By on March 4, 2014

Jeep-Renegade-23

 

Our photographers bring you live shots of the Jeep Renegade on the floor at Geneva. They even took snapshots of a Diesel Trailhawk, the best combination that we won’t get in North America. Gallery after the jump.

 

 

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45 Comments on “Geneva 2014: Jeep Renegade Live Shots...”


  • avatar
    alsorl

    At least Jeep kept the box shape. So many of the small SUV style vehicles have such a soft or very slanted rear end.

  • avatar
    redliner

    Now we just need an SRT version… as if this isn’t going to fly off the lot as is. It may be based on a Fiat 500l, but my dislike of that model is only equaled by my love of this one.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    It looks Jeep on the grille, but it is not Jeep anywhere else. But, Fiat will dilute the brand in search of conquest sales – as they should. That understanding does not make that fact any more palatable. Suffice to say, there will not be a Rubicon version. A “cute” rig. What is the saying about “damning with faint praise”?

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      A “cute” rig is the plan and globally it fills a nice to be a part of niche in that respect. Most of the planet’s inhabitants could be very happy in a rig this size.

      Meanwhile in Midland, TX – the quad cab Chevrolet Silverade 2500 HD and Ford Super Duty rule the back roads.

      • 0 avatar
        Hank

        Only a 2500? City-slickers.

        (living a couple hundred miles east of Midland, where it takes a King Ranch F-350 4×4 dually w/a diesel just to pull a single jet ski)

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      There’s a whole bunch of Jeeps, and very few of them have had Rubicon versions. Does that mean there have been few real Jeeps?

      It’s utilitarian and the Trailhawk will have above-average offroad capability (yes, a low bar these days). For an entry level Jeep, it looks promising, if some of Fiat’s small 4X4s are anything to go by.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Wow, the news keeps on getting better and better, from Jeep at least. Since GM won’t send us the Chevy Trax (in the US), I guess I may have to shop these when we go for our next new car…

  • avatar
    Feds

    There is so much to like here: Fun shape and detailing, COLOURS! in the interior, giant removable roof, interesting powertrains and 4×4 options.

    Looking forward to launch and pricing, etc.

    Also:

    http://www.topgear.com/uk/fiat/panda/road-test/4×4-twinair-driven

  • avatar
    chaunceyjb

    Tail lights remind me of a 1966 Galaxie 500

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Really great looking package. No shots of the trunk? I’m betting it will be tiny, unfortunately. The Trail variant looks just about perfect, the other versions have that stupid lower ‘chin’ that juts out for no good reason. I really hope that there is a trail version available with a stick shift, let alone diesel and stick shift, but I won’t hold my breath.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      There were some photos of the trunk is a previous Renegade post on TTAC.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      http://www.allpar.com/photos/jeep/renegade-15-jeep/storage.jpg

      Small, but I’m not sure it’s unreasonably small. Supposedly more volume than most direct competitors.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Hmm… I could see using one of these to transport me+gf+dog+camping gear with the seats down, heck even a canoe on the roof. 12.4 cu ft with seats up, 30 with seats down seems tiny. My 4runner has 44 cu ft with seats in place, perhaps the way volumes are measured has changed?

        I’m curious to see how it does on MPG in Trail guise, the current Patriot with Freedom Drive II and the 2.4+ CVT gets an abysmal rating of something like 23 highway due to gearing. Price would be a deciding factor for me as well. It’s hard not to compare the Trail version to something like an Xterra based on price and target market. The Nissan trades fuel economy for massively more space, off road capability, and performance.

        We’re considering getting a place down town, which puts parking at a premium and creates a longer commute, which puts me in a tight spot with my current ‘fleet’ that meets my needs perfectly. My new/reliable 35+ mpg Civic commuter is the perfect commuter/grocery getter. My older 4runner is the perfect weekend camping/hiking/hauling partner. If I had to roll that into one vehicle, this Jeep looks like a decent fit, or something like a base model 6spd Forester. Cherokee Trailhawk is too rich for my blood. Lightly used, highly depreciated Xterra with a stick shift would be nice, but they are super hard to find, and MPG would be low.

        • 0 avatar
          gforce2002

          Not sure where the 12 ft3 number came from but the official numbers for the storage are 18.5 ft3 with seats up and just over 50 ft3 seats down.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            That makes a lot more sense. That’s basically what a Fit can hold, but more with seats down, reflecting the larger passenger volume. (21 seats up, 42 seats down).

    • 0 avatar
      gforce2002

      My understanding is that the “chin” is for aerodynamics. It’s why the Trailhawk version has a slightly higher coefficient of drag (.37 vs. .36).

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I like the looks, but not the base drivetrain.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    If fiat is so ready and willing to spend such a large amount in the Jeep brand, can they at least get a vehicle that matches the “halo” (wrangler) vehicle offroad, ya know a BoF solid axle fullsize. Something matching the Scout II in size and ability. Base engine 3.6 Pentastar, w/ availible 5.7 and 6.4.

    There entering conquest markets, yet the above described market has 0 competitors.

    Take a extended cab short bed Ram, put a
    New body with removable roof, then put solid axles and transfer case from the 3/4 trucks. Parts bin paradise.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      The above described market has one insurmountable competitor: the used market.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        As long as new vehicles lack the features of used vehicles, then yes. If I wanted a plastic bumper for taking impact of a large rock, I would buy a power wheels car. The Z71 Tahoe was nothing but a appearance package in the GMT900

        The wrangler has very good sales, if it can be scaled up with offerings/ parts from the pickups it could be a reasonable priced and low cost build, that could share costs with pickups, helping both vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      “Parts bin paradise.”

      Until you get into safety, fuel economy, and emissions regulations.

      And lets not forget all the customers that said they would “put a deposit down today” only for them to walk when it comes out as they can’t afford it.

      Business case will never be there.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        This segment didn’t die from lack of sales, it died because it morphed into an entirely different segment.

        A segment let me point out that isn’t doing as well as what it was before it morphed.

        • 0 avatar

          Not sure what your going for here CUV sales are about twice what BOF SUV sales were at their peak. The problem with the trail rig is I don;t think the market will support more than the wrangler, Nissan and Toyota both tried and it didn’t work out well (iknow they had IFS) I love real off road SUV’s but based on what i see on the trails Used rules which may suck in 10 years but based on the number of IFS trucks showing up at trail runs I think the aftermarket will just adapt to reality.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I never mentioned CUVs which are an extension to cars.

            I’m talking about K5 Blazer morphing into the mommy-mobile k2XX 2015 Tahoe.
            They added 4 doors, ok good deal people seem to like this concept even if they still are trucks.
            Then they ruin it all and introduce car-like interiors, plastic bumpers, too much gadgetry, and price out the buyers that originally supported the segment.

            This is what I’m saying is nonexistant, the BoF fullsize for the normal weekend offroader.

            I have no problem with IFS if it is done well.
            It MUST be overbuilt, which judging by the looks of the K2XX, the only thing overbuilt are the cup holders.
            H2 has a 3/4 front end, because of duramax sledpullers I can put equipment under that front end to support well over 20,000 lbs of pressure in a second if necessary.

            End of the day, my point is, I just want a vehicle that can take abuse and be readily modified.

          • 0 avatar

            Yeah I know what you mean I wish there were more real SUV’s as well. But I realize it probably won’t happen. I would like to think I would by a new off roader but I know in the end any truck I buy to modify will be used. I think that’s kind of the reality of it. Also fuel economy and off roadability don’t often match the low hanging bumpers on the GM trucks are all about fuel economy now they could do what jeep is doing and offer an offfroad version with cut out bumpers but my guess is they don’t see the market for it.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    I guess I’m the only one here who is not excited in the least about this thing. Is it coming to the US? Why not just get a Cherokee?

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    This is an outrage! An All-American car company putting out models NOT AVAILABLE IN AMERICA! What does this Sergio guy think he’s running – a foreign car company?

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    I’ll bet the female take rate on these little cuties will be about 97%.

    • 0 avatar
      April

      I’m guessing it will not be that extreme. Something around 55/45 toward females.

      Considering the large number of various AWD models that Subaru sells each year I think there is a healthy market for a lighter duty Jeep. Lets face it, the majority of Jeep owners do not use their vehicle to climb boulders.

      P.S. If I had the money it would be on my short list. Especially if there was an option for the 2.4 non-turbo engine.

      • 0 avatar

        You can climb boulders with Renegade, just not very big ones. In terms of New Mexico trails, think La Bajada, Cedro. Heck I once navigated Cedro on RAV4 in the winter. Took me whole day, but I did it with just a few scratches.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    That white one is devolving back to common, sh*t ground clearance.
    Disturbing.

    Presumably there is a suspension option to provide the greater height of the orange one?

    • 0 avatar

      Apparently the 25mm factory lift that you detected is a part of “Trailhawk” package.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Thanks. So, only roughly an inch difference between the Trailhawk and that very Patriot-looking ground clearance of the white model.

        *sigh*

        “Nothing is ever as good or as bad as it first seems.”
        Bismarck

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I think it’s that low hanging front bumper you noticed. TrailHawk has a tidier approach angle.

        • 0 avatar

          Indeed 1″ is nothing dramatic, but my experience of beating snot out of a soft-roader on trail persuaded me that the clearance is not supremely important (although it is important). The most damaged part of the vehicle was the line between axles. That suggests to me that ramp angle is the most important measure in this kind of vehicle, and I hope that shorter wheelbase helps Renegade. I think I never landed a diff on a rock even once.


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