By on February 3, 2014

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No, this isn’t my new car. That’s still two weeks away, at least, as the wheels of the insurance machine grind exceedingly fine. It’s the next closest thing to my new car — my father’s new car. Insofar as he bought it at my direct suggestion, and insofar as no manufacturer has ever given us a long-term Cayenne or Mulsanne or all the other piggy vehicles cluttering up apartment garages everywhere from Automobile to Autoblog, we’ll take our long-termers where we can get them.

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This is replacing a 2009 ML350 4Matic. The best thing you can say about the 2009 ML350 was that it was much, much better than the 1999 ML320. But the best thing you can say about the new Grand Cherokee is that it is, in many ways, the best product in its segment. This particular one is a relatively conservative choice: an RWD Limited Pentastar with just a few options. To Dad’s chagrin but my secret joy, it happens to have the Class IV towing package on it. It’s not quite the loaded SRT-8 I suggested, but the Limited probably represents the best value for money in the lineup and it has everything you could reasonably want in an SUV that will basically be used as an airport runabout.

The dealer was Hilton Head Chrysler Jeep, and the sales and finance people involved were Mike Greggo, Dustin Adams, and John Lyons. They made Dad a square deal on the Benz and the Cherokee, enough so that I expect his overall costs for the next 75,000 miles to be lower despite the additional expense of purchasing the new vehicle.

We’ll keep you apprised of the ownership experience as it progresses. While this purchase might not sound like a bold move to most TTACers, it is to my father; it’s the first domestic-brand vehicle he’s owned since he chopped in his Town Car on a 1987 Maxima SE stick-shift. Watch this space!

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83 Comments on “Meet Our New Long-Termer, Sorta...”


  • avatar

    An interesting choice… I would think that the primary merit of GC over the rest of the field (such as Explorer and Pathfinder) were its drive architecture that permits the low gear, but this one is RWD, so obviously other factors were deciding.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      The JGC is a huge winner in features for the money, and interior quality. Compare a $36k out the door JGC Limited (before incentives) to a $50k Ford Explorer and the Grand Cherokee looks the more expensive of the two. Chrysler and Co’s use of high-quality leathers and other material trim is apparent, and in even higher end trims like the Overland or Summit, the Jeep Grand Cherokee truly has some of the finest quality leather this side of $100,000.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      The GC is a beautiful vehicle, and I’d say the same for the Durango as well. I honestly consider it a different class of vehicle than the Explorer and Pathfinder.

      You can also order it in some serious cool specs. V6 diesel on top of great gas engines, locking diffs, air suspension, etc…

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Many happy miles to him and you as you recover. It’s a nice-looking car.

  • avatar

    I approve of the color. Dark Blue looks good on a lot of SUV’s, including the Cayenne.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    Very interested to read how this goes. After near endless aggravation with MB wife “heard” Garn cherokee is the car to go for, or aRR which you cant get without a gold mine and a 6 month wait.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    Nice. Like the color, what is it called?

    How will this thing do with RWD in snowy weather?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      It’s called “True Blue”, oddly enough.

      Dad lives in Hilton Head. He won’t see a single flake of snow during this car’s lifetime.

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        Exactly. It’ll do better in snow than a 1980 Mercury Marquis with all-season radials. What else do you need in Hilton Head?

        Jeez, some people act like they’re gonna die if a car doesn’t have AWD. Put snow tires on that puppy for Ohio trips and it’ll go thru snow just fine. Nice choice.

        • 0 avatar
          ash78

          AWD has become an inexplicably big selling point lately, probably since all the FWD-biased viscous coupling systems have come about. You can brag about AWD but still boast mileage similar to FWD. Mechanical AWD/4WD systems can’t easily do that without funky tranny combos.

          I’d wager less than 1/4 of the US population would really benefit from AWD. Maybe half the country ever needs to consider snow tires. And how much of the US might need snow tires OR AWD more than 2-3 months a year? 10%?

          • 0 avatar
            bomberpete

            I live in downtown Brooklyn. This AM I got a big laugh watching those fancyboys in their $50K luxocars with AWD slithering around mindlessly on the snow and ice. NB: AWD is worthless w/out winter tires. You can afford them.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @ash78

            Amen

            @bomberpete

            +1

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            As municipal services decline, I suspect we’ll start seeing that number increase.

          • 0 avatar
            Atum

            If we had last week’s weather all winter, yeah, everyone would need 4WD.

            But you northerners don’t get ice; just fluffy snow. Ice is why people buy 4WD.

          • 0 avatar

            Northerners don’t get ice? Really?

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Atum – you are showing your age (or lack of years) again.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “But you northerners don’t get ice”

            Yes we do, I thought Jack had proved that with his recent accident

          • 0 avatar
            Atum

            I wasn’t the one who came up with that; I still thought there was ice up north. It was something my teacher told us today.

            But she grew up in south Florida, thinks F-150s don’t have 4WD, and is the only person I’ve ever known of to have a Suburban 2500. She mentioned that during the ice storm, her 4WD was good, and I wanted to ask about the Quadrasteer, but that would’ve been really creepy.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Is she hot? Your teacher?

            That’s what really matters.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I hope so, she’s not bright

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I’m far enough north that most of the city streets are covered in ice almost all the time during winter. Salt doesn’t function at our temperatures.

          • 0 avatar
            Atum

            Sorry I’m making a comment on an older post; I came back to it the first time in a while, and noticed DeadWeight’s comment.

            She’s 48. And hasn’t aged well. That is all.

  • avatar
    ash78

    I’ve been a fan on the new GC since the redesign (the previous one, IMHO, was one of the ugliest SUVs ever foisted on us).

    But every time I walk past one, it just strikes me as too small inside, like a big hatchback. To that end, I’m really eying the GC’s older brother — the Durango — for my next ride. Or maybe the upcoming Jeep Wagoneer, if that ever materializes. I could definitely use the extra passenger and cargo space, as well as the better cruising & towing nature of the longer wheelbase.

    • 0 avatar
      YellowDuck

      +1. We really wanted to like these, coming off a Wrangler Unlimited. But, alas, not enough cargo space for our needs, especially considering the enormous exterior dimensions. We ended up with an optioned-out Dodge Journey for less money. Its FWD/AWD system meets our modest needs (snow-covered roads, rutted cottage road).

  • avatar
    motormouth

    Hi Jack, I drove a RHD Limited in the UK last year and was impressed. The next car I drove straight after it was the latest Range Rover and the GC appeared way more than half as good at less than half the price (£100K vs. £45K).

    I was talking with some guys at Chrysler and the point that stuck with me was the improved chassis, which has considerably more welds on it than any other GC, something like 3,500 to 5,000, old vs, new. IMO, this has helped the model in every area. The guys at Jeep can thank M-B for that.

    Hope your Dad enjoys his new ride.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    I thought the main reason the Jeep was best in its segment was that it was a proper offroader? Wouldn’t an RWD version put it out of it’s own segment more or less? I hope this is at least the updated version that doesn’t shear the tires from it’s rims avoiding an obstacle :)
    (if it sounds like I’m being critical, I assure you it’s just lack of knowledge about this exact segment, and this car, as we only get the 4wd’s here in Europe, where it has very few real competitors.)

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The wrangler is really the only offroad vehicle offered by jeep.
      Sure some are “trail rated” but that doesn’t extent far beyond fire roads.

      Beyond the wrangler the company has became just a CUV company in the past 10 or so years.
      You can put 4wd on this but that doesn’t help you at all when your front valence is so low that its raking the ground in mud barely 10 inches deep.

      Edit: That’s not to say this is a bad vehicle, rather very good – best in class for its purpose.. On the road.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Zykotec, “I thought the main reason the Jeep was best in its segment was that it was a proper offroader? ”

      The Grand Cherokee is best in its segment for several reasons, including off-roading, but for those people who never need AWD/4WD/4WDHi/Lo, a RWD Grand Cherokee provides all the amenities and saves the buyer anywhere from $1400 for the AWD QuadraDrive 1 to well over $4500 for the SelecTrac 4WDHi/Lo.

      Many models of the Grand Cherokee that come with SelecTrac run only in RWD mode UNTIL you select 4WD Hi/Lo with a twist of the drive selector. After that you just step on the Go pedal.

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        My bad, I keep jumping to conclusions based on where it lands in the European market, and because of taxes on things like engine size and weight, it’s competition here is mainly Luxury/premium SUV’s, which the Jeep just wasn’t built to compete with at all. Hence it’s offroading capabilities is always mentioned as a plus. The American kind of road comfort rarely ‘hits home’ with European car critics , but it seems many are impressed by the new GC.

    • 0 avatar
      Compaq Deskpro

      There have been RWD only Wranglers/CJ’s for decades.

  • avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

    Have they stretched it a bit? My ’99 GC Limited had pretty poor backseat legroom, an adult certainly couldn’t sit behind me without chemical encouragement.

    If/when I get a pure electric as my primary vehicle, I reckon whatever secondary/backup I get will have at least a class 4 hitch and capacity to tow a motorcycle trailer..

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Yes, the wheelbase is 115″ and it has about 4.5″ of extra rear legroom compared to its predecessor.

      @Motormouth, it has 4,600 MB mandated laser welds, and the same chassis/body shell design as the ML350, which is heavily advertised as an uber-crash worthy vehicle, which is why it earns the highest markets from Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, as in “Top Pick.”

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    This is a solid choice, IMO.

    If I were buying a new vehicle right now, given the shape of the roads around here (resembling lunar scapes) and some life changes (young one), this vehicle – same color btw – in 4×4 Laredo E trim would be far and away the leading candidate to get the nod, and I’m even not a big CUV/SUV “guy.”

    They have rock solid chassis’, fantastic refinement on road, very good fit & finish, are crash safe, actually have a level of steering wheel feedback that is pretty much non-existent in competing vehicles, and are, generally speaking, uber comfortable.

    And the corporate Pentastar matched with the new ZF 8 speed is a match made in heaven.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The biggest irony in the automotive world is Chrysler, of all mfgs, is doing alot of things right while their Detroit’s cousins are doing it wrong. Chrysler offers you a V6 in almost all of its models, and a offers a V8 is some others. Ford/GM offer you a V8 in some truck applications and that’s about it save for the Aussie built Chevy SS. Chrysler puts out incredibly nice interiors and somewhat decent styling compared to their contemporaries, which range from average to awful. Chrysler for better or worse is keeping and creating iconic brands (even if they are just trim packages) while others foolishly shutter them. Chrysler decides to try diesel in a half ton, which has been the most obvious thing to do since the 2008 oil crisis. They hold back a major product release to fix bugs so it doesn’t become a recall queen, unlike some Ford offerings of late. I’m not a Mopar guy, nor will I forget decades of awful product but I’ll give credit where credit is due. These are the moves I expect from GM, who while making a few improvements steps all over itself in other ways.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      +10

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      Agree here. A year ago, I never would have given Chrysler a look.

      I truly believe they’re positioning themselves for the next 20 years when people will say “Wow, I’m sure glad Chrysler didn’t jump on the turbo bandwagon like everyone else.”

      They’re developing creating immediate, efficiency solutions that predominantly don’t involve hybridization or electrification, nor do they dilute brand equity or (hopefully) create insane complexity to build/maintain. Efficient V6 options, 8-speed trannies, better brand identities. Real RWD SUVs on unibody frames. Good styling, for the most part.

      I really believe their unique combo of American/German/American/Government/Italian ownership over a short period of time has been to their benefit, much in the way a mutt is smarter than a purebred.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Folks might argue its because Chrysler doesn’t have the R&D budget to experiment with hybrids. This might be true but I think its at least in part because they want to present themselves as a credible alternative to the missteps of the other domestics. The gasoline powered ICE isn’t going anywhere for at least the next twenty years and Auburn Hills is well aware.

      • 0 avatar

        Everyone has forgotten the hybrid Durango.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Great observation.

          The Durango is a better people carrier than the JGC for some obvious reasons (3rd row and 5 inches longer wheelbase), and some not so obvious ones (better ride quality due to longer wheelbase and availability captains chairs in 2nd row), for those who need a 6 or 7 passenger vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Good points, they also managed to get the “retro” thing right with the Challenger and they offer a V8 sedan (that doesn’t look like a Malibu) for those interested.

      I just don’t like some of their styling be it the Viper, the Cherokee, the RAM brand as a whole, but then again controversial styling is whats in these days.

      I still think the Challenger looks great though, some might call it uncreative, but unlike most newer cars the headlights actually face forward and it hasn’t suffered from hasty-face-lift-syndrome.

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        Chrysler is doing a lot of things right, especially design (which in my opinion they have done better than most, for quite some time) I really hope their current quality control can keep up with their specs and design. We won’t know for sure until a couple of years though.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    I could be a happy enough camper with even a Pentastar and the 8 speed ZF combo – but I live in Texas and rarely tow much these days.

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      Unfortunately, the Pentastar-equipped Grand Cherokees don’t get the “true” ZF 8-speed automatic. It’s actually a Chrysler spec version….which is not the same proven unit found in just about all new luxury cars these days. You need to spring for the V8 to get the real deal ZF.

  • avatar
    LeeK

    The Grand Cherokee is a winner around here, replacing the ubiquitous X3/X5/Q5/ML/RX hegemony as the preferred ride of real estate agents, affluent families, and empty nesters. It will be interesting to see how it holds up long term, which has been a trouble spot for Jeep. I think Jeep nailed their demographic with good looks, upscale interior appointments, and decent capability. The eight speed transmission added that extra bit of refinement to make this a very viable alternative to the German, Japanese, and Swedish alternatives.

  • avatar

    I never liked Jeeps until mine :-)

  • avatar
    EBradley

    I was recently in the market for a new SUV and picked up a ’14 Grand Cherokee Overland.

    After making a ’02 P38 Range Rover achieve 150k miles, I was ready for something else without such a heavy burden on the wallet. (This isn’t the time or place for the specifics, but I can assure you that reaching that mileage was an expensive, herculean task.) Since the RR was a mid-size SUV then, I wanted something about the same size, with the same feel and better gas mileage. Given that we live between Chicago and NYC now, I wanted something reliable (which knocked ALL the new Land Rover vehicles out of the running, thank you very much) for those cross country trips. After being a road warrior for almost a decade, the less I can fly today – the better. But, I’ll digress.

    Within one mile of the test drive, I was sold. The Grand Cherokee feels almost like a clone of the P38 RR. It’s about the same size, drives almost exactly the same and the V6 has about the same horsepower. Since Thanksgiving, when I purchased it, I’ve logged a little over 10k miles. It’s extremely capable, given all the winter weather I’ve driven through. It’s quiet, comfortable and inexpensive. One of the bonuses, which I discovered by accident, is that it runs on regular gas. That may not seem like a big deal, but after 12 years of running premium at 10 – 14 miles a gallon, it adds up. Plus, the maintenance costs are insanely cheap. I’m on my third oil change and just completed the 10k service. I spent less on all of those combined than the last service on the RR.

    IF, and that’s the big question, IF it turns out to be more reliable than the RR, I’m sold moving forward on having a GC in the fleet always. So far, I’m impressed. Time’ll tell the end result.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Dad had a ’99 P38 4.0S. So you two are in similar boats.

      • 0 avatar
        bigdaddyp

        One thing to watch for is Chrysler changed the oil filter for the 14 model year on the pentestar v6. Even though at first glance they look the same they are not. It will cause your low oil pressure light to come on. Happened to my brother, he just about sh!t himself. Had it towed to the dealer and the problem was the after market oil filter. So until the aftermarket filters get updated, he’s running the mopar brand oil filters.

        • 0 avatar
          EBradley

          Good to know. I currently take it to the Jeep dealer for all services, at least while it’s still under warranty. As I move out of warranty later this year, given the mileage I’m currently running, I’ll keep this in mind. Thanks!

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I agree with you 100% that this truck is about as good as a P38. But it is $45k more expensive than a decent P38 at this point too. But if I needed a 4×4 as a daily driver I could see doing it. $45k buys a LOT of wrenching though, even on a Rover…

      For the money, the JGC seems to be quite a deal. One anecdotal data poi t though. I have two friends who bought near identical ones when the first came out. One was perfect, the other got bought back for myriad electrical issues. Hopefully they have the QC consistent by now.

  • avatar
    bergxu

    Ya, W164 chassis MLs were frought with issuezzz…

    In fact, so were the majority of W163s. Oddly though, my parents had a ’99 ML320 which they ran to a near-trouble free 220K miles on minimal maintenance of fresh Mobil 1 every 5K miles or thereabouts. My theory was that they must’ve had one built on a good day in ‘Bama.

    Old man presently wants to trade in his 200K mile W220 S430 4MATIC on an ’09 or newer ML, much to my chagrin.

    Soon as the balance shaft gear in it disintegrates (as on all their 3.5 V6s) maybe he’ll listen to me and get a nice W140 S320 instead.

  • avatar
    Mike N.

    I was this close to buying a ’14 Limited with the diesel engine, especially since it was pretty easy to get one for 1% under invoice (join Tread Lightly, for example), but at the time I was looking to buy about ten months ago, the diesel kept getting pushed back, so I ended up buying a loaded one year old diesel X5 for a few grand more.

    My friends bought a ’14 Overland (RWD, with the Pentastar) right before we were looking to buy and it is really nice.

    The BMW is a definitely sportier drive, but I would have been totally happy with the ’14 GC.

  • avatar

    Billfrombuckhead, eat your heart out!

    All jokes aside, what a fantastic choice. My favorite SUV right now.

  • avatar
    honda_lawn_art

    Hmm, I love how this site boldly pieces together automotive reviews from business travel rentals, to creating a Car-2-Go account, to borrowing dad’s new car. I think that’s Gonzo journalism.
    The fact that what led him to borrow dad’s car was that he’d wrecked his own car makes it even better.
    Why not just borrow friend’s cars and do used car reviews?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      You prefer the “we’ve been flown to Pebble Beach, booked @ suite at Le Solidad, fed two rounds of golf and three meals, and lovingly returned home with a plush swag bag, al on the manufacturer’s dime” type reviews for your “objective” info?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      We’ve done plenty of borrowed used-car reviews.

      Everybody in the business has a review of the latest new cars.

      But if you want a review of a 300SEL 6.3 or a Cadillac Fleetwood Talisman, we are your only choice.

      There’s a review of a manufacturer-provided Regal Turbo on the front page, though.

  • avatar
    markholli

    What I’m about to say may be a very unpopular point of view, considering how highly praised this Grand Cherokee has been. When the 2011 model was introduced, I was a huge fan until I drove one. The problem for me is that the driving position is just all wrong for a GC. It’s too upright…legs down instead of legs out in front. The window sill is too high and the floor too low. You sit in it, not on it. Every time I have driven one I feel like I’m driving a minivan.

    I haven’t really compared them side by side, but I feel like if you took a 2010 GC and a 2014 GC and measured the distance between the door sill/window trim and the rocker panel, the 2014 would have 5″ more height.

    Maybe I’m just an old-fashioned stick-in-the-mud when incomes to SUVs.

    • 0 avatar
      motormouth

      “…You sit in it, not on it.”

      Do you mean that the other way around, or is this the first time that a car has been maligned for offering a seating position that would normally help improve the vehicle involvement level?

      • 0 avatar
        markholli

        No, I said what I meant, but I mean it in the sense that I don’t think I should feel like I’m sitting in a bathtub when driving a Grand Cherokee. When I say “sit on” I’m talking about the so-called “legendary command driving position” one might experience in a Range Rover.

        Anyway, maybe (probably) I’m the only one who feels like I’m driving a minivan when behind the wheel of the GC.

  • avatar
    WestoverAndOver

    I have a ’14 Limited 4WD with Pentastar in white. I am so excited to read that this vehicle will get the full-on Baruthian treatment!!

  • avatar
    EX35

    So, the most recent version of the JGC has been out for a number of years now. The big question is, how reliable? What have owners experiences been? After driving the Pilot, Highlander, even CX-9, the JGC is clearly the best. It wasn’t even close. But reliability has me scared.

    Should I just pick up a manufacturer extended warranty, close my eyes and sign?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I think this is the most attractive looking of the Fiat/Chrysler vehicles.

    The best of them is the VM diesel Laredo. I do know the SRT is nice, but it is useless for off roading. These are one of the more capable off roaders for weekend camping and can tow reasonably well in diesel form.

    I don’t know if our Laredo’s are blinged the same as the US variants.

    But being built on a Euro prestige chassis with a Euro diesel seems fitting.

  • avatar
    Fonzy

    Nice Jeep. If I was in the market I would check this and the 4Runner out. The 4Runner has a hi-lo 4wd and a roll down rear window for the dog. Jeep has the better interior.

  • avatar
    EX35

    But they drive like nothing alike. I wanted to love the 4runner. I really did. But it drove awful on the road. The JGC feels like an Infiniti FX or ML350.

  • avatar
    Atum

    Nice car, but… http://www.truedelta.com/Jeep-Grand-Cherokee/problems-144/2014

    The SRT is pretty cool though. The mother of the Chrysler dealership owning family at my school owns one (it’s obvious it’s hers because it has a dealer plate and the dealership front plate).

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    I’ve been closely watching the big Jeep forums for quite some time now. This updated Grand Cherokee has A LOT of electrical gremlins, mostly involving the new infotainment system. I’ll be interested to read the updates here though. The 2014 models have been out a very long time already, so maybe they worked out some of the bugs by now.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Tell Dad congrats – that’s a beautiful car. Amazing how a redesign throws something to the head of the crowd.

    If I had remained in the SUV camp this was my one candidate. Alas I wussed out and went crossover….

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I’ve had three Grand Cherokees, all served me well. They were all V8 4X4s and a bit piggy with the gas, but good do anything vehicles

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    Meh, I don’t like the GC at all. At face value it seems good, but then you go look at it and the seats are crap and uncomfortable, there is cheap plastic everywhere and then there is always the looming sketchy Chrysler quality.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I dare you to go and check out anything Ford sells that is even remotely in the same segment, for anywhere near the price, and get back to us.

      Oh, that’s right; Ford doesn’t have a vehicle at ANY price point that is nearly as refined, with as good interior fit & trim,not as capable in or off road.

      I’d pit the JGC up against vehicles costing 20k more all day every day, and FTW.

      Thee Explorer & Edge are sh!t boxes and the Japanese have NOTHING on the JGC at any price.

  • avatar
    Importamation

    I have had a 2014 Limited JGC 4×4 for a month and 2600 miles…….love love love it. Last car was a 2008 E350 (gave to 16 year old daughter) and prior to that a 2000 S500. After several years and a combined 200,000 miles in those two cars, I am 100% happy with the Jeep fit, finish, ride and overall luxury. I am in a snowy area and own acreage where I do need the 4×4 (used to keep a 2004 Ram 1500 truck around for such duty, traded it in on the Jeep). I agree the Limited is the best value of the JGC lineup….I have the optional sunroof and top of line UConnect 8 inch screen with Nav, but those are the only options. Many, many thousands less than Overland and not very much at all more than the Laredo. I had a hard time finding a Limited 4×4/gas V6/sunroof/nav, had to search 10 dealers online. Lots of 4×2′s and Hemis out there, and lots of Laredos and Overlands/Summits. The diesels are easier to find than I thought but at $4,500 and higher price at the pump, it makes no economic sense unless you have other reasons to get one, which I did not. On Chrysler reliability we have had a ’93, ’94, ’04, ’11, ’12, and now my ’14 JGC in my extended family and all have been very troublefree…as was my ’04 Ram 1500, not one problem or repair in 10 years…..unbelievable.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I was in a couple dealerships on Saturday looking at a few vehicles. If one doesn’t need leather or a ton of (mainly infotainment) options, they offered to sell me a Laredo E 4×4 with the 3.6 Pentastar, 8 Speed ZF slushbox, and group IV tow package for 29,688 OTD (I have signed order in front of me…err…near me), and I think this is probably the best value for someone who doesn’t need leather and every electronic toy.

      Even today’s “base” vehicles have enough options to satisfy a luddite like me.

      I won’t pull the trigger though. My now 8 year old vehicle is still like new, NAS been zealously maintained, and has been bulletproof, and experience has taught me it’s the height of bad finances to dump such a vehicle given the way the depreciation curve works, and also due to the transactional costs (including sales taxes when not trading a vehicle in) in acquiring any new vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      I’d love to hear back from you after a year and 12000 or so miles. Your time with the GCK is still just the honeymoon phase.

  • avatar
    luvmyv8

    Pentastar. ‘Nuff said.

    In all seriousness though, how does the Pentastar move the Grand Cherokee around? I have a ’12 Wrangler Sport 2 door with the 5 speed auto…. originally I wanted the 6 speed manual but this one came into my dealership as a trade and I got a smoking deal on it, it even had more equipment then I was looking for (I was going to go for a totally base model brand new Wrangler- power nothing, steel rims, soft top….) this puts it at roughly 4000 ibs- certainly not a lightweight.

    Even so with the auto and heavy weight, it moves. Though I don’t have exact times, it *feels* like a 6.5 to a low 7 second 0-60. Merging and passing isn’t a problem. It’s rated at 285 hp and 260 ft.ibs of torque. I’m quite happy with my Jeep and it makes up for the POS Chrysler Concorde my parents had in the early 00′s.

    I’m curious to see what your take is on it’s performance Jack when you feel well enough.


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