By on June 30, 2014

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There are old Sonatas, and there are bold Sonatas, and starting now, any bold Sonatas you see are going to be old Sonatas.
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That old, bold Sonata lifted Hyundai from casual-participant status in the American midsize game to the life of a full-time player. The timing was right, falling in the middle of the bailout mess. The quality and equipment levels were acceptable to a useful slice of the buying public. And the styling was ripped straight from the headlines — assuming the headline story of that particular day was “A Fuzzier Look At The First-Generation Mercedes CLS”. Plenty of flash, not much cash, and a warranty to ease your mind about the way your neighbor’s 1999 Elantra rusted out at the door seams.

To consolidate those gains and keep the Montgomery, AL plant running three shifts a day at full capacity, Hyundai’s elected to dial back the visuals and crank up the equipment levels, both standard and optional. They invited us to tour that plant and drive three variants of the new Sonata on a variety of suspiciously smooth Alabama highways and byways. Today we’ll cover the $33,375 Sonata Limited Ultimate Package; later on in the week we’ll have the Sport 2.0T and Eco 1.6T models.

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It’s fair to say that Hyundai has successfully met about ninety-five percent of their stated goals with this new Sonata. In the press preview, they promised us a large, roomy car — and that it is. They promised us a rigid car that matched the class leaders for solidity — and if anything they’ve exceeded that goal. They promised segment-unique equipment like stop-start laser cruise control, panoramic roof, ventilated seats, all at a price that meets or beats the value entries — and the numbers don’t lie.

Start with the Sonata’s size and weight. By removing the option of a V-6, Hyundai has moved the cabin forward and secured the only “EPA Large Car” classification in the segment. It’s the widest of the Camcord/Sonatoptima/Fusionbu crowd and it beats most of them in most measurements. After some prodding on my part regarding Hyundai’s ability to cut weight in this car the way Honda did with the most recent Accord, their chief vehicle engineer retorted that the old Sonata was among the lightest in the segment and that this new car would weigh just six pounds more. The Accord’s lighter, but you need to take a manual transmission to have a measurable gap. The number I was given for a base 2.4 Sonata was 3,259 pounds; Honda quotes 3,254 for the LX CVT.

So what we have here is a serious effort at delivering space without a weight penalty and the results are convincing. The Sonata never feels cramped, front or rear. In particular, the relative lack of tumblehome really imparts an airy feel to the cabin and if the windowsills aren’t quite Accord-low they are easily a match for the Camry or Altima. It doesn’t need to be said, but in this respect the Malibu isn’t even a competitor — which is perhaps why the press materials accidentally showed the previous-gen Malibu. Hyundai’s long past having to worry about fighting General Motors.

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A press of the metal start button, shared with the Genesis, and the 2.4L thrashes into life. Our test Sonata was in Limited Ultimate trim, which for over $33,000 offers you a BMW 7er’s worth of equipment. But you still have to take that lumpenprole big-inch four-cylinder, coupled to a six-speed automatic. Hyundai’s people refused to get defensive when I pressed them on this: “There are hundreds of thousands of Sonata owners who are very satisfied with this proven six-speed unit and they are coming back for more of the same.” Sure, but if any of them accidentally experience the four-cylinder powertrains in the Accord, Camry, or Altima, they won’t like what they find here very much. On the numbers, the Sonata is fine, offering about the same amount of power and economy as everyone else. On the move, however, it’s coarse and frequently whines in protest when asked to climb a hill.

The transmission is slow-witted and when the lever is moved over to Tiptronic mode it takes a full inch or more of meaningless travel in either direction before the desired gear is selected right as the level hits the mechanical stop. Annoying, the “+” and “-” selections are backwards, with “+” being towards the dashboard and “-” away from it. Hate to say it, but the Sonata really disappoints in the powertrain department, and my recent drive of a CVT Accord four-cylinder just hammered that home.

If you can let that go, however, you’ll find plenty else to love about the interior of this Sonata Limited Ultimate. The seats are brilliant; supportive, with strong ventilation or heating, they really satisfy and the range of adjustment is considerable. There’s even an auto-slide for entry and exit a la Town Car. There is a wide range of high-quality interior materials on offer, with the “wood” trim and the touch-points leather coming in for particular commendation. This is an expensive vehicle — indeed, I cannot readily think of a naturally-aspirated non-hybrid four-cylinder car that costs more — but there is clear value everywhere you look. Two false notes are struck by the much-ballyhooed “driver-focused” center stack shape that looks oddly like something from the original season of Battlestar Galactica and the LCD displays for time and temperature that would not be hugely out of place in a digital watch from that same era. Maybe there’s a retro thing going on of which I wasn’t aware.

This being the year 2015, or at least the model year 2015, there’s a requirement for full-featured navitainment and Bluetooth integration. The Sonata delivers ably with a high-resolution eight-inch center display, seamless ability to work with my old Samsung Galaxy S3, and a “BlueLink” group of external satellite features. The stereo is reasonably good although it isn’t very loud, offering reasonable clarity, focus, and adjustability. It’s a long reach to the touchscreen but if you can make it you’ll be satisfied with what Hyundai says is a more sensitive interface that allows the user to perform drags and slides on the navigation screen. (A tablet-style “pinch” or “expand” is not available.)

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What’s the rest of the drive experience like? As Hilary said, “what difference does it make?” But it would be unfair not to mention just how eerily quiet the Sonata is and how solidly it thumps on the bumps. I’d want a full week on Midwestern frost-heaved roads to really evaluate the ride, but in Alabama it was brilliant. Steering and brake feel are thoroughly artificial and strangely heavy, perhaps because the Hyundai customer might associate light steering with some cheap-ass Pontiac Grand Am. A “Drive Mode” button between the shifter and the electronic parking brake produces convincing further stiffening in steering and engine response.

The restrained styling, superior NVH, and unbeatable features list will make this Sonata a dangerously effective rival for the Fusion, but more than that Hyundai’s own Genesis is probably going to face some encroachment from the Limited Ultimate. It’s almost an Avalon competitor more than a Camry clone, and a few minutes behind the wheel of the relatively quick-witted four-cylinder Camry SE or XLE would drive the point home.

For this money, you can get an Accord Touring. Dynamically, the V-6 Touring murders this Sonata — but how often would you call on the power of the J35 six-cylinder, and how often would you miss the ventilated seats and the pano roof and the Hyundai’s ability to drive itself in traffic? How often would you hustle the big Honda down a twisty road, and how often would you want the Sonata’s vault-like isolation from the traffic outside?

In the areas of feature count, interior room, and quiet solidity, this is a genuine advance in the segment and should be recognized as such. The problem is that you can’t get the good equipment with the preferred engine. Come back tomorrow and we’ll talk about what you do get when you choose the “Turbo” logo. In the meantime, feel free to think of the not-so-bold Sonata as a Korean take on an Oldsmobile Cutlass Brougham. You remember how popular that was, right?

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(Lodging and meals were provided courtesy of Hyundai, who also offered us transportation which we ended up declining due to travel conflicts.)

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87 Comments on “Review: 2015 Hyundai Sonata Limited 2.4...”


  • avatar
    Pastor Glenn

    Actually, the Cutlass was the top-selling automobile in the entire United States in the late 1970’s through the early 1980’s until the Taurus took the prize……

    Congratulations to Hyundai for a job very well done. My wife and I are on our 5th (and still own our 3rd) Sonata, having started buying them in 2002.

  • avatar
    dwford

    I can get past the conservative exterior style, but that dashboard. Dear Lord. In an era where almost every car has some sort of stitched dash covering, this just looks cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Personally, I think the last thing you could call that dash is “cheap looking.”

    • 0 avatar
      stephenjmcn

      I happen to agree with you – it might impress superficially at a first pass, but reminds me of late 80’s stereo equipment on the whole. Hyundai also make the industry’s ugliest steering wheels IMO, which doesn’t help.

    • 0 avatar
      MattPete

      I agree that the dash looks cheap, cheap, cheap.

      I do like the color of the wood and the leather. I wish more companies used lighter colored wood and offered medium colored leather. I’m tired of black interior.

      But just because I like those materials, doesn’t mean that this interior looks nice. Not only does it look cheap, but it looks like a strange hodgepodge of mismatched shapes.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I share FreedMike’s bafflement.

      I’ve seen “stitched dash covering” (like in my parents’ 2013 Camry Hybrid) and … honestly, it looks kinda cheap most of the time.

      Because it’s great big stitches that don’t really do anything, but are there for a “stitched!” bulletpoint. And once you realize that, it’s not impressive or awesome or upscale.

      A pointless fad that doesn’t actually make a dash even minutely *superior*, unless one really really likes having some edge texture.

      I think the dash here looks nice and clean and – as far as can be told from a little picture – well made enough. (Actually touching it and driving the car, naturally, is the real test.)

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Fake-stitches on a dash looks cheap once you get closer.

      The gauges on the base model is a step down and Hyundai really needs to make the Sport steering wheel standard for all trims.

  • avatar
    aycaramba

    Is it just me, or does that close-up of the rear show major orange-peel in the paint?

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Fake stitching of plastics is for ultra-poseurs. Go buy a Buick or something then. This dashboard is clean, functional and therefore pretty.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Hyundai does the fake stitching on the Azera and Genesis Coupe (not even real thread, just a stamp stitch look on the panels), but my Elantra GT has real stitching on the instrument cowl and door panels. Of course, the stitching is unnecessary, but it looks nice.

  • avatar

    Geez. That’s a lot of bottled water, bruh!

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The 2015 makes the 2014 a bit of an odd bird, then. The YF Sonata was so good—and competitive—that Hyundai basically got away with updating it at the end of the model run. We have a YF Sonata, a 2012 Limited, and the only thing that truly annoys me about it is the fact that the plasti-rubber material around the steering wheel buttons peels off really easily.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    Ironically, Hyundai was the original posterchild for government motors bailouts.

    When you see the new Hyundai parked beside the old Sonata, the old one looks more modern, I think customers will be confused but then the subprime customers Hyundai relies on often won’t care, they just care about can they get in a ride with zero down with their low beacon scores.

    Oh yeah, $33,000? One can get Pentastar powered dream machines with 8 and 9 speed ZF’a like the new 200 and Charger for that price

    • 0 avatar
      MattPete

      Although I haven’t driven either, my first thought was: why would I want to get this Sonata instead of a 2015 200c? The 200c has pretty much the same features, looks nicer inside and out, can be had with a V6 and AWD. The only reason I can think is perhaps the Sonata is significantly larger inside.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        If you plan to hold on to your car for a long time, it’s a non-issue. But if you flip cars every 3-4 years, the Hyundai will most likely hold it’s value better.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Why, it’s almost like those cars are in *different segments* or something, aiming at different markets!

        This Sonata is not aimed at enthusiast drivers – the 200c with the V6 and AWD is, at least as a side-effect of the specs.

        (And if *I* was buying a new car in that price range, I’d be looking at the 200c real hard. But also the Genesis…)

        • 0 avatar
          Occam

          Is there a manual verson of the 200c, or do they limit it to lower versions of the 200? Adding mickey-mouse ears to my great-aunt’s PRND Oldsmobile ain’t gonna cut it!

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      And Chrysler reliability for that price as well. How many trips to the dealer will the Chrysler require?

      • 0 avatar
        billfrombuckhead

        The trim lines, seams and paint on the Chrysler are better than the Korean Government Motors appliance and way better than Nissan. FIAT does have some good robots at Sterling Heights.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Um, Sonata owners have a higher credit rating and income than Camry buyers and was at the top of the class with regard to income and credit rating when the outgoing Sonata was newer.

      Don’t confuse the Sonata with the Camry which has the lowest ATP next to the Avenger.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Not a fan of the dash or center stack. The faux wood looks almost out of place on the passenger side.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Is Kia doing a similar change to the Optima?

    Personally, I really like the 2.4/6A combination in the Sonata. It’s a thrasher at idle, but otherwise I find it quite drivable. The hybrid – like our Optima – isn’t so smooth, but we’ve chosen to call it “entertaining”.

  • avatar
    juicy sushi

    It is really impressive how far the D segment in the US has gone in the last couple of generations. For most people, between the level of engineering and equipment on offer, you would be hard-pressed to justify spending money on anything “premium” at all. Yes, gearheads might appreciate a difference, but really, the average consumer wouldn’t. Premium brands really need to hope that the social signaling of “I can afford a premium vehicle, therefore are superior to you by virtue of more money” sticks around, because if the preferable social statement ever becomes “I am smart enough to under-consume” their entire business model is toast.

    Seriously, these cars, and the C segment equivalents in Europe, are stunningly impressive achievements if you look at what they can do.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Pretty amazing feature content…but my favorite from this class is still the Accord Sport.

  • avatar
    turboprius

    “— but how often would you call on the power of the J35 six-cylinder.” I think the Honda fanboys are pretty mad.

    I’ve loved this car since the 2006 generation. Cheap, reliable transportation that everyone ignored, but when 2011 came along, everyone realized the strengths. If this one you tested had a higher ride height and got at least 30 MPG combined, I’d gladly tell my dad to get one.

    Plus, the 2016s will be out next year, which means some of the bugs from 2015 will have been solved. But the fact they sell the NV200 Taxi for personal use, eh… ;)

    • 0 avatar
      aycaramba

      I think I would be willing to “…call on the power of the J35 six cylinder”. I’m pretty close to pulling the trigger on the 2014 Accord EX-L V6. I was a little curious to read about the new Sonata before doing so, since I saw them start to show up on the lots recently. My first impression that that it looked OK from the outside. Actually, I think I like the exterior better than the 2014. I always found the Sonata to be a bit overstyled.

      Now that I’m learning (and seeing) more, I’m more comfortable with the decision to go Accord. Don’t absolutely need the V6, but regretting not getting it the last time when I bought my 2001, and decided not to make the same mistake twice. Besides, I think that this may be the last of the mid-sizers available with the V6, and I’d like to enjoy it.

      • 0 avatar
        turboprius

        The Accord is a great car, don’t get me wrong! Unless I wrongly interpreted Jack, all of these Honda fanboys are like “Oh, the J35 in my mom’s Pilot is so fast and awesome, and the K24 in my Accord is so fast and awesome. And the Sonata is the biggest POS ever made.”

        • 0 avatar
          George B

          The J35 is a pretty nice engine. Capable of serious power too. Here’s a turbo manual Odyssey doing burnouts.
          [ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivRj0wa_opc ]

          Stig in Odyssey minivan vs. Crown Vics in pursuit.
          [ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnHv14jo_Q8 ]

  • avatar
    mjz

    Maybe the colors are off in the photos, but the tan seats, combined with the mostly black interior, and the brown of the “wood” trim looks like a terrible combination. Blech.

    • 0 avatar
      This Is Dawg

      The wood and the seat color are really bad. And that center console just seems so…boring. I do like the tail lights though. I think those on the last gen sonata would have looked good.

  • avatar
    mjz

    To my eye, the interior design of the 2014 model is much more pleasing to the eye. The instrument panel and steering wheel of the 2015 are kind of awkward looking.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    It’s very nice that they put you in this high-zoot Sonata for the press day, but hardly anybody buys the high-end Sonatas. On the other hand, they buy tons of the baseline GLS (or whatever they are calling them this year). With $2,000 closeout incentives you can buy a 2014 Sonata GLS with the preferred package that adds heated seats, HD Radio, back-up cam and more for $20,000 plus or minus. A more article would be a comparison between the 2014 vs. 2015 GLS.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    This is a nice looking car. The last gen was one of the few Korean cars I actually liked.

    What I don’t like is the chrome Hyundai logo on the steering wheel. It looks cheap and reminds me of the awful Hyundais of yore.

  • avatar

    I don’t get it. It’s funny the disparaging comments about the interior. These are some of the same interior styling cues Toyota is using in the Avalon, 4Runner, and Corolla. And the center stack is nearly identical to what you’d get in a modern BMW.

    • 0 avatar
      MattPete

      1) The Toyota’s interiors are not high benchmarks. I want to like the Avalon, and I think they are onto something interesting, but ultimately it just doesn’t work. It’s like they have cargo-cult stylists: they picked out styling cues, but don’t know how to put them together to make a coherent whole. Hyundai’s interior stylists take cargo-cult cluelessness to another level.

      2) “nearly identical” That’s like saying that a Ford 500 is nearly identical to a Mercedes 300e. Look at the BMW dash, then look at the Hyundais. The BMW’s is symmetrical, and the lines meet in a graceful manner. The Hyundais’s lines are a mess [and that’s just scratching the surface].

    • 0 avatar
      TheyBeRollin

      My first reaction to the dash was that it looked like their take on one from a German car. The only problem is that they seem to have unnecessarily consumed some of the footwell on both sides with it.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        My thoughts too. I don’t absolutely hate the shape, but I’d rather have the leg room from a more vertical transition from console to dash. Looks like form not following function.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Beltline up past the seatbacks, a whole dash full of electronic gimmicks, unpleasant four cylinder powertrain, $33,000.

    I keep hearing that cars are getting better but damned if I can see how.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    In the meantime, feel free to think of the not-so-bold Sonata as a Korean take on an Oldsmobile Cutlass Brougham. You remember how popular that was, right?

    See GM we told you there was room for Oldsmobile, you just had to let it be Oldsmobile and not “ME TOO” for the cars you thought were stealing your sales.

  • avatar
    johnny ringo

    It looks like Hyundai is going after the Oldsmobile crowd with the new Sonata, the styling is bland to a fault. The interior is nice, although I could do without the fake wood, which looks like something of an afterthought, but what’s with white seats in a blue interior? Talk about a mis-match–they look totally out of place and are a violation of Oldsmobile’s interior decorating theory.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      Oldsmobile’s were far from bland unless your talking about the cheaper models like the Calais or Acheiva. Nothing wrong with a white interior but I think it’s morel ight gray than pure white. People are getting tired of black all the time!

  • avatar
    Occam

    Interesting that the Accord was an EPA-Large car until its most recent redesign.

    It’s an attractive car in a beige sort of way, like the Impala and Accord; this is not an insult at all – it’s understated and grown up in a way that the old/bold Sonata was not. Leave Kia to be the high-fashion offering. This is a car that won’t look embarrassing in 3-5 years.

    The only thing that gets me is the interior: Why is the console so wide? They build the car to be large and roomy, and put in a huge trapezoid that looks like a 1970’s Sci-Fi console. Looking at the seat, accelerator, and console, I can feel my right leg rubbing non-stop.

    Also – I’m assuming this is another car with no manual option – why is the automatic selector lever a mock manual? Leather shift-boot, round knob. This looks absolutely silly – and rates right up there with fake hood-scoops and port-holes masquerading as ventilation, black-plastic triangles pretending to be windows, and wheel-covers styled like alloys with black steel wheels showing between the ‘spokes.’ Can’t they just put a Chrysler-style knob or column shifter on there and be done with it?

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I’ve been pretty critical of the current Hyundai Sonata since its introduction however many years ago. It is a respectable and competitive midsizer, but I personally thought it was very overrated by some in the automotive press and by a surprising number of fanboys that hated Camries but somehow could not comprehend the Sonata was about as dull dynamically despite its disguise of *interesting* sheet metal.

    Drivetrain aside, it looks like Hyundai addressed all the criticisms I had of the last one: better seats, less road noise, some higher quality interior pieces, less tortured styling. The numb yet artificially heavy steering doesn’t excite me, but Jack’s right that most people rightly care far more about the hushed road noise than talkative steering during their freeway commutes.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Conservative exterior and interior? Check.
    Whisper quiet operation? Check.
    Extensive feature & options list? Check.
    Comfortable suspension? Check.
    Best in class warranty? Check.
    Good passenger and cargo capacity? Check.
    Competitive fuel economy? Check.

    Price? The Limited seems expensive for this segment but lesser trims are available which are competitively priced.

    Either way, Hyundai will have no problems meeting their sales targets with this new model as it delivers pretty much everything that US consumers want in this segment.

  • avatar
    mars3941

    If I were ever to buy a Hyundai it would be the Azera. More car and about the same money. I know it doesn’t sell that well so the incentives give me more incentive to consider one. This new Sonata kind of reminds me of the previous generation Chrysler 200 from the side view around the C pillar area.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The Azera is a pretty rare car in the US. I just saw one today on the street, and gave it a long lookover. Lots of chrome and a panoramic sunroof, so it must have been loaded.

      It is a good looking car. I think real out the door prices are around $30,000 without the option packages. Looks like a better option than this Sonata – more space and V6 power without all the clutter. And definitely more unique.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      I looked at the Hyundai Azera and the Kia Cadenza back to back and I preferred the Cadenza even though the name sounds like a piece of office furniture.

  • avatar
    zach

    I like the more upright front end (headlights), the profile looks similar to the Altima, I like it better than the current one, looks more sculpted and less bloated . They will sell a ton, sounds Cliché but they will!

  • avatar
    zach

    The orange peel around the license plate metal area, I notice this on a lot of cars and SUVs , might the metal be thinner in that area to save weight?

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Usually lack of clear, improper setup of the robot, or a material issue is the cause. Since the rest of the car doesn’t appear to have an issue, it’s a setup or clear problem in that area.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    That is ONE RETRO CENTER STACK! I didn’t notice the Battlestar resemblance until you made the reference, and that titular warship was also a throwback in its own universe.

    The previous-gen Sonata was certainly prettier inside and out, but I have a feeling this will age better and fade into the background…things the Sonata needs to do if they want more Camry market share.

  • avatar
    JohnnyFirebird

    Tedious Design Alert: Trapezoidal grilles.

    Mostly a Ford design cue, but showing up more frequently now.

    At least they’re less hideous than Altezza lights or those elongated-but-narrow Audi grilles that everyone copied for a while (worst example: later G6 GTPs).

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    “They invited us to tour that plant and drive three variants of the new Sonata on a variety of suspiciously smooth Alabama highways and byways”

    Why are California plates on a car previewed at the ALABAMA manufacturing facility? Just curious… :-)

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    I’ve gotta feeling that the previous Sonata is better than this one. It looks too much like everything else out there. There’s nothing unique or original about the exterior or interior. Regardless, people still will go for the 100K mile warranty Hyundai offers. I’d go for the Honda Accord, Mazda 6, VW Passat or even the Ford Fusion instead.

  • avatar
    George B

    Jack, do you think the NA four/6-speed automatic combo is sluggish more due to final drive ratio and mechanical limitations or more due to transmission programming to ace the EPA fuel economy tests?

    The 2.5L four/6-speed automatic in the 2010 Toyota Camry is old tech, but I don’t recall that road trip rental annoying me on hills.

  • avatar
    ShoogyBee

    I haven’t seen a 2015 Sonata in person yet, but I liked the photos of the Sport 2.0T’s black interior (dashboard and seats). If you think the Limited featured in this article looks cheap, wait till you see photos of the light gray interior of a base SE model. Just go to cars.com, you’ll find plenty of examples. Looks so cheap that it makes my eyes bleed.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    Which Oldsmobile Cutlass Brougham are you referring to the Supreme, Ciera or Calais?

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    My friend just bought a red 2015 Sonata Limited 2.4 automatic. In no way is the 2014 Camry 2.5/6 speed auto superior to his Hyundai. The Hyundai 2.4 is quicker, smoother, quieter and better on fuel than the Camry setup. For the same basic price as a mid level Camry Se Sport this new Hyundai offers a full 32 extra features that the Camry lacks and the interior quality/ambiance is vastly superior.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Full of it, Mr. I Feverishly Hate Everything Toyota.

      I’ve driven the Camry SE back to back with an Optima running that 2.4/6spd auto and the Camry engine makes less racket and is hooked to a far more responsive transmission. The Hyundai engine is fine, I wouldn’t call it “lumpenprole” as Jack did, but the Camry’s is better. The transmission is far better.

      There’s a Motortrend comparo from a year or so ago where the Camry blitzed the Sonata to 60 despite the hp disadvantage. Don’t know where you’re getting the “quicker” claim from. The Hyundai/Kia undoubtedly have nicer interior materials, but the drivetrain advantage belongs to Toyota.

      And yes, I would trust Jack’s assessment before your own.

      And no, I don’t believe your Camry rental horror story because it gets more outlandish every time you tell it.


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