By on May 14, 2014

2015-chrysler-2001

With the 2025 industry-wide fuel economy target of 54.5 mpg a decade away, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne believes “the house will make it” as far as all under the Chrysler Group umbrella are concerned, with a little help from hybridization of a number of models.

Automotive News reports Marchionne believes hybrids will “become a very large component” of the fleet going forward, stating that without them, meeting the mandate would be “impossible” for FCA’s Pentastar offerings.

Part of that plan may come through Chrysler Group’s new nine-speed automatic transmission, which will be used throughout the division’s line of FWD vehicles, starting with the 2014 Jeep Cherokee and 2015 Chrysler 200; the latter, released to dealers earlier this month, provides up to 36 mpg on the highway with the transmission delivering power to the front wheels.

Licensed from ZF Friedrichshafen and manufactured in FCA’s Kokomo, Ind. plant, the nine-speed transmission will see additional production at the formerly idle Tipton County, Ind. transmission factory. The $162 million refurbished plant will employ 850 by 2015, and will produce 800,000 transmissions annually at full capacity.

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26 Comments on “Marchionne: Hybrids Will Help Chrysler Group Meet 2025 54.5 MPG Mandate...”


  • avatar
    thelaine

    Insane for citizens to accept this mandate.

    • 0 avatar

      Citizens don’t have to accept it, corporations do.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        By extension, it limits consumer choice and affects pricing. If consumers decide they don’t want EVs and hybrids, the corporations will still need to find a way to force them onto the market to offset the regulatory costs of the less fuel efficient vehicles that people do want to buy.

        Maybe the small pickup jihadists here should lobby the government to pass a mandate that automakers must market manual transmission, RWD, compact stripper trucks or face steep penalties. Worked for the small contingent that wants EVs, amirite?

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          It’s simple buy a Ram/Jeep and get a “free” EV. Boom CAFE met. Of course that means the Ram and Jeep will get sort of expensive. Yes I know that the truck CAFE number is separate from the car CAFE number.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          Personally, I’m loving it. I’d much rather pay the manufacturer up front to reduce my gasoline purchases for the next 10 years. I have no desire to support the various oil despots of the world any more than I have to and am glad that fuel efficient cars are now available.

    • 0 avatar

      Licensed from ZF Friedrichshafen and cast, forged, machined, and assembled in FCA’s Kokomo, Ind. plants.
      There I fixed it for you.

    • 0 avatar
      LeadHead

      54.5 CAFE MPG really isn’t as scary as it sounds. That really only equates to about 36 window-sticker MPG.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Translation: That bet-it-all-on-diesel strategy ain’t gonna work.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I don’t think even FCA had any reservations that it would.

      Meanwhile, you’ve got FoMoCo, whose reaction to diesel is, “what, that smelly stuff those big ugly trucks run on? Why would you want that?”

      The Escape is sold as the Kuga in Europe (or rather, the Kuga is sold as the Escape in the US) with a 6MT and a diesel. Congratulations, Ford, you’ve made me want something that I can’t have.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      But wasn’t it just last week that they said diesel was the savior (along with 27 speed transmissions)?

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    What happened to the hybrid minivan and Wrangler they were working on a few years ago?

    • 0 avatar

      You will have to wait for the redesigned minivans.

    • 0 avatar
      LeadHead

      That whole “envi” program was basically a farce setup by Cerberus to make it look like Chrysler had good future product on the horizon. None of the vehicles were really production ready, They basically had off the shelf electric drive components dropped in. That’s why Marchione dissolved the Envi group when Fiat took over.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      They’re now talking up those particular examples of hybrid vaporware again.

      The only hybrids that Chrysler released were Durango/Aspens using the GM system and they abandoned that pretty quick. I have zero faith that Chrysler can get anything useful going any time soon.

      Does Fiat have a workable system of any kind? I sort of doubt it.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I’ve been driving a hybrid for the last couple of months. It’s been wonderful, for town driving it’s great and it does very well on the highway too. I don’t think I’d ever go back to a non-hybrid, unless it was a pure EV.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      Idling at stop lights is particularly pointless. For a while, I was shutting off the engine when I expected to stop for more than a few seconds but it was a pain in the neck to do that.

      I greatly prefer the car doing it automatically.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        I did the same in my previous car, if I knew I’d be idling for a minute or more.

        I’d never driven a hybrid before, but once I got mime, I was surprised at in the suburban driving I do, what a low percentage of the time the engine is running. It’s mostly hilly around here, and the engine is only on when climbing hills or accelerating, and that’s less than half of my drive.

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    The EPA at will changes CAFE standards.
    Current save the planet PV panels are 15 percent conversion efficient with one company advertising 20 percent. After the conversion 21 percent electricity is line loss to power lines.
    What is good for the auto industry is also good for the PV industry.
    30 percent panel conversion efficiency or no “incentives”.
    Just impose it.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      The EPA does not set CAFE standards. They were most recently updated through an agreement between the Obama administration and the automakers, but the legal authority and original standards were passed by Congress in 2007.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Back to the Future.

    It may mean 85 hp cars w/ 0-60 in 15 seconds like the late 1970′s/early 1980′s. Making today’s cars more valuable

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    Funny thing. Cars have gotten more economical and automakers have engaged in an insane flurry of engineering new solutions, yet cars are just as, if not more powerful. And lighter weight. Guarantee that if this mandate didn’t exist we wouldn’t have an F150 with a 700 lb weight loss or a diesel powered Ram 1500 in America.

    Anyone remember the days when a 400 horsepower v8 in a small, light car got 16 mpg highway, 11 city? Wasn’t really all that long ago (the example referenced being the 360 Modena)

  • avatar
    shaker

    Under the “massive yoke” of government regulations, cars are getting more efficient, faster, safer, and more durable. And though the MSRP’s are higher, they’re still affordable to own. Competition under regulation (the ‘moral’, as opposed to ‘unbridled’ “Free Market”) appears to be a reasonable compromise (in this case).


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