By on July 29, 2014

hipster lyft millennials

Though companies such as Lyft, Car2Go and Uber aim to help the young and the carless get around town without the need for owning a car — Uber wanting to go as far as to replace car ownership, period — the millennials eventually decide to go all in on individual car ownership.

Automotive News reports the transition from using ridesharing and car sharing services to ownership comes when cohorts of the generational group begin families, sometimes moving out of the urban core to do so. The delays in starting a family and purchasing a car are linked to student loan debt and a recovering, highly competitive job market, pushing the age of first-time buyers to the mid-20s at the youngest.

Meanwhile, those who live in cities like Austin, Boston, New York and Seattle are helping to make sharing services a success, with a projected 3.8 million users coming on-board by 2020. In turn, a total of 50 percent either sell a car or postpone buying a car, substituting ownership for sharing, leading to 1.9 million vehicles sold-off or not bought by 2020.

Though sharing may mean fewer vehicles leave the showroom, overall sales are climbing. Over 16 million units are forecast to head out onto the highway by the end of 2014 according to many an analyst. In the long-term, sharing services may also help send their consumer base to the showroom, with those shoppers looking a vehicle based on what they drove as a member of the service.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

119 Comments on “Millennials Start With Sharing, End With Individual Ownership...”


  • avatar
    alsorl

    If all the drivers looked like the one on the right. I can see how the auto sharing is such a booming business.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “pushing the age of first-time buyers to the mid-20s at the youngest.”

    Good, I beat that by ten full years. Makes me feel accomplished. Millennials don’t want to “start” being an adult – I feel this is the main reason for delay of purchase. It’s more fun to pretend you’re 18, slack off at work, make minimum payments on your debt, use public transport, and have lots of roommates. Your extra money goes to weekend road trips (borrowing your mom’s car) to go drink.

    Most of my generation really gets on my nerves. Like those women pictured. I can tell by the hat and the condo in the background that they’re most likely annoying.

    Where’s my coffee…

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      You sound like an old man trying to send soup back in a deli.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        What’s sad is that I’m 28, and I’ve felt like this for going on 10 years now.

        • 0 avatar
          cdotson

          I’m 35 and I’ve felt that way for over 20 years now.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          CoreyDL: “You girls! Get off my lawn!”

          Seriously, get a grip. The job market is bad and the median wage has stagnated for quite a long time. It’s going to take the millenials a long time to build up any kind of living standard and I expect it’s a source of frustration for them.

          I had it pretty good, most of my whole generation had it pretty good, and I make an effort to remember that.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I am a millennial.

            I’ve dealt with it like a responsible adult. It was frustrating yes – but do something drastic and get over it. My drastic thing was leaving the country for a year to teach English.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            These kids think they are something new and different in how tough they have it. Give me a break. I graduated law school into the depths of the previous recession in the e90′s. Ended up working at Staples selling computers! But I worked hard, made some connections that lead to having my own consulting business, then turned those connections into a great carrier in IT.

            The trick is the “work hard” part.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        +1

        That day, I was a marine biologist.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I knew I could count on you. I think that may be my favorite Seinfeld episode (top 5 at least). The way the ridiculous, unconnected, storylines weave together is Seinfeld at its best.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      Because their parents have “white collar” jobs (i.e. no pensions) the millennials get conned into thinking they are not the poor people for which the military exists to provide jobs, experience and education. And instead go into massive debt to work at Starbucks.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        No one has told them that the military pays for med school? As someone who had an 11B (infantryman) MOS, I recommend young people enlist, but do not select the infantry box. There are ways to go to jump school or Ranger school without being in the infantry.

        • 0 avatar
          racer-esq.

          But did being in the military leave you time to make artisanal pickles?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Alas, I did not have time to make pickles. Even of the non-artisanal type.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Me either. I worked, went to school, worked some more, and then went to college.

            Another point I wanted to make: Millennials are staying in school longer, and going post-undergrad not because they WANT to, or because they feel they will NEED it for their chosen career – but because they don’t know what they want to do. Hey, as long as I stay in school, I don’t have to become an adult with responsibilities! This works in satisfying their parents too, who stay off their backs as during school years.

        • 0 avatar
          TheyBeRollin

          Some of us got rejected by the military for health reasons. I was better suited for college and my profession, anyhow. I had already finished two years by the time the SS card came in the mail, but I was broke and thought getting my next two paid for while serving my country would be cool. That got shot down fast.

          I’m somewhat with Corey here, though – I bought my first car at 17 after getting my license, and I’ve been employed for most of the time since I was 15 (even if it was lousy contract gigs, I made sure I could pay my bills and tuition).

          Socially, on the other hand, I envy most of the younger people in my generation that have enjoyed extended adolescence and a relatively-carefree lifestyle. Some of us never had that option. Of course, I’ll be the hot ticket in the retirement home (and I’ll disregard them).

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      @Corey

      The 21-25 female crowd is somewhat brain damaged by-and-large from what I can tell from dating them, with only one notable exception out of six in the past year or so. Remember this when they exhibit the behavior you describe.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        What has caused this damage? The Facebook and The Twitter?!

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Honestly, I think its a biologic/biochemical problem. Poisons in the food, air, and water take their toll, although the continuing decline of parenting, family, morality, and the public educational system could also be a contributing factor.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            Because, you know, no other generation has _ever_ said this about the generations coming after it.

            Never, oh no.

            Are some of you people under 70? Could’ve fooled me…

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I see your sarcasm but many of the poisons I refer too are relatively new in a generational sense.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            “I see your sarcasm but many of the poisons I refer too are relatively new in a generational sense.”

            Really? Again, I think you need to get out more.

            We’ve largely gotten rid of lead, asbestos, mercury, VOCs as well as many biological toxins. The reduction in environmental lead is one of the largest factors in the steadily-dropping crime rate.

            I’d hazard that the last two or three generations are probably healthier than any that came before.

            As far as parenting: domestic and sexual abuse are also at their lowest levels in some time, as is racism and discrimination. Recreational drug use (if you include alcohol) is a wash. About the only factor we’ve reversed course on is child poverty, and that _will_ be a problem in a decade or so.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @psarhjinian

            My grandparents were born in 1918 and 1920 respectively. While yes some things have improved (such as the removal of lead from gasoline) other toxic or poisonous substances have replaced them. Between their time and mine the following has changed:

            -Unregulated chemicals in water supplies.

            “Traces of 18 unregulated chemicals, including solvents, herbicides, caffeine, metal and antidepressants were found in the water of U.S. water facilities.”

            http://www.care2.com/greenliving/18-unregulated-chemicals-found-in-drinking-water-2.html#ixzz38tYNfASH

            -Birth control in water supplies.

            “It is true that trace amounts of birth control and other medications—as well as household and industrial chemicals of every stripe—are present in many urban and suburban water supplies around the country, but there is considerable debate about whether their levels are high enough to warrant concern.”

            http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/birth-control-in-water-supply/

            -Artificial fluoride in water supplies did not exist until 1954.

            “Extremely high levels of fluoride are known to cause neurotoxicity in adults, and negative impacts on memory and learning have been reported in rodent studies, but little is known about the substance’s impact on children’s neurodevelopment. In a meta-analysis, researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and China Medical University in Shenyang for the first time combined 27 studies and found strong indications that fluoride may adversely affect cognitive development in children. Based on the findings, the authors say that this risk should not be ignored, and that more research on fluoride’s impact on the developing brain is warranted.”

            http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/features/fluoride-childrens-health-grandjean-choi/

            -Chernobyl had not happened.

            “A retrospective view of the Chernobyl accident of Apr 26, 1986 assesses the total radiation release at about 100 megaCuries or 4 x 1018 becquerels, including some 2.5 MCi of cesium-137. The cesium is the most serious release in terms of long term consequences. The total release was around 4% of the total accumulated activity of the core and compares to a release of 15 Ci at Three Mile Island. The release was then about 7 million times that at TMI.”

            http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/nucene/cherno2.html

            -Fukushima had not happened, which is still leaking 300 tonnes of radioactive water PER DAY into the Pacific Ocean.

            http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/07/us-japan-fukushima-water-idUSBRE9760AU20130807

            -GMO crops did not exist.

            “So while GM soybeans and corn thrive despite being repeatedly doused in poison, human beings aren’t faring so well. In fact, studies show that prenatal exposure to pesticides is linked to ADHD-like behaviors, slowed mental development and lower IQ scores in children. Many of these pesticides are also known to cause cancer and hormonal disruptions in humans.

            The growing body of evidence against pesticides and GMOs apparently isn’t enough to stop U.S. government agencies like the USDA from approving plants intended to be used with more and more toxic substances. In fact, a new variety of Bayer soybean engineered to be more resistant to the herbicide isoxaflutole (IFT) has just received the green light — despite the EPA’s warnings that the substance is a probable human carcinogen. IFT not only triggers liver and thyroid tumors in rats — it’s also highly toxic to most vegetables, aquatic animals and wild plants. It’s so toxic that three states (Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota) have already raised concerns about its effects on human health and the environment.”

            http://www.care2.com/causes/genetically-modified-crops-are-poisoning-us-on-purpose.html

            -High Fructose Corn Syrup did not exist.

            “Suggesting that sugar might kill us is what zealots do. But Lustig, who has genuine expertise, has accumulated and synthesized a mass of evidence, which he finds compelling enough to convict sugar. His critics consider that evidence insufficient, but there’s no way to know who might be right, or what must be done to find out, without discussing it.

            If I didn’t buy this argument myself, I wouldn’t be writing about it here. And I also have a disclaimer to acknowledge. I’ve spent much of the last decade doing journalistic research on diet and chronic disease — some of the more contrarian findings, on dietary fat, appeared in this magazine —– and I have come to conclusions similar to Lustig’s.”

            http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/magazine/mag-17Sugar-t.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

            -Oh and a bonus: HFCS does contain Mercury, the most toxic non-radioactive substance known to Man.

            “Almost half of tested samples of commercial high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) contained mercury, which was also found in nearly a third of 55 popular brand-name food and beverage products where HFCS is the first- or second-highest labeled ingredient, according to two new U.S. studies.”

            http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/01/26/AR2009012601831.html

            This is just scratching the surface.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @brenschluss

            YMMV but I see stark contrasts between the twenty somethings of today and the twentysomethings of my twenties.

      • 0 avatar
        Eiriksmal

        My wife and I graduated from high school in 2007, making us and the majority of our friends 25-26. Her female friends have done better than my male friends, honestly. I’ve got a smattering of actuaries and engineer friends, but the engineers took far longer to finish school than most of her friends with generic 4-year degrees and are still struggling to close the wealth gap.

        2/10 of her core friend group have doctorates (physical therapist and vet–the vet graduating with highest honors from Auburn’s program, to boot.) Her entire friend group was intelligent throughout high school and managed to retain their brilliance through college and beyond into professional careers.

        Mayhaps you’re finding the, er, less-abled 21-25 year olds.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’m not chasing after doctorates. Biological clocks, debt, and feminism are not on my female wish list.

          • 0 avatar
            racer-esq.

            Doctorates are great in bed. I’ve never been with a PT (BTW – that’s considered a doctorate program now?), but I HIGHLY recommend that to anyone that has a chance.

            “Feminism” is complicated. If it means that women can be successful, get doctorate degrees, and fully reach their potential it’s great and the way things should be.

            If it means slut shaming men, supporting negative stereotypes about men that it would be unacceptable to support about any other group, or trying to hold back men with the lie that women don’t get paid roughly the same money for the same work:

            http://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2012/08/16/the-gender-pay-gap-is-just-so-over/

            then it’s not so great.

          • 0 avatar
            brenschluss

            “I’m not chasing after doctorates.”

            If you don’t try to find intelligent people, you’ll probably continue to be disappointed in the quality of the people you do meet.

            If you really hold these assumptions about women with advanced degrees, I’ll go on a limb and assume you haven’t met a great many.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            Sounds like you don’t really know what you want. Which is fine, because most people don’t. My only advice would be don’t rule anyone out by being too presumptuous.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            @28
            Remaining childfree makes your life incomparably better even in good economic times. But I especially reccomend it now.

            Chasing after highly educated women tends to help with that.

          • 0 avatar
            TheyBeRollin

            Debt is the killer for me. I swear, I can’t find a girl in her 20s that isn’t at least 30k in debt. The best ones are probably 10k. Not counting student loan debt here, either.

            Bra-burning male-hate feminism is not as rampant as it once was, but I do avoid them.

            Biological clock problems only get worse as you get older. Once they hit their late-20s and until menopause, they’re crazy hell-bent on reproduction, with many trying to make up for lost time. Being a guy that doesn’t want them is difficult, especially if you are financially stable.

            The pool of women you can meet with advanced degrees is pretty small. They’re busy, they’re taken, or not interested in guys that stopped at four years… Depressing.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I love how I start these great threads and leave right after I start them (dentist today).

            @racer-esq

            Great points. My ex was threatening to pursue one because supporting herself on the BA/MA creative writing degrees weren’t paying the bills (without me of course) and some how more school debt was the answer. I would have been wiser to get out of it prior to 2013, although in truth she was very intelligent.

            @brenschluss

            I think its easy to say “its you/your choices” but five of six average people is quite a ratio, and all of them hailed from different parts of my region. Other than public education and ethnicity, they all had varied backgrounds with little in common. The girl I’m involved with now is actually quite intelligent for a elem ed major, which surprised me. We had a long philosophical discussion one evening on topics ranging from the Calvinist theory of Predestination to Schopenhauer’s ideas on the Will to Live. Aside from my Film Studies professor in college and the I/O psychologists I work alongside, most of the PhD’s I’ve met in life have been complete blowhards, I have little use for them. That and I find it trouble that such educated people are stupid enough en-masse to buy into the ideals of Communism.

            @danio3834

            Good advice, thank you. I’m biding my time another two or three years before I make a life changing move.

            @petezeiss

            I tend to hold the opposite view long term. Although world events may shape my future otherwise, I intend to eventually build a family. This will require a women of proper child-bearing age and hopefully an estate of some kind. Someone else’s debt and meaningless diplomas will not assist me in this pursuit.

            @TheyBeRollin

            I am seeing the same sort of thing, although I am counting non-dischargeable student loan debt. In two years I’ll be around 10-12K myself, although I can afford it. I agree on the 26+ biological clock factor, which is why my cut-off is 25 at this point. Even if you said to me 28CL, I really want a son of my own, I do recommend you respect the 25yo limit when choosing a wife. Unfortunately much like a beautiful automobile, a beautiful women does have depreciation costs, why incur them prematurely with a 30yo?

            YMMV but I think its best to avoid the advanced degrees. While I do think a pretty girl with an MD or Chemical Engineering PhD can look tempting: 1. If they are truly brilliant they will never need you (otherwise they were social promoted through their programs) 2. the pool of females with hard science degrees is quite small and since 3. most of the female advanced degrees are soft science, they ultimately worthless in the grand scheme of things except to SallieMae and that wench’s payments. I would recommend talking to an expert, but from what I have read over the past few years upon a marriage contact, student loan debt can become co-mingled. In some cases, YOU can end up responsible for a portion whether it was yours or not in the inevitable divorce settlement. If you’re in the now minority looking for a long term marriage and raising a family, your best bet is religious women. I’ll be looking soon enough. Paris is well worth a Mass – Henry IV.

          • 0 avatar
            brenschluss

            I’ve met a lot of people in the past year, and haven’t gotten any sense that there’s a biochemical problem with women in their twenties. If there’s a problem, it’s with everyone.

            I also wouldn’t argue that an advanced degree promises anything about a person but that they’re expert within a specific field, and probably that they’re persistent.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            @brenschluss

            A woman’s advanced degree is a pretty good indication that she doesn’t prioritize reproduction. It also suggests that her family and social circle are sufficiently educated and intelligent to leave her unpressed about same.

            Perhaps you’re unfamiliar with what’s left of the working class. The assumption that a woman must have children is still a living reality for them, like a bygone atmosphere thick with coal smoke, body odor and booze vomit.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        IMHO, all women are fundamentally crazy. It is just a matter of how well it is hidden. Some have it right out there, some have it deep down. But they are all crazy.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          Is that craziness extracted as part of gender reassignment surgery? And if so, is it stored away in refrigerated warehouses to be implanted during mtf transitions? Does it have to be cataloged by ethnicity and age to avoid accidentally queering the presumptions of people who stereotype habitually?

    • 0 avatar
      turboprius

      This is the (usual) American Liberal. Someone who doesn’t work, thinks they can get away with whatever they want, and does the complete opposite of what they preach. Most of these people from the late 80′s and the early 90′s that y’all speak of fall into this crowd. Along with minorities, how else did Obama win?

      Liberals think the government can do whatever they want for them. Pay for their healthcare, pay for their food, etc. The same people who complain at Mickey D’s for not getting enough pay should’ve gone to college and could’ve gotten a higher paying job. A job at a place like Chick Fil A or Publix sounds fun, before I get a college education. Once I graduate, I’ll have a higher paying job and will laugh at those who chose to slack now, in high school, who are on the local news at the corporate America protest at Centennial Olympic Park.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        turboprius,
        As you experience more of life, you will find that there are hard workers as well as slackers of every political stripe. In fact, here in New England, there is a correlation between higher income and being more liberal.

        Also, writing that minorities are lazy is a great way to get labeled a racist. Was that your intent?

        • 0 avatar
          Eiriksmal

          +1. Isn’t he 16? That seriously limits your exposure to the staggering variety of humans that make up our country.

        • 0 avatar
          turboprius

          I know a good chunk of liberal people that are successful. That’s why I wrote “usual”, not all. I wouldn’t actually laugh at people; I just wouldn’t feel sorry. And yes, there are some conservative slackers.

          I didn’t think that that last part was racist. I was implying that Obama got a large minority vote, and that had nothing to do with being a slacker. It may have seemed like it, but it wasn’t.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I know plenty of liberal people that have jobs and work. The city I live in is very pro Democrat, but it has the highest percent of the population with graduate degrees completed in Michigan as well as having one of the highest average household incomes. Someone must be working.

        I would also caution you not to laugh at those who have not achieved as much as you. You gain nothing, and life can change, for better or worse, in just an instant.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        I can’t wait until you graduate and learn the reality of life. Then your tune will certainly change.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Arthur Dailey, it sure did for me when I entered the workforce in 1965.

          Reality not only bites, it tears you to pieces if you’re not careful.

      • 0 avatar
        fendertweed

        “once I graduate…” ??

        Wow, you seem to have achieved a competent level of tossing Faux News-oriented attacks right and left, but I see little or no evidence of any real substantive thought or reality-based experience or skills.

        BTW, sport, I know of many unemployed and underemployed college graduates and professionals (lawyers & other postgrad degrees). So you may want to temper your self-absorbed and snarky superior tone about how far above the flock you will fly “once [you] graduate.” You may be eating humble pie before you know it.

    • 0 avatar
      Hillman

      Dang hippies and their tie dye shirts and anti Vietnam protests. Oh wait, same speech different generation. I am not sure when you all graduated college but if you graduate by 22 it may be that you use the old college hand me down for a few years. That would put you square in the mid 20s age group for your first car.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I have a law degree and did not buy my first new car until I was 31. And only then because my job paid for it in mileage reimbursement. That was about 5 years before any of my peers, so I was a bit precocious. I did not buy my second new car until I was 41.

        I dunno where it was that people frequently bought new cars in their 20s, but it sure wasn’t New England. I guess all those factory workers in the Midwest could afford new cars at younger ages?

    • 0 avatar
      matador

      I agree. I hate most people mt age, and cannot understand any of them.

      I remember a girl that I went to high school with. She financed a 2006? Ford Focus. For five years with high interest. I paid cash for a 1995 LeSabre at about the same time.

      About six months later, she sold the car at a loss. She couldn’t afford it (She was a waitress in a tourist town- October is a slow time!), and sold it for $5500. She financed it for $7000 originally.

      I still own the LeSabre (and actually enjoy it a lot). She asked me for advice on cars, and I advised her to get “something that’s easy to fix, common, and reliable”. I advised she buy an old LeSabre as I did.

      She asked me why I’d drive anything like that. I said “It’s all the car I need, and I can afford it. I enjoy it, and that’s a plus. I know it’ll get me wherever I need to go, and if something goes wrong, I can wrench on it a bit. If I can’t fix it, I can easily find someone who can”

      She apparently didn’t listen to my advice, and then financed a Mitsubishi. I think it’s for sale if anybody wants it…

      ——————–

      People these days make me wonder a bit. There’s no shame in owning an older car. If it’s what you can afford, so be it. I agree, though, millennials don’t want to be adults. I don’t think some of them even know how.

      Now, come on Corey, let’s go find an old, reliable clunker (I prefer Buicks, but am open-minded), and go get a coffee, talking about the war and the economy…

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t really buy the millennials are worse than any other generation argument. I mean basically the older generation has complained about the younger for at least a thousand years so nothing new there.

      I’m 33 but I bought my house at 21. Most of my peers here in southern New England also own houses by now (most bought in their late 20′s) I think there are changes in demographics (going to school longer living with parents longer) but I believe much of this has been caused by greater changes in the world effecting how people live and how fast the can accumulate wealth (less and less ever accumulate any at all) I remember being a teen in the 90′s back then every one called Gen X a much of Liberal slackers now every one refers to them as the tech generation give them 10 years I’m sure the millenials will be looked at in a much better light.

      Also It’s kind of funny you single guys complaining about women and not wanting kids. 25 years ago you would be complete outlier now you are just part of the larger generational trend to stay single longer and have kids later. You are actually part of this shift in society that your bitching about. Me I married at 23 and had my first kid at 26 which put me in the youthful parent category in preschool parent nights.

      Again it’s really a whole society slowly adapting to a changing world.

      For what it’s worth I have never bought a new car and not sure when I ever will be able too ( at least and feel comfortable about it)

      • 0 avatar
        Eiriksmal

        Heck, yes! My wife and I are blazing the trail in all of our friend groups. First to marry (at 21). First to have a kid (at 23). I look at it this way: I’ll only be 42 when my son moves out. 42! That’s Baruth’s age now. I plan to be a D/SINK again by the time I’m 46-48. Many of our peers will only then have their _first_ kid graduating high school.

        Personally, I feel it’s better to not have the responsibility of kids later in life when you’re raking in larger sums than when you’re a (comparatively) poor 20-something.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          “Personally, I feel it’s better to not have the responsibility of kids later in life when you’re raking in larger sums than when you’re a (comparatively) poor 20-something.”

          Yes, because it’s better to pile on more responsibility and time commitments when you’re poor rather than wealthy. Makes sense, on opposite day.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    Burt Reynolds will be thrilled to hear about the popularity of moustache rides with millennial women.

  • avatar
    hreardon

    This is yet another in a long series of “well, no sh!t, Sherlock” studies.

    I had a recent conversation with a good friend who is one of the saaviest businessmen I’ve ever met. Jack was talking about the pop-culture meme that milennials ‘don’t want to own things’ and shrugged it off for this exact reason: ‘sharing’ services is great when you’re single and don’t have to think of anyone but yourself.

    Once you have a family, however, the whole equation changes.

    For everyone? Of course not, but for a large majority it does, along with a desire to move to the ‘burbs, which for many requires a car.

    Car sharing is not much different from apartment or condo living: you have some shared expenses and some ownership/use of the property but not full responsibility. It’s not going to replace car ownership but become yet another means of acquiring a good/service.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Once you have a family, however, the whole equation changes.

      For everyone? Of course not, but for a large majority it does, along with a desire to move to the ‘burbs, which for many requires a car.”

      This is true, but I wonder if the variable is how many people of the young generation will put off starting a family until much later than previous generations, or forego family life at all. Things change with affluence to be sure, but there seems to be a trend.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I am absolutely not interested in having kids. My mom always does the, “Oh when you’re older you’ll feel different and then want them.”

        I’m like “Yeah well I’m almost 30, and still no.” I like having money, a clean car, nice non-broken possessions, spotless house, free time, etc.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Says everyone I know who is 30 or under and single.

          • 0 avatar
            TheyBeRollin

            I’m slightly above 30 and I have the exact same opinion of being a parent. I knew I didn’t want them by the time I was about 14. I don’t see that ever changing.

            Of course, between my childhood/life (I couldn’t be that cruel to someone that has no choice in the matter) and wanting to enjoy what I have left of it, having children is out of the question.

            I admit that there are some things that would make having children cool, but I can do almost all of those things without increasing the population of the planet.

            The funny thing is that the people that are probably best-suited to have children are the least-likely to have them because they’re the most likely to realize it’s a bad idea and capable of restraining themselves to avoid having them.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You know one way, if you ever feel like knowing what it is to be a parent – offer to take your friends kids out for a day. They’ll love you for it, and you’ll be even more sure ya don’t want them.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Corey-

            I don’t know about that. I love spending time with my daughter. I could spend time with her all day every day (stay at home mom with less than three kids is the easiest job ever). However, I don’t want much to do with other people’s kids. My wife says I’m a d!ck, but that isn’t the first time she’s called me that.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Well I dunno of any other way to get a real parental experience while you’re not a parent.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Well I dunno of any other way to get a real parental experience while you’re not a parent”

            Date a divorcee.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Parental experience with other people’s kids is overrated. I hadn’t changed a diaper or held a baby since 1995 and I kick a$$ at dad $hit. With the first kid, you get home from the hospital and you are still trying to figure out if all this craziness is real.

            The best thing I ever did was take ten weeks of paternity leave. I did it after my wife took her twelve weeks.

          • 0 avatar

            bball, absolutely correct. I thought I wouldn’t touch the diapers on my kid, guess what, after the first week, in which I was defecated on, urinated on and vomited on, no problem at all. It does not kill you and doesn’t bother me in the slightest. After that, a couple of sleepless nights when he was sick and would only sleep on my lap because I’d hold him a bit upright and he could sleep. He’s 3 now, and that doesn’t happen anymore. I miss it!

          • 0 avatar
            TheyBeRollin

            You know, I do this periodically. I love my nephews, but one day with them is plenty. I’d probably lose about 40lbs within a month if I took care of them all day every day. In fact, I once did exactly this when I took care of a nowhere-near-as-energetic daughter of a girlfriend a number of years back.

            The funny thing is that if I could guarantee I’d have my older nephew as a child, I would be ambivalent about having one. His younger brother, on the other hand, reminds me why I never want them.

        • 0 avatar

          Ha! A spotless house and things non-broken just means an empty house. With kids there is just that much more life in a house. Even if it gets littered with stray toys, it also gets filled with tapping footsteps and joyous laughter.

          Just saying…

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            There are challenges to be sure, but I know people with dogs that require more commitment and expense than my kids do. These are same people who know they never want kids for the reasons Corey stated. I guess it’s a bit easier to give a dog away…

          • 0 avatar

            Yep. Agree so whole heartedly with you, you wouldn’t believe. There is just no comparison. No dogs, no hobby, nothing can substitute the fullness of a life in family.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Marcelo, while I share your philosophy on family and kids, there are people in America who should not have kids.

            There is a notable trend in America among non-homosexuals, driven by a variety of factors, to delay marriage and start a family.

            No doubt one of the factors is America’s economy.

            But another factor could be that marrying and starting a family early in one’s life also denies one the joys of enjoying their youth to the max.

          • 0 avatar

            No challenge on my part Highdesertcat. This trend is worldwide. Had my first and only child at 40. Am open for more. Now that I have one, I realize I should have done it sooner. No career is worth the joy of having family. I only wish more would realize that.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            “There is a notable trend in America among non-homosexuals, driven by a variety of factors, to delay marriage and start a family.

            No doubt one of the factors is America’s economy.”

            This is pretty much the case in the entire developed world, and especially among the higher-educated.

            It’s a number of factors:
            * It’s not easy to be a single-income family anymore, not with median income dropping, ergo:
            * Completing education and bootstrapping your career is important. If this is important to you, and you’re not stupid, then you’ve looked into:
            * Birth control and sex-ed, and…
            * The deplorable state of early-childhood education and care, _especially_ in North America.

          • 0 avatar

            Yes psar agree. All those factors are felt here, but for many people, between 30-35, starting a family is doable. If they delay too much (like I did), they could be “wasting” time.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Guys, I appreciate your responses, but I’m not interested in the WHOLE world, just my little part of it.

            So…… isn’t it up to each of us, in our little corner of the world, to maximize OUR lives and those of our loved ones?

            And how do we each do this, we give ourselves and our loved ones the best care we can and the finest lifestyle we can afford.

            For those who are not ready for marriage, not even a marriage of convenience which so many are these days, why not let them do their own thing, work if they can find it, and pay more than their fair share in taxes?

            What is often overlooked is that every generation, including millennials, will have to find their own way in life.

            And they will. They’ve got to do what is best for them, in their time.

            Anyone who is in their forties and older realizes that the reality of life is a b!tch. Some pay the b!tch up front. Some pay the b!tch late in their lives. But we all pay the b!tch.

            Industry, if they are smart, will make adjustment for these trends.

            There’s money to be made. Lots of it! The popularity of the ride-sharing services doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface.

            Young people are innovating, adapting. In doing so, they overcome the financial limitations imposed on them by current economic conditions.

            I say, good for them!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            An empty house is good – that means it’s quiet. I often have joyous laughter as I watch something funny on Netflix!

            Just deep down, I have no -interest- in dealing with kids for two decades until they’re on their own. It’s hard to explain, I just don’t feel it. My life does not feel empty.

            An I’m not just saying this because I’m single. Seriously.

          • 0 avatar

            Hey Corey! I’m not knocking you or saying what you feel is not true. To some, it might even work and be true. For most though, having a family, enjoying the company of small kids, is a wonderful and eye opening experience. I think lots of us let ourselves be carried away with the very real cultural même against families and small kids. All I’m doing, or trying to do, is pointing out that, for most anyway, this idea is just wrong and having family and small kids is nothing like TV or Hollywood sells.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Thanks – I agree it’s definitely not actually going down the way Hollywood sells it! And I know it’s necessary for people to have kids, since that’s the purpose of human beings: more human beings.

            Reminds me of Top Gear:

            Hammond: My daughter loves cleaning the car with me. We turn it into a family event.

            Clarkson: Do you live in a yogurt commercial?

          • 0 avatar
            GiddyHitch

            I completely agree, Marcelo – the mess and the ruckus of little kids fill a house with a warmth like no other, and this is coming from a guy with OCD issues. Becoming a father has forced me to become a better person as well – to learn to be patient and thoughtful and set a good example for my daughters. Alas, I’m still learning. In return, I get endless amounts of giggling, snuggling, hilarious kidtalk, farting, hugs, etc. Most of the lifelong bachelors in their 30s that I know are just the right woman away from settling down and starting a family, they just don’t know it yet.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I’m 45 and I have absolutely NO desire to reproduce, AT ALL. And there are a lot of folks in my generation who feel the same way.

          Not as many as who have kids, of course, but far more than previous generations. Of my classmates who have had kids, most waited until much later in life than our parents did. Most of my friends who have had children waited until their mid-late-30s and even early 40s.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        “I wonder if the variable is how many people of the young generation will put off starting a family until much later than previous generations.”

        At thirty, my wife and I are the young parents at daycare. It seems strange, but the cost of sending someone there probably makes for a more mature couple career wise. $hit’s expensive.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I think car ownership has a lot more to do with location than maturity. Plenty of responsible, older Americans in the heart of Manhattan choose not to own a car. Plenty of immature young people in Nebraska do.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You can attribute some of those younger owners to people who’s parents GIVE them a vehicle – which is indeed very common in more rural areas (where a car is necessary). These same people are not “purchasing” a car until their later years either.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I will most likely give my daughter a vehicle when she is driving age. However, since its 14 years away, I can worry about it later.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          In high school, my grandparents gave me a loan to buy my first car – a well used one. My best friend’s dad gave him a pickup and a gas card. When he complained about the pickup, his dad bought him a used car. Both of his vehicles constantly had maintenance issues. He would conceal them because he didn’t want his dad yelling at him. Inevitably, his dad would find out and when he discovered the issue had been persistent for a week or more, he would yell at him. And the cycle continued. His dad would also go nuts when he got the monthly gas card bill. My friend Chris spent all of his freetime aimlessly driving around. After all, it didn’t cost him anything!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I don’t plan on giving my daughter a gas card or a blank check. If I look back at my last two years of high school, there wasn’t much time to work. I played three sports, had tough classes, got good grades, and was dual enrolled at a community college. If she does something similar, I won’t have an issue paying for a car.

      • 0 avatar
        matador

        I’ve never believed in giving people free stuff. I was in a unique spot. My father farmed, and had a bad year when I was 15. His old Chevrolet quit, and he had no truck. I actually paid for a Dakota, and gave it to him. I later bought an F-150 for myself.

        If you own something and worked for it, you care for it more (Or at least I think). My father let the Dakota fall apart, and I cared for the F-150. His Dakota broke, and he started using the F-150. He had that damaged in a couple months. I paid for a transfer case on the Dakota to get him out of my truck before he destroyed it!

        He’s back to beating up the Dakota.

        ————————

        Point being, I worked hard and stayed up past midnight many times fixing computers to pay for my vehicles in High School (That truck, and a 1995 LeSabre). I worked hard for them, and keep them in as good of shape as I can.

        ———————–

        @bball40dtw: May I suggest the Father/Daughter project car? If she works on it, it’ll be even more special.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          matador-

          That is probably a good idea. Again, I don’t have to worry about this for awhile, but I really like that idea. My daughter already loves to help daddy with projects around the house.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “You can attribute some of those younger owners to people who’s parents GIVE them a vehicle – which is indeed very common in more rural areas (where a car is necessary).”

        Not just in rural areas. I know several people and have relatives in LA, San Diego, Oakland, Scottsdale, Jackson Hole, Littleton, Idaho Falls, Houston, and Manhattan, NY, who did the same for their kids and grand kids.

        And this is something I (we) and just about everyone in my rural region does as well — ‘give’ our kids and grandkids transportation.

        But for those who can afford it, giving an offspring just entering the workforce a brand new vehicle is preferable — nothing fancy, but it has to be brand new with a factory warranty.

        That way the offspring are not getting someone else’s problems but have a factory warranty to take care of the potential btreakdowns.

        A friend of mine have his old VW Jetta to his daughter several years back, and the damn thing was nothing but trouble for her.

        He ended up trading that Jetta, after he paid to fix it several times, for a Hyundai Accent with AC, “el cheapo”, and his daughter still drives it today without any problems and still with several years of warranty coverage left on it. She and her husband have other newer cars, but the old Accent just keeps hanging on.

        • 0 avatar
          matador

          I’m in Wyoming, so breakdowns stink (and can be deadly in winter).

          Wrenching on stuff and working hard made me who I am. That said, my two vehicles were pretty reliable. I did have to use limp mode twice and walked four miles once, but it was fine in the end.

          I wouldn’t my experiences for any new car out there.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            Breakdowns certainly do build character. As does learning to find a decent trustworthy mechanic. It’s sad to watch grown ups who’ve never had to deal with any of these situations fall apart when they eventually encounter them.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “Breakdowns certainly do build character”

            Maybe for men and boys, but I don’t want any of my “girls” to ever have to suffer a breakdown, anywhere.

            Wasn’t this the entire thrust of the On-Star commercials? A lovely young mom and her young kiddies, stuck in a rain storm on some desolate road, at night?

            I bet that sold a few GM products! Then again, if you buy GM, you can expect to breakdown or get killed and NEED On-Star.

            Plenty of evidence for that in the current lawsuits against GM.

            At least we all have cellphones now.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “Maybe for men and boys, but I don’t want any of my “girls” to ever have to suffer a breakdown, anywhere. ”

            I’m not suggesting anyone deliberately put their beloveds in an unreliable car merely for the character building. That was just an observation.

            “At least we all have cellphones now.”

            That’s pretty much it. A warranty doesn’t protect you from mechanical breakdowns or even a flat tire. Reliability can be purchased without taking a hit on a new car.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I had to deal with breakdowns as a teenage driver. I had an Audi 5000 for goodness sakes. I am probably better off for those life experiences.

            However, I am not going to put my daughter in that position. I grew up in a small town that was just starting to suburbanize. Now, I live in a very highly populated suburban area just north of Detroit. I will do everything in my power for her not to have a breakdown. I’ll teach her how to change a tire, but AAA is like $45 a year.

            My wife, on the other hand, had a Ford company lease throughout high school and college. She realizes the good fortune it was to have a new Focus or Escape. It didn’t make her lazy or stuck up.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            It depends on where you live. In my senior year, there was a student who lived about a mile from the school, along an unmaintained road.

            For about three weeks in the spring, this was his “car” to get to school:
            http://www.oliverwhitev8.net/bigollie/1755.jpg

            Nobody looked twice. That could have been hot-wired in ten minutes by anybody.

            Half the cars out here have keys left in the ignition.

            It’s a different world, I guess. And I like it.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        I was “given” a car for my 18th birthday, with the condition that I pay for gas and maintenance for as long as I own it. Which looks to be until the wheels fall off, since I try to drive as little as possible.

        @ Matador: I can’t say if this was true for Oliver, IH, et. al., but every JD tractor up to the late 60′s had the same key, and pretty much every one from then to the early 90′s had the same too. It’s hard to make a quick getaway in a tractor, the market value wouldn’t be worth the risk, and people just trust everyone else.

        • 0 avatar
          matador

          We still have a Deere 6600 combine, and had a 4520 tractor. Both had the same key. Whenever I lost the tractor key, I had a quick duplicate made of the combine one before anybody noticed ;-)

          I think the top speed on the tractor was 17. Of course, everybody would recognize the stolen tractor out here.

          But, still, quite a different world than Detroit. Imagine the looks you’d get if you trailered one of those through parts of Detroit, much less drove it.

          Out here, we just gave the guy a few extra parking spaces.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            My father and I were cleaning out his closet many years ago before remodeling the kitchen/entryway. I came across a ring of probably 2 dozen keys, all the same, for JD 30-55 series tractors and other contemporary implements (Titan and Titan II combines, 6600 sprayers, etc.). I questioned (and still do) the logic of requiring duplicates of a key that 1.) is the same for every model, and 2.) never gets taken out of the ignition anyway! My father had no good answer.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I am in my mid 50′s, have 3 cars at home and just last month joined a car sharing service.

    There are a great many advantages. The number one advantage for younger drivers is that it covers their insurance costs. Here in Ontario a single male under 25 with a good driving record can pay up to $6,000 per year for a car that cost him less than $5k.

    Not only do they cover the insurance costs, when you do buy your own car, you have an insurance record so the costs come down. If you have no record of being insured, then the costs go even higher. And car insurance is required by law up here.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      It’s true. High insurance premiums for young people, especially in Ontario, are a major factor in pricing any car ownership out of their reach. Since you can’t amortize an insurance premium over more than a year, a young person could end up with a monthy insurance bill of over $400. That’s insane by any measure.

      Even the slacker young people that are mentioned so often in the comments here would love to have a car of their own if it was within financial reach. The operating costs are the real problem as there are plenty of cars available at a cheap entry price.

      If automakers wanted to get young people into newer cars with those low monthly payments the dealers scream about in advertisements, they should figure out a way to get these kids insured. I know VW explored such a program a number of years ago, but it appears nothing became of it. I imagine the costs just weren’t workable.

      • 0 avatar
        matador

        In Europe, the Citroen Saxo did (does?) offer a free insurance program. They’re real common among younger drivers- I’m sure this has something to do with it.

        Someone living in the EU will have to give details, though.

  • avatar
    Carilloskis

    I really dont see anyone waiting till there mid 20s to buy a car, most of my friends bought ones in highschool, i shared with my mom who had a jetta TDI and Chevy suburban 4×4 and drove which ever one she wasnt using. between my junior and senoir year of college when I was 19 years old I bought my first car a 2005 Chevy Suburban (summer of 08 gas prices where high and I got a good deal) when I was 22 and a recent college grad I sold it and bought a 2010 SVT Raptor which took me 3 years to pay off. two of my little brothers own 2 vehicles each, 98 exploer/2014 wrangler unlimted, 2001 Pathfinder/2012 Jetta TDI Sport wagon, my sister who has cripliing college debt even got finaced on a 2013 chevy cruz. My best friend is the person i know with the lastest car owner ship at 22 years old when he bought his 2012 silvarado crewcab in cash. I just dont see car sharing being that popular.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      I am assuming and forgive me if I am incorrect that you are presenting a rural or suburban American perspective.

      In large urban centres and in Europe quite the opposite is true (and you won’t find too many Suburbans in those environments).

      In the Toronto area, things used to be as you described. Now nearly all of those that I know under the age of 26 do not own cars. But many have joined car sharing organizations and these are available at many university campuses.

      The era of high schoolers in urban areas, owning their own cars and driving them to and from school has long since passed due to high insurance premiums, expensive gas, mandatory safety and emissions testing, traffic congestion, the conversion to urban condo living and the fact that there is a shortage of good used cars available. In fact many condos are built without parking spots for the owners/tenants.

      • 0 avatar
        Carilloskis

        I grew up in the Phoenix Metro area, I went to school in Colorado and currently work in Utah. I guess based on where I have lived nearly every residence has to car spots, the only time I had a problemb was visiting a friend in denver last year in the down town area whose apprtment had only 2 spots one for him and his roommate so i had to find on the street parking for the Raptor. I was the oldest of six growing up the suburban was pretty much the only thing that could transport the family especailly since my dads job took him out of state half the time.

        Also you live in the 4th most populated city in north america with only Mexico City , NYC and LA being larger. I think it has more to do with how cities are laid out than anything else, Phoenix is larger than san francisco but we have more car owner ship and use because of how the city is laid out, with more thrououghfares there is less congestion, resulting in lower accidents and lower inssurance, there is more parking and cheaper fuel, even LA its hard to get by without a car same thing with Dallas-Fort Worth which as a metor area is bigger than Toronto, and has 2 million more people than Boston but has a lower population density.

        • 0 avatar
          TheyBeRollin

          It sounds like cars are becoming like horses. City dwellers probably didn’t keep their own horses at the same time that most people lived outside cities where they were essentially mandatory.

          You really don’t want a car in most cities, especially in urban core regions. They’re an expensive liability and will almost certainly cost you more than a periodic rental, public transit, or ride sharing.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    The amount of butthurt from the older generation(s) who sincerely believe it’s just laziness that holds Millennnials back is regrettable, but not surprising in the slightest.
    Why do I bother to read things that I know aren’t going to be constructive?

    • 0 avatar
      jim brewer

      Yes. I thought they were being satirical at first. Quite a bit of woman-hating expressed here too. I wonder if there is a connection with being a gear head.

      Car sharing is a fairly straight forward proposition made possible with just a bit of technology. The need has always been apparent. 20 years ago I would have bought my college student a used car. Now $500 bucks a semester covers it. (Zip car of course).

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Whenever Caroline Ellis writes an article here, you can bet there’ll be 200+ comments eventually.

        $500/semester makes my sister’s parking fee at UNL ($200/semester) go from “ridiculous” to “highly illogical, Captain,” especially since her closest parking lot was a bus ride away, where my $76/semester meant I could see my car from my dorm on all but the foggiest of days. But I guess that’s what you get with 20K students versus 3,500.

    • 0 avatar
      This Is Dawg

      These comments, as well as any other remotely political thread on this site, rapidly turn into “Everyone that isn’t me is retarded.” That people are claiming women are actually mentally damaged blows my mind. Has nobody noticed that men haven’t understood women before? That generations don’t think alike? Ridiculous.

  • avatar
    GusTurbo

    Hopefully this helps knock down the silly trope that Millenials are somehow vastly different than their parents when it comes to cars. I’ve gotten awfully tired of hearing how my generation cares more about iPhones than driving, and how ride sharing somehow represents burgeoning collectivism among young people, or other nonsense. Owning and insuring a car is expensive. Ride sharing, where available, is cheaper than owning a car and can help you gain some of the benefits that come with having a car. Who’s to say that our parents and grandparents wouldn’t have used such a system if it were available to them?


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States