By on October 13, 2014

Cadillac CUE

Nielsen, who are better known for its television ratings system than much else, recently published a report narrowing down who exactly goes for connected-vehicle technology the most.

Short answer: Men 55 and over, college degree in one hand, $100,000 in the other.

Breaking it down further, men comprised the majority of all connected-vehicle users at 58 percent, with 42 percent over the age of 55, 62 percent in possession of a college degree, and 37 percent making over $100,000 annually.

As for how all users end up in a connected vehicle, Nielsen says safety is the biggest factor, with 79 percent believing the vehicle’s technology will keep them safe on the road. Crash notifications, Internet-enabled navigation and safety alerts were at the top of the users’ list when shopping for a new vehicle.

The entertainment side of the infotainment divide also had its day in the sun, with 36 percent of users streaming audio into their car on a regular basis, 26 percent going online, and 21 percent downloading media while riding the real superhighway.

Finally, 84 percent of women who own a connected vehicle consider having their vehicle act as a Wi-Fi hot spot is important to their needs, over 74 percent of men.

Nielsen Connected Car Report 1

Nielsen Connected Car Report 2

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94 Comments on “Nielsen: Baby Boomer Men Greatest Generation Of Connected-Car Users...”


  • avatar
    jimmyy

    The last generation are still think the vehicle they drive and the image that projects is important. So, old people who went to college have the money to waste on an “image” vehicle.

    However, my generation only cares about reliable and low cost. That’s right. Cars are now a commodity, and commodity pricing is in effect.

    • 0 avatar
      jimmyy

      Also, my generation cares about safety which has nothing to do with a connected car. I get my connection from a smart phone.

    • 0 avatar
      celebrity208

      Does your generation care about spelling, grammar, and punctuation?

      • 0 avatar
        Landcrusher

        And while we are at it, does your generation all agree with you? Will they not change their minds as they age?

      • 0 avatar
        autobahner44

        +1 Celebrity 208

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          We ALL become our parents. Or in my case, my Grandfather.

          Millennials don’t believe this, but neither did any of us.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            My dad was middle age when I was born, and friends thought he WAS my grandfather. He once turned down a deal on a car because it wouldn’t go up a hill. How’s that for exacting requirements? (The hill was 8 blocks long on an an 8% grade)

          • 0 avatar
            3Deuce27

            Reg; “Wouldn’t climb a hill”

            A Model ‘A’ would climb a tree, jump ditches, clear a fire hydrant, and pull stumps, and run on shitty fuel. We haven’t ‘really’ progressed much with cars, but we have heated and air conditioned seats and _”Pleasure for all your senses” and “Distraction for none of them.”(MB website and advertising noise)_ (didn’t know BJ’s were on the Merc’ option list, maybe I do want a new Merc’), and tech packages… what a world.

            If push came to shove, I could get by with a 48′ Chevy pickup with a Necker Knob and bottle cap remover screwed to the dash, and a Pioneer ‘Super Tuner’ hanging under the dash. Under the hood, a Jimmy Six with split manifolds singing a nostalgic tune down the road and behind that a compound low 4-speed for climbing or going down really steep hills.

            And to go with the pickup a VW Bug with a Safari roof and a Blaupunkt or Becker 5-band radio and motivated by a 356 Carrera 4-pot. Both of those rigs would put a perpetual smile on my face. But, I would sure miss my NA Miata with its only option, the hardtop.

      • 0 avatar
        JD321

        No…They care about smartphone SMS. Why do you ask?
        Are you a Baby Boomer?

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      Having some Millenial guys who work for me who are now in a position to buy what they want, and just a 15 year age gap, I was thrilled to hear the following:

      1. (The guy who literally said it was an appliance) Although the one guy eventually had to settle for an I4 Camry, it was because the V6 Camrys were all sold out. Even the appliance guy wanted the V6.
      2. The guy who has had hand-me-downs has a simple list of requirements: 250+ HP, no more than mid-size, preferably AWD from RWD.

      I don’t think they really think of them just as the cheapest proposition; I think that’s a rationalization until they get money. There’s no shame in that, it’s just how it’s always been; I’ve never understood the dewey-eyed sentimentalism about the first car, because I remember it being a crap can I kicked to the curb once I could afford a nice car. However, the Millenials are, like their Boomer parents, the narcissist generation, and must believe that every thought in their heads are original and novel, even if thought by everyone back to Adam or Aristotle.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I got my mother’s Impala as a first car. In retrospect it was a very nice car and I was lucky to get it, but at the time I thought it was dull and boring

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        MrGreenMan said – “However, the Millenials are, like their Boomer parents, the narcissist generation, and must believe that every thought in their heads are original and novel, even if thought by everyone back to Adam or Aristotle.”

        Isn’t that true of every generation to some degree? I suppose the difference is when you grow out of that attitude.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Isn’t the “we thought of everything” attitude just a generational thing? I mean, have you ever met an 18 year old who didn’t think he was the smartest guy ever?

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I thought I was a lot smarter at 18 than I do at 21. I guess alcohol does kill brain cells.

          • 0 avatar
            chuckrs

            “When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years.”

            ― Mark Twain

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Ironic, I just 5 minutes ago had a kid at work show me Blink for smartphone buying from a vending machine.

    What a marvelous way to rack up a $500 monthly junk food bill without ever pulling up to a real Taco Bell.

    Keep yer connectivity. Leeches employ the same kind of connectivity.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    What the?

    Are those Cadillac gauges?

    WHY AREN’T THEY STANDARD IN EVERY CADILLAC?

    That would fix one of the approx 17 dreadful, competitive disadvantages with the ATS & CTS

    Incompetent GM.

    (Can’t fix stupid.)

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      I ran into this phenomenon: I remember getting an early drive in a fully-loaded ATS, and it had gauges like that. AWD, the big V6, every possible feature.

      Then, some time later, I saw the pictures of what they were selling. They are stuck in this mindset that you’re going to follow the ladder and be pushed up to the CTS.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      p.s. – Here are the STANDARD gauges & backseat, respectively, of a 2015 Hyundai Genesis, which starts out (pretty much loaded) at around 38k MSRP (so figure 32k to 33k w/in 6 months to a year, max) and tops out at 49k completely loaded – or 44k max w/in a year (V8, sensor-everything, AWD, radar cruise, park assist):

      http://www.automotiveaddicts.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/2015-hyundai-genesis-sedan-dashboard1.jpg

      http://thisiswhatithinkofyourcar.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/2015-hyundai-genesis-007.jpg

      http://www.automotiveaddicts.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/2015-hyundai-genesis-sedan-rear-seats.jpg

      No wonder Cadillac is getting its a$$ handed to it.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      @DeadWeight: While other folks are getting pleasure from owning & driving Cadillac cars you clearly get yours from complaining about them. Remember, nobody is forcing you to buy one.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Folks are getting pleasure from owning & driving Cadillac [ATS & CTS] cars?!?

        WHAT THE ????

        • 0 avatar
          3Deuce27

          DW, my first car was a Cadillac, a 1948 ’62’ series convertible, Maroon/Maroon/Beige top. Its options, Automatic/PW/P-Seats/P-Steering/P-top, Flathead V8. It was followed by a number of 30’s/40’s/50’s Caddies.

          My only new one was an 78′ Coupe de Ville, which I later traded in for a Buick Turbo Coupe for my new wife after she found the Chevette diesel coupe, to hard to deal with a baby seat in the back seat.

          I bought the Caddy because with the options I wanted, it wasn’t much more then an Impala with the same options, and no, I didn’t opt for the padded top, did the two-tone Black and Gunmetal Gray with a sunroof. Good looking car with some B&L/staggered American 200S wheels and wide ovals.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Ah, 78′ Coupe de Ville.

            I remember fondly the warm embrace of our 1985 Fleetwood Brougham D’Elegance on cold Michigan mornings, cosseting me as we strode on a pillow of fluff over frost heaved roads to elementary school.

            That ride was a velvet carpet. Heaven.

            I think one of the nicest cars I have ever ridden in from a quality of ride and just overall coolness factor was an immaculate early 1960s (63, I think) era Riviera that belonged to a neighbor who was a GM engineer. He also had a Wildcat Gran Sport.

          • 0 avatar
            3Deuce27

            “I remember fondly the warm embrace of our 1985 Fleetwood Brougham D’Elegance on cold Michigan mornings, cosseting me as we strode on a pillow of fluff over frost heaved roads to elementary school.”

            Nice turn of words, DW. And I guess from your comment that we are about 30 trips apart going around old Sol, but pretty close on a philosophy wrought from playing on life’s stage.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            3Duece, thanks for the high praise (really).

            I like the cut of your jib, old chap, so your compliment means something.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        @carguy

        The reason some of us give Cadillac such a hard time is we remember when they truly were the “standard of the world” and it ticks us off watching them rise from the ashes only to self-destruct again and again. I currently have two antique Sevilles and my father, a former GM exec, has had at least 20 over the years, so I know good Cadillacs and I know some awful Cadillacs. When you compare the good against the bad it’s almost insulting the garbage GM has pushed onto the public and called it a Cadillac

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          “I currently have two antique Sevilles”

          What years?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            ’79 + ’83

            http://s188.photobucket.com/user/jimbob1955_2007/media/Sevilles/000sevile_zpsd11b0be8.jpg.html

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Sheesh… you couldn’t keep me out of that ’79. Even downsized, ’70s boats are best.

            Everything about their interiors says “This is your living room with a steering wheel”.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Two totally different cars and to tell the truth the ’83 is a much better car. Sometimes I laugh at all this longing for RWD. They weren’t that great and the Seville was one of the better ones

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Which one is floatier?

            That’s all I really care about though I’ve always adored the squared-off roofline and classic 3-box proportions of the ’79. Ditto for all full- and mid-sized GM sedans of that era.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Re; “Are those Cadillac gauges?”

      CTS dash board/gauge cluster/stack/console with key on. Otherwise the Gauge cluster looks blah!

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    it boggles my mind that anyone would pay for a ‘connected’ car.
    My phone is my connection, period. My car should work with my phone. I do not want my car to be my phone, but I do want to be able to access my phone from my car. I do not need the car to have Nav, 4g, or traffic. I spend maybe 1.5 hours a day in my car. I spend 18 hours a day with my phone.

    I keep my car for AT LEAST 3 years. Why would I want mobile tech, which updates on a 6 month cycle in my car?

    Is it any wonder that old people like connected cars? They don’t think like kids do who’ve had the world in their pocket for their entire adult lives. Their idea of tech is car centric, not phone centric.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      I completely agree. A tech heavy car is not something I want either, it will be out of date in less than a year unless it’s something like the model S which continually software updates. I can use my phone for nav, a 4 g hotspot, and media streaming. All the car needs is a phone interface.

      Another annoyance of mine is the acres of buttons that new cars come with. A happy balance would be appreciated.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    I’d love it if my car could take my phone from me upon entering and put in the dash for the passenger to use. Oh yeah, and take all my passengers’ phones, too, so they all have to talk to me instead of Snapchat and Facebook.

    See, now we see the impossibility of such a scenario: I never have passengers! FOREVER ALONE

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      What you need is smartphone blocking in the car! Your passengers will have something to say to you for sure.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      If I could, without it actually being financially disadvantageous, I’d order high quality cars with even less equipment than comes on the base version.

      I don’t even want huge alloy wheels (worse ride quality, 18″ wheels are my upper threshold – I prefer 16″ or 17″ wheels for better ride quality and less expensive tire replacements).

      I don’t want Nav, Radar Cruise, lane assist, electronic brake assist, massaging seats, etc.

      I don’t even want/need auto climate control, blind spot monitoring, auto on headlamps, anti-lock brakes (hate them), heated seats, automatic transmission (huge reliability issue and I like to row my own gears), stop/start button, streaming anything.

      Just cruise, AC w/recirc, pw/pl, a nice, clear, legible set of gauges w/tach & oil pressure and coolant temp gauges, heated side mirrors & rear glass, manual trans, stability control, tilt, a decent stereo, strong brakes (ventilated discs), a stiff chassis, preferably gas tube shock (or Bilsteins), and a few more things I can’t think of currently.

      I like the act of driving.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Technology is a cover in many ways for manufacturers to not sweat the details of the bones of a vehicle.

      If I could, without it actually being financially disadvantageous, I’d order high quality cars with even less equipment than comes on the base version.

      I don’t even want huge alloy wheels (worse ride quality, 18″ wheels are my upper threshold – I prefer 16″ or 17″ wheels for better ride quality and less expensive tire replacements).

      I don’t want Nav, Radar Cruise, lane assist, electronic brake assist, massaging seats, etc.

      I don’t even want/need auto climate control, blind spot monitoring, auto on headlamps, anti-lock brakes (hate them), heated seats, automatic transmission (huge reliability issue and I like to row my own gears), stop/start button, streaming anything.

      Just cruise, AC w/recirc, pw/pl, a nice, clear, legible set of gauges w/tach & oil pressure and coolant temp gauges, heated side mirrors & rear glass, manual trans, stability control, tilt, a decent stereo, strong brakes (ventilated discs), a stiff chassis, preferably gas tube shock (or Bilsteins), and a few more things I can’t think of currently.

      I like the act of driving.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I fit all the requirements for a baby boomer man except that $100,000 part, and I have no idea why I would want a connected car. I do know I don’t want to pay the thousands of dollars they want for the option, let alone the monthly service charge.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      If you had a job that took you to different places regularly you’d really appreciate the connected part. Not only does my Nav get me to where I need to be, it tells me real time traffic, suggests alternate routes if traffic is bad, but it can also tell me where to get the best burger and the cheapest gas when I get there

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        Well I do have a Garmin I use when I travel.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @Lie2me

        My new $150 TomTom has every one of those features. And I can use it in my rental car du jour as well. And all four of my own cars. And the interface is better than any factory NAV system I have ever used. It can even BT connect to the car stereo and play the directions from the car speakers.

        Why would I pay $500-$2000+ to have this built into the car?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I honestly don’t get it.

      I’m not a troglodyte, and will use my phone/tablet (tethered) to do/find out out anything I need to.

      When driving, I want a sound suspension, nicely weighted & meaty steering wheel, bolt action manual gear lever, nice hydraulic clutch, clear & informative set of gauges, and and good outward visibility.

      I do not want to be bombarded with semi-useless to useless to distracting information, data, messages & “alerts.”

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        It’s only useless information if you know where you are and know where you’re going, if you don’t that “distraction” is suddenly your best friend. Yeah it may be redundant if you have a smart phone, but being a dedicated device it’s much more user friendly making it a far less distraction then my phone

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          How is checking a 4G tablet (with audible function, btw) any more distracting/less helpful than checking a hard-wired-in-vehicle one?

          If anything, the amount of useful information, easy to decipher/digest data/information, and ease of receiving that information on a phablet is advancing more rapidly as a technology in the personal device market.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I was comparing a smartphone to a dedicated Nav system. Tablets can be just as useful and then some, but they cost twice as much

      • 0 avatar
        3Deuce27

        Confirmation that you are a troglodyte, DW, or at least a Neanderthal.

        I fit the Nielsen profile, but I’m with you on what I want in a car plus great brakes and damn good looks with only two doors unless it is a shooting brake/SUV/CUV.

        Was talking to a Merc’ salesman this weekend about a new GLA, and he as astounded that I didn’t want the the electronics pkg and the fluff stuff, just the pkgs that enhanced performance. He stammered that it would hurt resale, I told him that I was buying the GLA for me, not the next owner. Plus it will save me about $10,000.

        Count me as a troglodyte, too, DW.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Can I be the Piltdown Man?

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            You can be a troglodyte with us.

            Based on the very excellent definition above, we rule!

            (and we actually are meant to drive, rather than shuttle around)

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          They’re really gonna’ love me when I buy my next new car, then.

          The only reason I even have HiD headlamps (which I actually do like now that I’ve experienced them) and several other features that are now standard on many cars is because I was able to get my last new car that had a MSRP of $29,xxx for $22k on the nose (including destination, plus tax & title fee) back in 2005.

          It has what I call the “essential pack:”

          Manual gearbox w/proper hydraulic clutch
          RWD
          Limited slip differential in rear
          4 large disc brakes (60-0 in 114 feet)
          Proper luminescent full gauges with digital speedo
          ESC
          Traction Control
          Decent stereo (better than most stock ones)
          18″ alloy wheels
          HID headlamps
          Magic (barely) 1 HP per 13 lbs weight ratio
          Cruise
          Very rigid body/chassis (30,000nm/degree)
          Air w/recirc
          pw/pl
          remote entry
          hHandbrake (proper one)

          It has some stuff I’m somewhat ambivalent about,bloke:

          Magnesium steering wheel
          Carbon fiber transmission tunnel
          Automatic leveling rear suspension
          ABS
          9 (I think) airbags
          some other stuff

          So, I’m all good.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          @3Duece27

          I love that “it will hurt resale” argument for not getting all the tinsel. Spend the $10K, get maybe $5K back at resale time. “But you are getting $5K more than you would if hadn’t bought it”. Hmmm, math.

          • 0 avatar
            3Deuce27

            More then depreciation, that $10,000 if you finance, adds up to a a respectable amount of treasure.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Meh – if you have good credit interest rates are in the “paying you to take the loan” area for cars these days. I would have lost money if I had paid cash for the two cars I currently have financed.

          • 0 avatar
            3Deuce27

            Reg; ” I would have lost money if I had paid cash for the two cars I currently have financed.”

            Only if you have investments that pay more then passbook or instrument interest savings.
            I always pay cash unless it is a business vehicle. No interest loans are great if you can meet the abbreviated terms, but most people have to finance at some interest rate over a longer term.

            However, making payments in a rapidly inflating economy(1978-82), is good business if the interest rate is reasonable, but usually its a wash.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @3duece27

            2x 60mo loans. .9% on the FIAT, 1.9% on the BMW (wish it was the other way around, of course). Have averaged more than 5% over the past 4-5 years on my investment account, plus of course had I taken money out to buy the cars, I would have had to pay taxes on the gains.

            I call that “paying me to take their money”. These days, even my credit union is only just over 2% on any term I care to take, up to an insane 7 years on a new car over $40K.

            Really, at these rates, given the rate of inflation you are better off taking the loan even if you are not making money in the market. A dollar five years down the road is worth less than a dollar today.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Who buys expensive cars?

    In a world where cheap cars already absolutely nail the mechanical side and 15 years of 24/7 media greenwashing has voided the correct answer of bigger and faster, what’s left for the marketers to sell you an expensive car with?

    I can’t spin the all-importance of an ipad in the dash as in any way worse than the all-importance of burgerkingring abilities that it’s replaced. But neither gives me any optimism that the next all-important checkbox is something I’ll miss having either.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Reg; “Who buys expensive cars?”

      I do, as long as I can still fund my grand kids education, though, my acquisitions for the past 12 years haven’t been expensive new, but expensive 30’s/40’s/50’s cars.

      But, I’m about to pull the trigger on something new in the $25th-$40th range or $50+ range if I buy two new cars… at least that is what my new car fever is leaning to, but I always find an excuse to not buy new, but never have that problem with a collector car acquisition. And if I pick up the 1947 ’62’ series Cadillac convertible I’m scheming on now, my new car acquisitions will have to wait another year.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        With collector cars, the re-sale value is pretty much set at what you paid for it, so even if you do end up selling it someday, you won’t lose much if any, and maybe even make a buck. That makes much more sense than buying a new car which will be worth half in 5 years.

        • 0 avatar
          3Deuce27

          Reg; ” That makes much more sense than buying a new car which will be worth half in 5 years.”

          That depends_ Collector cars are not ‘daily drivers’. Your not likely to drive them cross country or in the Winter, or haul a load of plywood or an engine out of a V12 Cadillac, or trailer your Rat Rod to Viva Las Vegas or your LSR car to the Bonneville Salt Flats, if your ‘new’ is a pick-up.

          And, yes, there is money to be made with collector cars, if, you know what your doing. But, then, there are a lot of ways to make money with cars, Nickoo.

  • avatar
    skor

    “Short answer: Men 55 and over, college degree in one hand, $100,000 in the other.”

    They are the only ones who have money to burn on this, just because they buy it, doesn’t mean they understand it, or use it. My 87 year old WWII neighbor leased a new Cadillac SRX with all the bling options that were available. I spent 3 afternoons with him tutoring him on the car’s features. He learned only the few things which are really important to him, and he ignores the rest. He took the car because it’s a Cadillac, and ‘Cadillacs are the best’.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Short answer: Men 55 and over, college degree in one hand, $100,000 in the other.”

    Cameron you left out: Little to no required debt and little to no family responsibilities at 55+. I have 30 something friends which fit the college+bank prerequisite but we don’t have paid off properties, no school debt, and already grown children.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I think they’re drawing an incorrect correlation here. The 55+ and 100k$ set have the high income necessary to buy the “loaded” version of the car, which they see as “best.”

      The tech is included in the loaded version – they don’t necessarily desire it or know how to use it. And when they “use” it, it’s most likely the stuff that’s on by default, and they don’t know how to turn it off.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Having minimal debt and no kids lets you buy nicer cars sooner. I certainly would not have $100K+ of new and used cars in the garage if I had children and/or a $500K mortgage. No kids, tiny mortgage, and a good job means LOTS of disposable income. Having a roommate helps too – $800/mo tax free is no joke these days.

      Some older guys LOVE tech though – if my Grandfather wasn’t too old to drive, he would have a car with all the latest whistles and bells. He even figured out how to use the horrid NAV system in my Mom’s Prius-V, that thing baffled me. I’m more of a Luddite.

      • 0 avatar
        3Deuce27

        Those ‘old Guys’ gave us this tech world. The youngsters are just building on that.

        I just spent a couple of weeks with a 76 year old who is all about tech. I had to teach him how to use a Sextant in case all the NAV systems failed on the boat. I shamed him into it. He use to do electronic surveillance for the NSA, CIA, and MI back in the sixties, so is well versed in electronics.

        And one of my most interesting and valued friends is 86. He did the first data transmission between two buildings(BofA banks) in downtown NY in 1948. He also was instrumental in the development of our satellite system(Huges) and set-up India’s rural satellite schooling system(the predecessor for today’s Satellite TV ) and enabled the satellite transmissions from China during Nixon’s 72′ visit there.

        So don’t think all old guys are dumb when it comes to electronics. Some of us were early adopters of HiFi/Stereo systems, then cell/radio phones, and computers. I have been using computers since 1980 and wrote programs with a TI-99 in basic for flight regimes, had to save it on tape…col! GPS, Ipod, Ipad, had them before the kids, but I still haven’t used a Smart phone, cuzz I won’t pay the monthly charge…though, I did buy one, now where is it…?

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          Kudos to you for providing some perspective.

          It sure wasn’t Gen X or younger who built the infrastructure today’s revenue-sucking smartphone and tablet ecology rides upon.

          The most annoying tech freaks I know are older than I. Eternal 15 year-olds who are hipper than their grandkids and who have the leisure and money to stay extreme.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    My next vehicle will have Radar Cruise Control, Lane Keeper and whatever other advanced tech is available at the time.

    Right now, I’m happy with my current vehicles.

    It would be nice to someday get on the highway, set the nav, set the radar cruise, set the lane keeper and take my hands off the wheel.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Reg; ” Radar Cruise Control, Lane Keeper” That technology, is the only tech option I seriously consider, since I spend a lot of late nights/early mornings on long trips a sleep at the wheel.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    Comments not posting…AGAIN!

  • avatar
    nickoo

    If I could choose to design my own car, I would want my car to have RWD w/LSD, at least 8 gears, handling package, synthetic heated and cooled seats for durability, at least 300 hp, and pass on all but the most basic tech, my phone can do all that. Chances are there isn’t anything out there besides a 3 series or C class that would fit those requirements. A mustang comes close, however I would prefer a 4 door over another coupe and I don’t think mustangs come with vinyl seating.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Who buys expensive cars?

    In a world where cheap cars already absolutely nail the mechanical side and 15 years of 24/7 media greenwashing has voided the correct answer of bigger and faster, what’s left for the marketers to sell you an expensive car with?

    I can’t spin the all-importance of an ipad in the dash as in any way worse than the all-importance of burgerkingring abilities that it’s replaced. But neither gives me any optimism that the next all-important checkbox, probably electric, is something that I’ll miss having either.

  • avatar
    jetcal1

    Okay, I’ll bite.
    I’m 53 and am fortune to meet the demographic as a family. I selected the Nav on my ST because….
    I can’t read my Garmin anymore and the screen is bigger, and voice command allows me to not take my eyes off the road. Sucks to get old.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    I can’t wait for self driving so I can knock back a couple of old fashions onb the way to work in the morning!


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