By on July 14, 2014

TTAC_Muscle-Car-sales-chart-June-2014

It feels like we’ve known a lot about the 2015 Ford Mustang for years. There have been stories on its alleged weight gain, then stories that suggested the gain wasn’t nearly so bad. Its independent rear suspension makes the idea of serving global markets so much more tenable. Its turbocharged four-cylinder should, on paper, offer a new blend of performance and efficiency.

But it’s not here, and it won’t be sitting at the forefront of dealer lots (alongside The Used Car Deal Of The Day! Call Tom @ 555-4321! and its accompanying neon sign) for a few months yet.

It was therefore not surprising to see that Mustang sales in the United States dropped sharply in June 2014, even though sales of the venerable Ford had reported improved sales on a year-over-year basis in January, February, March, and May of this year. Could Ford really maintain a high level of interest in a departing pony car?

In a word, no. And yet, with 7631 sales in the sixth month of 2014, one could argue that Ford did, in fact, maintain a high level of interest in the Mustang, as they always do. Naturally, deals on an outgoing car improve as it ages. Some who perhaps thought they may want to wait for the new car have decided they prefer the current car. But 7600 units for a relatively impractical rear-wheel-drive muscle car, is actually a very high figure, if not for the Mustang itself than for cars which compete in a performance-oriented corner of the market.

Volkswagen announced a terrific GTI sales month: 1927 were sold. Subaru sold 2065 copies of their WRX and STi. Jaguar sold 428 F-Types. Aside from the Countryman and Paceman, Mini sold just 3238 cars in June.

The Mustang, Chevrolet Camaro, and even the Dodge Challenger aren’t low-volume cars. They attract lifestyle buyers – whoever they are, whatever it is they do – as well as performance car buyers. And they most certainly attract loyalists, the kind of buyers who, while acknowledging that these three cars are direct competitors, wouldn’t actually cross-shop.

After consecutive years with declining sales in 2012 and 2013, Camaro sales are up by 4360 units through the first half of 2014. If this sales pace holds, General Motors could see Camaro volume rise to a 2011-besting level, the highest since the nameplate returned in 2009. In this three-car category, the Camaro’s market share has risen from 36.7% during the first half of 2013 to 39.8% so far this year.

Since the Dodge Challenger nameplate returned in 2008, sales have always risen, doubling between 2009 and 2013, when 51,462 were sold. That streak is in danger in 2014: could the improved 2015 Challenger arrive in time for the year end results to improve from the current pace which would see fewer than 46,000 sold?

Even with its decreased volume and its third-place status in the category, the Challenger highlights the high-volume nature of this trio. FCA has sold more Challengers than Chrysler 300s this year; more Challengers than total Fiats.

The Viper, on the other hand, has clearly struggled in its latest form. June volume slid 63% to just 36 units. As for the Chevrolet Corvette, sales are booming, with 2723 sold in June and 17,744 in the first half, making it more popular than the Audi TT, BMW Z4, Jaguar F-Type, Mercedes-Benz SLK, Porsche Boxster, Porsche Cayman, and Porsche 911 combined.

Auto
June
2014
June
2013
%
Change
6 mos.
2014
6 mos.
2013
%
Change
Chevrolet Camaro
7721 7236 +6.7% 46,672 42,312 +10.3%
Dodge Challenger
4377 5101 -14.2% 26,281 29,982 -12.3%
Ford Mustang
7631 9243 -17.4% 44,231 43,111 +2.6%
Total
19,729
21,580 -8.6% 117,184 115,405 +1.5%
Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

26 Comments on “Cain’s Segments, July 2014: Muscle Cars...”


  • avatar

    It’s odd to me to compare a Challenger to a Camaro and a Mustang.
    It’s the only one that will comfortably seat 5 adults.
    It’s the largest and heaviest.

    The Challenger HELLCAT is definitely gonna do better than the Viper.

    MOPAR should have continued building the Magnum, but added optional AWD with Launch Control(the Jeep SRT’s technology).

    #2 Isn’t the Mustang a “Pony Car”?

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Why not? They’re all big, heavy domestic V6/8 coupes. The formal roofline on the Challenger gives it a little extra headroom in the back.

      The FR-S is a pony car.

    • 0 avatar

      The Viper has traditionally been WAY too much ‘work’ to be enjoyable, especially compared to a other cars in its class like the Corvette or even a hi-po Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      challenger2012

      Herr Big Truck. I own a 2012 RT. It was not cheap, and the SRT was about 15K above my car, so the Hellcat will be priced even higher. If FC prices the Hellcat just a little above the SRT or replaces the SRT with the Hellcat at close to the same price, it should sell well. A lot of the time, the Big 3 get overcome with greed and price a vehicle upon a fantasy rather than reality.

      • 0 avatar

        I know a guy who just traded-in his Grey 2014 Jeep SRT just so he could be first in line for HELLCAT.

        We don’t even know the MSRP yet…

        And he’s the second of 2 people to drop deposits that I know thus far.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Was that guy you?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’m trying to figure out why the color of the Jeep SRT mattered and why he had to trade it in to be put on the list for HELLCAT. Don’t you just go to a dealer and place a deposit?

          • 0 avatar

            Mine is Black.

            And I think I’ll wait till they put the Hellcat in a Charger or Jeep.

            But a HELLCAT system in the JEEP?

            Is man allowed that level of awesomeness?

            that would be the FASTEST and MOST POWERFUL SUV on the entire market – since the Germans are downsizing their displacement and only adding turbochargers.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Also, why did the guy with the Grey 2014 SRT trade it in? What did he trade it in for? Why not just sell it? And if he needs a car, why not wait until Dodge is actually selling the Hellcat, and THEN trade it in?

            Also, is Jaguar pissed that the Hellcat will be the highest output engine sold in cars from a British carmaker?

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        The current Shelby Mustang starts at $55K, which is practically a deal compared to the Z28, which starts at $75K. I suspect the Hellcat will be closer to the latter, given that the Dodge has always been overpriced compared to the other two.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Wow. How much extra for the Cialis package?

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I typically keep up with the obvious news on all things automotive, but had no frickin’ idea the Z28 was that much.

          75k MSRP for a fat, heavy, bloated & ugly vehicle (that already looks hopelessly outdated a mere several years after its “renaissance”) that has a laughably playskool like interior (both deign & materials)?

          These are surreal times that we are living in. There are some positive things, some very negative things, but mainly, there are many very BIZARRE & SURREAL things, and when we look back on this period, we’ll wonder aloud why anyone would pay as much as they did for a Z28, REGARDLESS as to how quickly it went ’round the Nürburgring or Burgerking.

          *All statements above are the highly subjective opinions of DeadWeight, all rights reserved. He possesses but merely one of the many opinions and arseholes that exist on planet earth. DeadWeight is known for extreme views on many subjects, and often reacts with outright ‘Pi$$ & Vinegar’ upon learning something that he previously hadn’t known, and that shocks him.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            I knew that was the rumored price, but I did check on Chevy’s website. They really do list it at $75,000. I really don’t appreciate collector-ready muscle cars. There’s something that’s just disingenuous about the whole thing.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    It looks like everyone had a down month for June, according to the graph and the Camaro had a bigger drop than the lame duck Mustang.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    I wonder how many are rental sales? Saw tons of Mustang and Camaro convertibles on vacation.

    I hope Ford has a longer 4 door sedan based on the Mustang coming soon. A cheap 3 Series competitor.

    • 0 avatar

      Better chance to see that with a Lincoln, which would be awesome and a car Lincoln could get folks excited over.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Well Mark Fields likes Lincoln a whole lot more than Mullaly ever did, so here’s to hoping. I still have a deposit ready. I will order one that is black on black and has a V8.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Ford seems to be hoping to save Lincoln by making it a Chinese brand. Will RWD V8 sports sedans make it there? Probably not, which means it won’t make it here. Lincoln won’t make anything that it can’t sell in both countries.

        • 0 avatar

          Lincoln is a brand that only appeals to people old enough to recognize the “equity” the badge held – long before BMW, MERCEDES and AUDI came upon us. The older, richer Chinese want Lincoln, but I’m sure Lincoln’s already lost its ground in China to Buick which is for whatever reason considered younger and hipper.

          In America, Lincoln CAN NOT COMPETE with Chrysler or Hyundai. Yes – that’s right. HYUNDAI builds better cars now than Lincoln.

          If you could slap “MKS” on a Genesis (or Equus) it would sell far better than it’s selling now. The Azera is a better car than the MKZ in just about every way.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Hyundai still can’t their suspension designs even remotely competitive, IMO, with the sole exception of the Sonata.

            The suspensions on their middle range vehicles like the Tuscon and Azera are really bad (the former is extremely harsh, the latter is just extremely odd), and their suspensions on their high end vehicles like the Genesis & Equus are even worse given the much higher price point (the Genesis suspension is one of the worst I’ve ever experienced, purporting to be luxo-sport, while managing to just be harsh, brittle & disconcertingly schizophrenic [we will see if the 2015 Genesis manages to set things straight in this area, I suppose], while the Equus has a ride quality that’s far inferior to the vehicles it purports to “compete” with, and that is actually not as smooth as some vehicles that cost $25,000 less).

            I agree Hyundai has dramatically improved its quality in the last decade (and especially during the last two decades), but that’s damning the brand with faint praise.

            As an aside, the Hyundai dealerships I’ve experienced (for whatever reason) are really cheesy, slimy feeling places that made me feel like I needed a shower afterwards in order to get the scum off.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            I’ve been saying for a long time that Lincoln should be licensing the Equus from Hyundai to sell it as a Town Car. Anything’s better than the MKT nonsense they’re trying to pass off as a Town Car these days.

  • avatar
    FAS

    +1

    I don’t think that’s a crazy statement. At all.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States