By on June 6, 2014

2015-Ford-F150-Front

Ford is in a transition phase: readying the new 2015 F-150 while trying to sell the old model as often as possible. This requires knowing just how many F-Series pickups dealers will need in the weeks leading up to the new model’s introduction.

Too few is a problem, as is too many. Of course, Ford has experience in this arena. They’ve restructured plants before, they’ve forecasted summer truck sales for outgoing trucks before, they’ve done so while continuing to play a major role in America’s truck market before. But we can still expect to see some fluctuation in the figures put up by America’s best-selling vehicle line.

Indeed, May F-Series sales fell by 3084 units. Where did those buyers go? General Motors added 3365 Chevrolet Silverado sales and 2265 GMC Sierra sales compared with May 2013, Chrysler said Ram truck sales grew by 5459 units, and Toyota reported an extra 1441 Tundra sales.

In other words, a handful of potential F-Series buyers may have headed elsewhere – and they could just be waiting – but the truck market added thousands of buyers last month. America’s full-size truck segment grew by more than 5%, or 9210 units, in May 2014. Year-to-date sales are up 6%, or 45,469 units.

At this point last year, six full-size truck nameplates accounted for 87% of the pickups sold in the first five months of 2013. They’ve moved that figure forward to 89% in 2014; 89.3% during the month of May specifically.

Compared with the first five months of 2013, GM and Ford have both lost 1.5 percentage points of market share in the category. Fears that GM’s new trucks couldn’t take advantage of what would inevitably be a more challenging start to the year for Ford have been set aside, to a degree, over the last couple of months, as Silverado/Sierra market share held steady in April (on a year-over-year basis) and improved in May, both on a year-over-year basis and compared with April.

Ram and Toyota are more expertly capitalizing on the opportunity, at least from a purely volume-oriented perspective. Ram’s share of the full-size truck segment has grown by nearly three percentage points as volume has shot up by more than 30,000 units over the last five months. Toyota has added 7204 Tundra sales so far this year.

During the first five months of the Tundra’s best ever calendar year, 2007, the Tundra generated 6.9% of the sales produced by these six trucks. (GM’s share was 39.6%; Ford’s was 32.8%. The full-size market itself was 10% bigger than it has been so far this year.) Toyota isn’t going to sell 196,555 Tundras in 2014 like they did in 2013, but the brand is rapidly moving back to those kinds of market share levels.

Ram’s move up the ladder is impressive, but it pales in comparison to what they’ve accomplished in Canada. 29.5% of the full-size trucks sold in Canada so far this year have been Rams. GM Canada’s twins trail the Ram P/U lineup by 3026 units heading into June.

Unworthy of mention now that GM has all but extinguished the last of its inventory, the Chevrolet Avalanche outsold the Nissan Titan by 578 units in May of last year. Cadillac sold three Escalade EXTs in May 2014; Chevrolet reported a single Avalanche sale.

Truck
May
2014
May
2013
%
Change
5 mos.
2014
5 mos.
2013
%
Change
Ford F-Series
68,520 71,604 -4.3% 305,265 299,477 +1.9%
Chevrolet Silverado
46,648 43,283 +7.8% 197,160 199,327 -1.1%
Ram P/U
37,131 31,672 +17.2% 170,711 140,675 +21.4%
GMC Sierra
18,326 16,061 +14.1% 77,785 71,065 +9.5%
Toyota Tundra
11,391 9950 +14.5% 49,010 41,806 +17.2%
Nissan Titan
1166 1402 -16.8% 5440 7552 -28.0%
Total
183,182 173,972 +5.3% 805,371 759,902 +6.0%

 

Truck
May
2014
Share
May
2013
Share
5 mos.
2014
Share
5 mos.
2013
Share
Ford F-Series
37.4% 41.2% 37.9% 39.4%
Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra
35.5% 34.1% 34.1% 35.6%
Ram P/U
20.3% 18.2% 21.2% 18.5%
Toyota Tundra
6.2% 5.7% 6.1% 5.5%
Nissan Titan
0.6% 0.8% 0.7% 1.0%
Full-Size Share Of
Total Pickup Truck Market
89.3% 87.2% 89.0% 87.0%
Full-Size Pickup Share
Of Total Industry
11.4% 12.0% 11.9% 11.8%
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31 Comments on “Cain’s Segments, May 2014: Trucks...”


  • avatar
    LALoser

    *truck*…CHICKEN TAX!

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I find it a pity that information and data regarding the sales numbers of pickups is so hard to decipher in the US.

    How hard is it for the manufacturers to breakdown the sales by Class, body type and number of wheels driving the vehicle.

    What is the reason for this? What are the manufacturers trying to hide?

    • 0 avatar
      See 7 up

      As a consumer, why does it matter? Do you only buy things if others buy or don’t buy “x” amount?

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @See 7 up – pickup trucks unlike a car model have multiple configurations as well as cargo and tow ratings. If you want to know how many small, mid-sized, and large cars Ford sold it is easy to decipher.
        Pickup sales lump 150/1500 sales with everything up to 4500 trucks. You are looking at pickups lumped together that have anywhere from a 6K tow rating right up to commercial licence level 30k tow ratings.
        A diesel crew dually is a tad bit different than a reg cab short box V6.

        • 0 avatar
          See 7 up

          Great info, but again, who cares. Do you decide to buy a 2500 Ram dual cab fancy horn long penis addition, but then double take because you read the short horn hairy ball crew cab 2500 diesel outsold it?

          Now if you want the info for investment or some other reason, OK – maybe

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Why do you think everything to do with full size pickups and pickups in the US in general is some sort of conspiracy? What value is there to you in knowing how many regular cab 2wd 1/2 tons vs crew cab 3/4 ton 4wd vs ….?

  • avatar
    morbo

    This is good. Hopefully the new Titan shakes things up some more. The harder they fight the better trucks we’ll get.

    Might even force GM to build a decent truck. Maybe even get a steering wheel designed after the Clinton administration or a radio without a pukesick-green dot matrix display.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    It’s too bad there’s not a break out between 1/2, 3/4 and 1 ton machines. Ram 1/2 tonners are decidedly less capable than GM, Ford and Toyota when it comes to cargo and towing capacity. In fact, the new GM 1/2 tonners are pretty close to the gasoline-powered 3/4 tonners in that area.

    So, if Ram is getting increasing share in the 1/2 ton market, what that would appear to say is that the buyers of these trucks are not particularly interested in big towing or big cargo capacity. If they want that, they’ll step up to the 3/4 ton gasoline engined model for not much more money.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @DC Bruce – I agree for the most part but most do not step up to the next level. That would require self awareness.

      I read somewhere that roughly 1/2 of pickups are sold for personal/lifestyle use and the other 1/2 for job related work.
      With that being said, the ones that tend to pay attention to capacities are going to be the “work” guys.

      I got in a debate with a guy on a pickup blog and the guy was a Ram fanboy blowing smoke up everyone’s ass about the Ram Ecodiesel. The site tested a fully loaded one. The door tag said 880lb cargo rating but they weighed the truck and due to bling etc. it actually had 480 lb(IIRC) left over. Myself and another guy went into tongue weight, cargo weight, and tow ratings and the guy was clueless even though he pretended to be smart. He described what he towed and hauled which would of been okay for my truck or the other blogger’s truck in the debate. He didn’t even know what the door tag rating was for his truck. When he actually looked and posted it, he had been routinely exceeding all of the ratings for his truck. He then went to try to defend it.

      If one wants to talk about stepping up to 3/4 ton or 1 ton trucks Ram has softened the ratings for the coil spring 3/4 ton trucks. The PowerWagon for example lost around 300 lb of cargo rating going from leafs to coils. That puts it within striking distance of the F150 SuperCrew Raptor which is known for being a wimp in the cargo capacity.

      Stepping up to a HD pickup for most is an expensive and unnecessary proposition. You pay more for the truck, your maintenance and fuel costs rise as well as insurance costs.

      One would think that buying a truck is a logical process but from what I see, it is as highly emotional and as illogical as gaggle of women in a handbag store.

      (No offence meant to the gaggle of women)

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        You do pay more for the HD pickup but you do not necessarily pay more for maintenance and fuel. Used the same the bigger brakes and tires will last longer on the HD truck offsetting the higher cost of those parts. If you get the same engine and gear ratio and use it in the same manner the very slight increase in weight will have a negligible impact on fuel economy. The reality is at least at the Ford store you can order your F150 so that it has a 3000lb payload more than even many 1 ton trucks of yore.

        But I do agree that for the consumer truck purchaser it is an emotional purchase not a logical one and the average buyer doesn’t have a clue as to the rated capability of their truck. I’ve seen way too many people claim they have a “towing package” because an aftermarket hitch has been installed and claim their truck is capable of towing how much that aftermarket hitch is rated for.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @Scoutdude
          If you’re a diehard Republican why do you need to know what the Dems are doing?

          Does it matter?

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Scoutdude: On the other hand, when compared to a mid-sized truck or smaller…

          “Used the same the bigger brakes and tires will last longer on the HD truck offsetting the higher cost of those parts.”
          False. Used the same, because of the higher weight of the truck under all conditions, the brakes and tires will wear out at just about the same time as those on a smaller and lighter car.

          “If you get the same engine and gear ratio and use it in the same manner the very slight increase in weight will have a negligible impact on fuel economy.” Except with a smaller truck the notable DECREASE in weight will have a significant impact on fuel economy.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            I was not comparing a 3/4 ton truck to a car or midsize truck. I was comparing a 1/2 ton to a 3/4 or 1 ton of the same brand. Used for the same purposes the brakes on the 3/4 or 1 ton will last longer and assuming the same quality of tires they will last longer too. The difference in weight between the 1/2 ton and 3/4 ton GM or Ram truck in the same configuration is negligible. For the Ford it is a little more significant.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Which is why I emphasized cars, Scout. The numbers above show that while full-sized trucks hold nearly 90% of the overall pickup market in the States, mid-sizers hold 10% and were they smaller and consequently more economical, they would hold a significantly larger share–double or even triple that of the current level. That would be a big enough market to attract even the D3 and MIGHT take some of the onus off the full sized trucks on economy.

            Meanwhile, despite your argument about parts longevity, brake and tires will still only last as long as any other vehicle because their weight overrides any increases in durability with increased wear.

      • 0 avatar
        See 7 up

        You must drive the women crazy with these stories of mental conquest.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Yet there are those who don’t want to ‘step up to the next level’, they want to step downwards–roughly two steps. More size and more power makes me think that pickup trucks have become the REAL muscle cars of today, while the Camaro, Mustang and Challenger have become “RetroFogey” cars with comparatively little capability. Heck, you can’t even stick one of the bigger engines from a truck under the hood of one of these cars, yet the ancestral Mustang, Camaro and especially the Charger/Challenger duo used to carry the biggest engines available for ANY private vehicle–pickup trucks got by with inline sixes and comparatively tiny V8s except for some very custom-trim models in the late ’60s and after.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Sure there are some people who want a smaller truck, the problem is that there just aren’t enough of them who will buy them new and not stripped to the bone to make it worth while for many mfgs to play in that segment.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          So you and many others say, but just as certainly there are others who disagree with you who don’t read these boards. I personally believe compact and mid-sized trucks could take up to 30% of the overall pickup truck market–which is a big enough segment to at least get the attention of the OEMs. The problem is, opinion polls are useless because the OEMs simply don’t know who to ask or how to ask the question.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Even in an off-month, Ford still edges out Chevy+GMC sales by 3,546.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Well I’d say that this means that consumers are not afraid of the new aluminum F150. Though it could possibly mean that Ford got the mix of the final production of the 2014 wrong and there just aren’t enough trucks in the configuration that people want to buy on dealer’s lots. If there were lots of people who were afraid of the aluminum truck I’d expect sales to go up, again assuming that there are trucks on the lot to meet the demand. The days of inventory on hand would certainly help complete the picture. Of course the Super Duty does make up a significant number of the F-series sales and it isn’t due for a radical change.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Scoutdude – I’m not seeing a shortage of trucks on any Ford lot in my region. I am surprised to see a few 2013′s still sitting on the lot. My local dealer has at least eight 2013 1/2 tons and one SuperDuty left.

      I wonder if 1/2 of new truck buyers are even aware of the fact that Ford is switching to aluminum?

      • 0 avatar

        My mom knows and she doesn’t care about any vehicle other than here 2006 CRV because the news reported on it when Ford released pictures of the new truck.

        At our dealership there is some anticipation for pricing, I think many folks who could go either way are waiting to see how that pans out. That being said, most folks seem buy a new vehicle when they need one more than on a planned cycle.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The fact that they have that many 2013′s makes me wonder if they have trucks equipped the way people want them. Someone looking for Platinum or King Ranch isn’t likely to go for a base truck and vise versa.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          My local Ford dealership always has more high-end trucks than low on the lot, though it seems they always try to keep at least one “stripper” available. That “stripper” usually stays longer than any other model but their King Ranch-level trucks take a long time to move as well. It’s almost always the mid-grad… The XLT through Lariat seem the most popular around here with a few FX4 on the road. I’ve seen one or two King Ranch and so far only ONE Raptor. The lots? Always two or three King Ranch, one Raptor and typically a modest selection of Lariat on down.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I agree with Lou that a lot of truck buyers buy on emotion especially those who are on a pickup truck only site. Most of those guys buy a truck more because they want one and less because they need one. For many it is like a big kid with a new toy. Trucks have gone beyond being a practical utilitarian vehicle into an ego thing for many (not all). There is one guy on PUTC said he felt embarassed to drive his relatively new F-150 and was going to buy a Ram. Who says that women are the only ones who are vain?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Jeff S
      How true, most pickups are wants and not needs.

      Even here in Australia I think less than 20% are physically used for work and many “business” pickups are tax write offs that are in essence a family SUV with a balcony.

      It is probably similar in the US, Canada and NZ as well.

      Thailand the world’s second largest pickup market is moving into the “want” direction as well.

      A mid to high end pickups here is a sign of middle class success.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    @Jeff S – I think that guy was a troll. He tried the tactic of being an ultra-hardcore Ford fanboy to make Ford look bad and when that failed he “came out of the closet” exposing himself as one of the Rambo Motard Goat Herders.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Lou BC–That’s true, I did think about that. Nevertheless he was an immature jerk who probably doesn’t know his head from his rear end. I enjoy a good discussion but that site has become infected with a lot of immature fan boys. Honestly I have had all 3 of the Detroit brands and some foreign and I have been overall satisfied. Anyone can get a lemon and if you don’t take care of any vehicle it will be troublesome.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Lou BC–Agree, the fan boys have ruined it. I really like the articles on TTAC and enjoy reading the comment section–I always learn something new.


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