By on April 3, 2014
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So far, Cadillac has moved just 180 units of the ELR in 2014 – at that pace, Cadillac stands to sell just 720 units in 2014, far short of the often-stated 2,000-3,000 unit annual sales target.

Even worse is the inventory picture. According to Cars.com, there are 1,077 ELRs available at dealers, which could translate to almost a year’s supply of the $76,000 plug-in hybrid.

The ELR is unequivocally a flop: between the absurd price tag, the fiasco erupting over Cadillac’s now-infamous TV ad and the early recall of the car, the launch of Cadillac’s “green” halo car could not have gone any worse. The only question is, how long will it last?

Personally, I think that it won’t make it past the 2015 model year. Dealers are already inundated with inventory, including multiple examples of the Saks Fifth Avenue tie-in cars, and the market for a $76k Cadillac version of the Volt is just not that large.

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158 Comments on “QOTD: How Long Will The Cadillac ELR Last?...”


  • avatar
    banker43

    That commercial is pretty funny. Anyone offended by it needs to check their sense of humor. The real problem is it probably will never sell any cars. But what commercial ever really does anyway? I’m glad thy had the guts to to go with it.

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      Agreed. I found the advertisement to be very clever – straddling the line between taking itself seriously, but then mocking itself, all the while hitting on very ‘American’ themes.

    • 0 avatar
      darkwing

      I wasn’t offended; I was scared. After the performance that guy gave on Justified a couple seasons back, I was worried he was going to shoot me if I didn’t buy one.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        I only know McDonough through his work on Justified, and thought it came off as “this is what psychopaths who want to project green drive”. It freaked me out. Mix in the bailout stigma and the group of us watching the Sochi opening agreed the ad would never move a car. Maybe if I know his work on Band of Brothers it would be a different experience?

        • 0 avatar
          carrya1911

          He also played Buck Compton in Band of Brothers. So I saw a WWII war hero telling people to work harder. Works for me.

          As for the image thing, I find that to be a very curious thing. People want to project “green” because in certain segments of society being *seen* as “green” confers upon you the assumption of virtue. You could sue people into poverty and confiscate their property, pilfer the intellectual property of others for profit, mine people’s personal data for sale to others on the theory that “Well, they don’t HAVE to use the website!”, and generally do all manner of heinous things to actual people that cause actual harm…but if you’re in a “green” car you’re not a bad person.

          We’ve come full circle. Used to be you had to go to the church and buy an indulgence, but now all you have to do is buy a Tesla and put an Obama sticker on the back and you’re absolved.

          • 0 avatar
            05lgt

            Nah, it’s the same deal as ever. If you buy the Book, He’ll know you by your works, not your words, afiliations, or contributions to the church.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            carrya1911: “As for the image thing, I find that to be a very curious thing. People want to project “green” because in certain segments of society being *seen* as “green” confers upon you the assumption of virtue. You could sue people into poverty and confiscate their property, pilfer the intellectual property of others for profit, mine people’s personal data for sale to others on the theory that “Well, they don’t HAVE to use the website!”, and generally do all manner of heinous things to actual people that cause actual harm…but if you’re in a “green” car you’re not a bad person.”

            What color is the sky in your world?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          He’s also M. Bison in the second Street Fighter movie. Not that anyone watched it.

          I remember him most from Minority Report.

          • 0 avatar

            I like how his character in Justified (the best dramatic series on tv right now IMHO) was disarmed. Fabulous twist on Chekhov’s Gun.

            Link didn’t work the first time:
            youtube.com/watch?v=YjqF5Vcn6Ns

          • 0 avatar
            Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

            “I like how his character in Justified (the best dramatic series on tv right now IMHO) was disarmed.”

            What you did there?

            I see it.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          McDonough was the Tin Man in the movie “Tin Man” (Netflix-able), which was a very promising reboot of the Wizard of Oz but ultimately not that great (mediocre script, poor ending and the female lead, Zoey Deschanel, wasn’t so hot in this role).

      • 0 avatar

        > I wasn’t offended; I was scared. After the performance that guy gave on Justified a couple seasons back

        Hey how’s that content coming along? If you need help with the material or thinking let me know.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I like the ad, but the problem with GM is that they didn’t have the guts to go with it. Originally, he was supposed to end his monologue by getting into his Escalade, a vehicle that would actually make sense for such a person with a family. Cadillac decided that reality wasn’t the message they were after.

      • 0 avatar
        carrya1911

        …which demonstrates the absurdity of “green”. If you think the spot makes your company look like it’s marketing to jerks when it’s an Escalade, the calculus shouldn’t really change any if he’s getting into a “green” electric.

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      Agreed. That’s about the only Cadillac commercial that I voluntarily sat through.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I actually liked the commercial I was simply disappointed by the Electric Cimmaron they put at the end. Guarantee the same hybrid stunt in a limited production Ciel would have sold better, if not been a hit.

    • 0 avatar
      Maseraudi

      I have to agree with you even if I am French. It is a funny commercial… But it is not clever because it is exclusive and not inclusive meaning that it is aimed at a very thin slice of the market. Berating the “cheese eating surrender monkeys” while extolling the “mmmerican” values should have worked better than sold a handful of cars.
      I know these are glorified Volts and moving shy of 200 cars is not a small feat but still… This ad was meant to rally the conservative crowd onto the Cadillac dealerships… I don’t know why but this reminds me of the Mc Cain campaign…

      • 0 avatar

        > But it is not clever because it is exclusive and not inclusive meaning that it is aimed at a very thin slice of the market. Berating the “cheese eating surrender monkeys” while extolling the “mmmerican” values should have worked better than sold a handful of cars.

        Yes, it’s quite disconcerting the discrepancy between those who believe themselves petit-bourgeois and the man in the ad for whom the price gap to the volt should be irrelevant.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      I disliked the ad, because I’m in the demographic they’re targeting, or close to it, but I really don’t want to he like the guy in the commercial. I’ve worked with guys like, and guys like that, and egos that big require “special handling”, which is ends up being a a necessary-evil and a distraction from the real work.

      This commercial is supposed to be aspirational marketing for guys like me, but it goes terribly wrong for me. And, when you’re charging double for a Volt with two fewer doors, you’re selling image and aspiration – rather than the car itself. Fail

      I thought the commercial was funny, in a Ricky Garvais from the UK version of The Office kind of way. It reminds me why I drive a 10 year old Toyota minivan, when I could pay for more.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I like the idea of the Volt; this sort of hybrid makes a lot of sense vs. an electric-only car.

    But for whatever reason(s), it’s been a flop. I have no idea what GM was thinking when they decided the best course of action was to make a Cadillac version of a Chevy flop. How was that EVER going to work?

    • 0 avatar
      sparc

      I think the only way this could have worked is if they used the ELR to launch a second generation volt technology. Then released the second gen volt a year or two later. They would have matched what Tesla has done with the Model S/Model E.

      Instead, GM did the reverse and launched the ELR on a dated platform that doesn’t have the technological wow factor anymore.

  • avatar
    shaker

    It’s a beautiful concept car – I hope they bring it to production and make it affordable!

    Oh…

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I think this car will have a market, IF the materials used are premium and not a re-skinned Volt, otherwise, why not just buy the Volt?

    If it fails, it will be due to a l-o-n-g memory of the Cimarron of 30 years ago, a ridiculously re-badge disaster, leather or not!

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      The problem isn’t that it is a reskinned Volt, it looks sufficiently different enough from the Volt that its fine.

      The problem is it is too expensive. Like $20K too expensive. This stood have started at the high $40s-low $50s max.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Absolutely right. At that price, my wife would buy one in a second.

        • 0 avatar
          ellomdian

          Odds are in Nov-Dec if the numbers are still this bad, you will be able to find a ‘manager’s special’ at your larger Caddy dealer with enough miles on it that they have to sell it as used. It’s not hard to imagine getting 15-20k off the ‘new’ price.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            Yeah, but you’ve got to get people in the door with a plausible price in the first place, before you can knock 25% off the price of the car.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        I would say the biggest problem is it uses the same voltec drive train as the Volt. It needs to perfrom better and always be one step ahead of the Volt in IMO to justify its existence.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think the last insult you could hurl at the ELR is “son of Cimarron”. This car is WAY cool. Problem is, it’s also WAY too expensive. And that’s why it’s not selling.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        I agree, this is not the Cimarron, although is does have a similar problem: Chevrolet technology behind a Cadillac badge.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          True, but you could also say the same about the CTS-V, and I sure wouldn’t mind one of those parked in my driveway.

          The Volt is a very sophisticated Chevy product, so I don’t really have much of a problem with the underpinnings being shared with more expensive cars. Unfortunately this one’s a LOT more expensive.

          • 0 avatar
            LALoser

            Looked at a Volt yesterday. Very cool car. Finally got a clear picture how it works…then I drove a Camaro ZL1. Beauty and the Beast. The Beast is awesome. Really awesome.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      I’d have considered this car at a price point in the mid-to-upper 50s, fully loaded.

      As it is, it’s a farcical proposition.

      Methinks this is a ploy to bury Voltec once and for all.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        More likely, GM thought they had to do *something* with Voltec to keep it moving ahead and fresh in the marketplace of ideas. A CUV would have been a better idea but, for reasons known only to GM, this was their best plan.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          Agreed. I liked the Voltec Orlando idea that they floated. I’d buy one of those in an instant.

          I like the Volt a lot, and test drove one. But it was clear that it wasn’t intended as a family vehicle when I drove it, despite how much I like it.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Ford’s response…

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2014/03/31/ford_versus_cadillac_new_ad_featuring_detroit_dirt_mocks_poolside_commercial.html

    Not that I personally have a problem with Cadillac’s “swagger” I just wish they had tried swagger back in the 70s and 80s. Now that Cadillac has decent product all their brand equity has been pissed away.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      That fro is AWESOME.

    • 0 avatar
      WhiskerDaVinci

      I find it rather ironic that Ford responds to a Cadillac ad with a Ford ad. Although the ELR isn’t selling well, Cadillac in general is outselling Lincoln. All Cadillac really needs to say is “so Ford, what uh…are you planning on doing with Lincoln to actually compete with us? At least we try…” I mean, taking a shot at a slightly arrogant luxury car ad with an ad for a more humble, non luxury car seems a bit stupid. Of course luxury car ads are somewhat flashy and arrogant, isn’t that kind of the point of a luxury car to a certain extent?

  • avatar
    Loki

    They sold 720? I live in SE Michigan and have only seen one so far, and that was a company-owned car driven by a GM employee. He didn’t look happy, either.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      They haven’t sold 720 yet – that’s just the projection. They’ve sold 180 so far. Even in the Edsels worst year, they sold 2848.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        the difference is Edsel was a division of Ford MOCO with many models and body styles offered, ELR is one car that was not ever meant to sell in volume from the get go.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Why wasn’t it intended to sell in higher volumes? They sold 3408 Corvettes last month – can’t they move a couple of thousand of these vs. 81? Oh, yeah, that’s right, the Corvette is actually desirable to own.

          They need to cut the price to $55k or lower. Otherwise, they’re going to end up with the opposite of halo car. It becomes another sign of General Motors dysfunction.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Those 180 people should all find each other and have a meet.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I see more than most because I drive by the GM Tech Center very often. The ELR looks better in its camo wrap and I’ve seen less than ten. The GM execs in my neighborhood are driving new Yukons and Suburbans. I see ten of those a day. The only GM people driving it are thoses who have to.

    • 0 avatar
      sco

      You haven’t seen many because I think McDonough said they were parked on the moon (with the keys left in).

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Keep the body, put in an ICE and lower the price and people will buy it, it’s a great looking vehicle

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      Aren’t you describing the CTS coupe?

      • 0 avatar
        AdamVIP

        Id argue this is better looking than the CTS coupe.

        THat being said, I dont think you could make this an ICE car as it would still be lame wheel drive and still not worthy of Cadillac pricing. Theres just not enough extras over a volt to justify 70k. It would have been cool if they somehow made a backwards volt that was RWD. That would have had a big differentiation from the volt that they could sell it but this is a volt with a big styling package and I dont think there is 30k in value in a new shell and interior, even if its the best interior Cadillac makes.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The ELR already has an ICE in it, it’s a Hybrid.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I just went onto the Cadillac website and did a “competitive comparison” and it is quite telling. The cars preselected were the Model S and the 4-series coupe. And both came in cheaper and better in every category Cadillac chose to share except for powertrain warranty and roadside assistance.
    Then I changed one to the Volt and, well, I guess I just don’t understand how Cadillac expects to win customers. If it was 1955, then yes, people would buy it. But in 2014 people aren’t impressed enough that you own a Cadillac anymore to justify buying one on that alone.
    At the very least, make sure your car beats the first two options in your own comparison in something. Though that may be hard since it only beats the Leaf in their chosen categories by having more torque and daytime running lights.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The commercial is wrong – the US isn’t going back to the moon; there’s no political will to do so. China will be next there.

    As for the ELR, I agree – it won’t make it past the 2015 model year. And Cadillac will have to heavily discount all of them, probably to the tune of $20k each or more.

    Cadillac should do what Chrysler did a few years ago when it recovered all of its hybrids – just recall every ELR and crush them, so the company isn’t burdened with supporting a low-volume car forever.

    The formula in the EV market is the same as in the ICE market – the vehicle must have something to distinguish itself – value, economy, looks, utility, performance… something. All the ELR has is looks.

  • avatar
    redav

    “QOTD: How Long Will The Cadillac ELR Last?”

    I would say definitely over 200k mi if you perform the proper maintenance.

  • avatar
    thalter

    The few that do get sold will be insanely collectible 50 years from now – there are more Bugatti Veyrons on the road than ELRs.

    25 years from now, The ELR will be the 1957 Eldorado Brougham our time.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Does Cafe work for #of vehicles sold, percentages of a brand, number of models?? Seems the amount spent to rebadge the volt could have given the volt a nice (perhaps temporary) price cut, which does more for the technology and GM than creating a vehicle with few examples to be seen by the public.

    I prefer to wonder if GM is now postulating Chevy as their 4th premium brand seeing as how the pricing is in that range.

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      I believe it is works by # of vehicles sold (as a percentage of overall sales), definitely not number of models.

      It’s typical GM. The idea was good- spread costs of the Volt across additional models, especially a higher margin premium model. It is just that their execution sucked. It is too expensive.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        That’s how I thought it worked, which is why the ELR made no sense. They spent a lot of money to have such little to show for it. I guess you can either try to make back the massive costs invested, or try increase the Cafe percentage, GM got a bit greedy and went with the first option.

        • 0 avatar
          whynot

          I don’t think CAFE was GM’s concern. They have plenty of fuel efficient cars like the Volt, Sonic, Spark, Cruze etc that generally sell in decent at worse numbers so I doubt they are running into many CAFE issues. Even some of their other cars like the Corvette have very good mpg figures (considering their performance and purpose). It was all about recuperating the Volt technology investment.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            I disagree. I think it had more to do with helping Cadillacs image. 2-3K is what the Volt sells in a month. If they were seroius about spreading the Voltecs cost across different vehicles they should be offerig the Voltec drive train in a CUV w/5 seats.

  • avatar
    PonchoIndian

    You guys act as if this was the only car ever built that sold in crazy low numbers and was overpriced. Has there ever been a manufacturer that hasn’t had something like this every decade or so?

    Other than affirming the author’s dislike for this car and GM in general, what is the point of this article?

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      Nobody is saying that this is the first time this has ever happened. The point of the article is that right now the ELR IS a case of an overpriced model with the sales figures to currently support that theory.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        So once again, other than click counts, what’s the point? This was beat to death already by the Best and Know It-Alls.

        Has anyone ever said there were specific sales projections it was supposed to have met? My local Chevy/Caddy store just got their first one in (and they are one of the top 5 dealers in the country selling Corvettes, so they aren’t from east BF). That is the first one I’ve seen, and I’ve yet to see the commercial that everyone is talking about. How many people actually know this car exists?

        What would be more interesting is figuring out why cars that seem to be priced appropriately and have largish sales targets aren’t moving off the lot. Not some niche car that was never expected to sell more than a K or 2K a year.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      The sales of this car isn’t gonna make or break Cadillac or GM and was never intended to. So Poncho is correct, this article is pointless click bait!

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        At least Derek put out a prediction of when he thinks the ELR will die. The post is attention grabbing, but I seriously doubt Derek is doing it for clicks.

        • 0 avatar

          Apparently, posts with sales/inventory data are clickbait if they aren’t complimentary to your favorite brand.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Actually it has nothing to do with favorite brand, it has to do with a snarky article about a car that was already beat up in its last article and everyone playing armchair quarterback.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Participating dealers also got test drive units that are showing online. The dealers technically can sell their test drive unit if they want, but most are holding them back for their intended purpose.

            The ELR exists for California, New York, Miami and a few other markets….that’s it.

            The poolside commercial (like it or not) was a Cadillac brand commercial…not an ELR commercial.

            It also outsold the Panamera Plug In easily as well.

            Not defending the entire concept of the ELR and its pricing, just stating facts.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            “Actually it has nothing to do with favorite brand, it has to do with a snarky article about a car that was already beat up in its last article and everyone playing armchair quarterback.”

            Oh, please. The “Voltec” program has been a total CF from the start. Everybody but the GM Fans could see that.

            4 seats? Premium gas? Crappy DBFE? $40K? All those factors spelled “FAIL.” The ELR is a similar set of problems in a way overpriced tuxedo.

            GM’s entire hybrid/advanced drivetrain program has been driven by irrational levels of Prius envy, inadequate engineering and top-down driven marketing mistakes.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Kix
            I understand you are one of the elite Pious owners and love to pat yourself on the back for it. Its also pretty clear that buying any kind of hybrid is done for a statement not a money savings.

            Your assessment on the use of the Volt as a commuter and having poor economy when the engine is running is a little poor, but it isn’t worth getting in a pissing contest over. Lets just say that the Volt doesn’t make sense for a long commute, but for some people it could work. Calling the program a CF and a “Fail” is completely showing your Pious fanboyism.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            @Kix

            Prius sales in first few years in the US.

            Year 1=5,600
            Year 2=15,600
            Year 3= 20,100

            Volt sales (ignoring the 326 sold at the very end of 2010)

            Year 1=7,700
            Year 2=23,400
            Year 3=23,100

            Not saying the two launches were identical and not saying Volt will follow the Prius path in the future, but Prius didn’t hit their big numbers until Gen 2.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            @Kixstart, considering former Prius owners are the Votls biggest customers I’d say GM hit a homerun in that respect with the Volt. Your Prius has more in common with my GMC Sierra than it does with a Volt. They are both tied to a gas pump. The Volt is meant to run on electricty, that’s why its fuel economy in the charge sustaining mode really isn’t all that important. But your so hung up on trying to convince everyone what a lousy car the Volt is, compared to that supposed godsend you drive, that you can’t see the forest through the trees. The Volt is the only US car EVER, to win the European car of the year plus a myriad of other automotive awards. Obviously GM did something right with it. And sales aren’t what GM had hoped at launch, but all things considered, it has more than held its own with other battery vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            SundridgePlace: … timeline comparison and “Prius didn’t hit their big numbers until Gen 2.”

            What year was the Prius introduced? What were the incentives for the Prius in that year? What are the incentives for the Volt?

            I see these timeline comparisons often enough and they’re completely bogus. When the original Insight and the G1 Prius came over, nobody had seen anything remotely like it in production. Incentives were minor. Neither Honda nor Toyota had any idea what would or could sell and why.

            By the time they decided to build the Volt, GM had opportunity to study at least 5 different hybrids in the market (G1 and G2 Priuses, Insight, Silverado HD and Escape hybrid), particularly the hot-selling Prius G2, which provides valuable marketing information that neither Toyota nor Honda had in 2000/2001. The Volt also enjoyed higher gas prices.

            And yet, there it sits, outsold by the Leaf, occasionally outsold by the Prius PHV, doing badly worldwide and generally not worth the $1.2 billion that GM reportedly put into it.

            Carlson Fan: ” considering former Prius owners are the Votls biggest customers I’d say GM hit a homerun in that respect with the Volt. Your Prius has more in common with my GMC Sierra than it does with a Volt. They are both tied to a gas pump. The Volt is meant to run on electricty, that’s why its fuel economy in the charge sustaining mode really isn’t all that important. But your so hung up on trying to convince everyone what a lousy car the Volt is, compared to that supposed godsend you drive, that you can’t see the forest through the trees.”

            My input isn’t needed to convince anyone with a clue what a lousy car the Volt is. The fact of 1472 in sales last month in spite of a massive tax credit is all the proof that’s needed.

            Now, I can enlighten you as to why this is… and, yes, the DBFE fuel economy matters a lot. That 37MPG means that a lot of people can stick with the safe alternative, in part due to liquidity preference and future uncertainty. While promising a “moonshot,” GM cheaped out on essential aspects of the car and left the door open for “excellence,” in at least certain respects, to still be the Prius.

            I’m not surprised some Prius owners were among the first to trade in their Prii for the next big thing… that’s part of what defined the Prius in 2001 and even today. But those claims are old and I doubt that GM has any interest in refreshing them.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            The Volt has outsold the Civic Hybrid, Escape Hybrid, Lexus Hybrids, Camry Hybrid, Kia and Hyundai hybrids…yet it is a complete fail?

            Not sure how you can come to the conclusion that the Volt is less of an engineering accomplishment than any of those and that it is complete crap.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            PonchoIndian: “Not sure how you can come to the conclusion that the Volt is less of an engineering accomplishment than any of those and that it is complete crap.”

            Which of those cars you named gets a $7500 tax credit to help it sell?

            That’s how I come to the conclusion that it is a failure; GM can’t get decent sales volume even with a massive bribe courtesy of the Feds. Note: I did not say “complete crap.”

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Ok Kix,
            What other plug in hybrid has sold more than the Volt? The Accord sold 562 last year with a lower price and the incentive…

            The Volt, so far, has outsold the Leaf overall.

            You can’t compare the Volt to a Pious because they are apples and oranges, and it has outsold ALL of the plug in hybrids on the market that are offered with the rebate…so, once again. Your side of the discussion is?

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            PonchoIndian: “What other plug in hybrid has sold more than the Volt?”

            I believe the Prius PHV is currently outsellng it. I don’t think it has exceeded the Volt in cumulative sales, yet. That’s worldwide, of course.

            PonchoIndian: “The Volt, so far, has outsold the Leaf overall.”

            Not worldwide.

            PonchoIndian: “You can’t compare the Volt to a Pious because they are apples and oranges,…”

            Are you talking to me or replying to SunridgePlace at 12:19pm today? (fixed error here)

            The market compares these two cars all the time. But the market does current comparisons only. Lameline comparisons are nearly useless.

            Currently, Volt + $5K + nationwide sales is 26 cars better than Prius PHV in 15 states. I’m not impressed.

            Volt + $7.5K is about 9.6K cars short of the regular Prius.

            The real importance of ’01 Prius vs ’11 Volt is… who did their homework? GM had an opportunity to do the car right, with lessons provided by Toyota, and didn’t bother to read the assignment.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            That’s what kixstart doesn’t get is that the Volt and Prius are two completely different vehicles. Like I said a Prius is more similar to my GMC Sierra than a Volt. They both need an ICE to move. The Volt doesn’t EVER under any condition need to use the ICE to move when the battery has a charge. Other battery vehicles that have the same tax credit aren’t flying off the shelf either so your argument for calling it a failure due to sales makes no sense. LIke I said, all things considered, the Volt is holding its own nicely sales wise with other battery vehicles. And there is nothing subpar with the engineering of the Volt, just the opposite, it is over engineered if anything. That’s why even with all the sophisticated new technology that went into that car it has performed flawelssly since its launch in 2011.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The Volt is the market share leader in the PHEV segment, and outsells the Prius PHEV.

            The segment just isn’t that popular. Those who want hybrids don’t seem to see the upside, while the EV purists believe them to be inadequate.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Carlson Fan: “Like I said a Prius is more similar to my GMC Sierra than a Volt. They both need an ICE to move.”

            Yes. You said that before and you remain wrong. The Prius and the Volt both have a traction battery, two electric motors/motor-generators, a drive unit involving planetary gears to blend inputs, regenerate kinetic energy into electricity and have an ICE that may or may not be operating at any given time. Even a basic Prius will move on electricity alone. I’ve gone a little over two miles towards the office without the engine starting.

            Your Sierra has an ICE and a typical transmission and burns gas or it doesn’t move.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Kix,
            his Sierra will go up to 30 mph for a couple of miles on electric only, just like your Pious.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            That fact that even with the Prius name on it the PIP can’t ousell the Volt shows just how good the Volt is or what a lousy car the PIP is. Even with a fully charged battey all you have to do is step on the gas a little too hard and it’s firing up the ICE. Big FAIL in my book. Plus your stuck with the crummy driving experience associated with the Prius versus the premium driving experience you get with the Volt.

          • 0 avatar

            I prefer the Volt to the Prius as far as driving experience goes, but I would not call it “premium”.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            “his Sierra will go up to 30 mph for a couple of miles on electric only, just like your Pious.”

            Only if it’s a Sierra hybrid… a very rare animal, indeed. And the Prius will do 40 on electricity.

            Carlson Fan: “That fact that even with the Prius name on it the PIP can’t ousell the Volt shows just how good the Volt is or what a lousy car the PIP is.”

            Or it might have something to do with an extra $5K in government bribes or 50 vs 15 state availability. But don’t let these other factors enlighten you.

            A few words specifically about the PHV… It’s not all that great. It’s really not much of a PHEV.

            However, when GM was bragging on about their upcoming “moonshot,” it was readily apparent to anyone who was paying the least bit of attention that Toyota could build a PHEV any time, if they wanted to. After all, people had already converted existing Priuses to PHEVs and Toyota was experimenting with PHEV adaptations themselves.

            For peanuts, they established a beachhead in a market that may turn out to be strategic. As a bonus, it sells almost as well as the Volt, which cost GM $1.2 billion to develop. In addition, Toyota has probably priced it to make at least a small profit unless they’re paying an awful lot of money per KWH, which seems unlikely.

            Strategically, GM has blown a $billion and gained no significant advantage over Toyota or anybody else. Tesla generates more excitement. Leaf generates more sales.

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          @PCH101, plug in hybrids are approximately half of all the plug in vehicle sales in the US. Last month 4594 PHEVs were sold, vs an estimated 4782 BEVs.

          The “estimated” is because Tesla doesn’t report monthly and an estimate for their sales was used. Incidentally, Ford sold slightly more PHEVs last month than did Chevy.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Ford has a decent hybrid system to extend into a PHEV and they’ve got two models going with modest sales for each. Like Toyota, this probably didn’t cost them all that much to do. In such circumstances, modest sales for two is not a bad result.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Suffice it to say that vehicles with extension cords are not particularly popular.

            What hurts the Volt is the same thing that hurts its competitors in the segment — the vehicle type is not just not popular. GM is actually faring somewhat better in this class than most, contrary to what some posters here are claiming.

            The early adopters flocked to the original Prius. The addition of a power cord is apparently not revolutionary enough to inspire an additional wave of tech enthusiasts who could support the segment. The primary draw for buyers of plug-ins is technical innovation, more so than environmental concerns.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @pch101:
            Speaking as a Prius owner with an anecdote, the problem isn’t that I don’t want a plugin vehicle. The problem is that, after 10 years on the road, our Prius is in such good shape that I can’t justify replacing it with anything.

            My wife even vetoed another Prius after test driving a Prius V, because she just straight up likes the paid off one she has. We test drove a Volt, too, and we liked it a lot. But it’s hard to argue with a paid off daily driver which never breaks and doesn’t waste much gas. The car is 10 years old and still reliable enough that my wife took it to a conference in Canada last fall.

            If we’re typical, the problem isn’t that we don’t WANT plugin cars. It’s just that the Prius is extending the replacement cycle and keeping us out of the market for longer. Waste not, want not.

            The thing is a cockroach, as far as longevity goes.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Yeah. My favorite vehicle brand is “Paidfor”.

            I’d be willing to go PHEV but I’m not willing to pay a lot for it and I’m unwilling to give up anything else to get it. We have the ’12 Prius and the vehicle works very well for us.

            I *might* be willing to give up the spare tire (as the current PHEV requires) but I’d certainly rather not. I absolutely wouldn’t give up any fuel economy or cargo space (including the tray under the floor). I’d be willing to trade maybe $1-2.5K for 15-20 miles of range and I’d be perfectly happy plugging it in to a 110VAC outlet (I have one in the garage, perfectly convenient) and letting the charge take all night.

            I’d be especially interested if the PHEV upgrade included some magic that got better regular non-EV mileage (I think the current PHV does this).

            I don’t know if I’m all that different from most other HEV owners.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Hey if I’ve got a tail wind and a big enough downhill run I can shut the engine off in my Sierra and do 30 MPH without burning gas. That’s about what it takes to do the same in your Prius. It will motor along on batttery power only if your totally babying it. In fact that was the biggest gripe in a review I read on the PIP. The author complained that the ICE constantly kicking on even when it had plenty of battery power. Just because the Volt and Prius have a lot of the same components doesn’t mean they are alike. In simple terms the Prius is an ICE car with electric assist, the Volt is an EV with gas assist. The Prius never operates like a true EV, ever. The Volt does. Apples and Oranges.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          Carlson Fan: “Hey if I’ve got a tail wind and a big enough downhill run I can shut the engine off in my Sierra and do 30 MPH without burning gas.”

          I can probably do better in my Sienna, as it almost certainly has a lower CD than your truck. I can definitely do better in the Prius.

          Carlson Fan: “That’s about what it takes to do the same in your Prius. It will motor along on batttery power only if your totally babying it.”

          All I need is level ground and a willingness to accelerate relatively slowly. The car will accelerate to city street speeds on battery.

          It meets my needs and delivers 50mpg, sometimes more. I am perfectly satisfied. Most Prius owners would probably agree.

          CF: “The Prius never operates like a true EV, ever. The Volt does.”

          Except, yes, the Prius does.

          CF: “Apples and Oranges.”

          More like “Sells well and Hardly sells.”

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Did your Prius come with the factory tampon dispenser or did you buy the dealer installed one?

    • 0 avatar

      You are describing most of my favorite cars. The big kicker here is that they are badly missing sales targets and they have over 365 days worth of inventory.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        365 days worth of inventory is taking a real shot in the dark for a car that has been on sale for 3 months. Nothing against you, but this is like using a crystal ball to predict the future.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      “what is the point of this article?”
      Reporting on cars and the automotive industry? You may come here solely to beat a team drum, but some of us want the truth about cars. Not reporting on the sales so far of the ELR would be a disservice to the readers. By airing the ad on the Olympics and an award ceremony GM got a good section of upper middleclass consumers to see the ad. The ad was polarizing. The car is a more expensive version of a great but over priced (for what it delivers to the customer) Volt. Who cares if it’s expensive to make? A Prius or Leaf are 85% of the car for around half the price. Of the Volt. A more expensive version of this was nothing but stupid, tone deaf, wish fulfilment fantasy on the part of GM’s executives.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        I don’t think I can be accused of beating a team drum. Its not quite like this is MSNBC and I’m Fox news.

        Lets face it, 99% of cars in this price range and above are nothing but stupid and wishful thinking for any automaker. Lets see, Lotus Evora, Nissan GTR, Lexus FLA etc…

        It is expensive, a coupe, made by an American manufacturer and hasn’t been advertised. It will never sell in high numbers and wasn’t supposed to.

        • 0 avatar

          GM projected a higher figure than what third party analysts forecasted (just above 2k units per year) and it isn’t even on pace to sell half of that. Then look at inventory. It’s pretty clear what the picture looks like.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    It will be extremely difficult to sell these when (perhaps I should say, “if”) Volt 2 arrives.

  • avatar
    ghills

    this car has to be really bad if ecos silly enough to buy into climate change cant get behind it

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      Why should “the ecos” buy this car? There are less expensive alternatives available. If your principal interest is driving “EV,” the Volt has better EV range and gets better DBFE. Or a Leaf would get you more electric miles.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, they wouldn’t buy the Lexus CT either, so there’s that.

      The ELR is way too expensive, and that’s why it’s not selling. At $50,000 or so, I think Caddy could move quite a few of them.

  • avatar

    This all reminds me of the Apple Is Doomed, FUD. Give the ELR some time, it’s a lovely car, with unique capabilities, well suited for the daily commute from the suburbs to the city.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      But Tesla, not GM, is Apple.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      >> with unique capabilities

      Okay, what are the unique capabilities? I’m curious.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The ELR has the power to languish on Cadillac lots longer than even the CTS-V wagon. I don’t know if has powers of depreciation as strong as the CTS-V though. I’m guessing it may.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          It will probably depreciate faster. The CTS-V uses tech that improves very slowly. All EVs are using tech that is falling in price and improving more rapidly, so new EV prices will be falling as capabilities are improving. This will depreciate the previous models more quickly.

          I dislike leasing but if I was going EV, I’d lease.

  • avatar
    bryanska

    They have 2 at Morrie’s Cadillac in Golden Valley, MN.

    1) it’s a looker. The chrome band around the windows is SO bold. You can’t say it’s an ugly car. The proportions are perfect. It looks like a wedgy Lotus. Razor sharp.

    2) The interior is incredible quality. It’s not a clean or harmonious design. But the gajillion knife edge shapes are SUPER high quality. Suede, carbon fiber, leather, aluminum… The interior design is like being in a storm of shards. Love it or hate it, you can’t call it half-assed. After sitting in everything below the Lambos and Rolls at the local auto show, I’ll say the ELR interior doesn’t need to apologize to anyone. No other car at the show (save for S class and 7 series) had a meatier interior.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    It’s effectively a trim level of the Volt, made on the same line. I would presume that production levels can be managed accordingly; there’s no need to cancel production just so long as they continue to build its sibling.

    GM deserves its share of barbs, but this car is not a big deal in the scheme of things. The future of the Cadillac brand begins with the ATS and CTS, not this.

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      Right. It could be a form of unusual market research like the EV-1 or Amazon’s proposed $40 Prime hike.

      if you are correct, it would be a cheap way to get a LOT of info about what Caddy EVs should be like.

  • avatar
    340-4

    Gee.

    I remember when it was officially announced that this thing was to be made.

    Asked a salesman at one of my state’s few remaining Cadillac dealers how much it was going to cost.

    “$75,000,” he said, without a second’s hesitation.

    So here we are.

  • avatar
    geeber

    I’ve thought that the Volt should have been a crossover instead of a sedan, and badged as a Cadillac from day one. That body style would have eliminated some of the interior packaging compromises with the Volt. Plus, people are willing to pay more for crossovers in general than sedans. Badging it as a Cadillac from day one would have given the Cadillac brand a little high-tech, green credentials, and allowed it to sell at a higher price point (although not as high as the price point for the ELR).

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      The Volt as a Chevy wasn’t such a bad idea. But building an expensive Cadillac Voltec coupe was. They should have went with a larger crossover (CrossVolt), whatever brand they sold it under.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Cadillac badging for the Volt would have been a tremendous flop. For that sort of vehicle, the price premium has to be earned through providing innovation to early adopters, not with a luxury badge. (There is a good reason why TMC didn’t launch the Prius as a Lexus.)

      If my mission was to sell a two-door Voltec-platform car with luxury pricing, then I would have launched it as a cabriolet. That’s about the only way to hit price points like this for luxury cars of this size, and the other perfomance specs would be less important.

      The volumes wouldn’t be high, of course, but they would be better than they are for this. It would probably also make things more exciting for the dealers, which would encourage them to promote them as a cool innovative alternative to topless Mercs and BMWs.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    its a rich persons car that comes with rich people problems. the real problem is, GM thinks rich people are stupid. they are wrong.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Hard to tell what Caddy was thinking with this car, especially at this price. The brand has a good performance image, but the ELR isn’t a high-performance vehicle.

    The only other luxury brand that’s tried a small, fuel economy-oriented hybrid is Lexus, and it’s failed miserably at it with the CT, which sold 3200 units last year. Granted, it’s ugly as hell, but it’s also a whopping forty grand cheaper. Lexus also bombed with the HS 250 before the CT.

    If Lexus bombed with two hybrids in the $35,000 range, I have no idea what Cadillac was thinking trying to sell one at $75,000, particularly when a Tesla Model S isn’t all that much more expensive, and it’s amazing to drive.

    I suspect the idea here was to have something to compare to a Tesla, and test the waters for a small electric luxury car. So far, the waters don’t appear to be very friendly.

    (I do LOVE that ad, though…I wish it’d have been for the CTS-V.)

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      Damn, you’re right. The same ad for the -V would make so much more sense. I wonder if that’s the car it was first pitched for? Were I buying in this segment, I’d scrimp somewhere else and get the real Tesla.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Ditto here – I’d spring for the Tesla, which is wicked cool. For folks who can afford a $75,000 car (not me, unfortunately), another twenty grand probably won’t make or break the deal.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      yeah, if there were no Tesla, the ELR might be OK. But there is, and it owns the high-end green car market. And it doesn’t have the stigma of a Chevy drivetrain. Nothing wrong with that drivetrain, but it’s old news and available in a cheaper car. If they’d done the ELR first and brought the cheaper Volt out now, they’d probably have done all right.

  • avatar
    carrya1911

    With the vast emissions regulatory schemes, the almost indecipherable world of corporate accounting and finance, and various other intangibles it’s entirely possible that somehow the company is better off building these things and selling them at a price where they won’t move is better for the bottom line than not building them or pricing them to move more units.

  • avatar
    PonchoIndian

    The Honda Accord plug in Hybrid sold 526 units in 2013.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      Then it’s probably a good thing they didn’t brag on for 4 years about their “moonshot” that would “leapfrog Toyota.”

    • 0 avatar
      galaxygreymx5

      That might have something to do with the fact that there are only 22 Accord PHEVs in stock nationwide.

      It’s not hard to make a case that the Accord PHEV is an overpriced flop, but at least Honda seems realistic about it.

      The point of this is that GM was beating the ELR drum for some time and then cranked out 1700 of them (based on the highest sequential VIN in the wild). There’s plenty of inventory. There have been plenty of ads. There’s been plenty of reviews. The ELR is clearly way, way overpriced.

      Remember after the price was announced last fall and one of the GM boobs responded to criticism with “I actually think you’ll see a bit of a scramble for the ELR?” Yeah, buyers scrambled to Tesla’s website instead.

      Can’t wait for the $20,000 ELR cash back rebates.

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    I think the screwup of a lifetime was making the original Volt a Chevrolet, not a Cadillac.

    Chevrolet cars are decent but basic transportation. The people that buy Chevrolet would not spend $30-40K on a PHEV. In fact, many people that buy Chevrolets are typically blue-collar and against electric vehicles as they are associated with the Green Movement, treehuggers, climate change etc. Maybe a stereotype but with an element of truth.

    Cadillac had passed it’s rap-star phase, but was right at the verge of actually attracting white-collar young professionals. People who really don’t give a crap about the V-series, but are THE MARKET that buys A4s, 3-series, and IS-250′s, and then sticks with foreign makers for life.

    By making the Volt a Chevrolet, they ruined the image of domestic electric vehicles (to this day they are “Chevy Cruzes with a battery pack and $10K more”). They ruined Cadillac’s chance to be the harbinger of a new, exciting tech (now the ELR is “an even more expensive Volt, which already sucks”). They ruined the chance to shift the perception people have about platform sharing from domestic “lipstick on a pig (applied to Lincoln/Cadillac) to Audi (you get an A4 platform when you buy a Golf.

    The craziest part is that the Volt is a Cadillac, awesome interior particularly in white, all the tech, decent acceleration and power and sold at a premium price.

    So yeah, GM’s biggest blunder in my opinion.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Unwanted Caddies can have a surprisingly long life. The XLR was still sold for years after it was clear that the Caddivette was a flop.

    Look for heavily subsidized leases in the near future.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      XLR like ELR is an oddball car which found a niche. However unlike ELR, XLR is (1) a convertible (2) a roadster and (3) has Corvette cred. ELR is a Volt which shares bones with Chevrolet Cruze (notice I didn’t say Daewoo!), and in addition to the most awful styling since CTS coupe offers no other specialties other than being a plug in electric car. XLR, like Corvette still commands decent resale almost ten years on (high 30s) I doubt ELR will simply because of low demand. Who is going to want a low range electric car after a new generation of electrics (with better batteries perhaps?) comes out?

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I was a fan of the XLR. They did a very, very good job of differentiating it from the ‘Vette. Loved the interior.

        Probably would have been a better seller with the LS2 motor instead of the Northstar.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          100% agreed. But the protect-Corvette-at-all-costs contingent inside of RenCen would have had their heads explode.

          I had hoped XLR would do a spectacular nosedive in value and could have been picked up for a pittance but sadly (for usurpers like me) this has not been the case.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            True, but for radical depreciation, there’s always the XTS. I’m waiting for the used V-sports to hit the market.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Not as spectacular as it should be as a near-rebadge. Cateras do the same 30Kish off the lot and at least that’s sort of a serious attempt at a “luxury” car. Between the platform/engine sharing with Chevrolet and the overall look of the model, these things should be free.

            MY13 XTS FWD

            Base:

            12/19/13 TAMPA Regular $36,000 806 Above WHITE 6G A Yes
            12/19/13 ATLANTA Lease $27,700 15,987 Below SILVER 6G A No
            01/21/14 ORLANDO Regular $34,400 2,735 Above WHITE 6G A Yes
            02/04/14 NASHVILL Lease $31,000 14,292 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
            03/21/14 PA Lease $30,500 12,597 Avg SILVER 6G P Yes
            03/27/14 PALM BCH Regular $30,700 16,657 Avg BLUE 6G A Yes

            Luxury:

            03/10/14 ORLANDO $33,000 19,530 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
            03/12/14 SF BAY Regular $34,500 14,039 Above WHITE 6G A Yes
            03/19/14 MINNEAP Regular $32,500 18,007 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
            03/25/14 ORLANDO Lease $30,800 29,263 Below BLACK 6G A Yes
            03/26/14 DENVER Regular $32,600 20,889 Avg SILVER 6G P Yes
            03/27/14 TX HOBBY Regular $32,700 13,184 Avg GREY 6G A Yes

            Platinum:

            01/24/14 PA Regular $41,750 2,942 Above BLACK 6G P Yes
            02/07/14 FT LAUD Regular $41,000 6,878 Avg RED 6G A Yes
            02/14/14 NEVADA Regular $41,750 8,164 Above BLACK 6G A Yes
            02/26/14 PITTSBGH Regular $41,600 3,154 Above SILVER 6G A Yes
            03/10/14 ORLANDO $42,400 848 Above BLACK 6G A Yes
            03/28/14 DFW Regular $39,600 11,608 Below BLACK 6G A Yes

            MY13 XTS AWD

            Luxury:

            03/06/14 DENVER $37,100 8,316 Above GOLD 6G A Yes
            03/06/14 DENVER $36,500 11,715 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
            03/10/14 ORLANDO $36,600 10,690 Avg GRAY 6G A Yes
            03/18/14 INDY Regular $33,800 15,473 Below Beige 6CY A Yes
            03/20/14 NORTHSTR Regular $34,750 15,354 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
            03/26/14 KC Regular $35,000 9,854 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
            04/02/14 PITTSBGH Regular $33,500 20,860 Below BLACK 6G A Yes

            Platinum:

            01/23/14 TX HOBBY Regular $37,600 36,396 Avg Black 6G A Yes
            01/23/14 DETROIT Regular $43,500 14,145 Above BLACK 6G A Yes
            02/05/14 PITTSBGH Regular $37,600 21,176 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
            03/14/14 PA Regular $38,250 21,230 Avg GREY 6G P Yes
            03/19/14 DENVER Lease $41,600 18,863 Above RED 6G A Yes
            03/21/14 PA Regular $40,750 11,274 Avg BLACK 6G P Yes
            03/26/14 PITTSBGH Lease $40,200 14,307 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes

            Evidently the sweet spot is FWD “Luxury” trim.

  • avatar

    Matt & Zach over at The Smoking Tire did a comparison of the Volt (Matt owns one) and the ELR. Their conclusion was that at $55,000 the ELR would be a great car (though they thought the ATS-like center stack wasn’t as upscale as the rest of the interior) but at the current MSRP it doesn’t make sense.

    Pete Delorenzo was talking about how Cadillac’s pricing strategy is out of whack and that the new CTS should undercut the Germans on price, not match them. Speaking of price, I saw an ad for the Kia K900 for the first time. Great ad until they mention the name of the car.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    I love this ad, because when I’m on my deathbed, just like this guy, I’ll be saying, “I’m glad I spent all that time at the office.” “I only wish it could have been more.”

  • avatar
    danio3834

    My beef with the ELR isn’t the price tag per-se, but the performance that you get for it. As the second most expensive Cadillac, it’s by far the slowest. The price could have been better justified by boosting the performance to a level where it could be considered a performance hybrid. Maybe not to Model S level performance, but at least something allowing ELR buyers to not get outrun by the cheapest Caddy.

  • avatar

    I think the problem is that no one buying a $76,000 coupe wants it to have a weedy 100 horsepower hampster on a wheel engine, when you can get a real car for that money. There’s no market for slow droaning prius coupes at BMW M3 money.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    The problem is that the ELR isn’t especially impressive. For $74k, buyers want something that screams ENVY ME!!!!

    A Tesla will impress your neighbors: you have taste! You’re forward-thinking and care about the environment! Look, it’s got a trunk IN THE FREAKING FRONT LIKE A PORSCHE!

    The Cadillac? How do you justify paying twice the price of a Volt for the privilege of driving an “upgraded” brand most associated with retirees and people in flyover country?

  • avatar
    oboylepr

    Well on the bright side, when the recall comes there will not be very many cars to fix.

  • avatar
    fozone

    The ads are atrocious. They only work if you believe that “any press is good press.”

    They say that Ferrari has the highest % of male ownership of any mass-produced marque, but with this ad I think Cadillac was swinging for the all-penis fences.

    To a woman, every one who I have talked to found the ads repulsive and the guy to be a (paraphrasing) “total d-bag” (newsflash Cadillac marketing staff: women watch the Olympics too! And actually spend their own money on cars!) The only way this ad could have possibly worked as written is if they had Jon Hamm in full Don Draper garb actually act as the spokesperson. That would have been clever. This ad was not.

    With this ad, Cadillac immediately cut their potential audience down by 50% from the get-go. Pile this on top of their dubious brand associations (old/male/tasteless/flyover/combover/etc…) and I can see why an expensive ‘green’ sportscar isn’t exactly flying off the lots.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, Draper was a Caddy man, so maybe that wasn’t such a bad idea, but GM already did this bit for the Impala.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mstSE1weBk

      But would any woman who actually watches Mad Men WANT to buy a car from Don Draper? The man’s the world’s worst man-who*e.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Why specifically does this ad turn-off women? Because it doesn’t specifically pander to them? They don’t like the character?
      I didn’t hear anything disparaging to women in the ad.

      I showed it to my wife to find out, and she felt mostly neutral about it. After prodding her, she thought it might be a little mean for him to make fun of the French.

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    XLR exterior design is classy, oryginal and extravagant .. ELR, as re-dressed Volt, looks ‘not Cadillac-ish enough’..

    ‘I think the only way this could have worked is if they used the ELR to launch a second generation volt technology. Then released the second gen volt a year or two later.’ – good idea , but still to develope II gen. they would need money (..that they didn’t get from Volt sales[even that car got MT COTY) .. and let’s remember that Volt developement’ve costed a lot!..)


    ‘Punk-rocker’ Cadillac ad enybody ?

  • avatar
    Brian P

    The ELR is a great $50,000 car.

    I had my eye on these since the first concept car, but the price tag …

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    Reg; ” Dealers are already inundated with inventory,”

    My local dealer still hasn’t received one, or I would have test drove it, they’re going to call me when one shows up. Had they received one, it would have probably sold in short order, as my go to guy at the dealership says, that they get daily inquiries about the ELR, and we seem to have a lot of Tesla-S’s running around here for such a low population density area.

    It will last as long as it does, no way to know how long, as we don’t know GM’s agenda with the car. I suspect it will keep going as long as the current Volt is in play.

    It is up against some serious competition with the Tesla-S, and serious money can be quite discerning. Its market is progressive* Cadillac aficionados both younger and older.

    *And that is not a maligned political term, its about people open to new ideas, and technologies, and not encumbered by Luddite mentalities.


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