By on December 27, 2014

nissan titan u.s. full-size trucksNissan USA announced on December 16, 2014, that the next Titan, the second Titan, the first all-new Titan since 2003, will be introduced at 2015’s NAIAS in Detroit on January 12, 2015.

Hardly altered since the production truck arrived for the 2004 model year, the Titan is now somewhat embarrassing. Yet while the truck never had the potential to tackle full-size pickup trucks from Ford, General Motors, and Ram – Toyota can’t either – in the same way Nissan’s Altima can outsell their midsize sedans and Nissan’s Versa their subcompacts, initial U.S. volume was respectable.

This chart shows the first-generation Nissan Titan’s market share in America’s full-size truck segment over the first eleven years of its tenure. Without heavy-duty versions, countless engine options, and myriad trim lines, the Titan was at a disadvantage before one even takes into consideration the loyalty engendered by Detroit’s massive truck lines. But when Nissan was grabbing 3% of the full-size truck market as recently as 2007, we would have guessed that they were primed to interpret that as either a reason to give up or a reason to put up a fight. They are putting up a fight, but not until next year, six years after their market share fell below 2%.

Another truck making its debut in Detroit? The Toyota Tacoma, which this year sells 12 times more often than the Titan.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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89 Comments on “Chart Of The Day: 11 Years Of Nissan Titan Market Share...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “the first all-new Titan since 2003”

    No one seriously is wondering why sales have plummeted are they? What other product with stiff competition has remained virtually unchanged for 12 years? I don’t know exactly what happened at Nissan, well I do kind of, same thing that’s happened at other auto manufacturers, stale out-of-touch management resting on past accomplishments. Nissan use to make a fine product and in many areas still do, but it’s getting spotty and Nissan is slowly becoming irrelevant. They need to “shake-it-up” or become an also ran

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      Of course without a lot of changes it ought to be pretty dang good by now. One guy in our shop has had one for a few years, he seems to like it and doesn’t have trouble with it.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      The second-gen Titan was supposed to be a reskin of the current Ram, but that idea died when Chrysler went tilt in 2008, so Nissan decided to develop the second-gen themselves. Should be interesting to see how much of the NV architecture shows up in the Titan, and how the Cummins diesel V8 fares.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      When the Japanese brought out their big pickups, they figured the US brands were soft targets. And based on competing vs their cars you’d figure that was the case. But it didn’t turn out that way.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        How could they be so wrong? Didn’t anybody check that although we hated our cars we loved our big trucks?… ‘murica!

        • 0 avatar

          Hey Lie2me. That view is so US centric it is involuntarily funny. What Renault/Nissan have been doing is integrating globally so much so muchthat nowadays even if Ghosn goes most see a bright future for the company. They have had great success and their fourth place in the global market guarantees their future. They are within spitting distance of the global big three well above the volume threshold that shows a viable business. Dont forget the US has just started leaving the doldrums while the global market was growing furiously. Nissan is at little risk of becoming irrelevant soon.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            That maybe true, but my focus was mainly their trucks and yes it’s US centric, but that’s what the article is about, US sales of Nissan trucks. I will say that as a former owner of a 4DSC Maxima, WTF happened?

          • 0 avatar

            Wont dispute that but the Titan is somewhat of a local product in that it is only sold in NA. With a diesel I think it could even scrape some sales in SA but not a lot of places else. Meanwhile the Frontier/Navarra has respectable sales and follows the longer shelf life these trucks enjoy in the global market. I think even it is now long in the tooth abd very behind. My guess is that the new Ranger, Colorado/S10 and even Amarok have shaken this market up by being very good and focused more as cars than work trucks. I think Nissan is biding their time and assessing if this new global trend tajes hold.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Nissan has been “biding their time” for 12 years. Like the 40 year old woman who’s still waiting for her boyfriend to pop the question, her biological clock is now a ticking timebomb

          • 0 avatar

            Sort of. Development is ongoing for thse companies. How fast or how much depends on executive decision. i’m guessing here but in the case of the Titan about six years ago the US economic situation and the relative non imporyance of the Titan not to mention the focus in global markets made them postpone any decisions. As to Frontier it should ve been out four years ago, but a shift in priduction sites and the new trucks has them thinking what to do i guess.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “the Titan is somewhat of a local product in that it is only sold in NA.”

            That makes it especially important to get it right and to target American tastes, since there isn’t a Plan B. If Americans won’t touch it, then it has no market.

          • 0 avatar

            Exactly Pch. I have no idea of the inner workings of the alliance but what they ve done until now is showing of the wait and see attitude. They have cash they can afford something like the Titan. I think they are marking their prsence until they decide what to do.

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          “How could they be so wrong?”

          Their previous marketing experience was primarily to the educated middle class. With trucks, they’re reaching out to multitudes of Americans who will only respond with a face full of f*ck you.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I’m beginning to think brenschluss was right about you ;-)

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Huh? I think maybe your origins aren’t sufficiently humble to appreciate the dynamic here.

            Do you chew?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Do you chew?”

            No, makes me lightheaded when I smoke and the spit clogs up my longnecks

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            *gakk*

            Reminds me of being about 9 years-old and sneaking up on my dad and brother who were re-flooring our dining room.

            I scored a hit off the old man’s can of Bud.
            But it wasn’t beer.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Lol, been there, done that, but with my dad I soon discovered to my dismay that half-empty cans of Meisterbrau made nifty ashtrays

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            Nissan let this perfectly good truck die on the vine, that’s the problem. Plenty of Americans have had good experience with Nissan products like Pathfinder and Hardbody.

            While the Big 3 and Toyota moved their trucks upmarket, Nissan failed to do so. It wouldn’t have been hard either, just a fancier interior and more premium options.

            Missing out on the V6 and Regular cab options basically cut Nissan out of the fleet market, which for trucks is huge.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      What happened is that it never met their sales targets so they had to keep soldiering it on in an attempt to amortize the costs. Corporate isn’t going to authorize spending development money on an all new truck when they are stilled “owed” a lot of money on the old one.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Seems to me a good opportunity to bring a Patrol-based truck here, since they already did for the QX80, and then the Armada, Titan, and QX can once again be on one globally-respected platform.

      It’s also crazy to think you can get the same 5.6 in a sedan if you like.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Too focused on NV line?

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The NV was an attempt as saving the Titan. It shares the same production line that was significantly underutilized and a lot of the same components. Without the NV amortizing some of the Titan’s cost they never would have been able to justify a new Titan.

      • 0 avatar
        Point Given

        There is three production lines in Canton, NV and titan are not on the same line.

        We expect the new titan to share components with the NV but not to the point of having a 2500 or 3500 series titan though.

  • avatar
    segfault

    I was looking at the incentives on these the other day, and they don’t seem to really reflect that the Titan is outdated compared to pretty much everything else on the market.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I think this is the biggest issue. If they had large amounts of cash on the hood, they might sell a couple. It seems like a decent work truck. When it came out, I remember many publications loved it. If they didn’t want to spend money developing a new model until now, they should have put some cash on the hood of the old design. I’m sure it would do great fleet sales with 8K off.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Titans start around 30K for the base King Cab. That’s stupid for a relative and foreign newbie in a segment utterly owned by the domestics.

    Whatever happened to Japan Inc.’s market-busting ways of the ’70s and ’80s? I think arrogance instilled by their success in nearly every other segment has crippled their chances at ever selling many pickups here. They must think they’re beyond having to take an initial financial hit to penetrate a segment.

    Honda appears to be the only one of the J-3 to have made an accurate appraisal of the pickup market and concluded it’s best to not even bother.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      The thing is Nissan is one of the few manufactures that offer a BOF small inexpensive SUV (XTerra) that they’ve just ignored now for years. They could/should be promoting this niche especially now that gas prices have returned to earth

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        Yep, the Xterra is both beautifully and cripplingly retro.

        • 0 avatar
          segfault

          I had an Xterra as a rental a couple of years ago, and it drove okay for what it was. The interior was dated and had no audio controls on the steering wheel (I think the newer ones have that standard). Gas mileage was crappy, even on the highway, but the most disappointing thing was that there was a rattle from the rear hatch area. I discovered that some load-retaining hooks were loose back there, and installed them, thinking I had solved the problem. It didn’t make any difference, the godawful rattle was coming from somewhere else!

      • 0 avatar
        Omnifan

        Just what Murica needs. A kidney pounding truck based SUV.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Real men only drive BOF, Argggh!

          • 0 avatar

            …like a Grand Vitara.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Grand Vitaras are pretty cool. By the time they came into their own I was into Grand Cherokees

          • 0 avatar
            formula m

            Got to the cottage late last night and had to crawl over a log in the road with my Highlander. I managed it fine but I wasn’t nearly as confident as when I drove a 4Runner. I’m sure their will be times I miss BOF ruggedness

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I hear you on the “BOF ruggedness” factor, I was taking the ‘scenic’ route to a piece of land my parents own in the sticks this morning to do some fishing, I was behind the wheel of a 98 MPV “Allsport” 4×4. It’s a reinforced unibody (a-la Cherokee) with macpherson struts and a solid rear axle. I was missing my 4Runner as I hopped along the two-track. The MPV feels somewhat fragile in these circumstances, while the 4Runner gobbles it up and asks for more. It’s funny the Grand Vitara is mentioned, as I could have borrowed my brother’s 2002 XL-7 for the trip but opted not to, owing to the MPV being shod in good snow tires and the XL-7 in well worn all-terrains.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The MPV feels fragile because it’s high school aged!

      • 0 avatar
        Drewlssix

        They should restyle it offer it only in bright primary colors or jarring special edition schemes and promote the hell out of it as a life style vehicle like the wrangler. It’ll need to come up market some though, the new wrangler is pretty nice and people don’t want to suffer for style.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Haha that could be a factor Corey, but the 4Runner is a 1996, 2 years older!! It feels tight as a drum. Both cars have pretty fresh front ends (struts/shocks/bushings)

          Heading back today to hit the same trail in my 4Runner, with my new dashcam installed, might upload the trip to youtube.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “Whatever happened to Japan Inc.’s market-busting ways of the ’70s and ’80s?”

    In no particular order: the maturation of the Japanese auto industry, the Plaza Accords, and the lost generation of economic malaise in the ’90s and ’00s.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      Yeah, they’re done except for clinging to a few segments (most of the important ones). You can only punch above your weight for so long and it helped that the big guys back then were old, fat and slow.

      But damn, they’ve made an amazing run of it.

  • avatar
    Joss

    I’m at the dealership right now for service. Not relevant to this article – but there ain’t a Quest to be seen anywhere – new or used. Not in showroom. No 1 volume dealership my metropolis. 4th largest NA city.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I remember they had a lot of rear axle issues early on, I think they used the same size Dana diff (small for a half ton pickup) as the old Jeep Cherokee.

    Pulled up alongside its high line SUV cousin the the other day (QX80) it really is looking old and bulky also.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Their pending Cummins V8 diesel sounded like a good idea at first, but now I think they really need a small diesel like the Ram 3.0.

    The V8 diesel will be the right engine at the wrong time.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I think the intention of the V8 diesel was to be able to offer something much more heavy duty compared to what they have been offering and at a cheaper development cost because Cummins had already done much of the development work for that engine. It was basically an engine looking for an application.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Agreed. They’ll definitely sell a few, but they’re missing an opportunity to fill the small diesel niche that only Ram is doing now. Soon, GM and Ford will have something to offer, and Nissan will be playing the wrong tune.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The Cummins 5.0 was rumoured to be for the Ram 1500. Bankruptcy killed that plan along with Ram/Titan platform sharing. Fiat through VM Motori, Iveco, and Case New Holland have a large number of diesel engines to chose from. The 3.0 now in the Ram was meant for Cadillac when GM was part owner. It made more sense to dip into Fiat global parts bins for and engine than buying an engine from Cummins.
      Diaz getting canned and subsequently getting hired by Nissan would of been a good fit since he would already have a good idea about where Nissan was heading with trucks. He also knows Ram’s long term plan as well as their weaknesses. I’m sure Diaz has an axe to grind with Fiat so he will target a part of the 1/2 ton segment FCA has weak coverage in. That is in the HD 1/2 ton sub-segment. A HD 1/2 ton Cummins will tap into the part of the market where guys actually use their trucks as trucks.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Nissan has Fred Diaz, Ram’s former head. With Diaz Nissan is starting to get more serious about trucks–V-8 Cummins and a new truck. Nissan trucks are so low in the market place they have nothing to lose and everything to gain. I think you are going to see Nissan make a serious revival even if they are not among the Big 3. Anything they do at this point is better than doing nothing.

    Nissan (Datsun) had the Number 1 selling compact pickup for much of the 70’s and 80’s and were the first with the King Cab (extended cab) compact pickup. Nissan should consider a replacement for the Frontier–something a little smaller and more fuel efficient. Nissan has a lot of potential in the the truck market.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Nissan during much of the 70’s and 80’s had the Number 1 selling compact pickup in America with a first in extended cabs (King Cab). A replacement for the Frontier wouldn’t hurt–something a little smaller and more fuel efficient. Nissan at this point has nothing to lose and everything to gain especially with a Cummins diesel and a new Titan. Getting Fred Diaz from Ram might turn out to be the best move Nissan has made for the future of their trucks.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Nissan $crewed itself out of fleet sales, with no regular cabs. Stup!d idea. The truck can never be taken seriously. Especially not in Mexico, where Nissan struck automotive gold.

    The Titan is just the boutique truck. For the occasional A$$hole that has to be different.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      Regular cab pickups seem to be the truck of choice only for the elderly, the cheap, and automotive Luddites. If there is any market segment to avoid it would be the “regular” cab.

      Regular cab pickups are the truck equivalent of the automotive brown diesel m/t station wagon: popular among a small hardcore group on the internet but a vanishingly small real world market.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        They look good as a little sport truck, nicely proportioned, but with a regular sized bed if you prefer carrying things outs1de as opposed to ins1de

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        “the elderly, the cheap, and automotive Luddites.”

        Funny, I’m not any of those but I only like regular cabs.

        Interesting that you perceive the elderly to be a “small hardcore group”. Don’t tell that to Pfizer, Merck, GSK et al.

      • 0 avatar
        MrGreenMan

        This seems unfortunately to be true. Ram made a big attempt with the idea of the stripped-down truck with a big hemi, but even the Express now appears to be an extended or quad cab, and 70% of Ram’s mix is crew cab, so the standard cab appears all but dead except in that old “W/T” configuration.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Don’t kid yourself. The Big 3 pickups have paid their dues to the fleet monster. They’re still paying every day. And the to cheapskates and bottom feeders. Nissan can’t skip over them and not have themselves an irrelevant boutique pickup, far from mainstream.

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          How are vast and almost guaranteed sales oppression-by-monster?

          • 0 avatar
            Drewlssix

            Who said oppression? He said dues, that means the entire production and development of the Silverado Ram and F series must account for the wants and needs of the commercial market. Slowly but surely there has been a division between civie models and commercial models though. If Nissan or Toyota wanted to make serious inroads to the domestic truck market they would have those same dues to pay. Dues in the form of larger production lines varied chassis and frame types drivetrain options and even seamingly minor things like interior and exterior bits. Fleet buyers will steer well clear of trucks sporting $500-800 headlamp assemblies. That’s why domestic trucks have grey plastic grills and bezels surrounding cheap easy to replace sealed beam lamps or basic cheap lamp housings. Breaking into our market would be a massive endeavor and cost much much money.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            OK, thanks. That’s the kind of answer I was hoping for.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Regular cab trucks have a limited market appeal. Adding more doors to the 1/2 pickup was a stroke of genius which contributed to the boom in pickups. Pickups would of remained a worker’s truck if they did not go to extended and crewcab 1/2 tons.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          “Limited market appeal” is right, except they serve an important role. The fleet buyer demands “regular cabs”, as well as a mix of multi-cabs in their fleets. But they don’t want to own a mix of brands. Say Chevy for the regular cabs and Nissan for their crew cabs. Not happening. And fleet buyers will buy trucks by the hundreds, in a single trans action.

          Regular cabs are also the “loss leader” to get buyers on the lot, before up-selling them a King Cab with easy payments. For others it may be an impulsive, last minute decision to step up to a multi-cab.

          Or the young guy or gal that starts off owning a regular cab, loves it and moves up to a crew cab of the same truck, as they prosper, open a business or start a family. Or start having grand babies.

          It’s not exactly rocket science, but Nissan is going to continue to struggle if it insists on redefining the full-size pickup market for us. They might as well kill off the King Cab too.

          But it’s a combination of factors that dictate market share. Some really don’t pop out at ya on pie charts and graphs. Nissan needs to do something to keep buyers coming back though. Fleet and otherwise. Clearly they’re ditching the trucks for something else.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            I’m still curious how fleet sales are a “monster” oppressing a truck manufacturer.

            Seriously, I just don’t understand your statement. Nothing says they can only produce one type of cab/box combo, as proven by what’s rolling out their doors as I type this.

        • 0 avatar
          Drewlssix

          Crew cabs were built decades ago. I almost scored a sweet international CC built in the mid 60s, and the others made their own CCs as well. What made the pickup desirable to non working types was fashion and a responsive market.

  • avatar

    It can’t help that the Nissan 5.6-liter V8 gets, by a significant margin, worst-in-class fuel economy.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      This is very true, it and the Tundra have some atrociously low mileage figures.

      The low highway number is due at least in part to them not participating in the current ‘race to the bottom’ of making the lowest hanging front air dam possible. I’m floored when I see a 2014 4×4 GM truck with a front bumper that doesn’t clear curbs much better than a crossover. Then again for 99% of use that is a non-issue, I guess the aesthetics just bother me. I did clip the crest of a muddy jeep trail this morning in my old 4wd Mazda MPV a few times, albeit with the plastic mudguard under the engine. I’ve been spoiled by my 4Runner’s crazy clearance. Had I been driving one of the Big 3’s latest offerings the front splitter would have been left out on the trail.

  • avatar
    th009

    Real commercial vehicles don’t get frequent updates: the previous-gen Transit was 13 years old when replaced, and the current Transporter will reach that age, too. Toyota’s last HiAce was 15, and the current Sprinter is already eight years old. And that’s not even considering the E-series that basically dated back to 1975 …

    But for pickup trucks sold mainly to consumers that doesn’t work. And it certainly doesn’t work if you don’t bother doing any facelifts or even lesser updates during the truck’s lifespan (as is the case for the Titan).

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    As the wife told the husband when he said he did not want her pregnant: “Why don’t you just pull out”? Nissan needs to do the same.

  • avatar

    So what is the size of the full-size truck market in 2014 vs. 2004? If the number of total sales has gone up (which I would suspect it has), then the number of Titan sales may not have gone down that much in actual number even as the percent has gone down.

    I wonder how many Titan buyers started looking at the Frontier and ended up with a Titan? Nissan has offered big incentives on them in the past. I was originally looking at Titans and ended up with one of the last BOF Pathfinders, because they were discounting the heck out of them 2 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      If you take the sales of the F-150 as reported in Wikipedia (so you can choose or not to believe), 2004 was a very good year for pickups. Counting US and Canada, it was over a million in 2004, dipping to a low of 495k in 2009, and back to 885k last year.

      So, it has steadily declined in market share both while the market shrank and while the market grew.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Titan sales have most definitely not gone up. http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2011/01/nissan-titan-sales-figures.html

      The full-size truck market in 2004 was worth just under 2.55M units. Should just top 2M units in 2014, up 6% or so from 2013.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    Yet, Nissan seems to hang in there without a lot of aggressive discounting. The engine is still basically a very good engine. I understand they have a lot of thoughtful if not terribly expensive features. They do discount off of heavily tricked up vehicles where the bottom-line damage is less. Still, I wonder why they bother. To get back in the game five or six years after the expiration date of their current vehicle, they might as well start over.

  • avatar

    Part of me says that Nissan are bringing in a second Gen Titan to keep market presence in this ‘cash cow’ segment. But two things make me question their logic. The first is that to become a real player in trucks it requires serious commitment. That would be a diversified product offering, including heavy duty options, various cab sizes and a trim level ladder that encourages folks to spend on the profitable King Ranch derivatives etc. Yes you could start small and expand, but the Titan name is a spoiled brand. This being the second reason to question Nissan’s logic. It has not gained much of a loyal following and it has been too long as the orphan child of trucks.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    It is apparent that Nissan is not pulling out of the truck market by redesigning the Titan and offering a Cummins V-8. Also hiring Fred Diaza from Ram is not the move of a company pulling out of the truck market. Nissan doesn’t have to be among the top three sellers to make money off of trucks, but Nissan needs to at least get their market share up. I don’t think Nissan even needs a regular cab if they offered a work truck in a King Cab with a rear seat delete. Also Nissan needs to replace the Frontier with a true compact truck competitively priced about the size of a compact truck of 20 years ago with an affordable diesel option. Even then Nissan could offer this in a King Cab and a crew cab with an option to delete the rear seat in the King Cab. Nissan could definitely sell a smaller truck to fleet buyers without having to offer a regular cab with a seat delete and not loading it with too many expensive options. Nissan has a past reputation for tough and inexpensive compact trucks and they need to have a product that serves that market even if they have to manufacture it in Mexico to lower the cost. I think a lot of customers that would buy a regular cab would buy an extended cab with a seat delete if the price was the same or not much more. I agree with Lou in that the extra doors on extended cabs as well as crew cabs created a market for trucks that never existed before.

    • 0 avatar
      Drewlssix

      Nissan is doing just that with the frontier. A re vamped hardbody for North America. Lots of Internet chatter about small trucks and how well they will sell but my prediction is a market flop or at best a niche vehicle that will quickly saturate that small market before getting dropped to the chagrin of those who didn’t buy new when they could.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    It’s truly a shame the Titan has been left to rot on the vine. It remains one of the ore decently styled trucks.

  • avatar
    slow-rion

    I had an 08 titan crew cab long bed LE. It was a helluva truck. Cowboy Cadillac for sure. At the time I just couldn’t quite comfigure a ford, gm, or Toyota exactly right.

  • avatar
    George B

    I suspect that the high gasoline prices of the summer of 2008 greatly hurt sales of a vehicle that gets 13 mpg city. Doesn’t look like Titan sales ever recovered after that price spike.

    Not offering a Titan work truck to go with Nissan NV cargo van is an unforced error. A fleet manager that has deal with both vans and pickup trucks would love to only stock parts for one brand vs. two. Just put the regular cab long bed body configuration on the existing frame, use the 4 liter V6 from the Frontier, and paint it refrigerator white. With trucks, the plain work version doesn’t cheapen the higher trim levels. Instead, work trucks help make the expensive versions plausibly authentic.

    • 0 avatar
      Drewlssix

      It seems the most popular use for the NV around here is as a parts delivery vehicle for the Nissan/Infiniti dealers. The Benze and Ford tall vans far out number them at any rate, Nissan would need to take a wholistic approach to tackling the commercial market imo.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If Nissan made a true compact size pickup and priced it below the current midsize trucks (Tacoma, Frontier, and Colorado/Canyon) it would not be a flop. Nissan would have to keep the options simple and limit it to two body styles, extended cab and crew cab, and no more than two bed sizes. There is nothing currently on the market that is the size of a compact pickup of the prior Ranger. Nissan would have to share a platform and parts with an existing vehicle. Don’t design this truck to compete on towing or hauling capacity but make it very affordable and very economical. Don’t even offer a V-6. Produce this new truck in Mexico and call it a Datsun. Many who buy and drive older compact trucks do so because the newer trucks are too big and not fuel efficient. Price this truck starting at 16k and keep the price to no more than 24k. Fleet operators would definitely buy a smaller and reasonably priced trucks and many would buy it as a second or third vehicle. Sharing platforms and parts would lower the volume for making a profit. I would definitely buy one.

    As for the Titan if Nissan does what they say they are going to do with the Cummins diesel then they might actually have a truck that would sell well enough to gain a little more market share and still make a profit. Don’t try to compete against Ford, GM, and Ram just make a better product. I seriously doubt Toyota or Nissan are losing money on their trucks, they are just not making the amount of profit that the Big 3 truck makers are making on them and they are not as dependent on trucks for their overall profitability. The fact is Nissan is not pulling out of the truck market and has nothing to lose by trying products that the Big 3 will not try because Nissan does not make most of their profits from one product as Ford does from the F series trucks. Ford does not want to produce a smaller truck that would compete against the F-150 because F-150 is their Number 1 seller.


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