By on February 14, 2014

Mirage (3)

 

Not content to let Nissan steal their A-segment thunder, Mitsubishi brought out their Mirage G4 sedan, which was locked and on a turntable, next to an Evo and a Mirage hatchback. In person, the G4 looks just as pinched and stretched as photos make it out to be.

 

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

41 Comments on “Mitsubishi Mirage Sedan Displayed Proudly In Toronto...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Unfinished wheel wells at the rear. Is that at all common any more? Just asking for corrosion.

    You can buy this Mitsu and get no money back when you finish with it, or you can another brand offering in this segment, and get a lot more back in the end.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      My Alero has open rear wheel wells. I always thought it odd and kinda cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      IndianaDriver

      It’s a simple car that carries the same high “gear” ratio JATCO CVT as the Nissan Juke, so that Mitsu can get the most out of the small engine. I see the typical buyer as someone who finds the car at a good price with the 10 year/100,000 mile warranty included for peace of mind.

  • avatar
    Short Bus

    Why is the distance between the top center of the wheel arch and the highest point on the hood about the same length as the diameter of the tire? This has to be one of the ugliest vehicles I have ever seen, ever.

  • avatar
    countymountie

    Unless it’s a sign of build quality, I hope someone stole the shift knob.

  • avatar
    JK43123

    I have seen that at car shows before, so no one can move it except the person with the knob.

    John

  • avatar
    Atum

    If this was widened about a foot and made 190 inches long or so, Mitsubishi could have a good Galant replacement. Add the 3.0 liter V6 from the Outlander, optional AWC (for the northerners), the safety features from the Outlander, and the structural safety of the two Outlanders, and you have a competitive midsized sedan.

  • avatar
    johnny_5.0

    At first blush this seems significantly worse than all of its peers, at least for the North American market. Looks, powertrain, everything seems awful. I don’t think everyone needs 400hp to get to work, but 74hp would be brutal on an uphill toll road merge to 85mph (even though it is quite light). I’d gladly pay an extra $300 for a Fiesta, even with less standard equipment. This seems like another credit challenged special from Mitsu.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    Can anyone truly say that this is a more rational decision than a 1 year-old Focus SE with 9k miles?

    • 0 avatar
      IndianaDriver

      The buyer wouldn’t get Mitsubishi’s 10 year/100,000 mile warranty with a 1 year old Ford Focus. Would not qualify for the low interest new car loans either with a used car. It may not be an exciting car, but the Mirage probably meets some people’s checklists for a car purchase.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Mitsubishi may not be doing business in the US in ten years. Parts may not be available in ten years. I agree with you on financing, but depending on pricing vs the used Focus (and financing costs Mitsu vs used Ford) it might be a wash.

      • 0 avatar
        johnny_5.0

        First they’d have to find their local Mitsubishi dealer. Then they’d have to drive past a dozen other dealerships from far better known brands who have more desirable inventory at similar starting MSRP values. Let’s be honest, (in the US) Mitsubishi and this car in particular are absolute bottom feeders aimed at those who can’t get financing anywhere else. I live in a metro area with over a million people. I think we only have one Mitsubishi dealership left, and it’s way down on the south side of town (the fact that I had to look it up on Google maps is a problem when I could tell you where one or more dealerships for any other brand are located off the top of my head). The dealer website homepage has a giant “BAD CREDIT? NO CREDIT?” banner. If I had to I would rather eat ramen every day 3 times a day for months to save up a few hundred extra dollars to buy something else…anything else…from any other brand on sale in America today.

      • 0 avatar
        Flybrian

        You think Mitsubishi will be around in 10 years?

        And aside from that, at least Mitsu’s traditional subprime fodder had a vague appearance of being an actual vehicle. This sled is simply embarrassing to be seen in.

        I can’t wait to buy a few next year from MMNA for $8400 a copy and make a grand reselling them to Carmax so another generation of low-FICO bottom-feeders can enjoy the waning grandeur of Mitsubishi ownership.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Looks like a jellybean with a smile to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      In the old days, an advertising agency could run with that idea, and get a lot of mileage out of it. Today, it wouldn’t get past the focus groups, let alone the corporate suits.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Red-checkered seats in a blue car. Looks like you’ve had it resprayed while you’re still driving it off the lot.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    WHOAAAA….it has LOCKS?!

  • avatar
    James2

    How expensive would it have been to hire Giugiaro or Pininfarina anyway? Mits could have saved some Yen by firing its “design” staff.

  • avatar

    It’s cute, and I like the reasonable size wheels, but I’m afraid it may be not much of a car, and I lived with a Mitsubishi through several main seal leaks, disintegrated lower joint (translation: a wheel fell off), bad rear bearing and blown A/C compressor. My hopes are suitably moderated.

  • avatar
    shoganai

    In a past life, I worked (at the corporate end) of the design division of Mitsubishi in Japan. Here they made wall mounted hand dryers and smoke removal hardware you would see in a smoking room of any Japanese company. Wickedly advanced technology and design, might I suggest they move a few of the salarymen over to the automotive division and let them have a crack at something that moves. At least SAAB had design and style, Mits on the other hand needs an intervention of Mt. Fuji proportions.

  • avatar
    300zx_guy

    Mitsubishi has mastered the art of designing new cars that look they are 10 years old. If you want a new car, but don’t want the social stigma that comes with driving a newer car, Mitsubishi has you covered.

  • avatar

    I think it looking quite Versa-esque, but it’s more conservative styling could find it many buyers in those markets accostumed and partial to small sedans. Here, I think it could compete well for those who don’t absolutely prioritize infernal space. In other works it would compete indirectly with Logan, Cobalt or Grand Siena and directly with Voyage, Etios among others. Would have to see it in person to see if I agree that it is só pinches as describes since being that these cars are the majority here, I think I would find the proportions normal tending towards good.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      this site has some of the saltiest cattiest droll remarks out

      just completely vicious and also funny

      i am at a loss to why these cars have a market

      where i am there is no penalty for driving a car smaller than a C segment, there are no undue space pressures, the govt. doesnt care about capacity although you get discounts for a lighter car its not worth the saving (ie. $25 less if your car is under 1,000kg? no thanks)

      i just dont see why you would need to punish yourself with a midget sedan, i am dead on 6ft so i dont like knocking elbows with passengers

      if it were me, i’d like a Dacia Sandero Estate with the 900cc turbo triple and a manual box

      i dont like hatches, the sedans are ugly and impractical… to me a wagon/estate is the best utilisation of space aside from a FWD CUV like a Dacia Duster

      going by UK prices, I dont see why you’d bother with a Micra or Mirage or any of them extremely ugly Nissan sub C sedans

      i wish they sold there here as Nissans or Renaults

      http://www.carbuyer.co.uk/reviews/dacia/logan-mcv/estate/review

      • 0 avatar

        I agree, with the emergence of Logan and others, the case for these smaller sedans gets harder and harder to make. Afterall, the ogan offers the same space as a Focus or Corolla, in a tidier package and a bigger trunk, for the price of a Mirage sedan. From what i’ve read elsewhere, the Mirage sedan is closer in size to a Fiesta sedan than a Logan, which would be a traditional step down from the Focus. Here in Brazil at least, things like Fiesta sedan, VW Voyage or, eventually, this Mirage, survive placing themselves as a more premium product than the Logan. They do that by putting a slightly better interior and not offering the smallest engines. People in this market buy this.

        Now, with the Logan redesign, it is at least on par with Fiesta sedan in terms of material quality and offers more space. That’s why if I I were to buy in this segment, Cobalt, Logan or Grand Siena it would be and to hell with the premiumness. Sedans, in Brazil, and other places in the world, do offer practicality. Would a SW offer more? Well if they could carry more luggage, but often time in this segmet they don’t. So sedans are competitive here. There is also, in diametrical opposition to Europe, that sedans are more prestigious than hatches.

        If the Duster proves a success in the UK, a redesugned Logan SW might make it to the UK as might a minivan. Let’s see if Renault believes the market there is big enough.

  • avatar
    krayzie

    3rd world country models in Canada now man times are tough.

    • 0 avatar

      In a word: Globalization. Ford can afford to shower billions on an F150 as sales allow it to fit the truck with the big engines, chrome and everything else north American buyers traditionally expectativa. However, in other smaller segments of the market, the taste of those who buy it in greater numbers well be imposed on others as makers strive for sales on a global scale. I mean if 100,000 Chinese buy one per year and only 20,000 north Americans do likewise, who will the makers attend to first?

  • avatar
    mjz

    First of all, Mitsubishi has an ASSEMBLY PLANT HERE. They are not going anywhere for the near future. It would cost them way too much to shut down here, unlike Suzuki. Secondly, the Mirage hatch is now Mitsu’s best selling car line. Laugh all you want, but for $13k, it has a lot of kit standard (ok, I read too many British mags) and gets great mileage. Read the owner reviews. So why not add a sedan version too? Some people just don’t want to buy a USED “whatever” car. They like the idea of getting something brand new, however modest it might be.

    • 0 avatar
      IndianaDriver

      Agreed. Mitsubishi is employing a lot of AMERICANS at their factory in Illinois. Mitsubishi/Kia/Hyundai/Nissan are good for the car buying public, because they offer decent cars at lower prices. The average person doesn’t need a $30,000 car to drive back and forth to work and there definitely is peace of mind with getting a new car instead of used (or pre-owned) as they now like to call it in the car dealer PC world to not offend the buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      Atum

      Mitsubishis are usually highly discounted. You could drive away from a dealership with a 2014 Outlander GT with every option available and all-wheel-drive for 30 grand. THAT’S good value. I’m a huge supporter of Mitsubishi and know they’ll have a good chance here in the US, no matter what others think.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Yes, but will the Mirage sedan be available here in the US in the same colors as the hatch: infra-red, Kiwi green and plasma purple? I love that plasma purple, but only in a sedan with a lockable trunk for my golf clubs. It would be the hit of the country club parking lot.

        • 0 avatar
          Atum

          If Sharpay Evans were poor, she’d probably have a Plasma Purple Mirage sedan. But spoiled teenage girls who go to country clubs have Shelby GT500s that they get painted Plasma Purple. However, the sedan looks to appeal as A-B transportation rather than “Fabulous.” They’ve gotta work things out, right?

          It’s really funny I thought of that, since Ryan Evans is my profile picture right now. And Sharpay had a Mustang in the movie.

          Fine, I’ll shut up. A teenage boy isn’t supposed to know this much about HSM 2.

  • avatar
    motormouth

    Oversized body rolling on absurdly small wheels. A typically Indian design where a large body has been mated to an existing platform to hit the combined targets of interior cabin space and cost reduction.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India