By on April 26, 2014

images66fairlanegalaxie

For those of you who haven’t had the good fortune to attend the New York International Auto Show, it’s a must-do. Every manufacturer pulls out all the stops. The displays are mind-numbingly expensive, featuring massive LED screens, arena-quality sound systems, and concept cars that cost millions to develop.

As I walked around the Javits Center, admiring the vast and varied vehicles preening before an obsequiously adoring press, I noticed that much of the adoration and admiration was directed toward a car that featured a big cosmetic change but not much of a mechanical one—the Dodge Charger. Granted, the automotive press tends to get a little more of a tingle up its collective leg than consumers do about rear-wheel drive sedans, but the buzz surrounding the Charger was palpable. Furthermore, the reaction in the comments section of this and every other automotive blog seemed to suggest that, at the very least, automotive enthusiasts were right there with them. Whether people liked or disliked the redesign was almost irrelevant—they were TALKING about the car.

At the other end of the floor, one of the largest displays in the show belonged to Ford. A couple of different Mustangs bracketed the display, which also included the marvelous Focus ST and the perhaps even better Fiesta ST. However, the Ford area was sparsely attended—at this point, the Mustang is somewhat old news, having lost a good deal of its buzz even before it makes its way to showrooms later this year. Their giant, stadium-style seating was mostly being used by journos ravenously enjoying their free lunch from Nissan as though they were going to be executed directly thereafter.

In the interest of what I like to call “full disclosure,” I should note that I own two Fords that I purchased new off the lot; a 2013 Boss 302 and a 2013 Flex. However, even if I didn’t, I’d have to consider Ford’s product lineup to be the best in the industry from top to bottom. In reference to the Fiesta ST, The Smoking Tire’s Matt Farah tweeted a few days ago that “The Fiesta is probably the best car in the world. For that kind of money nothing comes close.” This comes from a man who spends a good deal of his time behind the wheel of things like Aventadors and Wraiths. The Focus and Fusion are class leaders in driving enjoyment. The Mustang is the best pony car available, and only looks to be getting better for 2015. The F-150 is the undisputed king of trucks and has been for decades. The Escape and Explorer are considered the benchmarks by the competition, a position confirmed for me several months back by Toyota’s leadership when I attended the Highlander launch. In other words, they are at or near the top of every segment in which they compete.

Well, almost every segment. The Taurus is, for all intents and purposes, a joke. According to Timothy Cain’s numbers, if you subtract Police Interceptor sales from the Taurus’ sales numbers, it ranks almost dead last in 2014 YTD sales in the segment, behind the Impala (which outsells it at a 3-to-1 rate), Charger, Maxima, Avalon, and 300. Its stablemate, the Lincoln MKS, fares even worse—much worse. What’s even more unsettling for the Blue Oval is that both cars are down hugely year over year; the Taurus is down 27.5% and the MKS is down 11.4%.

Chevy owns the segment right now with a big, comfy, and stylish FWD sedan. If one combines the Charger and 300 numbers, Chrysler is right there at the top as well with an aggressively styled RWD car that looks like it was designed for caped crime-fighters. Obviously, either type of platform can be successful.

But Ford likes to make big splashes—you don’t put a Mustang on top of the Empire State Building if you don’t want people to notice. And FWD sedans, while practical and loved by the general public, don’t get you magazine covers.

So here’s what you need to do, Ford. Kill the Taurus. If you have to nuke it from space, do it. It’s an anchor that is damaging the perception of your whole brand.

You need a halo sedan. See that big 302 engine that you’ve got stuffed under the hood of the Mustang? Put it in a big, RWD sedan. Don’t make the same mistake Chevy made with the SS—make it look mean. That grille you put on the 2013 Flex? That’s a good place to start. Make twenty inch rims and summer tires an option. Put a real suspension in it. Price it competitively with the Charger SRT-8.

Then, build down from there. Put an EcoBoost sixer in the next model down and price it next to the Pentastar Mopars. Maybe even a four-cylinder EcoBoost for an entry level. In fact, just swap over the entire Mustang engine lineup. It works for Dodge with the Charger and Challenger. It could work for you, too.

Here’s the last thing you have to do, and this is critical. KEEP THE LINCOLN BADGE AS FAR AWAY FROM IT AS POSSIBLE. Face it—Ford is a more prestigious brand than Lincoln is. Make the top trim level a Titanium Ford, and stick a giant blue oval on the back. Hell, go crazy and put the Shelby GT500 engine in an SVT model and embarrass some M5s around the track.

What should you call it? Come on, do you really have to ask? Retro is in. You’ve got a name in the history books begging to be resuscitated. We haven’t seen one in forty years…it’s time.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you…the 2016 Ford Galaxie. Stick this one on top of the new World Trade Center. And you don’t have to pay me a dime when it becomes the top selling car in the segment, guys. I’ll just be glad to buy one.

(To be fair, I anticipated this idea a few years ago — JB)

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95 Comments on “Bark’s Bites: The Best Car at NYIAS…in 2015...”


  • avatar

    HYUNDAI/KIA had the best show.

    Normally I’d be completely praising the 2015 Charger/ Challenger, but:

    #1 The Charger 15 and Challenger 15 weren’t open to the public. They had a video game where you could drive the Challenger 2015, but you’d have to wait on a long line to get in it. I didn’t want to.

    #2 When you compare the interior fit, finish and feel of the K900 or Genesis 2015 to the BMW 5 similarly priced models, Audi base models, Acura RLX or Lexuses they just seemed better. There was a huge drop off when you go from the German cars to the Japanese to the American and the Koreans seemed to be right above the Japanese with the Americans on the bottom.

    MERCEDES BENZ wowed people with a fully functional W222: rear recliners, tray tables, etc, etc , but the volume models they’ll sell: GLA and C-Class 2015 weren’t open to the public. That’s a huge disappointment.

    BMW’s i8 was the best looking car they had, but you couldn’t get in it. The M-cars attracted the most fanfare.

    While I wasn’t impressed by the redesigned Escalade, I was impressed by the ELMIRAJ which absolutely will make it into my parent’s driveway if it is built. Too bad you couldn’t get in that either.

    The Lincoln show was a total disappointment. Everyone else has a V8 or a diesel and stupid, stupid, stupid Lincoln has nothing more than an EGOboost V6 in its Navigator to show you in a dimly lit room. And to top it off – you couldn’t get in that either.

    It allows me to tease my Uncle – who wants to replace his 2009 Navigator with a new one but is dissapointed he probably won’t be able to take his big family on vacation in it or take them while towing his hand rebuilt Capri, Merkur or Mustang to car shows on a trailer. I don’t have any faith in the EGOboost to tow that family a trailer and cars. I just can’t see it.

    His wife drives a Lincoln LS and she wants the MKC because she was disappointed in the MKZ. I suggested she go to the car show to see it up close but GUESS WHAT??? You couldn’t get in that one either…

    [And before anyone replies: oh but the V6\'s have comparable output blah blah blah, I grew up in a family who has it embedded in their minds that a V8 is the best and part of owning a top spec car - so that\'s just that. Amazing that Hyundai/Kia still give you a V8 and the majority of the Americans don\'t. My family REFUSES to buy a non-American car. ]

    Ford’s show was dominated by people browsing the 2015 Mustang. I just saw a bootleg of NEED for SPEED. After seeing the Shelby in that movie why the hell would I want the 2015 Mustang???

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      “#2 When you compare the interior fit, finish and feel of the K900 or Genesis 2015 to the BMW 5 similarly priced models, Audi base models, Acura RLX or Lexuses they just seemed better. There was a huge drop off when you go from the German cars to the Japanese to the American and the Koreans seemed to be right above the Japanese with the Americans on the bottom.”

      The bit about the K900 is important because although it is really in a class with the larger 7-Series, it’s not going to sway a prospective 7-Series buyer. More than likely, it’s prospective customer is someone who’d otherwise be considering a 5-Series, from a price point. And even then, there is a significant number of people who won’t even *look* at a Kia—no matter how nice—and so the U.S. K900 may not necessarily even be a conquest car, but rather a vehicle for people who are already in the Kia/Hyundai family and who are moving up.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        The K900 was $66,000!!! Nobody spending that kind of money is going to buy a Kia. Those buyer, for the mot part, buy snot brands and no matter how good the K-9 may be, it will not be purchased by them. Kia buyer, on the other hand, are not interested in parting with that kind of cash for a car – period. I guess Korea did not notice that the Phaeton was a dismal failure for pretty much the same reasons.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Honestly, I’m sure they did take note of the Phaeton. Really, the K9 was developed for the Korean market, where people will readily part with that kind of money for a domestic vehicle. The K900 here is more of an exercise in image, really. Kia’s saying something like “It looks good in our portfolio and it’s a bonus if we sell any of the damned things”.

          I’m starting to see many examples of the Hyundai Equus in my area. I don’t know if they’re discounting them or what, but sales are picking up around here. And the Kia is arguably better-looking, so I hope that people will at least pay attention to it.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Of course no Kia owner is going to buy a K900 since generally Kia owners (unless they had come into some wealth recently) aren’t in that income/price bracket (even Cadenza or Optima SXL owners) – so every K900 and Equus sale for that matter is a “conquest sale” and Hyundai and Kia sold about 500 of them last month – about equal to what Audi does with the A8 and Jaguar with the XJ and neither the K900 or Equus are available with the all impt. AWD.

          And I guess you didn’t get the memo that VW is planning to bring back the Phaeton, but this time at a lower pricepoint (more in line with the Equus and V8 K900).

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Agree with all of this.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      The Charger seems to have ever so slightly more rear head room than a cat carrier.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Wish ttac did an article on the escalade, 0-60 6 seconds, 420 HP 460 TQ, and then to top it off its mpg is now 15/21.
      I just now looked it up, didn’t know it was at NYAS.

      I think the design is terrible myself but that fuel economy from something that big and powerful? Damn.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I think that platform could work as a Lincoln. Really well actually. They could load it up with hybrids and stuff. But the key for that will have to be the styling and going back to names. A big, sexy, coupe shaped hatchback called the Continental would do well. As the 300 shows not everyone wants some German cookie cutter car and there’s a lot of room and volume to be found outside of that space. Contrary to manufacturer’s beliefs people want cars that are unique and distinctive.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    “Ford is a more prestigious brand than Lincoln is.”

    And that’s because the F-150 *is* their halo sedan now. But I’d love a return of the Galaxie name. I had that black ’66 pictured until it was totaled by a ’67 goat.

    • 0 avatar

      The F-150 and Mustang share “halo” status at Ford because they are traditional American cars with actual NAMES (without letters) and still offer a V8 (shame on Navigator).

      Of all the cars Cadillac makes, the Escalade is its halo car for the exact same reason.

      If only Lincoln would make the 3.5-L EGOboost standard in all its cars and allow you to upgrade to the BOSS in the Navigator/ MKS for extra money. If only they had my vision.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It’s just not “Luxury” without the V8. Anything else is a cheesy engine for the masses. It doesn’t have to be a SC’d monster out of the CTS-V or GT500. Just a simple V8 in the 5-6 liter range. No booming exhaust, just a normal V8 sounds. And some grunt when you floor it. Not some wheezing.

        I’m a huge fan of the Origami styling of the last decade’s Cadillacs. I’m all about it. But the V6 is a limp d!ck. They even put a big chrome “3.6″ badge on the back. For what???

        • 0 avatar

          Everyone accuses me of being V8-thirsty, but I recognize realities and I accept other powertrains:

          Tesla’s in the Model S
          Diesels and turbo diesels.

          My problem is when they don’t use an appropriately sized engine for an appropriate vehicle. A big truck should have a diesel. A big car or SUV should have a V8 – or diesel.
          These small/ midsized cars are where it gets hairy.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Sure, if you mash the accelerator at every opportunity, you may find yourself short at some point. But most vehicles are endowed with more power and speed than they actually need.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            I actually prefer the effortless torque of 8 cylinder engines for moderate to mid acceleration as well, not just WOT. It’s nice to not have to force a double downshift and make the engine rev to the moon to get up a hill or a freeway on ramp.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          The sooner we realize V8s are god’s gift to cars… Nothing else has ever come close.

          But V8′s have never really been given a half decent chance in everyday FWDs. The Taurus SHO had a V8, but let’s not tune it for performance. Or gear it for acceleration. Just an all aluminum V8 in the 5 liter range, pushrod for simplicity/size, with all the latest tech, including cylinder deactivation. Of course, tuned/geared specifically for fuel economy. And in an Altima, Camry, Malibu, and such.

          Remember, V8s aren’t known for blowing head gaskets without doing something really stup!d. And V8 timing chains are forever. So there’s that reliability, longevity thing that V8s offer. Probably much better fuel economy too, if set up right. And driven normally.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “But V8′s have never really been given a half decent chance in everyday FWDs.”

            Maybe in Ford Land. GM has done the FWD V8 thing for decades. Results and reliability have generally been mixed.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “Results and reliability have generally been mixed.”

            You’re talking about the NorthStar and other GM disasters. The way those V8s were facing had nothing to do with their problems.

            Start with a proven V8 and work backwards. Then a proven trans, and so on.

            But I’m at a point in my life where I want luxury and I shouldn’t have to settle for a V6, turbo or otherwise. It’s V8s from no on. If I have to own old cars to have a V8, so be it. OEMs don’t want my money? Fine. At least pony cars and trucks won’t let me down. For now.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “Start with a proven V8 and work backwards. Then a proven trans, and so on.”

            They did, the LS4 W-bodies. They’re really fun cars, but in a really stupid way. Putting that kind of power in a FWD application becomes pretty fruitless when pushing the car to any degree.

            Another FWD transverse V8 car I really liked was the last gen Continental. A nicely put-together car for it’s era with the 4V modular engine. I much preferred those over the STS of the same time period.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            The LS4 cars are fun, but they have issues with the early cylinder deactivation and they grenade their transmissions too often (I guess that’s what you get when you use the same transmission that could barely handle the 3800S/C).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @ajla

            Couldn’t agree with you more on the LS4. Typical GM thinking come up with awesome idea for the time, rush production (cyl deactivation) and cut corners (4T60-HD as opposed to 4T80 which was designed to handle Northstar and might have worked)

          • 0 avatar
            skor

            @ajla, I still have my Seville with the 4.9. The engine has been bullet proof….wish I could say the same about the rest of the car. The Northstar, on the other hand………

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            Lincoln did a transverse V8 in the Continental. Its part of the reason the MOD motors were saddled with a pathetically small bore (3.552″ – 90.2 mm) and bore spacing (3.973″ – 100 mm) so the 4.6 in DOHC form could fit between the strut towers of the FWD Continental.

            The only good thing that came out of that decision was forcing Ford to get serious in the cylinder head flow department and the small bore with small bore spacing puts less engine on or over the front axle in a RWD car.

            The worst aspect was the crippling performance in the 2 valve engine which if the MOD motor had more bore and bore spacing (say something more conventional like the retired 302 with its 4″ (101.6 mm)bore 4.38″ (111.25 mm) bore spacing could have been a better player in the game.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            But the V8s which have a timing belt are not forever.

            Nor are MB V8s with chains.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Nothing lasts forever.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Diamonds, Mr. Bond.

  • avatar
    gasser

    The Taurus was a rare miss for Mulally. He took the 500 and had it renamed and then restyled to be the Taurus. Ford was in love with the Volvo underpinnings. The combination of blah styling, plus big outside but small inside doesn’t work. I agree with the idea hat Ford has a lot of RWD engine and transmission packages. I just don’t know if the size of the total RWD pie is big enough to invest in a new RWD (read as North America only) car.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      In the real world, people don’t care about RWD. And they don’t care for full-size sedans much, either. The Galaxie name means absolutely nothing to me, and I doubt it means anything to virtually anyone under 50.

      The Chevy SS isn’t a sales/publicity dud because its styling isn’t mean enough. People just don’t care about its segment. The SS has not helped or hurt the Chevy brand is any measurable way. If the Taurus is a poor car–and I genuinely don’t know if it is–it hasn’t affected the public’s perception of Ford one iota. (I suspect that if I conducted a random survey asking people to name the models Ford currently sells, 80%+ wouldn’t even name the Taurus. I wouldn’t be surprised if it was 90%+.)

      This editorial should be filed along with all the “If they just put a manual in it… ;” “If they just made the wagon… ;” and “If Lincoln had a RWD platform…” theories. I don’t think the car companies are the smartest in the world, but I do think they are smart enough to know what sells. Ford lets the Taurus languish because it doesn’t matter.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Agreed, anyone who gets a warm rush from the Galaxie name and all it conjures (like me) won’t be buying many more new cars. People nowadays would just think Ford was trying to capitalize on the popularity of Samsung’s phone and the lawyers made them spell it funny.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          My dad thinks the Galaxie (original old ones) is/were a joke.

          I saw a Galaxie once, bright red in perfect condition, a coupe. I pointed it out, and said hey that’s nice!

          He replied, “Pfft that? It’s just a Galaxie.” This was around 2005, which puts him at 42 years old.

      • 0 avatar

        Not quite correct. Look at Charger and 300 sales numbers. People apparently love Chrysler’s RWD full size American sedans. There’s an opportunity there for Ford, especially considering that the Taurus lags behind the Charger/300 at a 3:1 ratio.

        Also, the SS come in essentially one trim to avoid competing with the Impala. If there were a $25k V6 SS, it would sell like the Pentastar Charger does.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        If a historical name has to be used as fanbois insist, Fairlane would be better and fit the ‘F’ nomenclature. Although the purists would probably get upset that the Fairlane was an intermediate and not a full size throughout most of its lifespan.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          The Fairlane concept (that became the Flex with very few changes) was most decidedly not mid-sized by any metric, and no-one complained then. Mostly because it was a concept.

          Or wait, maybe they did and that’s why the name Flex was applied to a vehicle that looks like it has all the flexibility and elasticity of a silo stave.

          Okay, I think I just answered my own question/complaint. I’ll show myself out.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            Worth noting that the one big difference between the Fairlane concept and the production Flex was, in fact, size. The Fairlane was significantly shorter.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Also, I believe over in the EU a Galaxie is a current people carrier?

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I’m not sure the latest Taurus was really a miss for Mulally. Compared to the car it replaced, it sold significantly better. When it was released, a lot of people had good things to say about it, especially the SHO. The problem is they haven’t done much to it since.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Things ain’t so bad, but you’ll never get a Galaxie 500.

    The Ford brand is never ever EVER going to offer another RWD V8 sedan in North America. You might as well be asking for a 2017 Pontiac Catalina with a 400 V8.

    If we get really lucky Ford might put some big effort into a Taurus upgrade and end up with a highly competitive FWD/AWD car that offers the 2.3L and 3.5L Ecoboost. Which wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world.

    Also, the Fiesta and Focus are alright but their back seats leave a lot to be desired and the most positive opinion on the Powershift is “I don’t have a big problem with it.” I think the Fit and Mazda3 have those segments. Fusion against Accord? I don’t like the Ford’s odds. And don’t forget about the Edge.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    What is so bad about the Taurus that is so good about its competitors? Thats what I’m kind of confused about.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      I’m curious about that, too. Granted, you can’t see a gotdamn thing out of them, especially to the rear, but that’s SOP nowadays for everybody’s sedans except the new Accord.

    • 0 avatar
      gasser

      Big outside/Small inside, poor outward vision. The main reason for a large sedan is ROOM. If you are a big guy, need a car for clients or for sales samples, or renting for a family vacation with luggage you need a full sized interior. This is the main reason the Town Car was a livery mainstay.

      • 0 avatar

        +1 GASSER beat me too it.

        The Chrysler 300/ Charger/ Azera/ Genesis and even CAMRY have more spacious interiors. The problem is that the Taurus has:

        #1 a very thick transmission tunnel that cuts off thigh space for larger Americans.
        #2 very think door handles which “bunkerize” the “cockpit seating”.
        #3 narrow rear doors.
        #4 4-door-coupe headroom.
        #5 A steering wheel that doesn’t telescope or tilt enough – shared by the MKS and Flex.

        It’s not a comfortable car for me in the ways the Genesis, Camry, Azera and LX-vehicles are. I’m larger than the average person so I feel every single bit of cramped-ness.

        Even the old Panther Platforms were far more accommodating.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          That Volvo-derived platform was never terribly space efficient, but Ford has made it worse with all of its newer products. The current vehicles on that structure have large footprints, but cramped interiors. And while people may put up with it when choosing the Explorer (with its macho, Land-Rover-esque styling), they’re not going to be too fond of it in a pig of a sedan whose “smaller” brother is a better vehicle in every measurable aspect. The Taurus was bad enough when it debuted, but it was doomed once the new Fusion debuted. The only people I see buying Tauruses (Tauri?) buy ex-fleet ones as cheap cars, because they depreciate like rocks. The Lincoln versions are awkward-looking and the Lincoln brand doesn’t have enough equity for people to want its cars anyway, so that explains the MKS and MKT’s struggles.

          I feel that the Lincoln brand will make something of a resurgence with its hot new MKC crossover and the next-gen MKX….because (brand-cachet be damned!) people will buy crossovers if they have nice styling and features…which is what Mitsubishi should have realized when they developed the current Outlander.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The 05-09 500/Taurus Montego/Sable were the same size outside I believe, but HUGE inside!

            They really screwed themselves with the Taurus post 09.

        • 0 avatar
          omer333

          Spacious interior in a Charger? I felt claustrophobic in one when I test drove one last summer.

          Might have had something to do with those tiny window openings.

          • 0 avatar
            nrd515

            I would have to call them normal sized window openings. I’m so happy the giant greenhouse look went away. It was so ugly, and ruined the looks of so many cars over the period it was so prevalent. I have no need or desire to see the little area of road right next to my door while driving.

        • 0 avatar
          jpolicke

          “A steering wheel that doesn’t telescope or tilt enough”

          This. Trouble is, nobody does the tilt right anymore. Whatever happened that killed off the GM Tilt-Wheel? It was the best in the world, probably the one thing that GM did better than anybody else. Smooth action, solid engagement, and a meaningful difference in position and angle. Everybody has some wretched lever under the column that wants to rip your nail off when you dig your finger in to release it, all for a crummy couple inches of movement of the entire column. The GM Tilt-Wheel was good enough to rate being advertised on its own:

          http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTYwMFgxMjAw/z/C~sAAOxy0zhTMg0J/$_57.JPG

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            This!

            I loved those on my pickups and station wagon. Agree with everything you say about its convenience and modern mechanisms’ crappiness.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            Airbags happened.

            The thing that drives me nuts are the non-spring-loaded tilt releases that swing away from the driver. I have been in a rental car or two where I’ve released the adjustment lever and it swung down so low I couldn’t reach it to lock the wheel without unbelting myself.

    • 0 avatar
      fredtal

      My buddy at work just bought a Taurus after having his 500 wrecked. He loves big soft cars and is a Ford fan anyway. He liked the Lincoln, but didn’t think it was worth the extra money. Hell he even likes the My Sync. Also he got a pretty good deal, which I think is a big advantage to liking unpopular cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Well, that’s just about the best position you can be in as a used *or* new-car buyer…to love unpopular models. If, for example, you can’t stand the mid-aughts CamCord selection but you have the hots for some Galant Goodness, you’re in business. But then there are other cars, like pre-bankruptcy Buicks, that are quite popular among certain niches, but still very cheap. That’s good too.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I wanted them to make an MKS in 08 and 09 to match the Ford/Merc twins. That would be something rare and interesting today.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The center console is the monolith from “2001 A Space Odyssey”. That console has got to be one of the worst interior design features ever.

      It also has 7 cubic feet less overall interior space than the Five Hundred and razor-face Taurus.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      In addition to the inefficient packaging/ergonomics there’s the lost brand continuity (Taurus 500 Taurus) and it’s …. Aesthetically challenged. That never helps sales.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    “that big 302 engine”

    o_O

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      These days five liters is fairly big engine when most people are used to 2 and 3 liter engines. I was talking to a European man a few years ago and told him I had a 5400 cc V8 motor in my Mustang and he was gobsmacked.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I was under the impression that the large car segment was seeing declining sales. If so, why would Ford put a major effort into it, especially since they don’t have a platform for such a car?

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Is it declining? Cain says so, but he measures it with cars like the Maxima, Avalon, W-body Impala that weren’t large to begin with.

      Chrysler sold 200,000 LX cars last year and is on pace to do it again. GM is on the way to 150,000 Impalas.

      There’s no reason that a Taurus that didn’t suck couldn’t move that many – which would be three times better than it sells now.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        “GM is on the way to 150,000 Impalas.”

        Why aren’t I seeing more on the road? I drive deer huntin’, military joinin’, pickup inundated central Wisconsin. Some of the fly-overest, red state turf there is and I think I’ve only seen 4 that weren’t on a rental lot and they may have come from there.

        Have pickups so eroded large sedan sales?

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    i dont know why anyone cares so much about a Ford or GM V8 rwd sedan

    dodge charger or 300c?

    i actually dont like the new charger, the current one looks ace

    unless you’re a diehard GM or Ford fan, just go with Fiatslyer

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    Hell, go crazy and put the Shelby GT500 engine and matching suspension in a Flex already. I’ll happily abandon 4WD for that sort of factory sleeper option.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      The 5.8 from the Shelby is dead, it was the last of the old generation MOD motors to be produced. Going forward anything V8 based from Ford that isn’t the 6.2 is going to be coyote based and if Ford does a tall deck coyote you might even see the 6.2 fade away as I understand it Ford was pretty underwhelmed with the 6.2.

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    If they gave the 3.5 EcoBoost a more impressive sound it would probably get more enthusiast respect. It has more power than damn near any new car “needs” and is sufficient for even big SUVs. It just doesn’t sound badass at all.

    And yeah, if they aren’t gonna do RWD for the Taurus, at least make it the most space efficient thing in its class or close to it. And make it so that BMW X1 drivers aren’t staring at its door handles. Most people don’t want a 63 inch tall sedan. Every time I pull up next to one in my E46 sedan I’m staring at its bloody side mouldings.

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    Oh and Lincoln? Rip off the design of the freaking Hongqi Red Flag and put a retro modern Lincoln grille on it and a range of V8s stolen from the Mustang inside it. Bam, profit.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    Make it a 4 door ‘coupe’ Thunderbird, and I’m with you. Price it against the Charger, and style it towards Panameras and CSL’s (and smooth as a peregrine falcon), but with an american ‘flair’. Make hybrid and v6 options to help sales, but remember it is ‘The’ (first) personal luxury car. Only compare it to ’58-97 Birds when marketing it, and remember to make the rear seats useable. (There is a risk we end up with an rwd VW CC, but that’s definitely not the worst that could happen)
    And make sure that people forget the previous genration ‘Bird…

  • avatar
    omer333

    All about there being a new Galaxie that’s priced around $25k for a reasonably optioned car.

    Why not a Fusion? Because if I couldn’t trust the 1.4T to NOT blow up in a Dart, I can’t trust the 1.5T to not blow up in the Fusion. And both cars weigh about the same.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Ford is a pick-up truck company that also happens to make rental cars. Outside of pickups, Ford products are pedestrian – that Aston grill on sub-compacts is making the whole effort look ridiculous.

    Since pickups are where the profits are, I anticipate Ford has to learn to deal w/ drastically falling margins as the now equally good competition forces them down.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Oh aye. Ford has the best lineup, you say.

    Next job, assemble them in such a way that even the readers of Consumer Reports agree with the rather naked fanboi love evinced here rather than dunning them to the lower ranks as happens now.

    I thought you lot thought the Grand Cherokee was better than the Edge, but absent a direct comparison the Flex was awarded special mention. Now how is that selling?

    • 0 avatar

      I didn’t write that review. Not all of us agree on everything here.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      While not as extensive a lineup, Mazda has a claim to that title.

      According to the majority of reviews -

      Mazda6 > Fusion
      Mazda3 > Focus
      CX-5 > Escape
      CX-9 > Edge

      The Fiesta beats the Mazda2, but the new 2 will soon likely reverse that.

      • 0 avatar

        It’s trendy and cool for reviewers to like Mazdas (don’t get me wrong, I’ve owned and enjoyed two, myself) and uncool for reviewers to like Fords.

        The sales numbers speak for themselves.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “The sales numbers speak for themselves.”

          By that metric the Versa, Accent, and Sonic outshine the Fiesta, the Camaro is the Mustang’s equal, the Corolla and Civic are better than the Focus, and the Flex is a terrible vehicle.

          • 0 avatar

            The Versa is just cheaper than everything else in class…but I do like the Sonic better than the Fiesta.

            The Camaro and Mustang? Closer call than I’d like to admit. :) If you like one, you’re not likely to like the other.

            Corolla and Civic definitely outsell the Focus, but they are also names that have thirty year histories of excellence behind them. I could see where someone could prefer the Civic, certainly.

            The Flex is a total niche vehicle. While I bought mine after comparing it to other vehicles in class, I know that Mrs. Bark had to be coaxed into even test driving it—the looks are enough to kill it for a lot of consumers.

            Now, having said all that…you mentioned four different brands in comparison to Ford’s models. If you had been able to say Fit, Accord, Civic and…okay so Honda doesn’t have a horse in that fight. How about Sonic, Malibu, Cruze and Camaro? Nope.

            My point was that Ford has a vehicle at or near the top of every segment except full-size sedans. Nobody else can make that claim.

      • 0 avatar

        Mazda6 with 2.5L four vs 2.0L turbo Fusion with tight steering and beautiful interior? really? You cannot be serious.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you…the 2016 Ford Galaxie”

    Samsung releasing another phone so soon? Always trying to keep ahead of the competition I guess

  • avatar
    danio3834

    The Ford Interceptor Concept was the car to build…at the time it was shown. With higher CAFE targets on the horizon, I don’t see it happening, but it’s nice to dream about.

    http://photo.netcarshow.com/Ford-Interceptor_Concept_2007_photo_01.jpg

    The Lincoln MKR would have been a good companion for it as well. Different enough to not give a sense of outright badgeneering.

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-wNw16qy8FRY/UNcBiIbwuqI/AAAAAAAADUI/BB36DOJFiOA/s1600/Lincoln-MKR-2.jpg

  • avatar
    Joss

    Competition has put Ford in it’s place. The general public flock away to the more fuel & consumer friendly.

    • 0 avatar

      Not so. The Fusion is gaining like crazy on its competitors, the Escape and Explorer are the best sellers in class, and the F-150 sells almost as well as the Ram and Silverado combined.

      It’s easy to believe these myths that the automotive blogs spin, but it just ain’t so. Ford is, by far, the number one brand in America.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    “Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you…the 2016 Ford Galaxie. Stick this one on top of the new World Trade Center.”

    Yes please. Shut up and take my money. In fact I believe that the entire front end of the Flex could be grafted onto a sedan and it would work. Make sure the wheelbase is nice and long too.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Ford is a more prestigious brand than Lincoln is”

    I disagree, Ford has put out enough junk in my lifetime for me to remember there is nothing prestigious about the brand itself. Ford and their contemporaries like Dodge and Chevrolet may put out a real hit once and a while but there are still plenty of skeletons in the closets of each of those respective brands. Lincoln could be legitimately prestigious, but this requires serious money, marketing, and product none of which FoMoCo wants to pony up. That’s fine, evidently poorly assembled Mercedes FWDs and fancy Acura, er Hondas, for 60K are all the rage among the tasteless “luxury” buyers of today, these people couldn’t handle a true Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      “…and fancy Acura, er Hondas, for 60K are all the rage among the tasteless “luxury” buyers of today”

      Pardon me, but I don’t think that $60K Acuras are *en vogue*. The only Acura that people will pay $60K for is the MDX, and it happens to top-out around $57,500. The RLX, if that’s what you’re referring to, is as stagnant as its predecessor.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’m not sure how much they cost to be quite honest, just throwing a figure out. I do recall the ILX MSRP’d at 26 and change, that’s the only one I’ve ever looked at new. I see the silly things everywhere so they might be more en vogue then we’d like to believe, although RLs are few and far between among the ones I see (and they are all the 96-04 generation).

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Actually, I was up in the western part of Austin yesterday and I saw a slew of the RLXs. My buddy is a COO of a tech company – he buys a new car every 3 years, and just traded his 5 in for an RLX back in February. It reminds me in a sense of the Legends of old – very technically sophisticated, but relatively mundane looks for the perfect Q-ship. He’s very please with it, and had car shopped for 6-7 months before deciding on the Acura. He’s the firs to admit it’s not a Benz, BMW or Lexus – it is a highly competent car with decent luxury accommodations…

        I got to drive it for about 45 minutes out in the hills…I was hugely impressed with its responsiveness and handling; take that with a grain of salt since I haven’t driven anything in its class recently. I did like his 5 series, but not the Lexus GS before that.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      What’s a true Lincoln? The interesting car they made in the ’60s, or the unfettered junk they built the rest of their history? Even their old flat-head V12s were marginally engineered. When Acura stoops to putting fake Rolls-Royce grilles on their cars or Honda to putting fake Aston-Martin grilles on their cars, then they’ll be as tasteless as Lincoln or Ford.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I think its subjective. Most people think of the mid 60s Conti, some say 460′d 70s Conti, some might say 80/90s Panther, and some still the LS. I’d say any variation on those would be a welcome change to the tarted up Mercurys currently being offered. Brands have been built on the past on one product, and even as recently as 2005 when Chrysler was reinvented around the 300. FoMoCo would have to come up with that product.


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