By on July 11, 2014

Mazda-2-Range-Extender1

The oft-rumored Mazda2 RE PHEV, powered by a range-extending rotary engine, may soon become reality, appearing sometime after the next-gen hatch debuts in showrooms between October and the new year.

Motoring.com.au reports the PHEV won’t be making its global debut with the rest of the new Mazda2 family in August, nor will it likely appear in showrooms where government support is lacking, according to Mazda Australia Managing Director Martin Benders:

The only markets in which you can justify bringing something like that out, to get at least a reasonable amount of volume to justify setting it up as a saleable model, are ones where there’s government support for those types of models.

Benders adds that the current crop of Skyactiv engines do a better job of reducing CO2 emissions and boosting fuel economy than the more expensive PHEV technology, with subsidies and sales quotas hindering the case for hybrids in countries where the support isn’t there. However, Benders doesn’t believe government money should be used to promote the technology, preferring the market to decide what lives and what dies.

As for the new-gen Mazda2, which will take its cue from the Kodo design language found in vehicles like the Mazda3 and Mazda6, power will be supplied by a 1.5-liter naturally aspirated gasoline engine and a matching turbo diesel; the latter will likely not make it to the United States when the new compact arrives next year.

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15 Comments on “Mazda2 RE May Appear Soon, But Only In Select Markets...”


  • avatar
    FormerFF

    “Benders adds that the current crop of Skyactiv engines do a better job of reducing CO2 emissions and boosting fuel economy than the more expensive PHEV technology”

    I’d like to see the analysis on this.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    @FormerFF: I think he must be referring to Mazda’s efforts only.

    And if that’s the case, why is Mazda fooling around with a PHEV RE?

    Just what the world needs – a hybrid whose rotary range extender leaves an oil cloud behind it.

    Nobody will buy this thing; besides the 2 is just 2 small.

    • 0 avatar
      BigWill

      “Nobody will buy this thing; besides the 2 is just 2 small.”

      Unfortunately true. However it is approximately the same size as the Fiesta hatch, a car which gets the “too small” comment a lot less than the 2 does.

      Regardless, driving a Mazda 2 with a stick makes one quickly realize that the 2 is the Miata’s kid brother.

      • 0 avatar
        ...m...

        …well-tuned suspension and steering carrying just twenty-three-hundred pounds will do that: with a manual gearbox, it’s a riot to wind around town and plenty powerful to pull through street traffic…

        …admittedly, it’s the big car in our stable, but we’ve found it extremely capacious for two adults and perfectly comfortable with four big men in both the front and rear seats…

  • avatar
    BigWill

    Not much to analyze if you look at the guy’s actual quote. From the original article:

    “Benders said that because it’s more expensive, hybrid technology could not match the overall CO2 reduction impact of Mazda’s more affordable new conventional engines, which will make the new Mazda2 up to 20 per cent more efficient than before.”

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    W-W-W-W-Wha? Rotariez??

    OMGZORS, RX-9 confirmed!

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Just stick the APU from the Abrams tank into the Mazda2.

  • avatar
    Redshift

    Well, looks like I’ll have to buy one of these too in order to complete the set.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    This should be called the 212.

    Also, if you get a flat just break out an Oreo cookie, should fit on there nicely.

  • avatar
    blowfish

    RE engines were suppose to run on constant rpm.
    the fluctuation of rpm did all those NSU RO80 in then. Some survived well when drove mainly on autobahns.

  • avatar
    SOneThreeCoupe

    But will we get the three-door? I won’t buy a small car that’s not a 3-door.

    I’m to the point where I don’t want to keep putting miles on my E36 M3, and would prefer to have something stupid economical, yet fun, to commute back and forth to work.

    The Mazda2 is light and small with good steering and aftermarket support. Add some 14×6.5s with 185/60 ZIIs and that seems like a match made in small car heaven.

    It’s either a Mazda2 (only if a 3-door) or a vintage Mini for my next daily, and I’m a wee bit more likely to walk away from an accident in the Mazda2.


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