my landlord installed three EVs chargers for EV tenets to use (you know, promote as “Eco-Friendly” in marketing). He does not charge for the chargers. I picked the place in large part because of the chargers. I think there has been outstanding progress. For the first year I was the only one using it but a couple of other tenets caught on that it is a good deal. Now there are about 6 of us who routinely use them.


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