By on February 21, 2014

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Although the Honda Accord finished second to the Toyota Camry in the official sales rankings, Honda is touting the Accord’s dominance in retail sales, which accounted for 98 percent of overall Accord sales. By contrast, Bloomberg reports that Toyota’s retail mix for the Camry was 84 percent, with 342,007 Camrys ending up in the hands of retail customers. The Accord sold 360,089 units at retail.

Retail sales are more profitable for auto makers, and contribute to better resale value, but many OEMs rely on fleet sales to move inventory. Many mainstream auto makers conduct significant fleet sales programs for government and daily rental fleets, with Honda being a notable exception. While Honda has dabbled in fleet sales before (the much-maligned 2012 Civic being one example) the company still had no central fleet office.

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93 Comments on “Honda Accord Is America’s Best-Selling Car – With Retail Customers...”


  • avatar
    mjz

    Derek, I think the 16% retail for the Camry is a typo, maybe you meant 86%?

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Very fishy PR by HMC. Good work Derek!

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/08/the-truth-about-hondas-fleet-sales/

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      That article was quite effectively debunked by Pch101. Read his comments in the accompanying thread.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Norm’s too busy grossly miscalculating his fuel economy to bother.

        • 0 avatar
          Ishwa

          Your comment made me laugh unexpectedly and choke on a small hard pretzel that I was eating at that very moment; which then made me cough very hard until a muscle in my abs cramped very painfully.

          Just thought you should know what your responsible for, Pch101.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Norm could pick you up in his magic Buick, take you to the emergency room and back, then take a road trip for the rest of the weekend, all without using a single drop of fuel.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Oh come on Pch, I am sure it would use at least ONE drop…

            You shouldn’t exaggerate so greatly about fuel economy you know.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I was exaggerating.

            Norm doesn’t use fuel, he actually produces it as he drives. The US is going to achieve energy independence by having Norm drive in circles around a test track, as giant hovering reverse supertankers capture the fuel that Norm makes.

            (I pity you poor Canadians, who won’t get to use our secret weapon.)

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Pch:

            I am no economist. But, we cannot let Norm ruin the energy industry. If it were to happen, the tar sands in Alberta would cease to be required and a lot of my friends would be jobless.

            What you suggest cannot be allowed to happen.

        • 0 avatar
          LectroByte

          LOL, thanks!

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    McDonald’s makes the best selling hamburgers in the country, doesn’t make them any good. Who cares who sells the most boring 4dr sedans?

    And this whole ‘Honda doesn’t sell to fleets’ meme is utter bunk, considering how many of the things Hertz alone has. They may not buy them from a corporate fleet department, but they are buying plenty of them from SOMEWHERE (and they are getting counted as retail sales, obviously). Maybe not as many as Camrys, but still plenty.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      About 2 percent of Accord sales go to fleet customers. If a local fleet manager wants to buy an Accord from a Honda dealer, I’m sure that the dealer isn’t going to say “no.” But, sorry, Honda and its dealers aren’t secretly dumping Accords on Enterprise in a way that prevents R.L. Polk from noticing.

      The Accord is a very polished, well-engineered sedan available at an affordable (for most people) price. Boring? Well, if well-engineered competence is boring, then the Accord does fit the bill.

      • 0 avatar

        “If a local fleet manager wants to buy an Accord from a Honda dealer, I’m sure that the dealer isn’t going to say ‘no’.”

        Spot on.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        What that prior article missed is that a “fleet” sale as booked by RL Polk is not indicative of the presence of an OEM-sponsoried fleet program.

        A fleet program includes special financing terms and incentives that are provided to established fleet operators. Honda doesn’t have such a program, except for special instances such as the nat gas Civics that are sold to government.

        Polk looks at the registered owner. If the local Enterprise buyer goes to his local dealership to buy a few Civics, Polk will book that as a fleet sale because of who purchased it, not because of the purchase terms. That buyer isn’t getting special OEM treatment to buy the car.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I never said anything about dumping. But Hertz has a TON of Hondas. Seriously, I rent cars every other week all over the country and nearly every location has Pilots, Odysseys, Accords and Civics. My local Enterprise has two solid rows of Accords. So Honda (or Honda dealers) is selling plenty of cars to fleets, whether they are getting reported as fleet sales or not.

        I fail to see the stigma these days anyway. Do fleet buyers pay THAT much less than dealer invoice less holdbacks etc., etc.? This isn’t the 90′s when the Detroit three OWNED the rental three, and dumped heaping piles of dreck on them. A sale is a sale.

        To me buying an Accord simply shows a lemming like total lack of imagination. Reliable but dull (and most everything is pretty reliable these days), and I have never understood why people think they have some sort of dynamic appeal – they never have for me. Though I would infinitely prefer an Accord to a Camry.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          There’s really no comparison between Honda putting a tiny fraction of its cars into fleet without a program offer, and with domestics such as Chrysler that dump 50+% of some of their models into rental with blowout discounts attached.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          ” I have never understood why people think they have some sort of dynamic appeal”

          For me, it’s about excellent body and wheel control which result in a very satisfying ride/handling compromise. It’s not hard like a real sports sedan, and it’s also not flabby or crashy like a Camry, Sonata or 200. The 6 is good too.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          To me buying a BMW simply shows a lemming like total lack of imagination. Unreliable and dull (and most everything else is pretty reliable these days), and I have never understood why people think they have some sort of dynamic appeal – they never have for me. Though I would infinitely prefer an BMW to a Audi.

          See what I did there? How is someone buying some yuppie lease BMW somehow more knowledgeable or discerning than someone buying, say, a 6spd Accord Sport? The argument could be made (quite easily) that the VAST majority of BMW buyers are throwing their money to the wind spending their income on what can only be described as a status symbol. That you’re some sort of higher being for special ordering a BMW and look down your nose on everyone is old shtick.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Actually fleet sales are not always less profitable than retail sales. With a dedicated factory fleet sales dept the dealer gets a couple hundred for prepping the car for delivery if it is shipped through a dealer so the majority of that dealer mark up goes away. The mfgs also don’t extend the low/zero interest financing, subsidized leases and rebates to the fleet buyer.

          Certainly some MFGs like Chrysler dump vehicles like the 200 on rental car companies but then again they are often offering pretty serious discounts at the retail level.

        • 0 avatar
          Tim_Turbo

          Things have changed then. I used to be a regional fleet manager for ERAC/National/Alamo, left in 2010, and at that time we never bought any Hondas. Well, we did have a few actually-but we didn’t buy them new, bought a bunch of Accords one year sub 20K miles at auction once or twice.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    For the most part, look who is buying the new Accords however. The Accord (and most of Honda) is now “your father’s Oldsmobile”.*

    *I’m 57, I drive a 2012 Accord EX sedan and I approved this comment.

    • 0 avatar

      Yeah, our E-I-C Pro Tempore is so old now that he bought an Accord too.

      • 0 avatar
        doug-g

        True, but Jack is in a bit of an “automotive rebound” at the moment.

        • 0 avatar

          I am 25 and like the Accord a lot. I don’t think it’s an old man’s car, especially not with three pedals. Maybe it’s perceived as such, but I couldn’t care less.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Ha, its certainly a younger man’s car than a Buick Verano….and I am 28.

            Also, the Accord was basically second place on my list.

          • 0 avatar

            I like the size and the powertrain of the Verano, Accord gets the nod for handling and shifter size.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Derek, have you driven a 2.4L Verano? How does it compare to a 4 cyl Accord?

          • 0 avatar
            doug-g

            Derek, you’re strange. When I was your age, I was strange: I bought a Buick Park Avenue. Sometimes strange is OK.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Buick average age dropped from 64 to 57 years old. This is while every other brand’s average age is increasing.

            http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewdepaula/2013/03/31/2014-buick-regal-enhanced-to-continuing-drawing-younger-buyers/

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Edmunds has the slalom speeds very similar between the Verano and Accord.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            The Accord has never favored one age-group or demographic over another; it’s appeal crosses all boundaries.

            The thing got too big with the last-generation. Fortunately, the 9th-Gen is now down to the 7th-Gen’s size (and the 7th-Gen is rated as the best of the bunch in the handling department).

          • 0 avatar
            DC Bruce

            Hey Derek! Given the decreasing number of folks in your demographic who know how to operate a “3-pedal” car, I’d say a “3-pedal” car is more likely an old man’s car, because he is actually going to be able to drive it.

            Sez this old man! ;-)

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        It replaced a Town Car! Jack is obviously getting younger.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      Buick ( a dead brand, according to Lutz) is trying (unsuccessfully) to abandon the Geritol set just as the Geritol set is about to explode w/ wealthy baby boomers.

      You’d think Buick would like to claim its rightful, geriatric heritage.

      Who buys new cars? That’s the market, grey hair and all.

      • 0 avatar
        doug-g

        As a card carrying member of the AARP, I can tell you that no car manufacturer markets to we older people in any of their publications. Buick was the last and they stopped a few years ago.

        We more mature Americans are a large market and often cash paying (now THAT really throws the dealers for a loop! LOL) and no one wants us. I went to the Cadillac dealer to look at a new ATS and the salesman wasn’t too thrilled. It was almost like, “I’ve been told Cadillac doesn’t want older people to be seen in this car”. To be honest, all I really want is a 1967 Imperial. They can keep all the new cars!

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I’m also resisting the urge to upgrade to a stick shift accord from my Civic, went so far as to casually inquire what kind of trade in I could get a month ago.

          I actually think Buick is doing rather well with its image, at least in my eyes. The latest commercial of theirs with a young, well dressed father (an engineer?) in his early 30s spoon feeding his baby son by making car noises. It then cuts to him canyon carving in his red Regal GS. Something like that resonates strongly with me, the Regal is a very handsome automobile, and is available with a stick shift to boot.

          But being the practical guy that I am, I prefer the Accord’s roomier interior, better fuel economy, and (likely) lower running costs and better reliability, not to mention higher resale.

          That shade of blue is awesome on the Accord, too bad you can only get grey or black with a stick shift :(

        • 0 avatar

          I’ve been called an “old soul” before, but really, when you daily drive a Miata, anything that is comfortable starts to look appealing. I have a CX-5 this week and I find myself enjoying the compliant ride and high driving position. Though the steering is (thankfully) Miata-esque rather than the sensation-free mush of the CR-V.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            I’ve been called an old soul pretty often myself.

            I’ve been listing to talk radio since I was ten. Buying a Buick at 28 seems appropriate.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            If you love the Mazda, you’ll the Encore as well as they have similar grip levels. I’ll sit in the Mazda at next week’s auto show to compare interiors. The Encore loves decreasing onramps as you pass the apex just feather into the throttle while opening the wheel to let the Trifecta Tune sling shot you into an open place in traffic. :)

            At DaveinCalgary’s age I had a supercharged 3800 Regal GS with a smaller pulley and supporting mod would run low 13′s in the 1/4 mile with the Corvettes and F-body cars. Lots of fun to be moving “Fast with Class”.

          • 0 avatar
            TEXN3

            The Encore is a squashed looking Asian bug with chrome lipstick. The Mazda is way better looking, and I’m no fan of Mazdas.

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          That was tongue in cheek for Norm. But it’s true, the retiring Boomers are relatively wealthy, huge in size,(sic) and you’ d think they’d chase that.

    • 0 avatar
      schmitt trigger

      Ditto: I’m 58, and just purchased a 2014 Accord EX sedan for my wife.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The average age of a buyer of the midsize sedans is pretty similar – 50-51 for buyers of the Accord, Sonata and Camry and slightly younger for the Fusion.

      And yes, the avg. age of the Buick buyer has been dropping with the additions of the Verano and Encore to the lineup, as well as the Enclave.

  • avatar
    Hemi

    Toyota was VERY agressive with Camry discount in 2013, not sure if they still are. I would hope they would beat the Accord, which doesn’t heavily discount.

    Also almost every yellow cab in NYC is now a Camry or Prius, along with Ford Escapes. There are soooooo many Camry livery vehicles as well. Camry in NYC is becoming the black Towncars of yesteryear. I feel like 1 out of 5 vehicles I see is a Camry. Funny enough I saw a 13 Accord livery for the first time today.

    • 0 avatar
      Atum

      The Camrys made before December 2013 aren’t as safe as the ones made afterwards. This could be why they’re so highly discounted. Less safety, lower price.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I’d bet that most of those livery Camrys are hybrids. When I was in NYC last time (2011), it was full of Hybrid Escapes, Hybrid Camrys, and Priiiiiiii. Hybrid electric makes a ton of sense for that duty cycle. I imagine there are a love of Prius v and C-max now, too, especially since the Hybrid Escape wasn’t carried over to the new model.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      A CAMRY “black car?”

      I hope it’s at least an XLE trim, all the better with the V6!

  • avatar
    thornmark

    I wonder what this means to that segment:

    “Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) must have a great deal of trouble selling its inventory of 2014 Fusions. It has started to offer among the most aggressive incentive packages in the industry so far this year.

    Under terms of new leases for the Fusion, Ford Credit Financing has a 0% APR for 60 months in some regions of the United States. “Cash back” for the Fusion ranges from $1,000 to $2,500.

    Lease offers for the 2014 Fusion SE are just as attractive — $0 down payment, $0 first month payment and $0 cash at signing.

    The Fusion deals are another in a line of incentives given by manufacturers to move cars that have not sold well, or have very large inventories, off of lots…”
    http://247wallst.com/autos/2014/02/21/ford-offers-fusion-with-zero-dollar-finance-package/

    I guess it’s good for the consumer, that Ford now has extra Fusion capacity and appears to need to move it.

    • 0 avatar
      84Cressida

      Those deals are more than what Toyota does for the Camry. But the Fusion is a high in demand game changer while the Camry is an old has-been and the biggest pile of crap on the streets.

      So the rhetoric goes, at least.

      Oh yeah and didn’t frog boy and the Hyundai shill all last year berate us about how Camry sales are over 20% fleet and the car is going down the drain? 84% were retail which means much less than 20% went to fleet and sedan to sedan sales between it and the Accord are probably VERY close.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Please, unlike you being a total Toyota shill, I actually use facts and not try to twist them around when they don’t suit my agenda.

        From Auto News -

        Ford has been spending about $2,900 in incentives on each Fusion since December, up from an average of roughly $2,200 for all of 2013, according to Alec Gutierrez, senior market analyst with Kelley Blue Book. Both the Toyota CAMRY and Nissan Altima still have HIGHER incentives, he said.

        http://www.autonews.com/article/20140221/RETAIL/140229964/ford-raises-incentives-on-fusion-to-cut-inventories

        So, the incentives on the Camry are still higher and the Fusion has one of the highest ATPs for the segment while the Camry has just about the lowest (lower than the Chrysler 200).

        So incentives as a % of ATP is much higher for the Camry than for the Fusion.

        Geeze, how many more times do I have to prove you wrong?

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          And I just looked it up on Edmunds. Toyota offers $1K cash or 0/60 – 1.9/72 financing. Ford is offering $1.5K or 0/60 – 1.9/72 financing but they also have a $1K conquest offer which looks to be allowed to combine with one of the others.

        • 0 avatar
          84Cressida

          “Please, unlike you being a total Toyota shill, I actually use facts and not try to twist them around when they don’t suit my agenda”

          Says the clown who considers the Genesis to be a luxury car, simply because it’s lumped into that category by JD Power’s meaningless definitions.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Funny that the Toyota and Honda schills reply to each other as their high-five.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I don’t know about the Fusion being highly discounted. I couldn’t get anything attractive for my sister this month on either a Focus or Fusion. She ended up with a Cruze. And we have a large selection of Ford dealers in metro Detroit, and I can get Ford X plan.

      • 0 avatar
        TEXN3

        X plan may be what screwed you up, a dealer can’t put incentives or dealer haggling on top of x plan price. Otherwise we may have had a 12 Fusion Sport in the garage instead of an Accord (wife’s preference). The Fusion with the 3.0l has transaxle issues, the 3.5l doesn’t. We bought the Accord EXL for $23k TTL. I screwed myself by saying I had X plan to the dealer. Oh well, her car not mine.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Fusions are being BLOWN OUT, but ironically not in the metro Detroit area so much.

          You can get into an automatic Fusion SE with the 2.5 liter N/A motor or the recently unveiled 1.5 liter ecoboost (I guess it performs about the same as the 1.6 ecoboost did) for roughly 17.3k plus TTL if you are willing to travel to Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, or North Carolina (or Washington or California on the left coast) to pick it up.

          Ford is really aggressive in trying to move the Fusion S and SE trims in many regions right now.

          It’s a good time to be a midsize sedan shopper, as the obsession with CUVs (especially the midsize and compact ones) is the lifeblood of automotive sales volume & profits, disproportionately, right now.

          Decently equipped midsized cars can be had for 17k to 19k now, which really is going to put the hurt on the compact market, given that the compacts come with less equipment standard and are only 1k to 3k less expensive in terms of real life transaction prices currently.

          • 0 avatar
            Atum

            I just went to the website of my nearest Ford dealer. Fusion SEs with MFT are being sold for 24 grand. Maybe Ford finally realized that their cars are overpriced for what they are, so they slashed the prices.

            I hated the extreme hype of the 2013 Accord when it came out, but its grown on me. I love it now, even if the coupe has bad reliability (I didn’t say that on the Jack post, as I didn’t want to sound like a pessimist).

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            The reliability is with stereo issues, which an upgrade should fix. (The 2014s should have that included.)

        • 0 avatar
          dtremit

          All manufacturer incentives (cash or financing) stack with X Plan. If the dealer told you otherwise, they were lying.

          Haggling and “dealer incentives” are out, though.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            That’s what I’ve always heard. Z plan eligible, here. Most people in my family buy Fords, and they get the cash back.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    Camry and Altima are fleet queens. Altimas are also growing to supplant the Galant’s reign as subprime queen, too. Can’t count how many beat-to-shit 30k-mile ’12s there are clogging up auction lanes all over the place…

    • 0 avatar
      84Cressida

      16% fleet doesn’t make it a fleet queen.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Yes it does – when there are more Camrys in rental fleets than even domestics like the Fusion.

        • 0 avatar
          84Cressida

          Nope. Fusion had higher% of fleet. Your company’s products also had higher fleet percentages. Try again Agnes.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            We’re talking “fleet queens” as rental fleet queens and for 2012, more Camrys (52,768) went to rental fleet than Fusions (46,197).

            And the Camry was a BRAND NEW/current model and the Fusion the previous generation model.

            Rental fleet nos. for the new/current Fusion have done down.

            This has been brought up numerous times but yet, you repeatedly ignore it.

          • 0 avatar
            goldtownpe

            If 16% makes Camry a “fleet queen”, does that make the Fusion a fleet whore since it has a higher rental percentage?

            Camry also sold way more to retail than Fusion. Second only to Accord. It guess that makes it the retail queen and the Fusion is the retail jester. Maybe when the Fusion actually surpass the Altima, then we can compare it the Camry and Accord.

          • 0 avatar
            84Cressida

            No, the only thing continuously ignored is the fact that the Fusion is more reliant on fleet sales for a higher percentage of its overall sales than the Camry. If Toyota sold 100 Camrys and 25 went to fleet, where as Ford sells 50 Fusions and 25 go to fleet, which one is more reliant on fleet? Do they not teach math over at Hyundai, Agnes????

            The 2013 Fusion went on sale in July of 2012, it had half the calendar year.

            Meanwhile, the Camry still outsells the Fusion retail to retail (and even just retail to Fusion fleet and retail, choke on that one)

            What’s funny is that you bash the Camry for its fleet and supposed low ATP (BTW, posting numbers from year ago has no basis on today) but when you try to make the Hyundai Genesis a Lexus GS competitior, which it is nowhere near, you constantly try to shove down our throats how it outsells that car, ignoring the fact that the GS has a higher ATP, less fleet sales, less incentives, and is in a completely different class.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I don’t care if 100% go to fleets; they still end up in consumers’ hands once resold. And a fleet manager buys the car he considers to have high utility, high reliability, and low operating cost, while maximizing profit.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I’ve never even seen an Accord in a rental fleet. I have seen several Camrys, and gotten them a couple of times. Both the Camry and the Accord are very competitive cars in my opinion, but the Accord just feels like a nicer product.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      A few Accords showed up in fleets in 2011-2012, but it’s pretty uncommon. As far as I can tell, they’ve been selling all the 2013-14 Accords they can build to retail customers.

      Both cars are pretty comfortable from a passenger’s perspective. The proof is in the driving. The 2013 Accord, as a driver’s car, is just on a completely different level of refinement from the Camry. It and the 6 are the best in the segment, with the Fusion close behind (hindered mostly by porkiness), and everyone else out of the game.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      I’ve seen a few Civics at Louis Armstrong and even though they were rentals, they had dealer plate frames. So did a couple E-classes.

  • avatar
    alsorl

    I work with two people that have bought the new Camry. One is complaining about a squeak and the other has a rattle in the dash. And one of them gave up there 14 year old Accord to there son, which had no rattles or squeaks and 190,000 miles on it. They both thought the Camry had more room. But, are regretting not purchasing a Honda or Korean brand.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I Like the refreshed Accord. I like it a LOT. The previous style had those awful dog-bone outside door handles which were visible from space when chromed, and had all thse other angles and protusions which was a deal-breaker to me.

    HMC fixed all that, and had I been aware of the restyle before I bought my 2012 Impala, I would have given one a serious look. Oh, well…

    An “old man’s” car? Hmmm… so what? I’m a guy who grew up on Impalas, and the first chance I got I bought my own Impala at age 19. I’m about to turn 63. Go figure… Guilty as charged.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Although it stays true to its predecessor, this is a redesign, not a refresh. I do agree with you that the old one was awkward looking, and that the current one has refined the look. It just feels like a solid, well-designed and well-engineered vehicle that doesn’t need styling gimmicks in order to be relevant. Plus, I like the amount of standard equipment that it comes with, which probably makes a base Accord the best value in the mid-sized sedan segment.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    In other news taupe beats out beige as the number one color of US living rooms

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    An early 20s coworker just traded his 626 in for a brand new Accord with a manual. After looking at it inside and out I can say I don’t blame him. Handsome car especially compared to the ugly boat that it replaced.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “Accord with a manual”

      I haven’t see any in my area. Just the 4cyl/CVT version.

      One of my friends in his 70s is looking to buy a 2014 Accord for his wife to replace her antique stick-shift Accord that dates back to the late nineteen eighties.

      He may end up buying a 2014 Camry LE 4cyl/6sp auto for around $23K.

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    I’m 31 and have a 2014 Accord Sport 6mt. It is just a good car and I don’t feel old driving it, even though there are a number starting to fill up my company parking lot. 2 kids go in and out of the back seat easily.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Enterprise sometimes makes available certain brands at locations where a given dealership is nearby, to attract customers who may need to rent a model from the same OEM as his own car, this is a smart business idea.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Normally I enjoy “dissecting” things through though, but I must ask why at TTAC, which sales are fleet and which aren’t matter so much?

    As far as I know it only means that resale won’t be as good in the long run, but they’ll be good used ex-rental Accords at some point.

    btw I can’t get over how generic that Accord sedan looks in the articles shot, Jack picked right when he picked the coupe.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    I wouldn’t put too much weight into the phony numbers as they import US to a ttune of almost 20%.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/driveon/2014/01/28/honda-exports/4956205/?showmenu=true

  • avatar
    KixStart

    It would be interesting to see how other types of fleet affect the mix here. Some companies provide cars for their some of their people, for example, what cars to they favor? They have to make their selection partly to help make the job atractive for the employeee.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Passenger car fleet is dominated by rental. Those nameplates with very low fleet will generally have a higher proportion of corporate, but all of the fleet queens are rental-heavy.

      Pickup trucks do have more commercial sales as part of their mix, for reasons that you can guess.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    SO, I guess, if the total of cars sold is a statement towards the car being good or not, the new Accord is roughyl 1/3rd the car that a 1964 Impala was ? And people think beige is bad? How many people here hate 1964 Impalas? (PS the number of Impala SS alone in ’64 isn’t too far from the total number of Impalas sold to retail customers last year)

  • avatar
    romanjetfighter

    Bought two 2013 Accords. There was absolutely no comparison to the Camry, which was the same price after discounts. You have to test drive it for yourself. The steering just feels secure, you can sort of estimate how close you are to the limits of grip in fast cornering, and the steering feels precise, i.e. there is no “see-sawing” the steering wheel when going through corners at speed. The dash of the Accord is urethane, so it feels slightly cheaper, but it’s one solid piece so it will rattle less. The only big downside to the Accord is that the rear suspension is rough over big bumps (almost jarring) and the LX stereo is absolutely terrible. Sorry, but we’ve been a Toyota family since the 80′s, but the 2009 we last bought had too many squeaks and rattles that couldn’t be fixed by the dealer, and the steering is terrible, and emergency maneuvering is impossible because of the squishy handling.

    Honestly, though, I think the Accord is doing better because it is a new design and the prices are the same as the older Camry, which has increased in real (not MSRP) price since the 2009 years.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      Top 10: Which vehicles will last 200,000 miles?

      ” Only one car makes the list, Honda’s Accord. The rest are pickups and SUVs”
      http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2014/02/23/long-lasting-200000-miles/5704783/

      The title is sorta off, since it’s a prediction. But I’d take that bet.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        No Accord mentioned on this 200,000 mile list and welcome you to the new age:

        “While most of the models on our list are from Asian automakers, based on past model-year performance, we expect additional domestic models to make CR and J.D. Power’s most-reliable lists in the years to come.”

        http://www.forbes.com/sites/jimgorzelany/2011/12/09/cars-that-can-run-for-over-200000-miles/

        A 300,000 mile car is the old 200,000 mile one. Thonmark your going to be like the old codger clinging to his rusted out oldd Honda.

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/07/question-of-the-day-is-300k-the-new-200k/

  • avatar
    Ion

    Here’s the thing with fleets. Unless your using heavy incentives or selling cars to yourself (ala Hertz), a sales a sale. The domestics cut back on fleets Hyundai/KIA, Nissan, etc moved in. So retail sales or not the Camry still outsells the accord.
    Furthermore Honda doesn’t have an official fleet department so their numbers are skewed.


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