By on June 24, 2014

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Let’s play a little word association, shall we? Okay, great! I will say the name of a car, and you describe its owner.

Nissan Leaf S. Got it? Cool.

Here’s what I came up with: LeMons-racing, Glock-owning, Libertarian-leaning, father of four, mechanical engineer. Wait, that’s not what you came up with? Well then you don’t know Brian, TTAC reader and owner of today’s Reader Ride Review, a black 2013 Nissan Leaf S.

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Who is the smartest guy you know? Okay, in true Niles Standish fashion, “Double it!” Brian’s brilliant engineering mind led him to lease the Leaf about eight months ago. Although certainly not opposed to the ecological benefit, he leased the Leaf because “I did the math on it. I had a PT Cruiser before this, and when I calculated the cost of the lease after the available subsidies, subtracted fuel cost, and added in the twenty bucks a month to charge it, it worked out to be a significant savings for us.” As a father of four, Brian also owns a Pentastar minivan for kid-hauling duty, and he races a ’75 LTD in LeMons (which Bark M. said was a pain in the butt to pass, at Carolina Motorsports Park earlier this year).

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As opposed to most Leaf owners who are city dwellers, Brian and his family live in a rural area known as Greer, SC. It’s a little ways out from the city, which we southerners like to say is out in the sticks. When I arrived at his house to check out the Leaf, the little black car was plugged into a standard garage outlet, charging back up from a day’s worth of commuting.

My initial impressions of the car upon seeing it were…well, I will let Brian say it.

“It’s not an attractive car,” Brian said. “I didn’t buy it for the aesthetics.” He’s right. In the Leaf, Nissan managed to do the impossible—they made a car that’s uglier than the Cube. In the base level S trim, the Leaf’s ugliness is borderline charming, though. Brian’s had cop-spec black steel wheels with no wheel covers, almost like that kid you used to know who wore black military boots to school. This particular Leaf had a unique decoration, placed on the left side of the rear windshield by Brian—a Glock window sticker. “I wanted everybody to know that this car doesn’t belong to a hippie,”he explained. Duly noted!

Sitting behind the wheel of the Leaf requires a bit of re-education. First of all, I realized that the Leaf would be silent upon start-up, but I subconsciously expected to hear SOMETHING when I pressed the Start button. Nope…total silence, like a golf cart. The gear shift in the center console had only two settings—Reverse and Drive, with a button in the middle for Park. The Leaf’s instrument display shows all sorts of things that this author had never seen before. Squarely in the middle sat a gauge that showed how much electricity was either being used under acceleration or being generated by the regenerative braking system. In the bottom right of the display was a miles to empty gauge—it showed 37 miles when I started our drive out of Brian’s driveway. I immediately and needlessly sensed a bit of range anxiety. What would happen if we got stuck in traffic? Or had a detour? Or had an emergency ice cream run? One never knows about these things.

My first impressions upon driving the Leaf? It’s not slow. Not at all. In fact, the instant torque delivered by the electric motor makes it pretty quick off the line. “It’s as fast from 0-45 as a BRZ,” explained Brian from the passenger seat. Granted, that’s not saying a whole lot, but it’s definitely sufficient to move the Leaf around comfortably in city traffic. The low-rolling-resistance tires didn’t inspire cornering confidence, but grip was sufficient for everyday driving.

The one thing that surprised me was a light whistling sound the car made when you would slow down to a stop. Brian explained to me that because the Leaf makes nearly no noise when going slowly, Nissan added the whistle to alert pedestrians amend other motorists of its presence in city situations to satisfy some pending legislation. Too cool!

Visibility from the main cabin was excellent, aided by some cut outs in the A pillar; it felt as if I was driving a windshield, not an EV. In comparison to my Sonic, it was spacious and comfortable. The back seat was big enough for an average adult to sit quite comfortably in, and the rear storage area was surprisingly large—a week’s worth of groceries for this single gal would fit, no problem. The S trim level meant that the bells and whistles of the car were pretty limited, but it still had Bluetooth connectivity (which Brian used to connect his flip phone…engineers!) and steering wheel audio controls. Black and gray plastic is abundant throughout, but the spartan nature of the interior almost added to the functional charm of the car.

As we drove, I asked Brian what else he had considered in addition to the Leaf. “Honestly, other than Tesla, there isn’t another truly electric car on the market. In South Carolina, neither the Spark EV or the Focus EV is available for sale. Plus, Nissan just did this car correctly. Everything about it is right.” Upon entering the highway, I found it hard to disagree with him. I had no trouble coaxing speeds well over the 65 MPH limit out of the Leaf—in fact, the single gear transmission and lack of engine noise make it easy to nose the car past 80 without even realizing it. It never struggles or whines or roars…it just goes, and it does so without difficulty or complaint.

I kept watching the miles to empty tick down closer to zero, and as we got under ten, it no longer gave me an actual number. Instead, it just blinked at me. Brian said that it has been surprisingly accurate,over the course of his ownership, especially considering how difficult it can be to measure such things. He launched into a very technical explanation of why that was, but as a mere mortal, I just took his word for it.

I saved my final and most important question for last: If you only had two kids, would you consider making this your only car?

Brian hesitated slightly, and answered reluctantly. “No. I still like to go on trips every now and then, and the range of the Leaf just isn’t sufficient for that.” I couldn’t agree more. If you buy an EV then you are consciously making a choice that will change your lifestyle and fact is, some lifestyles are not made for conformity.

So, does Brian have any regrets about the decision to lease a Leaf?

“Not one. It’s been great. It’s exactly as advertised, and, again, Nissan did everything right when it came to this car.”

After my thirty-seven miles in the Leaf, I came to the same conclusion. Yes, it is, for all intents and purposes, an appliance. However, it doesn’t pretend to be anything but, and it also happens to be a damned good appliance. Everything about the car is exactly as it should be. Everything just works.

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My only complaint is the price. $28K before subsidies, and in South Carolina, about $21K after, which puts it squarely in the realm of some cars that might be more enjoyable to drive, still deliver good fuel economy, and have many more standard features (Fiesta, Sonic, Fit). That being said, it’s not a penalty box by any means, and if you drive enough to make the math work for you, then I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it. I liked it much more than I expected to, and if you aren’t “too cool” for it, you would, too.

Many thanks to Brian, who provided his car and a tank of…er, some electricity!

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77 Comments on “Reader Ride Review: 2013 Nissan Leaf...”


  • avatar
    bludragon

    OK, as an engineer my question is, did that Math include the lease down payment, lease end fee, additional insurance cost and the extra you pay for your electric not including what you pay to charge the car, but just to switch to the EV plan?

    The math worked out for me until I factored those in… But then, this would have to be a 3rd car for us, rather than a 2nd car replacement. The idea is very appealing though, especially as you get a carpool sticker as well. Actually it might be worth paying for just to get that.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      “OK, as an engineer my question is, did that Math include the lease down payment, lease end fee, additional insurance cost and the extra you pay for your electric not including what you pay to charge the car, but just to switch to the EV plan?”

      Versus those costs on a roughly-equivalent gas car? I would bet all but the “fuel” are a wash.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Nissan was doing so really crazy subvented lease deals on these, which is why a friend of mine bought one. The buyout is fantasy-land, and the money factor was actually negative on his lease, so it ended up being something like $139/mo. I don’t recall if he had to put anything down, but it wasn’t much. What he saves in gas on his big Nissan pickup running errands in the Leaf pays for the Leaf and the electricity. They pretty much couldn’t give them away in Maine.

        I think MSRP on these cars is largely theoretical outside of California.

  • avatar
    Hillman

    Nice car. I wish I had a garage so I could look at these cars. Also, did you look at the Volt for the extra range provided by the gas or were you looking at only EVs?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    They don’t have carpool lanes here, so that’s not a factor. However, I could totally see this working out for me. I don’t do a lot of road trips, so I don’t need a car that I can fill up on the go. If it got a guaranteed 150 miles on a charge (as I bet the next one will), I’d have one in my driveway…and I’d just keep an older, low-maintenance car on hand for the occasional long trip (like one of the GM 3800-powered cars), or just rent a car.

    And I’ve always liked the Leaf’s styling. I think it strikes a nice balance between eco and conventional. It doesn’t even look as geeky as less-exotic wares, such as the C-Max and especially the Prius. But that rear end looks decidedly French. Maybe Renault had a hand in designing it..?

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      The rear end looks to me like they sacrificed some interior space in order to enable it’s butt ugly back end styling. They could have filled out the car’s footprint with a longer greenhouse and interior space instead of huge bumper bulge.

    • 0 avatar
      TorontoSkeptic

      I agree, it’s an interesting look that’s better than the Volt. Kind of a “killer whale meets bug” style. I seem to remember it’s basically a Versa hatch structure, and it sure looks better than that.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      150 miles it the magic number for me as well. I commute 40 miles each way, and having the range right at 100 give or take for climate and battery life doesn’t leave enough wiggle room for me. I’d worry f I were to go out to lunch, have to drive to a different facility, or run an errand or 2 on the way home I’d be left stranded.

      150 though gives me everything I’d need for a single day. Heck, I could even take it to Ocean City or Philly provided I could charge it overnight to come home, and that’s not bad if you ask me.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    It’s umm, not horrible all black with black steelies like that.

    I followed an electric Focus into work yesterday. Now that’s an electric I could probably stand to own.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I wonder why the guy feels the need to display his Glock bumper sticker. I’ve spent some time around Greer, SC, it’s not exactly a hotbed for hipsters.

    Regardless of that, I’ve spoken to a few Leaf (and other alt-fuel car) owners, the vast majority are about as average as I’ve ever seen. Special interest cars attract the highly committed owners, these folks seem to enjoy a different style of driving.

    As I enter my empty nest phase, I like the idea of a car like this, although if we were to go down to one car, something like a Volt might make more sense.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “I wonder why the guy feels the need to display his Glock bumper sticker. I’ve spent some time around Greer, SC, it’s not exactly a hotbed for hipsters.”

      Probably why he doesn’t want to be seen as one. People are weary of outsiders.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      He’s just trying to prove he belongs in his community. I did the same kind of thing when I lived in the rural south.

      These days, I live somewhere where the fit with my community is more natural, so I don’t have to try as hard.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      I’d rather not advertise that I might have a gun in the vehicle, more so for breakins than police problems around here. Still, the Volt can hold an awful lot of guns and ammo, Newt-rack or no.

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      “I wonder why the guy feels the need to display his Glock bumper sticker.”

      As soon as I saw the sticker thing, I’m sorry, but the first word that popped into my head was douchebag. First of all, if he’s carrying (even ccw licensed) it’s not smart AT ALL to advertise it, and it’s a remarkable kind of not smart to advertise the specific weapon (for various reasons I won’t get into here)
      Second, the Glock sticker doesn’t change one bit any impressions I may or may not form about his personality/politics/whatever vis-a-vis the car.

      Just stupid.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Wow.

    When’s the last time you’ve seen a Glock decal on an EV?

    Also, I never did get the whole steelie wheelie thing.

    I had a buddy of mine who stripped the wheel covers off his ’04 Elantra 5 speed. Less things to break, maybe?

    Not for aesthetic purposes. Hopefully…?

    Nevertheless, I applaud your economic efforts for a few extra bucks around the household.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Steelies say, “I’m not poor, I like this look”.

      Plastic hubcaps say, “I can’t afford nice wheels.”

      • 0 avatar
        Felis Concolor

        For about 3x the cost of a new set of wheel covers, one can have bare steelies powder coated in a wide range of contrasting or complementary colors. A bright red, yellow or blue set of wheels would make a good attention grabbing scheme with that Leaf.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        Gotcha.

        Thank You, Danio.

        FWIW, I don’t mind steelies- but the ones I’m referring to usually are silver and may (or may not) have a center cap.

        The ones that aren’t designed to have wheel covers over them, I suppose.

        I’ve actually seen my fair share of “widened steelies”. When I had my Jetta, that was quite the modification. Not sure how popular that is now.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I remember that the previous Malibu LS had steelies that were shaped to hide behind the plastic hubcaps. The current Malibu may also have that “feature”.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Steelies say, “As an OEM I give up design wise and will just put some cheap plastic here”. Similar to DLO fail. Sorry I’m not digging it. Looks like he lost the plastic cover and was too cheap to replace them. The only time steelies are acceptable are on police edition vehicles, so to that point what this Leaf needs is a light bar on top and push bar in the front.

      • 0 avatar
        hybridkiller

        “Steelies say, “I’m not poor, I like this look”.”

        Except when they say, “I can’t afford nice wheels, but I hate plastic hubcaps”.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I have several engineer coworkers that drive Prii and seem to think that guns are the second coming of christ. I’m probably the only engineer on the staff that drives a Prius and doesn’t give a crap about guns. The Prius is just a normal car these days. You pay a little more up front for a car that costs a little less to keep on the road. In a state like WV, probably a lot like SC, you see way more Prii with conservative bumper stickers than Prii with liberal.

      (My Prius v has a flying WV on the back glass. No other stickers.)

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        Hmm.

        Gun guy, here. With regards to guns, Missouri is basically a “Little Texas”.

        We actually had a gun law in deliberation where the boys in the Capital down in Jeff City were trying to decriminalize automatic weapons. Shot down the first time, I think it may still be up in the air.(Lol, can’t say I’m against that, but can certainly understand the concern!)

        Further, I like a good, unbreakable Austrian Glock. But as for me and my house, when shooting polymer pistols, we go with M&P :P

        In Missouri, we’re a pretty conservative, traditional bunch. A trip to the range and you’ll find many a pick-up truck and BOF SUV- rather, the Suburban Trio. As well as mostly domestic sedans.

        I work at a corporate center with probably about 120 folks here at any given time. Out of them, one person drives a Prius- the IT guy.

        Welcome to the bible thumpin’ Midwest. In other words, vote Republican or perish.

        It’s always fun playing a round of “Name Your Geographical Norms”.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Most car purchases aren’t politically motivated. One of the most hardcore gun collectors I know has a Fusion hybrid as his daily. It made sense for him as a used car purchase, and that’s generally what it comes down to.

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      If I were leasing the car, I’d take them off, too, since they’re easily lost or damaged and would incur an extra charge at lease end if that were the case.

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    I’ve always wondered how EVs fared in regions with cold Winters 4 – 5 months out of the year. How does that affect range and/or longevity of the battery pack?

    I’ve seen salt covered Tesla S’es here in the dead of Winter so I suspect they work well?

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      It reduces the range, doesn’t harm the longevity. There’s a double whammy in cold weather because the vehicle’s heater can consume rather a lot of battery. For a Tesla which has a substantial battery pack it’s probably not that much of an issue, but for cars like the LEAF that have marginal range to begin with, it can be a problem.

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        I can’t speak for American spec cars, but I was at a release event for the Leaf in Canada, where they talked about making heated seats a standard feature because it was a more energy efficient way to warm the driver and passenger.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          They’re standard here as well. Later model LEAFs have a reverse cycle A/C that is used for heat.

          The heated seats are nice, but if it’s below 40 degrees F and there is no sun, at some point you’re going to want heated air. Most (all?) plug in cars can be set to have the cabin heated to a set temperature while still plugged it, which is very nice in the morning.

          • 0 avatar
            IHateCars

            Not to mention defrosting windshields.

            Sometimes, I really wish I was the type of guy who viewed cars as mere appliances because something like this checks most, if not all the efficiency/practicality boxes. but I just can’t see myself driving one yet…

          • 0 avatar
            FormerFF

            The LEAF is really a lot of fun to drive. Any electric has all of its torque available immediately so they all seem quicker than they are. In traffic that counts for a lot.

          • 0 avatar
            360joules

            In the current US model mix, you have to upgrade from the S trim to get the heat pump.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Because of the state subsidy, we see lots of LEAFs in Atlanta. I think there are five in my office’s parking lot and it’s a rare day that you don’t see at least one on any trip over five miles. I’ve yet to see one that appears to be driven by hippies. They are bought, or more likely leased, for economic reasons.

  • avatar
    Fred

    So why can’t hippies have guns?

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Because a hippie with a gun would be a “real ‘murican” with long hair, instead of a hippie.

      Despite the fact that shooting is an fun skill to build for those who are so inclined, It’s not as much about the actual guns as much as it’s about deciding who’s “your people” and, more importantly, who’s “not your people”.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      That’s like asking why vegans can’t eat bacon.

    • 0 avatar
      360joules

      “You’d be a great hippie, Dad. Lazy and self-righteous.” – Bart Simpson.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I have some important questions. Would many Leafs be Leaves? Is a Scandinavian Nissan EV a Leif?

  • avatar
    shipping96

    I like the murdered out look as the hipsters call it on this Leaf.

    Unfortunately I have to do some long distance driving and I’m not a regular commuter so this car wouldn’t work for my family, except as a 3rd car. But hopefully someday my situatin will change and electric vehicles will get better range and a price point cheaper than Tesla’s.

    Nice review. I like this approach of reviewing reader’s cars.

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    The electrics really are nice: I’ve testdriven all the majors (Leaf, i3, Tesla), and even a “slow” EV like the leaf has an instantaneous nature that is really unique.

    The current Leaf, however, I believe should be lease-only: the passively cooled battery does end up having some longevity issues. Liquid cooled batteries are IMO necessary if you buy the car rather than lease, so I’m probably going to wait for Gen2 and/or just bite the bullet and get an i3 REx.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      I think I’ll wait before testing the i3, though from what I’ve read it has ~1″ more headroom than the Volt, and that would be a big plus for me. I kinda lucked out on the 2011 Volt, as it turned out to be pretty reliable and bug-free, which for a brand new design is more impressive than it should be.

  • avatar
    healthy skeptic

    Speaking as an EV proponent, it’s nice to see that most of these comments are receptive and open-minded towards the Leaf and EVs in general. The average attitude seems to be: “Might work for me one of these days.”

    Fifteen years ago, a review of an EV on this or any other automotive enthusiast website would have probably generated 75% knee-jerk derisive comments. Of course, the 90′s-era compliance cars weren’t as good as today’s EVs, but I also think there’s been a general awakening that these cars are for real, particularly as the next few years will likely bring addition improvements in range and cost.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I like it when people agree with me too. Sometimes though, they shouldn’t. And that frightens me.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “Might work for me one of these days.”

      That’s me. If something like the Transit Connect wagon or Nissan NV200 taxi shows up as an EV for under 30K I’ll haunt the dealers till I get a test drive.

      We never drive if we can fly, my 2010 Camry has only 23-something K on it and my daily commute is 10.5 miles round trip. I’m perfect for an EV, but it’s gotta be utilitarian.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Da-yum! Blak walls, black round-slot steelies and no covers!

    Just what I was saying yesterday about the Daihatsu!

    I am so impressed by me :-D

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Still waiting for Caroline’s personal review of a Malaise-Era Brougham :)

  • avatar
    turboprius

    My dad loves these, and may get one when we purchase a fourth vehicle sometime in 2015. The low ride height may draw us back, though, and I don’t know the electric vehicle discounts for Georgia.

    I think Brian made a good choice, both with the car and the bumper sticker. Just needs some hubcaps. ;)

  • avatar
    YellowDuck

    Am I going to get sued or banned or something if I just mention how pretty Caroline looks in that picture standing in front of the car? I am not a real hound or anything but….wow, pretty lady.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    taking the wheel covers off a leased vehicle means its one less thing to get lost, stolen, or damaged when returned at lease end. and it looks ok, because who cares? its a leased EV.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      People still steal wheel covers?

      Sh*t, man. Hard times in Cali?

      Paying 600K for an 850 square foot house probably doesn’t help.

      Neener, neener!

      • 0 avatar
        JohnnyFirebird

        People steal VW hubc… wheel covers… all the time in Montreal. Not sure what the black market worth on them is. Also wheel caps get stolen all the time.

        Someone finally tried ripping the Jaguar statue off of an X-Type in our lot the day it was sold. Fortunately the thing didn’t come off, until the car was driven into the garage.

        Weirdest theft: someone ripped the SRT4 logo off of my Caliber. I guess to put on a crappy Neon?

  • avatar
    Disaster

    Nissan cheaped out with the Leaf and didn’t include any battery cooling system. As a result, the batteries take a beating, especially in warmer climates (like Arizona.) After only a year people are down 30% battery life. Lots of complaints.

  • avatar
    Slow_Joe_Crow

    Speaking from the experience of a friend who is on his second Leaf, black paint is a bad idea, especially in a warm climate. Leaf 1 was the ubiquitous light blue metallic and Leaf 2 is white and noticeably cooler when left in the parking lot. This is a big help since Leaf 2 is the base model without the telematics package so he can’t pre-cool the car remotely any more.
    The math works out pretty well for a 40 mile per day commute in Portland Oregon with cheap/free electricity (dude just installed solar panels on his house). The real kicker is that one month’s lease payment and electricity is less than one tank of diesel for the guy at the next desk’s F350 crew cab. His long trip solution is a 99 Subaru bought used and cheap and his wife’s daily driver is a Think City electric car.
    Personally I commute even cheaper with a bicycle and light rail.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Why only steel wheels? If one is going for the all black effect would a set of 15in painted wheels be too much to buy?

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      The guy is leasing, and chose the car for ostensibly economic reasons – buying wheels for aesthetics doesn’t sound to me like his next move.
      In any case, I stopped trying to analyze this guy’s motivations with the Glock sticker.

  • avatar
    JohnnyFirebird

    Isn’t everyone on here libertarian-leaning? I just figured. I vote NDP / Coalition Avenir Québec but fortunately that doesn’t mean anything to anyone outside of this weird province.

    I’ve never been in a Leaf or Volt, I’m really curious to try driving one. My hybrid experience has mostly been SUVs, the CR-Z we have in our lot, and a Camry Hybrid.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    “It’s as fast from 0-45 as a BRZ,”

    Did he mention any reference for this? Car and Driver got a 0-30 of 2.1 seconds and 0-60 of 6.4 seconds for the BRZ’s twin, the FR-S, and only 3.4/10.2 for the Leaf SL. It’s hard to imagine the Leaf pulled ahead anywhere between that. Is the S much lighter than the SL? Even if he was comparing it to the automatic version of the BRZ, I can’t see that being more than a second slower to each mark. A 5-60 rolling start puts them closer, at 8.1 vs. 10.1, so I could see how the Leaf could maybe nip an automatic BRZ in a 5-45.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Caroline – your stereotype Leaf driver is me. Mechanical engineer, 5 kids, minivan in the family fleet, Libertarian-leaning.

    During the 2012 election, I really wanted to place an Obama sticker on the left side, and a Romney sticker on the right – just to confuse people – but mostly Righties get my vote.

    Brian will have better luck in the SC winter than a PA winter, but I have few complaints about my 2012 Leaf, except I’ve learned how to correct for the fictitious range meter, and the nav system is atrocious. After 15k miles, I love it.


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