By on July 7, 2014

Audi S3 Limousine

The 2015 Audi A3 Sedan is doing quite well for itself in the United States since its arrival back in April of this year, even if the hipster parties during the sedan’s U.S. unveiling more than likely just amused the automaker’s traditional clientele instead of attracting younger buyers as the party plan intended.

Autoblog reports Audi of America sold 2,452 A3 Sedans in June alone, with just over 25 percent of consumers under the age of 30. That particular group of young Audi drivers are new to the automaker, brand conquests over Honda and Toyota.

As for buying one right now, there may be a line ahead of you: Audi is still stocking its dealer network with the $30,795 sedan, with a wait as long as 30 days for those wanting specific features for their A3. The line may grow longer, however, when the automaker’s A3 E-tron arrives in Q2 2015, with every one of Audi’s U.S. dealerships being granted the opportunity to sell the PHEV.

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117 Comments on “2015 Audi A3 Sedan Sales Outpacing Supply, Stealing From Honda, Toyota...”


  • avatar
    Dragophire

    Just curious as to how we know they are conquest from Honda and Toyota. Is it just the age group? If that’s the case then you can add Nissan, Hyundai, Mazda and a few others. Is it trade ins? If so this a better indicator along with real numbers…

    • 0 avatar
      sitting@home

      I would suspect someone of that age buying this class of car has completely skipped Honda and Toyota (as new cars). They’ve gone from a college crap mobile to a sensible/reliable used vehicle while finding their feet and paying off student debts. Now 3-4 years into a fast track career, with no debts nor family, they jump straight to the prestigious brand as their first new car.

      Been there, done that (if you can call Acura prestigious).

      • 0 avatar
        oldfatandrich

        No, the Acura brand is not prestigious. In fact, Acura itself doesn’t know what it is.

        • 0 avatar
          hifi

          It wasn’t too long ago that Acura was a legitimate premium brand… but never “luxury.” There was a point where all of my friends bought an Integra or TSX as soon as they landed a middle management job.

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        My experience with Acura and the dealer is that they want to sell you a nicer Honda. I don’t know how to categorize it either but in general that’s about it.

  • avatar

    Who cares about Toyota or Honda?

    Show me sales comparisons of A3 vs. CLA vs. 238i.

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      2 series is a coupe. Would those sales be compared to CLA and A3 ? I drove the base A3 and feels much more organized and planned over the cla.

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        I,too, think a more direct competitor is the CLA. if outselling the CLA, would it be because the A3 seems like a real Audi, and the CLA seems like a car Honda would typically build and not really perceived as a true Mercedes.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    A waiting list for a mass market entry level luxury car should be the last nail in the coffin of the recovery/recession – especially considering the oft lamented demographic of unemployable recent college grads making up a large portion of the buyers.
    Let’s hope the mainstream media starts to realize this soon.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Waingrow

      How you can extrapolate from the sale of 2452 particular cars a conclusion about the unemployment problem of younger people in this country, is breathtakingly astounding (not wanting to exaggerate). I’m certainly a fan of inductive reasoning, but c’m on. Also, Mr. Ark, “last nail in the coffin” and mainstream media” are cliches that should be “put to bed”.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        He’s not extrapolating, he’s putting two facts together (waiting list for entry level lux + employment prospects for recent grads) and reaching a conclusion. He can be totally wrong about the connection and/or conclusion, and he could have worded it better, but he’s not creating one fact from another.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      The economy is crap.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Landark,
      The Dow is at 17,000, unemployment at 6% and the economy keeps growing. Have you read a paper in the last 6 years?

      • 0 avatar
        cartunez

        Actually @VoGo the US economy has shrunk, the unemployment you speak of is now based on the measurement of people that were getting unemployment benefits but can no longer get them, real inflation has been running at over 9% a year (or more), and unemployment fell to 6.1%, but the broader unemployment measure, U-6, barely budged, at 12.4%. The reason the Dow is up is that people on fixed incomes are being killed by the FED 0% interest and are in the stock market looking for returns since they can get any money from their savings. Even with super low interest rates most industries are having problems selling their wares from homes to autos. Of course there are some bright spots in the economy as is usually the case but the overall health of the US economy is critical. Regarding the Audi…I am raiding my piggy bank for the 707HP beast :)

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Cartunez,
          In a word: “NO”. Your data is selective and just plain wrong.
          – The economy shrunk in the first quarter due to the extraordinary weather. Economists and analysts discount that single data point fully. The economy continues to expand, as it has since just after Bush left office.
          – Inflation has been at ~2% for many years. Your 9% number is not close to being correct.
          – Unemployment at 5% has traditionally been viewed as full employment. That we are down to 6.1% shows that the economy is getting close to reaching that point, and already has in many regions.

          If you truly think the overall health of the US economy is in critical condition, you simply have not experienced times of real hardship.

          • 0 avatar
            jpolicke

            I don’t care what the official inflation rate is declared to be, all I know is that prices for necessities have gone up a hell of a lot more than 2%.

            That 6.1% unemployment figure ignores the fact that we have the lowest labor force participation rate in history, just as it ignores that the majority of the recently created jobs are part-time.

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            I have a bright pink unicorn to sell you.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “we have the lowest labor force participation rate in history”

            That isn’t even close to being accurate.

            Are you guys aware of a website called Google, or is it just easier for you to make stuff up as you go along?

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS11300000

            We have the lowest labor participation rate since 1978, and it has been falling ever since we elected a campus radical to run us into the ground. Inflation is ‘low,’ but commodities, food, and energy have skyrocketed. What percentage of Americans are shopping for any of the goods whose prices have been flat when all their necessities have been turned into luxury goods by the suicide king?

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            For those who aren’t familiar with U6.

            http://www.portalseven.com/employment/unemployment_rate_u6.jsp

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I’m beginning to see the problem with conservatives: A lack of literacy.

            The labor force participation rate peaked in early 2000. It declined during the Bush 43 administration, falling by 1.5% during his time in office. Even the housing bubble during his term didn’t increase it.

            Yet it’s only now that you want to complain about it. Your whining is quite selective, to say the least.

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            @ Pch101 I am not a conservative. Please don’t tell me you think this is a red/blue issue. The only difference between the two party system in this country are the names.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            A guy who believes that the US inflation rate is running at 9% does not deserve to be taken seriously.

            While you’re at it, you might want to learn a bit more about the U6 rate. (Hint: There are some people who have jobs who are counted as unemployed using the U6 methodology.)

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            @ PCH nice attempt at spin but let me post it since reading and comprehension are not your strong suit.

            What is U6 unemployment rate ?
            The U6 unemployment rate counts not only people without work seeking full-time employment (the more familiar U-3 rate), but also counts “marginally attached workers and those working part-time for economic reasons.”

            Note that some of these part-time workers counted as employed by U-3 could be working as little as an hour a week. And the “marginally attached workers” include those who have gotten discouraged and stopped looking, but still want to work. The age considered for this calculation is 16 years and over

            U6:
            This augments U5 by including part-time workers to the unemployment rate calculation. The addition of part-time workers adds a full 2-3 percentage points to the official unemployment rate. This measure of unemployment is perhaps the most comprehensive measure of labor resource unemployment available.

            - See more at: http://www.portalseven.com/employment/unemployment_rate_u6.jsp#sthash.k3DjwAag.dpuf

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            CJinSD
            1. You were very selective in your choice of data set. If you look at ALL the data, you will see that in the 1950′s and 1960′s, labor participation was around 58%. Then it moved up to around 66% in the 1990′s and is now at 63%.

            2. These changes have more to do with demographics (i.e. baby boomer generation) and the inclusion of women and minorities in the workforce than anything else.

            3. The recent reduction may be the result of the Great Recession, or it may be part of a longer term trend.

            4. In no case has any well reputed economist (i.e., not a political hack) made a convincing argument that this is caused by our current president.

            5. The CPI takes into account food, energy and whatever consumers typically purchase. You may be confused by the fact that many traders exclude those two when looking at the monthly number, because they tend to be volatile.

            5. You have every right to disagree with Obama’s policies, but when you disrespect our president with schoolyard insults, you disrespect America.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            You have to love the internet age, where facts are resented as “spin.”

            The U6 rate includes some employed workers. That’s just a fact.

            To understand data, it is necessary to put it into context. There is a reason why there are six unemployment rates, and not just one — by reviewing all of them, we can get a better sense of the overall picture.

            You’re only referring to U6 because you’re a doom-and-gloom monger, and the U6 rate will always be the highest of the six unemployment rates, given the methodology. You want the numbers to be bad, and are excited to either misinterpret them or else make them up entirely when misinterpretation alone isn’t bad enough.

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            I yield VoGo. Clearly real inflation is only 2%. You win the economy is great. I will ignore all the physical evidence around me and drink your koolaid. There is no place like home….

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            Thanks for your posting @geeber. But actual experience can’t convince this crowd. If you grocery shop you see it everyday.

        • 0 avatar
          challenger2012

          Sir No doubt you are getting your data from FOXNEWS. But if what you say is true, then how do you explain the car and truck sales that are close to a projected 16,000,000 for this year. If the economy were as bad as you state, then why are people buying new vehicles instead of keeping their old ones as they did in the 2008-2010 years? If I were concerned about my job, I would keep my current vehicle until I was sure my finances were sound. It seems close to 16,000,000 people think their finances are sound enough to guy a new vehicle. And ideas as to this buying trend?

          • 0 avatar
            JD23

            “It seems close to 16,000,000 people think their finances are sound enough to guy a new vehicle.”

            Plenty of people thought their finances were sound enough to buy houses with a 3% down ARM near the height of the housing bubble.

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            I don’t watch the news at all. I look at the hard data that companies report. But hey if the economy is going great for you then I am happy but please don’t run around telling people things are fine when things are definitely not. Regarding 16 million people do you notice the credit quality of the people you are referring too? Most of the jobs being provided right now are part time low wage jobs.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            You self-identify when you use Foxnews in a discussion. When accompanied by insults to those who disagree, the discussion is poisoned.

            Let’s talk about that A3!

        • 0 avatar
          jmo

          A 2004 Camry LE had an MSRP of $19,875 a 2014 Camry LE has an MSRP of 23,850.

          19,875 with 2% inflation would be 24,227 in 10 years. So, inflation has been slightly below 2%/year.

          If inflation were running at 9%, as you claim, that Camry would be $47,951.

          So, please do us all a favor and spare us your paranoid ranting.

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            I really shouldn’t even respond to you..but I am a glutton for punishment. I was speaking about since the last “correction” not 10 years ago. Go back to the auto website and give me the cost of automobiles from say 2007 to now. Please take into account currency fluctuations and in which country said product in being produced. Please review commodity prices, food, energy, etc etc and tell me again inflation is only running 2%. “The ignorant fear the truth”

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            Ok Cartunes,

            A 2007 Camry LE (which as you know is made in the USA) was 20,500 a 2014 is 23,850.

            20,500 2% inflation for 7 years = 23,548.06.

            So, about 2%.

            Is a Camry made out of spit and unicorn farts? No, its made of out steel and glass and plastic and a large input of energy. And yet, only 2% price increase per year.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Cartunez,
            So what you are asking for is an index that looks at a basket of goods which are representative of what consumers buy, and then that a nonpartisan group of economists check the prices of those goods periodically to see how they change?

            Yeah, someone actually thought of that already and called it the Consumer Price Index. It has been showing inflation at ~2% for many years now.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            Just because the price of a brand-new Camry hasn’t increased by 9 percent annually doesn’t mean that other goods and services can’t increase at a faster rate. The inflation rate does not apply equally to every good or service.

            Food prices are definitely up:

            http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2014/04/16/cpi-shows-food-prices-rising/7742669/

            (Note that the source is USA Today, not Fox News, so there is no need to attack the source as a substitute for facts.)

            The reasons for this rate of increase are varied, ranging from the drought in California to virus outbreaks among livestock, as the article notes.

            But anyone who believes that food prices have only increased at a 2 percent annual rate needs to come food shopping with me. Then we’ll compare our grocery bill to our bill from last year at this time.

            You’ll lose that notion pretty quickly.

            Also note that one doesn’t have to buy a new Camry, but most people I know need to buy food regularly.

            And then there are increases for local services that are not necessarily calculated as part of the official inflation rate. For example, at our old home, the rate for sewer and trash services increased by almost 100 percent over two years. The municipality claimed that these increases were needed to pay for upgrades to the local sewage/water treatment plant. (The water was treated before it entered the Susquehanna River, which, in turn, empties into the Chesapeake Bay. Municipalities located along the Susquehanna River were required to make the changes to reduce nutrient pollution in the Bay.)

            We had no choice but to pay the higher rate.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            ” Just because the price of a brand-new Camry hasn’t increased by 9 percent annually doesn’t mean that other goods and services can’t increased at a faster rate. The inflation rate does not apply equally to every good or service.”

            Right, but overall the price of the basket of goods that people buy isn’t up 9%. Keeping in mind that people spend 17% of transport vs. 13.3% on food.

            The price of oil is down 40% since 2008 and the price of vehicles is up 2% a year.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Food prices are not up 9% per annum. The 9% figure is complete BS pulled out of that poster’s backside, with no grounding in reality at all.

            Core inflation excludes food prices because food prices are volatile. A drought or bad crop can push prices higher, while a bumper prices can result in dramatic price decreases.

            A virus impacting beef supplies is not inflationary, per se. Inflation is generally a byproduct of low unemployment and excessive wage growth, which are not factors in the current economy. If you can’t afford a steak due to there being fewer cattle, then find a substitute until the cattle problem is resolved.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Geeber,
            The source you cite has 2 months of data showing food prices up 0.4% for those two months, due to drought. Your other data point is for the sewage treatment at a home you sold.

            On the other hand, the CPI is calculated from many thousands of data points gathered monthly across the country.

            I understand that it may FEEL like inflation is more than 2%, but that doesn’t make it true.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            jmo, you can control your transportation costs much more than you can control food costs, especially with the quality of vehicles made over the past 10-11 years.

            One can skip buying a new car, as we have done. Our 2003 Accord has 218,000 miles on it, while our 2005 Focus has 191,000 miles on it. They don’t LOOK great, but they still work, so, to save money, we haven’t bought a new vehicle.

            We have to eat regularly, especially with small pre-school children. Unless we want a visit from Child Protection Services.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            Pch101, please note that I’ve never said that food prices are increasing at 9 percent annually. I’m only saying that, just because new-car prices aren’t up all much doesn’t mean that prices of other goods and services haven’t gone up by a greater amount.

            Note that the increase isn’t limited to beef or beef products:

            “A drought that thinned cattle herds two years ago has driven up wholesale beef prices 23% the past year, according to Sterling Marketing. Meanwhile, a virus outbreak in the hog population has pushed up pork prices by 56%, the firm says.

            “The California drought is likely to lead to higher prices this year for a variety of fruits and vegetables, such as avocados, lettuce and berries, says Professor Timothy Richards of the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

            “Retailers have absorbed much of the increases. Retail beef and pork prices are up about 7% and 5.3% respectively the past year. But Sterling owner John Nalivka expects sharper hikes of about 10% in 2014.”

            Fruits, vegetables and pork, along with beef, covers a very large percentage of our diet. There is only so much substitution one can do, particularly with seafood not being that cheap around here.

            The cause are varied, but the result is the same – less money to spend on other things. That may not be an issue for younger people (most likely unmarried and childless) who can afford brand-new Audis, or the wealthy who can afford higher-level BMWs and Benzes.

            But to the married Ford- and Honda-buying population who also have children, yes, it makes a difference. I’m not interested in assigning partisan blame here – you can’ t blame the White House or Congress for a virus outbreak among cattle. I’m just pointing out how things are working in the real world for real, live people who aren’t statistics.

            VoGo, you have to consider whether the purchase is discretionary. We can decide not to buy a new car, or a new flat-screen television (electronics prices haven’t gone up that much, either, or have even been declining).

            Food is not a discretionary purchase, and neither is paying the higher sewer-trash bill, unless we wanted the municipality to place a lien against our house. And while we have moved, our former community has lots of people who still live there, and are paying the higher sewer-trash bill. Just because WE aren’t paying the bill doesn’t mean that other people aren’t still being affected by those higher rates.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The point remains that food prices are volatile for a variety of reasons, which explains why they are not included in the core inflation measure. Anyone who would blame a cattle virus on the president is a looney.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Geeber,
            Inflation is at 2% nationally. That doesn’t mean that the exact products you buy are 2% more expensive than they were a year ago, it means that for the nation, a typical consumer basket of goods is 2% more costly.

            So it is entirely possible that you are experiencing prices more than 2% higher. But by the same token, others are seeing lower prices on the things they buy, in their part of the country. For example, anyone who bought a PC lately knows how powerful and cheap they have become.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “you can control your transportation costs much more than you can control food costs, especially with the quality of vehicles made over the past 10-11 years. ”

            And, what’s your point? That we should base our inflation concerns on the 13% of the median household budget that is spent of food and exclude the other 87%?

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            Pch101: The point remains that food prices are volatile for a variety of reasons, which explains why they are not included in the core inflation measure.

            Which strongly suggests that, while the core inflation rate is one measure of economic performance, it may not be the most effective way to measure the overall economic well-being of families.

            Pch101: Anyone who would blame a cattle virus on the president is a looney.

            Please note, again, that I never did that. I specifically said that one cannot blame Congress or the White House for a livestock virus or a drought.

            VoGo: Inflation is at 2% nationally. That doesn’t mean that the exact products you buy are 2% more expensive than they were a year ago, it means that for the nation, a typical consumer basket of goods is 2% more costly.

            I know that, which is why I explained to jmo that his example of the price increase for a Camry can’t be used to prove that food prices have increased by a similarly small amount.

            VoGo: So it is entirely possible that you are experiencing prices more than 2% higher. But by the same token, others are seeing lower prices on the things they buy, in their part of the country. For example, anyone who bought a PC lately knows how powerful and cheap they have become.

            The problem is that people buy food regularly, but generally don’t buy a new personal computer every two weeks. We bought our last one four years ago. We’ll certainly appreciate any price decreases when we buy the next one, but that isn’t doing us much good now. Meanwhile, I have to buy groceries this week. And two weeks later. And two weeks after that…

            jmo: And, what’s your point? That we should base our inflation concerns on the 13% of the median household budget that is spent of food and exclude the other 87%?

            We were comparing the cost of transportation to the cost of food.

            A 13 percent chunk of a household budget that is a bought on a recurring basis is a big deal in the real world. Rising prices for this one item are going to be more important than rising prices (or lack thereof) for a new car or a new personal computer, the purchase of which can easily be delayed or even skipped entirely.

            I’m pretty sure that no one ever starved to death because they couldn’t buy a new personal computer.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Geeber,
            Best wishes to you in feeding your family. I certainly did not mean to insult you or belittle the challenges you face in providing nutritious meals for your family.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “while the core inflation rate is one measure of economic performance, it may not be the most effective way to measure the overall economic well-being of families.”

            That isn’t what it means at all.

            For one, food comprises a relatively small part of the family budget. The modern family devotes a lower share of its income to food than a family would have decades ago; thanks to modern production and distribution, food is generally cheap overall.

            The point is that food prices are **volatile,** which means that they can both rise and fall dramatically for reasons that have nothing to do with the drivers of inflation.

            In my area, a pound of strawberries will cost $1 during a good season, and $5 during the off season. When the prices fall to a buck, we aren’t caught in a deflationary cycle, and when they rise back up to $5, we aren’t burdened by inflation. Rather, the price falls when there is a lot of supply, and rises when there isn’t. The moral of the story: If you want to pay low prices for strawberries, then eat them when they are in season, and eat something else when they’re not.

            Food prices are impacted by droughts, diseases, storms and the like, as well as by seasonality. The typical consumer will switch into and out of foods as they rise and fall in price. When steak gets expensive, chicken becomes more appealing, and so on.

        • 0 avatar
          challenger2012

          Sir. I call BS on your post again. You state,” Regarding 16 million people do you notice the credit quality of the people you are referring too?” I fond it stange you post all sorts of numbers to back your point of view, then regarding sales due to Poor Credit, you provide nothing. So I ask again, what percentage of the 16,000,000 vehicles are bad credit people? I look forward to your answer. You seem to have data for everything else.

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            I won’t nitpick about how you “fond it strange”. But in your first opinion you stated a “projected” 16 million vehicles. Projections are not sales they are projections. Regarding my simply asking the question about the credit worthiness of these buyers. This site and plenty others have talked about the high number of subprime buyers in the current “car boom”. Here is one article there are many many others.

            http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-11-08/good-job-is-good-enough-as-subprime-car-buyers-lift-sales.html

          • 0 avatar
            cartunez

            @ VoGo your basket has changed but again if you believe that inflation is only 2% per year knock yourself out. Tell the nurse for lunch you want pudding instead of jello cause you are obviously in a memory care facility.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            Cartunes,

            If inflation were 9% since 2007 a Camry LE would have a 2014 MSRP of $37,474 not it’s actual MSRP of $23,850.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Cartunez,
            Here are annual the inflation figures for this century:
            2000: 3.4%
            2001: 2.8%
            2002: 1.6%
            2003: 2.3%
            2004: 2.7%
            2005: 3.4%
            2006: 3.2%
            2007: 2.8%
            2009: -.4%
            2010: 1.6%
            2011: 3.2%
            2012: 2.1%
            2013: 1.5%
            2014: 1.7% (first 5 months)

            Do you see any 9s in there?

      • 0 avatar
        alsorl

        Vogo stop stating facts. Some people like to live in a parallel universe.

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      A lot have people have been very successful over the past few years. The DOW and NASDAQ is one source that can offer information on the economy not being that bad for the ones that plan ahead for the future.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      “oft lamented demographic of unemployable recent college grads making up a large portion of the buyers”

      You just made this up.

    • 0 avatar
      TheyBeRollin

      How is there a connection between the two? The recent college grads I know don’t even work in their industries, let along make enough to even lease an entry-level luxury car. The most well-off one I know works a blue-collar job and is painfully contemplating buying a used economy car because the car they inherited (GM, of course, and on the recall list) is literally falling apart. It wouldn’t be so bad if their parents were still alive and they could live with them, though, like most do.

      I’d wager a bet that 90% of the A3 sales are for trophy wives that don’t know any better and mid-50s-60s housewives. Probably the same demographic as the CLA. The “I could get a nice Accord or Camry, or I could impress my friends with a badge for about the same money.” demographic.

      • 0 avatar
        alsorl

        You just described the Camry owner. When is the last time you saw a 60-70 yo female driving a new Audi? I’m seeing mostly successful late 20 to 40 year olds male and female. I would say a grandma driving an A3 would be one cool grandma.

        • 0 avatar
          TEXN3

          How do you know they’re successful? Because they’re driving an Audi?

          • 0 avatar
            vbofw

            This is one of my favorite TTAC pissing contests ev-ar.

            One doom & gloomier says inflation is 9% (might as well have said 90% – insane), evolving into a detailed discussion of CPI schematics!

          • 0 avatar
            alsorl

            I guess the definition of success can be different to different people. But, I would have to say that making more money for most people equals being successful. And the people that I know and have talked to that own Audi’s are above average on most pay scales. example: check out a doctors parking lot at a hospital. You will probably see more Audi’s, MB, and Porsche’s over the rest of the staff that works at that hospital. This really should not be that hard to understand.

          • 0 avatar
            TEXN3

            Got it, so perception is always reality. I generally agree with your metric but don’t always assume a high dollar car equates a high dollar paycheck. Many folks who are successful choose not to flaunt it through choice of vehicle, and an A3 or A4 (or 3/4-series) is definitely not a sign of success.

  • avatar
    tced2

    The Acura TLX competes with the A3 – similar pricing and the undesirable FWD. The TLX can be equipped with AWD for a much higher price. Although the TLX is not shipping yet, it will be interesting to see if Acura(Honda) can win some of these sales.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    here’s my problem with this:

    there is no stocking problem. there are no less than four (4) Audi dealers within stone’s throw and they are all sitting on 30-60 A3′s each, and they all have ‘refreshed’ their service fleets with all new A3′s.

    I find it hard to believe that Audi is having a hard time keeping pace with demand when every dealer in northern NJ – the east coast heartland of brand awareness – is sitting on $1.5M – $2M in stock of a single model.

    • 0 avatar
      djsyndrome

      Are those actually in-stock-on-the-ground, or in transit? Many dealers (of all makes) here have a nasty habit of listing vehicles as soon as they have the VIN and manifest, but they don’t arrive for weeks.

      (for example, our local Audi dealer shows >30 A3s, but only about ten are actually in-stock. http://www.universityaudi.com/new-inventory/index.htm?model=A3&&&& )

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      The Houston Audi dealers page shows 118 A3 in stock split among the 3 dealers. Just a bit less than the number of A4 they have. So yea maybe this press release is a bit bold.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Okay, the NJ market has vehicles, and Fred notes a decent supply in Houston. But where are the buyers? What’s the supply like where the sales are hot? NJ and Houston are convenient ports of entry for German-made A3s, but LA and SF are farther away. It may be the waiting lists are at dealers farther down the supply/shipping chain. As djsyndrome points out, the press release may be a bit of self serving by Audi.

  • avatar
    alsorl

    Hmm grandmas Camry or an A3. Seems like a no brained with the appliance like Japanese sedans vs. Audi

  • avatar
    turboprius

    I think there’s a reason I’ve never seen a 2015 A3 and almost never seen an ILX or a CLA: people realize that 30 grand is too much for a compact car. For 30 grand, you could get a loaded Camry Hybrid with better fuel economy, regular fuel, more interior room, more features, and cheaper maintenance costs. (Latter mainly applies to the Audi and the Benz). Because no one would cross shop a Camry and a compact luxury sedan, a Civic Si does all the power for less than even a base ILX/CLA/A3.

    Yet that’s ironic, as I see a ton of extremely expensive 2015 Yukon/Tahoes in my middle class part of town.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Waingrow

      I live in an area where fairly rich second-homers come to escape the NYC area, especially in the warm months. And I see every imaginable Audi, Lexus Mercedes and BMW. Yet up ’til now, I haven’t seen a single A3 or CLA, and I’ve been looking. And the people I speak of here have to have the latest and greatest new thing. Make of that what you will.

      • 0 avatar
        TheyBeRollin

        Where I live gets an invasion of these people in the summer, too (the year-round residents don’t really like these people and mostly drive Honda Fits, Nissan Leafs, Toyota Priuses, Ford C-Maxes, Subarus of all types, VWs, old Audis (the A3 wagon was so wildly popular that they’re probably as common as older Golfs here), lots of Mercedes from the last decade, and lots of assorted cool older wagons (Volvos, especially)). I have seen exactly one CLA45 and it was unique enough that I noticed it against the backdrop of all the Cs, Es, Ss, CLs, CLSs, and SLs I see daily. I haven’t seen it since, though, so it might have been a tourist. The new A3 is a total unicorn – I’ve never seen even a single one in person.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The A3 is about the same size as the B5 A4 (as the compacts have progressively gotten larger in size) and has a more luxurious interior.

  • avatar
    mars3941

    This car looks like every other car in it’s class. It’s an Audi, big deal. Not!

    • 0 avatar
      FractureCritical

      it also looks like every other car in every other class Audi sells.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        This. The ONLY vehicle with 4-doors that Audi sells with any -hint- of looking interesting is the A7. Everything else is 100% homogenized.

        • 0 avatar
          djsyndrome

          Not true! The Q5 looks unique.

          Until you compare it to the Q3 or Q7, anyway. Seriously, the copy and paste styling is the worse since Nissan’s late-80s offerings (when the Sentra, Stanza and Maxima sedans looked identical).

        • 0 avatar
          darkwing

          You call it homogenized; I call it anonymous. I like the design language, and personally, I prefer flying under the radar.

          Besides, flash just means that every troglodyte BTSR-type is paying attention to you.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Is that why you have a giant S-Class, because you like to go under the radar?

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            Black S-Classes are pretty common around here, so as long as you don’t thug it up, you’d be pretty anonymous. Even so, no, I don’t have one. I don’t like going above a midsize.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            My mistake darkwing, I get you confused with VenomV12 sometimes.

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            Huh. Wouldn’t have seen that — but no problem. Nope, just a turbo V8 here.

        • 0 avatar
          alsorl

          So is almost every BMW. Same design different size.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    My bet is most of these are conquest sales to people who would have bought an A4 but now can get an A3 for less money, or would have got a CPO A4 instead. Its the entry level luxury buyer, they were not going to get a Honda or Toyota instead, they aspire to the badge.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The conquest claims come directly from Audi. They’re probably accurate.

      That doesn’t mean that most Toyota and Honda buyers are migrating to Audi. Audi sales comprise a fraction of Toyota and Honda sales, and many Audi sales are not to conquest buyers. The total number of these conquests compared to the overall auto market is not that large.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Still no manual on this car?

    I’ve driven two in Germany now, though with diesel and the 5 door hatch. Great car and noticeably improved over the old model.

    I know this is America… But for those of us who love the GTI but would prefer just something a slight bit more adult… This car about nails it. I can probably forgive not bringing the hatch (tho I love the look of the 3 door!)… But the lack of a manual is a real bummer.

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      No manual and according to my sources at AoA it’s 99% certain one will NOT be rolled out in the coming model years, either.

      • 0 avatar
        sproc

        I’m the opposite: DSG I can live with, tiny sedan trunk probably not. Any new talk of getting the 5-door 2.0T in the U.S.? I would hope the sedan’s success would have Audi considering it. The previous gen was a perfect urban runabout.

      • 0 avatar
        moorewr

        I am pessimistic that we’ll see any new Audi models with manuals in the US at all.

  • avatar
    sketch447

    I think Audi is fudging the demographic stats a bit, spinning them in their favor.

    There’s no way on earth that young people under 30 are buying the A3 in appreciable numbers. They can’t even get jobs, all the entry level stuff has been outsourced, and illegal aliens have taken all the minimum wage stuff.

    Utter nonsense. Maybe their rich parents are buying it for them. But a millennial with $31k in his/her pocket is gonna buy a loaded Accord or a compact SUV or a Jeep; NOT a Focus-sized, overpriced German car that’s gonna self-destruct after the warranty expires.

    Here’s what Audi (and every other carmaker) won’t admit: the people buying the A3 are all over 50. Heck, most are probably retired. Entry level Audis and Bimmers are also popular with middle-aged professional women, who are lured in by easy lease rates.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The data is fine, it just requires context.

      In a given month, they’re selling about 500-600 of these to millennials. That’s good news for Audi, but that’s not a lot of cars.

      • 0 avatar
        hreardon

        Bingo. The aggregate number looks great (for Audi), but broken down you get the real raw data. For example, you’ll see that several hundred per month go into dealership loaner fleets as well.

    • 0 avatar
      06M3S54B32

      ” But a millennial with $31k in his/her pocket is gonna buy a loaded Accord or a compact SUV or a Jeep; NOT a Focus-sized, overpriced German car that’s gonna self-destruct after the warranty expires.”

      Dead on for me, and I have always driven German cars. But when my wife needed a new car we went with a fully loaded Accord for north of $31K. It’s a brilliant car, and I’m not worried about it self destructing at the warranties end.

  • avatar
    cartunez

    I used to have an A8 which I enjoyed but I think Audi along with BMW and Mercedes are killing them with all these different offshoots. Just make really nice cars for their respective segments and call it day. A4, A6, and A8 for the sedans and coupes and be done with it.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    Toyota sold more white Camrys than 2452 units.

    But wouldn’t this car steal more sales from Passat? And CC?

  • avatar
    Quopar

    As the U.S. middle class continues to erode, one wonders if the Camcords are ultimately doomed. People are either upmarket into a BMW or Audi or downmarket into an used Fit, or a bike.

    It may be a stretch of logic, but look how “middle class” stores and restaurants like Sears and Red Lobster are on deathwatch. Society goes either up to fine dining or down to fast food. Cars will follow suit. The middle is vanishing fast, and automakers need to decide which side of the economic divide they want to be on (hint: its not the lower one).

    • 0 avatar
      darkwing

      The badge may be more prestigious, but if the sticker price is the same, I wouldn’t necessarily call it an “upmarket” move.

      As a counter-example, look at “middle class” stores like Trader Joe’s: good quality, low prices, good customer service, and they’re booming. The middle class is fine, if a bit battered; it’s just transformed itself since the 80s.

  • avatar
    haroldingpatrick

    That A3 looks snazzy and is pretty affordable to boot. I’m a Quaker at heart, so I’ll stick with my plain Honda.

    The economy, hmmm? Bear in mind I’m a civil engineer, not an expert at everything like some folks I work with and who post on this website. It seems plain to me that the days of the middle class “job” are over because there is really no need for one unless you legislate a need, which won’t ever happen in this country. So if you want to be middle class, you better have a trade, profession, or business that is marketable. That being said, I have 2 nieces and a nephew who came into true adulthood over the last 6 years. The two who graduated college with marketable degree’s found employment in their fields (they did have to move, gasp!) and the slacker who spent 5 years in college without getting a degree is currently working some crap job and could not support herself without her husband. She’s one of the few young women around that is actually worth marrying, so things should work out for her.

    I tell my 11 year old the truth – it’s a mean old world that doesn’t give a damn about you. Be useful to others with a trade, profession, or business or live under a bridge.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      I totally agree with everything you’ve said. Of course, I still wouldn’t mind a new(er) F150 and a camper now that the boys are getting bigger and the tent is getting smaller. The Accord only gets us so far in Idaho. Good thing I’m an engineer at a monopoly/utility.


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