By on July 13, 2014

I know you’ll enjoy this: noted first-poster “Bigtruckseriesreview” takes to the sky in a Cessna 172.

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71 Comments on “Enter The Bigtruck: Cessna 172...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Back story, please! Nice takeoff and landing on a beautiful day.

    • 0 avatar

      I am a member of two pilot groups inside New York City operate from JFK airport.

      My way of giving back to the community is taking high school and junior high school kids to the airport career training to show them all the possible careers they could have an aviation.

      August Martin high school, Aviation high school and a few others will train teenagers to be pilots. A filter into Farmingdale aviation colleges.

      Flying isn’t a very difficult thing once you get past the fact that you are 3000 or so feet in the sky. Being able to keep down your lunch is also important.

      There is a kid who thanks me to this day for getting him interested in engines and he is currently getting a rating on diesels.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        From the headline, I figured you had something to do with it – nice.

        I mildly regret not completing my A&P training at the Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics in 1982. I went for 9 months, but the airline industry was in a shambles at the time and job prospects were bleak. So I switched to mechanical engineering at Pitt instead, and have had a good career.

        But my love for all things aircraft remains. However, I’m not sure I could keep my lunch down; my light aircraft experiences have been middling at best.

      • 0 avatar

        That’s a wonderful thing to do for kids.

        When my niece was 7, I took her to an airfield where they gave half hour lessons for a reasonable fee. We each had a lesson, and we each did everything although of course the instructor was right there with the second set of controls. She did so well the instructor gave her an extra take off and landing.

        Years later, on a semester abroad, she went paragliding over Melbourne, Australia. At some point after that, she told me she’d gained a lot of self confidence from having flown at such a young age.

      • 0 avatar

        That’s a wonderful thing to do for kids.

        When my niece was 7, I took her to an airfield where they gave half hour lessons for a reasonable fee. We each had a lesson, and we each did everything although of course the instructor was right there with the second set of controls. She did so well the instructor gave her an extra take off and landing.

        Years later, on a semester abroad, she went paragliding over Melbourne, Australia. At some point after that, she told me out of the blue that she’d gained a lot of self confidence from having flown at such a young age.

  • avatar
    Windy

    I think jack has been drinking a bit on sat night if this is a relavent post for this site unless it is meant ad a demo on how not to shoot pov video with a rolling shutter device

    • 0 avatar

      I wrote 2 car owner reviews for you a month ago and this got there first…

    • 0 avatar
      jetcal1

      Windy,
      Where were your criticisms about the Trimotor or the Flivver? I haven’t seen any of your articles here either.
      Jack, and BT thanks for the posts.

      BT, as a aviation guy, thanks for giving back. The scene has changed significantly since I was hired to wash airplanes at the age of 11. The federally mandated fences are keeping kids out.

      There is a group here in DFW that sponsors scholarships and guest lectures at the two high schools with aviation programs.

      • 0 avatar
        Windy

        They were well written history pieces with solid links to the auto world. This was badly photographed with no textural background story.

        And I applaud big truck for his aviation advocacy work as a retired airline pilot with over 8000 hours I gave a large number of fam flights to teenagers when I was in the Civil Air Patrol back in the 1960s at the time I was working as a CFII so I was able to provide a bit of first flight instruction to them. I still get Xmas cards from several of them that went on to major airline pilot jobs or the Air Force.

        All this video needed was a line of text attribution to big truck and his work with kids and the bad quality of the video would have been overlooked.

        As to why I do not appear here as a writer of posts…. It’s very simple I do not write very well and know my limitations … Hence I restrict my activity to this comments section.

        • 0 avatar
          jetcal1

          Windy,
          Jack has strongly encouraged amateur writers here.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            I attributed the video after Windy saw it. It didn’t occur to me that people would think that *I* was the big black dude with the W222 Benz :)

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @J.B., thank you that is the best laugh I’ve had in a while thinking about someone making that mistake.

          • 0 avatar
            3Deuce27

            Reg; ” It didn’t occur to me that people would think that *I* was the big black dude ”

            Maybe the use of the limited ‘first person’ context led some us to think it was you, JB. Couple that with necessarily skipping through the poorly produced video and not seeing a ‘big black dude’, would also lead some to think it was you.

            BTSR may like us to look at what he is looking at and a helmet or headphone mounted Gopro will do just that. Don’t like fixed viewpoints, don’t fix them.

  • avatar
    j.grif

    Brilliant blue sky, puffy scattered white cumi’s, and the obvious actions and profile of flight instruction taking place, or maybe just a discovery ride or from a gift certificate that came from an FBO, this is the third article on aviation or aviation related people in the last few days, I welcome the new blog, The Truth About Planes!

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Reg; ‘ I welcome the new blog, The Truth About Planes!’

      More like ‘The Truth About the Meanderings of JB’ I thought he already had site about that.

      The ‘C172′, the Toyota Camry of the light plane industry.

      OK Break_ I will watch the video…………………… ……………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………… …………………… ……………………………………

      God, that was excruciatingly boring and I only watched 3-minutes of it. Was that a lesson?

      How about some ‘Minimum Controllable Airspeed’ to spice things up, or ‘Spin Recovery’. What’s the hour rate at that municipal airport. Most of your bucks went to power on checks, taxiing, and sight seeing. Wind was from the ‘NW by West’ at 8-12. I always land just to windward of the line on any crosswind landing, not to leeward.

      OK! Don’t think there is a future to ‘The Truth About Planes’, if that is the quality of the submissions.

      On another note, I have been in some of the most abused and misused ’172′s/185′s/210′s on the planet, flown by some of the best damn pilots on the planet. Welcome to third world travel via light aircraft.

      One flight I helped to load 10_ 5-gal cans of fuel in the back. What stinky flight that was once we managed to get in the air. Thought for sure we were going to have to buy a new house roof just off the San Pedro(Belize) airport runway.

      Did you have fun, Jack…col!

      PS! If we should meet up one day and the opportunity to take you up should occur, we can have ‘a little’ more fun. I will provide the barf bags.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Why not! It has wheels, an internal combustion engine, and less wing area than some riced out civics I’ve seen.

  • avatar

    I apologize for the low quality of the takeoff portion.

    My 720p glasses broke and I hastily bought a $24 pair of spyglasses from Toys R Us. The HD glasses take 2 weeks to get here from China.

    The next video I make will be full HD: half from glasses, half from iPhone 6 (once I get it).

    Most likely I’ll make it in a Citation Jet.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      >> The next video I make will be full HD: half from glasses, half from iPhone 6 (once I get it).

      No! Don’t fool around. Buy 1 or 2 (or more) GoPros (so you can shoot 2 angles at once) and some mounts. Then, get a “Steadycam Smoothee” kit (for handheld video) for the iPhone and GoPro. It would do wonders for the technical quality of your videos. The big camera stores in NYC should have the everything in stock so you could try it out.

      • 0 avatar

        I prefer iPhone for recording because it stores the video, effects, music, etc and with iMovie I can edit the entire video – no matter how long – in minutes.

        With Go Pros and a Macbook, it can take a very long time just to import the files.

        While I like using the HD camera glasses, it means I’ll have to get my iPhone videos to a desktop so I can blend them with the camera glasses’ video.

        I’ll probably end up getting a 128GB iPhone6 and a mount for the windshield. The problem is, an airplane’s windshield is different than a car’s.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          >> With Go Pros and a Macbook, it can take a very long time just to import the files.

          You can get GoPros with built in WiFi. While I don’t shoot with GoPros yet, I have a high end DSLR that’s WiFi enabled. I can shoot stills or full HD video and move them to my phone for editing (a Nexus 5 with Android “L” and ART) at 70 Mbps and edit them there.

          On rare occasions, I freelance for a TV station (if I’m close, have the time, and they can’t get a crew in fast enough). I can send the phone edited stills and video directly to the station. One of those big news trucks condensed onto a mountain or road bike.

          Anyway, everything transfers fast and I shoot full HD very high resolution stills. I would use a GoPro, but I need the big lenses – although, I do want to get one!

          If you want to be serious about this, you’ve got to get the equipment and take the time to do it right. I want to see you succeed.

    • 0 avatar
      tekdemon

      I thought you lived in Jersey? How come you fly out of Long Island.

  • avatar
    alsorl

    A little shaky. But a cool video of the flying VW bug. Is that a flat 4 or 6? Stick a Hemi in that thing.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      Lycoming Flat 4, 360 cubic inches. 160 or 180 hp depending on model. That appears to be an R or S model 172, so it’s got mechanical fuel injection, older models are a single carb. Dual magneto ignition system. Positively Stone Age compared to any automobile built in the last 20 years( oldest R model 172 built in 1997, though the 172A flew in the early 50′s). Engine needs rebuilt or replaced ( too many variables to list here) every 2000 hours, which could be every 2 years for a busy flight school or rental plane.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Nice view of the Robert Moses traffic circle and monument – cool perspective. My friend went to Embry Riddle in Florida to become a commercial pilot. He took us up on occasion and we got some flight time at the controls as well. Too bad the industry is as hard as it is early in the career. He made it to Dash 7 commuters before the closings, loss of jobs, etc. caused him to lose his job. This was in the 80s, but from what I understand the industry is still very hard and poor paying for the first decade of a pilot’s life. Sad. A pilot used to be a respected, high paying position. Today it is viewed as being an over-glorified bus driver.

    • 0 avatar

      Golden2Husky

      When I was a kid, the movie Top Gun made me want to be a pilot. I imagined I’d be fighting for my country, shooting down Libyans and blowing stuff up real good.

      Then I realized that: #1 in reality, fighter pilots have nobody to fight anymore, #2 there are too many rules to allow flying to be fun, #3 I could make more money and fly as a hobby and #4 I’m very tall and I wouldn’t fit in a Harrier or F-16 easily – so I can only get jet training on Kit planes or business jets.

      You’re absolutely right…many people don’t look up to pilots anymore. However, when I show kids that “if I can do it – they can do it” and I take them to JFK/Laguardia for the career days, many of them become interested in getting into Aviation. That’s good enough for me!

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        Good decision, especially when you take into account the move towards pilotless combat aircraft. You’d be sitting in a darkened room operating the aircraft by remote control.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Taxi cab driver of the sky for sure. Before finishing up my degrees in Business and Finance I spent a few years studying aviation at The Ohio State.. Between flying Chevette of the sky, Cesena150/152 and the low paid glamour of airport and administrative life I was looking for more opportunity to make money.

      • 0 avatar

        Flying is relatively easy. The harder parts are actually learning all the rules of flying and intricacy of individual airplanes.

        Essentially, learning to fly carries the same coursework, TIME and COST of getting a Bachelor’s degree.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          >> Essentially, learning to fly carries the same coursework, TIME and COST of getting a Bachelor’s degree.

          It’s not that bad. AOPA says 5k to 9k, but some schools are supposedly doing it for $3k. My son’s tuition with room and board at a top tier tech university is over $50k per year (trust me, it was more than worth the cost!).

          You can get a new LSA (light sport aircraft) and your license for far less than a bachelors – at least at an expensive school.

          http://www.aopa.org/letsgoflying/ready/time/options.html

          And check out this plane. Run the configurator and compare it’s cost to an exotic:

          http://www.fk-lightplanes.com/aircraft.php?ln=2&pg=27&af=4&idp=7

          • 0 avatar
            gearhead77

            The minimum time for private pilot is 40 hours of flight time. Most people take around 60-80 hours in my experience. Rates vary, the average is $125 with instructor.

            That’s just flight time. The theory part can be done online, through books and an instructor or a combination. Written tests and practical tests which consist of an oral exam and a flight test( the checkride) are an additional cost. I can’t see it costing less than about $8,000 allThe AOPA, like any lobby group, has it’s detractors, but it is an excellent resource to have if you’re interested in learning.

            Bachelors time and money only if you’re planning on making a career of it. Also, you’d need a bachelors degree to add to that expense if you hope to make

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          Landing is the most challenging thing to teach. You can demonstrate, talk through, assist on the controls,etc. But until the student learns the combination of sight picture, feel and judgement of height, you take a pretty good pounding. And that’s on calm wind days, crosswinds make it all whole ‘nother story.

          But one thing I do miss from being an instructor is that moment when they finally get it. They finally get a good landing, then a great one. That first “greaser”, squeaker or whatever want to call it is a proud moment for any pilot.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Reg; ” Today it is viewed as being an over-glorified bus driver.”

      To a degree, that is the case, but you can appreciate the “Bus Driver” when he has the actual piloting skills to save your life.

      Three times for me I have had high appreciation for those skills.

      The first time was heading to Jersey on a 3-hopper flight to Ft. Lauderdale. A couple hundred miles out side of Chicago the plane lost its hydraulic control of the rudder and elevators. Luckily they were in a neutral positions. The pilot came on and told us that we had a little problem and that we would be landing in Chicago to address it. The very nervous Stews prepped the cabin for emergency landing and seat belted themselves in. I was moved to one of the escape doors to assist if needed.

      I could tell that there was some issue with the empennage controls as they were using ailerons for turns and getting some skid. No biggy, but I didn’t realize till later that we had no elevator control, either.

      About 25 miles out, all empty seats in the back were filled with passengers from the front. As we came down on final I saw all the emergency vehicles heading for and lined up along a seldom used runaway.

      We landed without incident and spent 3-hours sitting in the plane while mechanics fixed the hydraulics, so I missed my connecting FLT to Ft. Lauderdale. At Jersey, they searched my bags, first and last time that has happened. I had some diving equipment in one of them, so maybe that was their interest.

      On final approach into Ft. Lauderdale, we were hit by a micro-burst coming over the threshold. Plane was flying sideways in the air just fifty feet off the tarmac and was skewing about violently. Finally after long moments, full throttle came on and we went around.

      Jump ahead ten years to this Spring and we were on final into DFW and the same thing happened, though, not as severe as the FLL incident, but pretty serious.

      On both occasions(FLL/DFW), I gave the PIC and copilot a $100 bill to buy themselves dinner.

      Bus Drivers, my ass!

  • avatar
    Luke42

    I’m glad I’m not the only a aviation enthusiast here!

    I’ve logged most of my hours in Cessna 150/152/172s, with some time in a Mooney M20C, a J-3 Cub on floats, and I’m currently working on a sailplane rating.

    My interest in cards comes any goes, depending on the kind of engineering and innovation I see happening. My current interest in cars was touched off by the Volt and EVs announced in 2006. As for airplanes, I’ve been obsessed nonstop since taking an airplane ride with my dad – it’s the coolest thing ever, despite the dismal pace of technological progress. But cars are affordable enough that I can own one, and wrench on them in my driveway – airplanes, well, not so much. I’m still obsessed with airplanes, because they fly, dammit! :-)

    But my local sailplane club fills in the gap between the unfulfilled promise of general aviation, and my means (most of which goes to mortgage and daycare/preschool) – while providing a great flying and a community of fellow pilots. It’s total win.

    If we did start The Truth About Planes, I would have a lot to say.

    • 0 avatar

      The Truth About Planes might fit well with the Truth About Guns and the Truth About Boats.

      I’d look forward to a TTAP.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        Both TTAP and TTAB sounds like fun!!!

        As someone who received an actual education in gun safety as a kid, though, I’ll skip TTAG. My dad would never have let me touch a gun if I clowned around with a deadly weapon the way Farrago did in the photos that were posted here recently, and my son won’t be allowed to touch one until he knows better, too.

        But I have been taking him to the glider field. He’s four, and already knows all of the wingrunner hand signals. He also informed my wife about the pattern when she drove out to see the field. :-)

        He’s also built a lot of Lego towplanes and gliders. He thinks it’s normal to tie two aircraft tyogether with a rope and go fly!

      • 0 avatar
        j.grif

        BTSR, I find that a merger of automotive and light general aviation would be a natural, with many people that own light aircraft also own automobiles that would best be described as non daily drivers and some are even on the exotic side, and are auto enthusiasts, to me the two go hand in hand.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        How’s that go, if it flies, floats, or something, you rent it.

        Seriously though I would love a blog dedicated to aircraft and large marine vessels.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      Another plane enthusiast here…

      It is so sad, as another poster put it, that general aviation is not more accessible because of “federal fencing” that makes flying for fun very expensive and keeps young people from exploring flight.

      I was always a sucker for light twin-engine planes. Beechcraft Barons, Cessna 310s (especially the long nose “P” series) and the King Air 200. I have fond memories of going on “adventure” trips from Texas to Alaska, horrible airport coffee and all.

  • avatar
    WheelMcCoy

    Wow, Microsoft Flight Simulator has gotten very realistic! :)

    I caught take off, jumped to the middle of the flight, and then jumped to the landing. Nice flying BT!

  • avatar
    el scotto

    -Meh- It’s not painted gray and doesn’t have a ramp. I’m looking forward to The Truth About Combat Landing Spirals! (TTACLS)

  • avatar
    turboprius

    Once I get the courage to ask my friend if I can get inside her Focus and play with MyFord Touch, then put a review of it on a website she’s never heard of (this site), this could become The Truth About White People!

    Post number two on TTAWP: Apple.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      There is already a blog like that. It’s called “things white people like” on blogger IIRC.

      • 0 avatar
        turboprius

        I’ve read “Stuff White People Like” before. I like a good amount of it, but it’s mainly an example of the annoying Liberals found in the northern and western United States, which definitely isn’t every white person. Plus, a bigger part of it is that it’s old; the newest post was written when Silly Bands were just starting to die out, and most of the stuff written doesn’t really apply anymore. Besides, Instagram only existed for a month or so!

        I live in the southeast, where there are a lot of white things barely even considered in the northeast and the west coast. Case in point? Visit the website of Mason Dixon’s. They have shirts that say “Kennesaw, GA. Stay Southern.” and stuff like that.

        I was going to make my own site on Blogger, but I have a good relationship with my fellow women. I don’t want to make them feel bad by bashing John Green, Disney, etc.

  • avatar
    Rich in Fla

    Thanks for the memories Jack. My father had a Skymaster 336 based at Republic and everything in that video brought it back.I had a key to the plane and would take dates there, fire up the lights on the instrument panel and make my moves…………….

  • avatar
    daviel

    well done!

  • avatar
    iMatt

    That looks a lot like my office did…until about a week ago. I remember in high school as part of a career project, I had to call someone in the field of work I was wanting to get into. I called a flight instructor at a local school and asked him for advice on becoming a pilot.

    His words were “whatever you do, do not become a pilot. Just don’t”. That was almost ten years ago. Should have listened.

    As a (starving) flight instructor relying on my girlfriend to live, I finally had enough. I said f*/: it, I’m going to become a truck driver.

    And that’s what I’m doing.

    I still get bitter as hell looking back at all the time and energy I spent training, working in Canada’s far north and “volunteering” at the flight schools only to be pushed around and taken advantage of by an unkind industry. I don’t know how the hell pilots think this is okay….and don’t even get me started on the working conditions in the self-regulated north. Disgusting.

    Sadly, truck driving is paying bills flying would never have been able to. I can find pride in that.

    • 0 avatar

      This is honestly why I got into the car business. Too many stories from contemporaries about working for peanuts to accumulate turbine time at some dumpy regional out of the Rust Belt. I can actually afford to fly as a hobby because of my job.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      I’m sorry to hear this. I’ve always wanted to fly, it just took half a century for me to get into a position where all the pieces came together. I can’t imagine how it’s possible for any young person to become a professional pilot these days with the 1500 hour requirement and starting salaries of $20K.

      As a student, it may seem great that there are all these young folks instructing to build hours, but many of them are just not cut out to be instructors and that creates its own set of problems. I had one of those guys, furloughed from his job flying CRJs, and it was clear that I was a means to an end. Not good.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        I was furloughed from a regional and went back to instructing. It made me a better instructor because I wasn’t as nervous. I flew in much more challenging conditions then I would have before the airline. Funny thing about flying( in the US anyway) is that instructing is a time building job for 90% of the people who do it. But we teach when we don’t have any real experience and some people just can’t teach period, but the checkride doesn’t test that.

        Sorry to hear that about your instructor. I quit flying because of a terrible instructor and then started again a few years later. I mentioned his name to someone a few years later and they laughed. He wasn’t the best instructor and a bit of a PITA but you don’t know that . And some people don’t get a chance to find out it’s the instructor, not them. Glad you did, keep flying and stay current!

  • avatar

    As someone with a PPL (earned it in 2003 – one of the last of a generation that did it in a ‘real’ plane and did NOT have to opportunity to enjoy the cost savings and modern technology of an LSA), the 172 is a much ‘friendlier’ plane to use to further the interest of the general public – the open, airy glass, expansive backlight, dual doors, pop open windows for fresh air intake, easy duck-and-get-in access.

    Contrast that with what I did my training in, a Piper PA28 140 ‘Cadet’, assuredly the battered ex-county Cutlass Ciera of the Skies. Closed-in cabin (especially older models that lacked a third side window) with no backlight, one small ‘pilot vent’ about 4″ x 3″, access that required you climb over the wing to get in, and a single heavy dual-latched door on the PASSENGER side, meaning that every first flight with a friend or – worse – young lady meant you had to instruct them how to open it (release top latch, release lower latch, jab vigorously with elbow). Flap operation in a Cessna? Slide a small lever. Flap operation in a Cherokee? Wrench up this giant bar between the seats. Also, they all have stabilators or one-piece flying tails, which bothered people more than I thought it would.

    And since that’s what I learned in, I kept renting and flying Cherokees with my friends and young ladies.

    No wonder why no one ever wanted to go on a second flight with me…

    • 0 avatar
      j.grif

      I did m private pilot license in a 152 in 1999, and later transitioned to Cherokee 180 and then the 182 and 172, the 152 is light and flickable compared to the larger cessnas, the Cherokee was a nice handling aircraft, now I fly a piper colt, simple aircraft, no flaps, selectable fuel tanks and a lot of fun.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      I had my first “$100 hamburger” yesterday. Although it was actually a brisket sandwich at the restaurant at KRDG (Carl Spatz field in Reading PA.). The joke, of course is that these days with $6/gal avgas and wet rental rates of $125/hour, it’s a $250 hamburger, but my flying club offers time in our two ancient C150s for $50/hour wet. I logged 1.9 Hobbs hours on my first solo x-country so I got in at just under $100. Not bad.

      • 0 avatar
        j.grif

        Congrats on your solo x-country and good luck on your check ride,50$ is not bad wet, that is the most logical way unless you see yourself flying more than 50 or 60 hrs per year, do not discount tube and fabric aircraft if you are in the market to buy, just be very selective of the purchase and obviously get a pre-purchase inspection, again good luck!

      • 0 avatar
        3Deuce27

        Learning to fly at a municipal airport serving a large metro area is one of the worst and most expensive ways to learn how to fly. The only good thing about it, is the proximity to where you reside and learning to deal with controlled airspace.

        Evergreen Airport in Vancouver, Wa. used to be one of the cheapest places in the nation to get training, and from seasoned older pilots. Young people would come from all over the country, singly and in groups, camp out on the field and get their training and check ride in ten days to a couple weeks for about a $1,000 or so.

        Champs and Taylors rented for $12.00 wet. C150′s for $15.00, and the 172 for about $20.00 in ’1985-2000′ dollars. Instructors charged $12.50. I had two, one was an ex-Vietnam era F-4 Phantom pilot who also was, at the time of my instruction, a Top Gun for the Air National Guard(Yes, most of the real Top Guns are older jet jocks, not the Tom Cruise punks portrayed in the movies), and the other instructor was a guy who learned to fly at the same time he learned to drive the family farm’s tractors. He was my t-dragger instructor.

        Find that rural FBO offering inexpensive planes and instruction, or a private unaffiliated instructor with his own plane, and fast track that training using your vacation time. Probably cost you less then a week in Hawaii.

        Since getting proficient in a taildragger many years ago, I have rarely flown a tri-gear, and that is usually a rental which are hard to come by today for long cross country FLTs. Rough field capability, is a great asset to have and if you own your own plane, opens up a myriad of opportunities for camping/fishing/rock hounding or that remote, off the grid cabin along a stream or on the side of a hill.

        All runways are not flat, one of my favorites is located at a friends remote cabin in SE Oregon where we have to land uphill at a 50%/25 degree grade, and take off down hill, all in about 350ft of runaway, and 500 ft of clear at 50 ft. It is near the top of a narrow canyon and you have to fly down the opposite slope then pull up the landing slope all at nearly minimum controllable airspeed. Take off is full throttle and flaps down slope with a turn down canyon when enough airspeed is attained.

        I have managed to do this numerous times in several different aircraft, all tail draggers of course, with out incident. Another friend wasn’t so lucky on his first attempt trying to follow me in, we had to remove the wings from his bent plane(gear/ wingtip/prop) and strap them to the fuselage, and have it helicoptered out. It is back flying now.

        For all you wannabe pilots, your first solo, especially if it comes early in your training, is better then your ‘first’ you know what. Priceless and something you will take to your grave.

        As my step-grandfather, an Alaska bush pilot who retired from the rigors of dealing with drunk hunters to running and FBO in North Central Washington, insisted, get spin training. If your instructor balks at the idea or refuses, find another instructor.

        Now get out there and fly something, we need new blood in the GA world.

        By the way a newly built RV-4 costs less then a new 3/4 series BMW or ATS, and will last you a lifetime.

        http://www.vansaircraft.com/public/rv-design.htm

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          You are dating yourself,sir. Renting a single engine airplane is somewhere around $100-$140 an hour, instructors are about $30-$40 with most instructors lucky to see half that as pay. There are variables to be sure depending on the market, but most FBOs I’ve been to around the country, thats what I saw.

          I learned to fly in the mid to late 90′s, the 152 was $50 an hour wet and instructors were $25. My last instructing job 4 years ago I was lucky to make 20k thanks to winter in Pittsburgh and the low pay rate. We do need new blood in GA, but the current average for private pilot license is 70 hours. 70 hours at nearly $200 an hour is not cheap. The sport pilot license to me made as much sense as the recreational pilot licenses and most new Light Sport Aircraft that are any good are over 100k. And not everyone is capable of building an RV4 or similar kit. I prefer my planes built in a factory by people trained to build them.

          Learning to fly is a challenge and an expense that many aren’t willing to take. It’s sad because it is so rewarding. I love cars and I love to drive. But if I could have loaded the family into a Cessna 182 instead of our Odyssey to go to the beach, I’d rather do that. But I’m employed in aviation, so I can’t afford to ;)

          • 0 avatar
            3Deuce27

            Reg; “You are dating yourself,sir.”… Duh!

            The dates were provided and the costs were accurate for the time period at the owner of Evergreen Airport’s FBO, which consisted of a wood barn built before 1900 with a dirt floor and an office full of airplane parts. Back room is where we recovered wings and fuselages and rebuilt engines to just help out and/or earn plane/instruction hours. Wally the owner, just wanted to get people in the air and had been doing it since before WW11.

            The fancy FBO next to Wally’s charged prices similar to what your talking about, after 2000.

            Wally is gone now(@94′) and so is a valuable community service and a great annual antique airshow. But I would bet nobody put as many people into the left seat then Wally and his instructors.

            Wally was still flying to nearly the end. In his late eighties he still flew his Jenny with a wing walker in her eighties. The FAA finally grounded that sweet performance.

            Most new light aircraft are far north of $100,000 that is why the kit market is so necessary. The litigious 80′s and 90′s killed the light aircraft industry in this country. And with the annual loss of aircraft and the offshore purchasing of our planes, we don’t have many left in the country and used prices have gone through the roof.

            In 1996 I sold a like new Cessna 150 with very low hours and with only two owners, myself and the US Forest Service(Spotting plane in Idaho), for $7,500. Try to buy one today in that condition for six times the price. Most of whats out there in 150′s and 152′s, have been pretty abused by students in the past forty years. I get all the ‘NTSB’ accident reports and follow up analysis, and structural failures of older certified aircraft are mounting.

            I would rather build a new one that I know how it is put together, then buy a beater used one that is going to also be slow and limited in its flight envelope and consumes a lot of fuel.

            As far as the RV’s and kit/scratch planes in general , you should investigate their history before making generally negative comments.
            The quality of the construction of Van’s aircraft, is top notch by guys/gals who are solid mechanics with a very high degree of professionalism and craftsmanship. They are not built by place holders in an assembly line who only know one part of the construction and are just there to punch a clock and collect a weekly check.

            As far as the RV’s and the RV-4, you should investigate its history before casting aspersions about low build quality. Opinions only matter if they are well founded.

            We are basically flying around in structural tinfoil, so keep all the shiny parts shiny, Gearhead77

          • 0 avatar
            gearhead77

            You are making inferences from my statement. I didn’t say kits were low quality, I was stating my preference for factory made airplanes. A kit plane is no better or worse than a kit car: Solely dependent on the quality of the kit and the builder, which can depend on the pocketbook. Vans Aircraft are well loved and regarded and the EAA seems like a great organization for support. It’s just not something I’m in to, though my Dad and brother are both A&P mechanics, I’m sure we could figure it out.

            In full disclosure,I don’t have any experience with kits, but I know of their capabilities in terms of speed and efficiency compared to a similar factory airplane.

            Tailwinds to you, 3deuce.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      Most of my time is in Cessnas, but I do have time in Pipers. Simple though it maybe be, I hated the flap lever in the Pipers and I hate that they only have one door. The flying tail is weird until you get used to the fact that it just stops flying faster than a fixed stabilizer. The only time that shows up is during landing or slow flight.

      My favorite was the Diamond 20 we had. Carbon fiber fuselage, long wings, 172 speed with 152 economy. Pushrods for controls and a stick, so they are very responsive and direct.The 20 is the two seat, the 40 is the four seat. My lottery airplane. Big money would be a diesel Twin Star.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    BTSR-

    Were you flying out of Nassau Flyers at KFRG? I did some training there last summer until the day I walked in and was told that my instructor had abruptly quit and that I had to do yet another “let’s send you up for an eval with ” on my dime.

    I liked flying out of KFRG, it’s about the only place left on Long Island that’s connected to aviation. I got a thrill thinking of the F-105s and Hellcats that took off from the same runways that I was using.

    I’m planning to take my PPL check ride at the end of this month. Yesterday I completed my first solo x-country and will of my long x-country on Friday.

  • avatar
    sitting@home

    I found my log book and flight training manuals in a dusty bag in the garage over the weekend. Oh for those care-free days from my twenties before mortgages, family and 401k’s ruled my financial life.

  • avatar
    shipping96

    A lot of pilots here. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised. People interested in moving machinery have all sorts of crossovers: boats, cars, airplanes, tractors, etc. I’d guess we have a good percentage of divers here also.

    I’m an Embraer 145 pilot. I have about 700 hours in Cessnas.

  • avatar
    Stovebolt

    What? A lousy video of a LOUDMOUTH flying a plane. Editorial license, and not at its best.

    Here’s a flying video worth watching:


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