By on February 3, 2014

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Chrysler marketeer Olivier Francois has been a master at getting enormous buzz from Chrysler’s Super Bowl commercials. Two years ago, they launched the memorable Imported From Detroit ad for the Chrysler 200, using music by Detroit area rapper Eminem. That ad was said by many to be more memorable than the 2011 200, a warmed over Sebring, every car writer’s favorite whipping boy. Chrysler has an all-new 200 that it just revealed at the Detroit auto show less than a month ago and to get the buzz going on the new car, Francois has tweeked the 200′s tagline to “American Import” and instead of hiring someone contemporary like Mr. Mathers, Chrysler’s Global Hue ad agency went old school and engaged Bob Dylan to appear in, provide music and perform the voiceover for the Chrysler 200′s new Super Bowl spot. I’m also wondering if Bob didn’t also write some of the ad copy.

Chrysler’s press release about the commercial calls the voiceover an apologue. An apologue or apolog (from the Greek ἀπόλογος, a “statement” or “account”) is a brief fable or allegorical story with pointed or exaggerated details meant to teach a moral lesson. In his voiceover, Dylan intones:

Is there anything more American than America?
‘Cause you can’t import original.
You can’t fake true cool.
You can’t duplicate legacy.
Because what Detroit created was a first
and became an inspiration to the… rest of the world.
Yeah…Detroit made cars. And cars made America.
Making the best, making the finest, takes conviction.
And you can’t import, the heart and soul, of every man and woman working on the line.
You can search the world over for the finer things,
but you won’t find a match for the American road
and the creatures that live on it.
Because we believe in the zoom,
and the roar, and the thrust.
And when it’s made here, it’s made with the one thing
you can’t import from anywhere else. American…Pride.
So let Germany brew your beer,
Let Switzerland make your watch,
Let Asia assemble your phone.
We…will build…your car.

Now some of that was undoubtedly written by an ad agency employee (“so let Germany brew your beer”) but I’ve been a fairly serious fan of Bob Dylan’s for about a half century and some of those lines sound authentically Dylanesque to me. The passage, “You can search the world over for the finer things, but you won’t find a match for the American road and the creatures that live on it. Because we believe in the zoom, and the roar, and the thrust,” sounds to my ears and brain as if it could have been on an episode of Dylan’s satellite radio disc jockey show. “The creatures that live on it”, the word creatures, would seem odd if anyone else said it, but it sounds naturally awkward in Dylan’s voice. “We believe in the zoom, and the roar, and the thrust”, in its invocative echo of The Lord’s Prayer’s “kingdom, power, and glory” is again, something I’d expect to hear from Dylan.

So what do the Dylanologists among TTAC’s Best & Brightest think? Was Bob just reading a script, or do you think he lent his considerable poetic hand to the selling of Chrysler’s?

Ronnie Schreiber edits Cars In Depth, a realistic perspective on cars & car culture and the original 3D car site. If you found this post worthwhile, you can dig deeper at Cars In Depth. If the 3D thing freaks you out, don’t worry, all the photo and video players in use at the site have mono options. Thanks for reading – RJS

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77 Comments on “How Much, If Any, of This Chrysler 200 Ad’s Copy Did Bob Dylan Write?...”


  • avatar
    carinator

    More importantly, does Bob Dylan or Chrysler realize they are now an Italian car company?

  • avatar
    Ron B.

    …And Andrea Boccelli should be singing it …

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    LOL! Never have been a Dylan fan, as my best friend and I argue about from time to time.

    I always thought he followed on the heels of, and borrowed from some of the great American patriots using song and music to sell universal ideas and holistic philosophies and was a bit commercial and unoriginal, arguable, yes. One of those great patriots was Pete Seeger who just died recently.

    But, to get back to your question, he probably collaborated on the wording of the ad.

    Now all of you Dylan fan boys can crucify me… col!

    • 0 avatar

      Thanks, you just summed up what it took me years to figure out. The ad to me was deceptive as are most ads but also instead of coming across as “cool” it gave me a creepy kind of nostalgic feeling like watching Norma Desmond in Sunset Blvd. I bet the comparison will make sense in the future.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    Let’s see, Chrysler, and Italian company soon headquartered in Holland. And Detroit wasn’t the birthplace of automobiles or American cars.

    The whole ‘apologue’, is full of bogus or debatable claims. But it sure sounded good to the patriotic, ideologically fueled, and willfully ignorant. Now, for a buck, Dylan is helping lead the sheep to slaughter. I protesteth too much… again. Shame on me.

    Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain.> Friedrich Schiller

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      I thought some of the same things when I saw the ad.

      “Detroit” = failure of epic proportions & the punchline of a national joke. Batman’s Gotham with its corruption, poverty, crime, dilapidation, etc., is nothing if not a allegory to Detroit. I don’t know how associating your product with it can improve perception, unless it’s only with the “willfully ignorant.”

      The sad thing is that when I saw & sat in the 200 at the local auto show (they didn’t have one to drive), I was very impressed with it.

      • 0 avatar
        Hillman

        I see the failure of Detroit as a metaphor failure of America. The manufacturing center that made us the envy of the world after WW2 is now a reminder for our decline in manufacturing, urban decline, and world status.

        • 0 avatar
          racer-esq.

          The US is a manufacturing powerhouse. That just does not provide a lot of jobs because of increased automation and efficiency.

          It would be like saying the US had a decline in agriculture because farming only employs 1% of people.

          If rich Europeans and Asians stop sending their kids to the US for university that will be something to worry about.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “The whole ‘apologue’, is full of bogus or debatable claims.”

      You mean, versus Nissan, which is airing commercials showing one of its SUVs being able to hop on the top of a train? Or VW showing its engineers sprouting wings every time one of their cars hits 100,000 miles?

      Of course this ad is bulls**t. Ads are SUPPOSED to be bulls**t.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Oh, what the hell… why not?

    This is one of the last times a major advertiser will assume that anyone remembers and is favorably impressed by Mr. Zimmerman.

    Let’s celebrate our ’60s Snots while we’re still watching TVs in private homes.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    Way to piss off a ton of US craft beer fans and Moto x owners. Along with the Shinola quartz watch guys (although they do use a Swiss quarts movement).

    Because nothing says America like an Italian company whose “cool” cars (300/Charger/Challenger) are made in Canada.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    Way to p_ss (really, p_ss is blocking comments?) off a ton of US craft beer fans and Moto x owners. Along with the Shinola quartz watch guys (although they do use a Swiss quartz movement).

    Because nothing says America like an Italian company whose “cool” cars – 300/Charger/Challenger – are made in Canada.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    I thought the same about the beer. That was a hell of an insult to a lot of US brewers. And as for the “Let Asia assemble your phone.” There’s an insult there as well.

    • 0 avatar
      rpol35

      “Let Asia assemble your phone.” There’s an insult there as well.”

      I’m not sure that I am following you. The last time I checked, most cellphones, are in fact, mostly made in China and maybe some in Singapore. I think the Samsung (Korean company) that I use to have was made in China too.

      What would be better or less insulting? If Germans are making beer and the Swiss are assembling watches, then…what “Chinese” assembling cellphones?

      • 0 avatar
        VA Terrapin

        About the “Let Asia assemble your phone” alleged insult, one western stereotype about East Asia that persists is that different East Asians are alike. This stereotype extends to a certain extent to East Asian cultures. The most obvious, recent examples of making different East Asian cultures look alike are Katy Perry’s outfit in the 2013 American Music Awards and Coldplay’s video of Chineses Princess, featuring Rihanna.

    • 0 avatar
      VA Terrapin

      The biggest racial insult in this Chyrsler commercial is that practically everyone representing America is white or black. The more multicultural Coca Cola America the Beautiful commercial makes Chrysler looks like a racist company that’s stuck in the past.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Dude, if you found that ad racially insulting, then you are really reaching.

        • 0 avatar
          VA Terrapin

          Watch the Coca Cola and Chrysler ads back to back. You can’t help but notice the stark racial differences in these ads. The Coca Cola ad acknowledges and embraces America’s multicultural reality where there are lots of Americans who are neither white nor black. The Chrysler ad is a retrograde insult that looks back at a time when the only Americans treated as fully American were whites, and the only minorities who many counted as real Americans were black.

          Chrysler’s use of major celebrities from the past like James Dean, Marilyn Monroe and Julius Erving implies that Chrysler thinks that America stopped being “real” when America became more obviously multicultural.

    • 0 avatar

      I see the ad differently. I’m a native Detroiter and for years I’ve been telling my neighbors that we don’t just make American cars, we’re the global center of a global industry, just as NYC is the center of the global financial industry, as Los Angeles is the center of the motion picture industry, and yes, as Germany is to beer in a lot of peoples’ minds and Switzerland is to watches.

      They know how to make beer in Germany. They know how to make watches in Switzerland. They know how to make cars in Detroit.

      Speaking of Germany, it might be a subtle dig at Daimler, who used to own Chrysler, from the Italians.

      … and speaking of Italians, the car advertised in the spot is built in suburban Detroit, in Sterling Heights, and while it’s based on an Alfa platform, as is the Dart, the design and engineering was done in Auburn Hills. If anything, after the merger there will be more Italians from Fiat moving to this country, than jobs moving from Auburn Hills to Italy.

      In any case, this ad and the multilingual America the Beautiful ad for Coca Cola have succeeded in that today we’re talking about Chrysler and Coke.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Haven’t you heard, Ronnie?

        You’re from Detroit so you’re not allowed any civic pride. I’m from St. Louis, so I’m not either.

        Glad I could clear that up for you!

        (eyes roll)

      • 0 avatar
        3Deuce27

        Thanks for your perspective, Ronnie. It allows me to look at the issues with different eyes, something we all need to do more often.

        Regards

      • 0 avatar
        VA Terrapin

        Ronnie,

        It’s fine to have pride in Detroit, America or wherever else you come from. Using pride in your identity to disrespect others is problematic, and that’s what Chrysler did.

        Chrysler’s “imported from Detroit” ad with Eminem was very good. It spoke to pride in Detroit without resorting to desperation or putdowns against others. It might have even planted seeds in import car fans who otherwise wouldn’t give American cars a chance. Of course, now that Chrysler is fully owned by Fiat, “imported” takes on a new meaning.

      • 0 avatar

        Yes but,, Which country gets the profit from selling the cars? Pleases explain.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Ronnie have you seen the documentary “Search for Sugarman?”

        You’d like it if you enjoy Bob Dylan. I just watched it a couple days ago. It’s on YouTube in HD.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Aside from the racist overtones of letting “Asians” (I almost thought he’d say “Orientals”) building your phones, what is ‘merican about a car company brought to failure by predatory German managers, turned loose, then sold and completely taken over by Italians?

    If Chrysler spent as much money on R&D as it does on commercials, then the 200 wouldn’t be a rental queen you dread to drive when all the Hondas and Yotas are snapped up by holiday travelers.

    • 0 avatar
      deadliftsnbroccoli

      +1

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      He said, “Asia,” not “Asians.”

      And unless you’ve driven the new 200, I don’t see how you could call it a rental queen.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The majority of the world’s mobile phones are assembled in China. That’s simply a fact.

      If the reference in the Chrysler ad offends you, then you’re just looking for excuses to be offended.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Yeah guys he said Asia. And lets face it, Germans taught us how to brew beer here in the USA. Busch, Adolph Coors – heck even the beers of Mexico are heavily influenced by the German tradition.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          You’d have to be completely delusional to say that Schlitz is an American sounding name, that’s for sure.

          • 0 avatar
            bobman

            Is Schlitz an American name?

            Yeah it is.

            Just like Laverne and Shirley. :-)
            (yes I know it was Shotz.)

            Perhaps you were just being facetious.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Allagash, Monadnock, and Narragansett are American beer names.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            The Germans still had a HUGE role in beer brewing in the USA. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_in_the_United_States

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          I thought that the point of the ad was pretty obvious — they were trying to sell American pride in automobiles without bashing on imports in general. They’re not trying to get you to give up your iPhone or your Heineken, they just want you to feel good about buying a Chrysler product. (The whole “imported from Detroit” theme.)

          If Chrysler makes the pitch to just buy American everything, then that’s fighting an uphill battle. Personally, I’m not going to do Bobby Zimmerman’s bidding on this one, but the ad was pretty well constructed, as far as car ads go.

      • 0 avatar
        VA Terrapin

        This Chrysler ad was already a big piece of xenophobic crap by the time it got to “Let Germany brew your beer.”

        The reason why the ad said “let Asia assemble your phone” instead of “let China assemble your phone” is because Fiat is afraid of offending Chinese government officials who could otherwise more easily see how Fiat is using anti-Chinese xenophobia to sell the Chrysler 200 in America.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I liked it. Better than the Silverado add with the bull being pimped out.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Sadly, I think this ad missed the mark. I was in a room full of people 30 and under and no one recognized Bob Dylan. Of course, many of them didn’t know Queen Latifah was a singer either… ::head slap::

  • avatar
    fredtal

    To me this downgrades Bob Dylan more than it helps Chrysler.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    After recent Chrysler group ads such as “Arrive in Style”, “Manifesto”, “Born of Fire” and “Farmer” I was looking forward to seeing this ad. I was disappointed – it didn’t really seem authentic to me, and it didn’t really make me want to check out a new 200. This is too bad, because the new 200 looks like an interesting and class competitive product, at least on paper. And Chrysler really needs to build awareness of it, as they haven’t had a class competitive D segment offering in years.

    I would be interested to see what some of the professional marketing folks who frequent this site think of the ad.

  • avatar
    Dweller on the Threshold

    The fact that Dylan has a unique voice (I mean as a songwriter, not a singer, but that too) also makes him easy to emulate.

    But he’s almost always oblique in his references, which this ad copy certainly is not. Even his prose is indirect and figurative.

    Dylan can definitely be a jingoist, so it isn’t a bad pairing, but only by way of transfer.

    Fool’s gold.

  • avatar
    sco

    Spent the next 10 minutes after watching this ad trying to summarize all the reasons I disliked it:
    1. when a noted counter-cultural recluse like Dylan goes in front of the camera he better be selling something very important like …the Chrysler 200?
    2. the disingenuousness of the ad – as noted, if the Italian-owned Chrysler was genuinely dedicated to all things “American” it would make more cars in America
    3. the inaccuracy of it all- Detroit did not invent the car and the Autobahn was built by the Nazis, not inspired by the American Interstate system, etc etc
    4. the fact that ads like this make any thinking person feel like an crotchety old crank. Yes I know I’m supposed to watch this commercial and feel good about being an American but Chrysler, do you have to make me feel so dirty and ignorant about it?

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      “3. the inaccuracy of it all- Detroit did not invent the car and the Autobahn was built by the Nazis, not inspired by the American Interstate system, etc etc”

      I had to fact-check myself on this one; but the opposite was true:

      “The Interstate Highway System gained a champion in President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was influenced by his experiences as a young Army officer crossing the country in the 1919 Army Convoy on the Lincoln Highway, the first road across America. Eisenhower gained an appreciation of the Reichsautobahn system, the first “national” implementation of modern Germany’s Autobahn network as a necessary component of a national defense system while he was serving as Supreme Commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II.[9] He recognized that the proposed system would also provide key ground transport routes for military supplies and troop deployments in case of an emergency or foreign invasion.”

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_Highway_System

      As well as national highway network; portions of it were designed to act as temporary airstrips; which was also pioneered by the Germans in WWII.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The world’s first road to resemble a modern freeway (high speed, limited access, car traffic only) was the Long Island Motor Parkway, a private toll road that opened in 1908. It was a commercial failure, and was closed in the late 30s.

        The first German autobahn was built by the Weimar government, before Hitler came to power. Hitler expanded the network, but it wasn’t the Nazis’ idea.

        There were plans elsewhere before WWII to build motorway networks, such as in the UK and certain parts of the US such as in the LA area, but the Depression put a halt to many of those programs. Still, the US already had some of these types of roads before WWII, such as the Westside Elevated Highway (which was a bit of a disaster), the Pennsylvania Turnpike and a few around Los Angeles.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    When I heard the “Let Germany brew your beer” bit, I immediately expected that the next commercial would be from Budweiser, making a counter-offer: let the Germans build your cars, let the Asians do likewise (in addition to your phones), we’ll brew your beer.

  • avatar
    makuribu

    I thought the ad fit the Super Bowl perfectly. An all day, all American hype machine that ignores facts while relentlessly promoting poor quality product as the greatest thing in the world.

    Whether it’s Bob Dylan, US football, Belgian owned Bud, or Italian owned Chrysler, none of it is genuine, true to its roots, or very good anymore.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Don’t worry, none of this crap stayed in anybody’s head for more than 10 seconds.

    Like most people, Americans ignore TV ads as a practical commonsense measure. Then get another beer of their choice and crack another bag of Doritos, while wondering how the office pool is going to turn out on the point spread. Just like the Brits betting on the name of the new royal baby. That’s the practical side of things.

    Only media types examine these ads in any detail for they are the navel-gazers of our time. And because they want to fulminate on some subject, while pretending it’s real work.

    Hype? Yes indeed. Overall importance? Zero.

    Bob Dylan is unfortunately now a legend in his own mind, taking money from the marketers and only about as good as Joni Mitchell thinks he is, or was.

    • 0 avatar
      sco

      Yeah maybe your right, maybe I am overthinking it. If the voice in the commercial was Homer Simpson instead of Bob Dylan I’d probably find the ad very funny, esp if he added that it wasn’t over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor.

  • avatar
    readallover

    I really liked this ad and I wouldn`t DVR past it if I saw it again. But I have no interest in buying a Chrysler.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    Fantastic ad and a fantastic car.

    How anyone could not like it is beyond me. You people don’t know whats good or bad.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      “How anyone could not like it is beyond me”

      If you like being fed BS I guess you’d like it.

      “And when it’s made here, it’s made with the one thing
      you can’t import from anywhere else. American…Pride.
      So let Germany brew your beer,
      Let Switzerland make your watch,
      Let Asia assemble your phone.
      We…will build…your car”

      Let Mexico build your HEMI,
      Let Canada build your Charger,

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Cool ad and hits the USA consumer right.
    Music background and pic’s excellent.
    Bit too much Dylan appearance.
    Nice finish.
    Too bad the car quality doesn’t match.

  • avatar
    rickentropic

    “Ahhhh but I was so much older then, I need the money now.
    You don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.
    Everything is broken.
    You can fool all of the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you can’t…”
    Take your pick…
    Dylan sometimes speaks the truth, when he’s not being the Jokerman.
    Let’s find out what kind of car he drives. If he drives at all.

  • avatar
    Loser

    Couldn’t help but think about Dylan’s “Union Sundown” when I saw the ad last night. I guess he forgot about what he said in this song. How many cars and engines does Chrysler assemble outside the USA?

    Well, my shoes, they come from Singapore
    My flashlight’s from Taiwan
    My tablecloth’s from Malaysia
    My belt buckle’s from the Amazon
    You know, this shirt I wear comes from the Philippines
    And the car I drive is a Chevrolet
    It was put together down in Argentina
    By a guy makin’ thirty cents a day

    Well, it’s sundown on the union
    And what’s made in the U.S.A.
    Sure was a good idea
    ’Til greed got in the way

    Well, this silk dress is from Hong Kong
    And the pearls are from Japan
    Well, the dog collar’s from India
    And the flower pot’s from Pakistan
    All the furniture, it says “Made in Brazil”
    Where a woman, she slaved for sure
    Bringin’ home thirty cents a day to a family of twelve
    You know, that’s a lot of money to her

    Well, it’s sundown on the union
    And what’s made in the U.S.A.
    Sure was a good idea
    ’Til greed got in the way

    Well, you know, lots of people complainin’ that there is no work
    I say, “Why you say that for
    When nothin’ you got is U.S.–made?”
    They don’t make nothin’ here no more
    You know, capitalism is above the law
    It say, “It don’t count ’less it sells”
    When it costs too much to build it at home
    You just build it cheaper someplace else

    Well, it’s sundown on the union
    And what’s made in the U.S.A.
    Sure was a good idea
    ’Til greed got in the way

    Well, the job that you used to have
    They gave it to somebody down in El Salvador
    The unions are big business, friend
    And they’re goin’ out like a dinosaur
    They used to grow food in Kansas
    Now they want to grow it on the moon and eat it raw
    I can see the day coming when even your home garden
    Is gonna be against the law

    Well, it’s sundown on the union
    And what’s made in the U.S.A.
    Sure was a good idea
    ’Til greed got in the way

    Democracy don’t rule the world
    You’d better get that in your head
    This world is ruled by violence
    But I guess that’s better left unsaid
    From Broadway to the Milky Way
    That’s a lot of territory indeed
    And a man’s gonna do what he has to do
    When he’s got a hungry mouth to feed

    Well, it’s sundown on the union
    And what’s made in the U.S.A.
    Sure was a good idea
    ’Til greed got in the way

  • avatar
    CapVandal

    I like the ad.

    Anyone else notice the woman getting the tattoo about 30 seconds in? It was just a couple of seconds, but I have never seen it before in an advertisement. Especially one created for a broad based audience.

    As far as selling Detroit …. I also like it.

    Even though the city is a disaster — its population is only about 10% of the entire Metro area, which is anything but a disaster. It is hardly a secret that anyone that could afford to get out of the city did so beginning in the late 1960′s if not before. The city population has been declining since 1950.

    As far as the car — I have no idea. Except I like the very Detroit idea of a a 295 HP V6 vs a turbo 4.

    No need to put too fine a point on it. It’s an apologue, after all. It either appeals to you, irritates you, or some combination of both.

    For me it was the tattoo.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    “We…will build…your car.”

    And I…will buy…WTF I want.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Wow, guys…of course this ad was BS. It’s an AD. They’re SUPPOSED to be BS.

    But I don’t see any complaints about other TRULY ridiculous BS.

    To wit: a Nissan Rogue can hop the top of a train; the Muppets can actually drive a Toyota Highlander and put the driver in the back seat; Morpheus likes the Kia K900; VW engineers sprout wings when one of their cars hits 100,000 miles…and on and on and on.

    Lighten up, fellas. You’ll live longer.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      It’s a little different when an ad is obviously over the top. But to say “And when it’s made here, it’s made with the one thing you can’t import from anywhere else. American…Pride” when it’s obvious crap is another. I’m not trying to bash Chrysler, looking hard at buying a Canadian Charger with the Mexican engine. Yes a lot of companies pull the same crap but it doesn’t make it right or acceptable.

  • avatar
    bobman

    I liked the commercial too. It is 100% American, as is Dylan. I thought he looked quite good and spoke very clearly. I especially liked the accompanying guitar tune which is truly American sounding to me. I didn’t see anything racist nor anything that would indicate he has sold out. This is another example of Fiat Chrysler’s Chief Marketing Officer Olivier Francois’s marketing genius. The internet was full of discussions about his work and the products he represents.

    I would say he earned his paycheck again this year.

  • avatar

    My guess is the advertising copy was written at the agency GlobalHue in the style of Bob Dylan, then he will have asked for changes.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/edlis.cafe/permalink/661382020567000/

    EDLIS Café

    http://www.facebook.com/groups/edlis.cafe/

    http://www.edlis.org/cafe

  • avatar
    GuyNumberOne

    I won’t bother to reply to the dime store intellectuals who deride Bob as irrelevant or a “60s snot”, or delve into the looking-for-something-that’s-not-there politics of the commercial, for obvious reasons. I’ll leave that to the less reasoned among us.

    I came here specifically because I, like the writer, was curious to know if Bob did, in fact, write some of the copy, as it sure does sound like his work. I’d bet anything he wrote most, if not all, of it.

    As a parting shot, it’s always amusing to hear a vainglorious butcher/baker/candlestick maker admonish the genius of Dylan and his unrefuted impact on the world as we now know it from the insignificance of their shop/office/cubicle. Truly astounding. As the saying goes, “Any idiot with a keyboard….”.

  • avatar

    How much is Chrysler paying you to say that? Sounds like the feeble attempt of some shill to disgrace other opinions. Oh you are a “dime store intellectual” if you disagree with me. Does it really take that much intelligence to see that that commercial is about as American as Fiat?


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