By on April 28, 2014

Ferrari_458_Speciale

The Environmental Protection Agency said Fiat Chrysler Automobiles’ Chrysler and Ferrari divisions, as well as Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz unit, bought greenhouse gas (GHG) credits to remain in compliance with the agency’s 2025 twin goals of 54.5 mpg and halved greenhouse gas emissions.

The Detroit News reports Honda and Tesla sold 90,000 and 35,580 greenhouse credits — each one measured in 1 metric ton of emissions, or megagram — to Ferrari and Mercedes respectively for the 2010 model year, while Chrysler bought 500,000 such credits from Nissan for 2011. In addition, Mercedes purchased 250,000 credits from Nissan and 177,941 credits from Tesla for 2012; the EPA does not disclose how much the automakers paid for the compliance credits.

As for what the three divisions are doing to come into compliance with EPA and CAFE standards outside of the credit market, Ferrari — which FCA petitioned the agency to classify as an independent automaker, allowing the brand to enjoy the same conditional exemptions as Aston Martin, Lotus and McLaren due to its low production output — “is working to boost fuel efficiency while improving performance,” while Mercedes is looking into stop-start and other fuel-saving technology. Chrysler, for its part, is experimenting with flex fuels and using turbocharged four-cylinders in some of its offerings.

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6 Comments on “FCA, Daimler Buy Greenhouse Credits To Meet EPA Emission Limits...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Ferrari — which FCA petitoned the agency to classfy as an independent automaker…

    So right now Ferrari sales get lumped in with all FCA sales in the U.S. or does the agency look at each brand separately within the corporate hierarchy?

  • avatar
    wmba

    “Each one measured in a million metric tonnes”

    What a howler! Cameron, you’re only out by a factor of a million! Time to change the post if TTAC is not going to be the laughing stock of the automotive world.

    An energy credit is ONE tonne of CO2, not a million tonnes. One tonne is a thousand kilograms. There are 1000 grams in a kilogram, hence the term megagram for an energy credit. You know, a thousand times a thousand.


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