By on February 12, 2014

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U.S. sales of full-size trucks slid 4.5% in January 2014 as the two leading manufacturers of pickups reported falling sales of all their big trucks.

Typically the slowest month of the year for new vehicle sales, this past January should be no different, as the U.S. auto industry generated 32,000 fewer sales than it did one year ago. Although minivans, commercial vans, and the vast SUV/crossover segment all expanded, passenger car sales plunged, year-over-year, and truck volume declined, as well.

Despite the Ford F-Series’ slight 1% (305 fewer units) drop in January sales, the market share of America’s best-selling vehicle in its own vehicle category expanded by more than a percentage point compared with January 2013.

FCA’s Ram pickup range improved its January market share by more than four points to the level where one out of every five full-size trucks sold were Rams. Year-over-year, Ram sales jumped 22%.

The only other big truck to report higher totals this year than last was the Toyota Tundra. Toyota has recorded four consecutive months of Tundra increases; only once in 2013 did the Tundra decline. But Tundra volume is well off the pace Toyota set in pre-recession 2007 when nearly 200,000 were sold – Tundra sales jumped 11% to 112,732 in 2013. January market share didn’t rise as much as Ford’s even as Toyota sold 886 extra Tundras.

GM’s losses were the bigger story during a disappointing January for trucks. Silverado sales plunged 18%; Sierra sales fell 13%. In total, GM sold more than 10,000 fewer full-size pickup trucks this January than in January 2013, a 20% drop.

Jointly, the Silverado/Sierra decline to 40,044 January sales resulted in a market share tally of 33.2%, down from 38.3% in January of last year. The GM twins outsold the Ford F-Series by 1450 units in January 2013, the second of three consecutive months in which the pair had outsold the F-Series. They have not done so since.

If we are to assume the two trucks themselves are to blame, rather than some combination of inside and outside forces, we can surely place some responsibility on the conservative nature of the redesign. Perhaps the exterior changes from one generation to the next needed to be as different as the changes made under the skin. It’s true, the serious truck buyer is well aware of the newness of the Silverado and Sierra. But the family truck buyer – a big reason for the mass expansion of the truck market – may not wish to pay more money in order to park a pickup in their driveway that doesn’t look much different from the pickup their neighbors bought two years prior.

Thus, with plenty of trucks on dealer lots and concern about losing market share to Ford even before the F-150 is replaced by the more boldly-designed 2015 model, GM will ramp up incentives with a long-running Presidents Day promotion, according to Automotive News. Clearly, for General Motors to avoid going head-to-head against Ford without F-150-like incentives would have required a more significant leap forward with the 2014 models. There’s a belief that truck buyers will pay more for the better truck, but how much better does that truck need to be?

Truck
January
2014
January
2013
%
Change
January
2014
Market
Share
January
2013
Market
Share
Cadillac Escalade EXT
25 172 - 85.5% 0.02% 0.1%
Chevrolet Avalanche
31 1939 - 98.4% 0.03% 1.5%
Chevrolet Silverado
28,926 35,445 - 18.4% 24.0% 28.1%
Ford F-Series
46,536 46,841 - 0.7% 38.6% 37.1%
GMC Sierra
11,118 12,846 - 13.5% 9.2% 10.2%
Nissan Titan
887 1394 - 36.4% 0.7% 1.1%
Ram P/U
25,071 20,474 + 22.5% 20.8% 16.2%
Toyota Tundra
7890 7004 + 12.6% 6.5% 5.6%
Total
120,484
126,115 - 4.5%
Total (Excluding EXT/Avalanche)
120,428
124,004 - 2.9%
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81 Comments on “GM’s Truck Market Share Slides In January...”


  • avatar
    DadMEGA

    I’m the customer that they are probably losing sales to. I don’t need a truck for my job, I don’t pull anything; I just like the look of the new silverados and any truck would make fixing up this house I just bought a bit easier…though so far my 4runner has been fine and Home Depot does rent trailers…

    I’ve been looking at at crew cab 4wd v8 z71 pkgs for a couple months now and expect to buy one within the next 6. Walked into the local dealer with a check in my pocket back in December ready to do it but nobody could give me a straight up price. What they advertise as their “internet price” is not as straightforward as other manufacturers. They seem to be applying all kinds of rebates to advertised prices that the general population is not entitled to. It would be easier if they would list every rebate on the main website and consumers could see what they are eligible for. After really digging around online I’ve found that my wife’s company is eligible for supplier discount (something I specifically asked about at said dealer and was told no), and that you can join a local farm bureau and get that discount too.

    It seems that the primary marketing goal is to get people into the dealership and then monkey around until people give up. Guess I’m just surprised that I’m going to have to turn what should be a simple truck purchase into a week-long email negotiation with every dealer from New Orleans to Houston. Or go look at the new Ford…or my neighbors new Ram which looks nicer every time I drive by it.

    • 0 avatar
      Waterview

      +1

      I was recently in a Chevrolet dealership and space and decorum prevent me from adequately summarizing the ridiculous experience. Let’s sum it up this way: Current vehicle: Tahoe Previous vehicles: Blazer, Corvette, Cavalier, Nova

      Hey Chevrolet – you had a nice trend going with me but now I’m exhausted on the dealership experience. Time to try something else (which, admittedly may not be better).

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “…now I’m exhausted on the dealership experience.”

        Better hope Dave Ruggles doesn’t read this.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          lol.

          ‘The War & Peace Length Treatise As To Why & How Automotive Dealerships Are Virtual Non-Profit Entities & Their Salespersons Are Virtual Saints’ – by David Ruggles

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DW, for more than thirty years I was on the other side, the dealer side, of the discussion, viewing potential buyers as prey and a meal ticket.

            My only concern at that time was the profitability of the multi-brand dealerships owned by my brothers. Lotsa factors go into profitability. Margin is just one of them.

            I didn’t ask or volunteer to be a part of all that; I was drafted because blood is thicker than water. They were getting started in business, I had the MBA.

            So when I read Dave Ruggles’ dissertations I know exactly what he is saying and where he is coming from.

            I am so glad that my bothers sold the dealerships and retired in 2012 and that I am no longer a part of the underbelly of the industry, since I am not deceitful.

            But I haven’t quite weaned myself from my dependency to read up on everything automotive on ttac and other sites. Maybe in time.

            BTW, there are some really insightful individuals who comment on ttac and I enjoy what they have to say. Dave Ruggles actually is one of them. His perspective of the industry trumps all.

            I’d like to see articles by Bob Lutz et al, and maybe one by Mary Barra, Sergio Marchionne and Alan Mulally. Once in a while I catch them on CNBC and what they have to say is truly interesting.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      I haven’t noticed Chevy dealers having any particular monopoly on dealer sleaze.

      Yeah they advertise prices with every conceivable incentive already applied, leave out the $4-500 in dealer “fees”, the $1100 for delivery. Yeah GM’s incentive structure where a rebate applies to an options package instead of the vehicle is unnecessary and confusing.

      But so does everybody else. And it works. Read any buying experience thread on the model specific forums and even among people savvy enough to hit the forums for pricing a disturbing number don’t understand what they actually paid.

      America. Where people who can’t even do 4th grade math can borrow their way into a brand new car.

      • 0 avatar
        Waterview

        Certainly a fair observation regarding Chevy dealers not having a monopoly on sleaze, I simply wish my local dealer could take a page from the local Lexus dealer regarding the overall experience. I told the guy I was interested in a Corvette convertible and would prefer to buy from the local guy. It went downhill from there. . . . .

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          I had the same experience as well. I went to see the new Vette and I got the “supply and demand” bull as to why I should shell out $5K over list. They were dishonest about availability, about when the convertible would go into production, and how long it takes to get one built special order. I understand their desire to get me to buy the car they had, but lying does not sit well with me. I felt as if any deal with them would be loaded with surprise junk fees and other unethical practices….

          • 0 avatar
            Thatkat09

            Are you sure its dishonesty and not them just being unknowledgeable about their products? I nearly broke a salesmans heart when i broke it to him that the Aveo he was trying to sell me was made in Korea.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “America. Where people who can’t even do 4th grade math can borrow their way into a brand new car.”

        Only in America! Money for nuttin’! Foodstamps and cellphones for free!

        100-month NINJA-loans, anyone?

  • avatar
    alsorl

    Heads need to roll for this redesign. You can barely tell the difference between a 2010 and. 2014 model. And to me the interior already looks outdated. The big jump of an extra 2 MPG from previous models is shameful. No incentives and all four door models built in mexico with poorer build quality over the crew cab does not help. I test drove an LT four door that was $39000 and didn’t even have leather or heated seats. I walked away shaking my head saying what they thinking. Did anyone at GM do any critical thinking about the new model ? The only thing that will save this truck will be a high MPG v6 or a small 4cyl or 6 cylinder diesel.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      So why, exactly, does the Mexican GM plant have poorer build quality than the American one? Have you got any evidence to substantiate your claim?

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        I haven’t heard from any of my friends who sell GM that the Mexican plants have poorer built quality.

        In fact, I have heard the opposite; that fewer Mexican-built GM vehicles have to go through dealer intervention, as in warranty work, to make them right for the customer.

        Ditto with Mexican-built Fords. Maybe there are better Exit-QA procedures in place in Mexico since they are not UAW assembly plants?

        American-built Fiatslers however are another story, I’ve been told during a friendly game of poker.

      • 0 avatar
        alsorl

        Just go look at the trucks. You can tell the difference before looking at the final assembly. Or take a look at a used avalanche. Poor build quality, even the paint looks different.

  • avatar
    teasers

    Surprised to see the Titan took such a huge beatin and Ram jumped so much.

    I figured the GMC sales would be better. Most truck buyers I know really like that front end, although personally, in ten years when this years trucks are in my budget I hope to be in a dodge.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Seems like GM’s truck interiors merely caught up to those in RAM, but didn’t exceed them. Other than a slight improvement in engines, these are not a game-changers . . . and GM was pretty aggressive (greedy) on pricing as compared to Ford and RAM. As for the appearance . . . I never got the point of square wheel openings, but what do I know.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Does this usage of “game-changer” get Derek paid, or is it only in Ford related articles??

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Speaking of Ford, Dearborn HQ has got to be sweating aluminum bullets, especially given the decreasing pickup truck loyalty as of late (evidenced by the increasing willingness of Ford & GM buyers to go RAM) with their new, literal meal ticket being rolled out, AND given that there may be other, larger issues at play (e.g. economic woes) that threaten to undermine the 3 1/2 year winning streak of domestic automakers’ recovering fortunes, built (from a profitability per unit basis) almost entirely on the back of truck sales.

        On a side note, not that I am fond of J.D. Power’s in terms of their methodology for tabulating vehicle reliability, but they claim as of today that vehicle reliability has dropped for the “first time since 1998″ and that the two biggest components responsible for the drop were 4 cylinder engines & transmissions (and not MyFordTouch – sorry, apologists):

        “The biggest increase in complaints by owners involved engine and transmission problems, Sargent said. In particular, people with vehicles that have 4-cylinder engines complained of problems such as engine hesitation, rough shifting and a lack of power.”

        http://www.cnbc.com/id/101408079

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @DeadWeight
          “Economic woes” are more of a problem than anything else. The US Economy is treading water instead of improving.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I absolutely agree.

            The economy is heading into some brutal headwinds, consumer debt is now at record highs, and much pent up demand has been satiated – not a promising outlook on the horizon for automakers.

            p.s. – On that new slew of more powerful 4 cylinder motors being “problematic” topic I raised prior, Consumer Reports has lent its influential support to it – and Ford is among the worst offenders.

            Vehicle Dependability Declines Significantly

            http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/12/automobiles/vehicle-dependability-declines-significantly-in-jd-power-study.html?hpw&rref=automobiles&_r=0

            “[I]nfluential outlets such as Consumer Reports have panned turbocharged four-cylinders.”

            “ENGINE and TRANSMISSION PROBLEMS increased by nearly 6 problems per 100 vehicles over last year, which ACCOUNTS for the MAJORITY of the OVERALL INCREASE IN PROBLEMS reported, of 7 per 100.”

            “The engine and transmission problems are the same issues that Ford had with the PowerShift dual-clutch automatic transmission in the Fiesta and Focus that contributed to Ford’s poor showing in the 2011 Consumer Reports Reliability Survey. Auto reviewers and owners complained that the transmission stumbled at low speeds and in stop-and-go traffic.

            In THIS YEAR’S survey, FORD had 140 problems per 100 vehicles, which is 13 MORE than LAST YEAR. The automaker ranked 17th this year, just below the industry average of 133 problems per 100 vehicles – down from 13th place in last year’s study.”

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DeadWeight, I completely agree with your analysis.

            Does that make us “alarmists?”

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @DeadWeight – It depends on whether you are looking at JD Power “Initial Quality” ratings which take in every factor that annoys a buyer during the 1st 6 months of ownership or the “Dependability” survey which looks at dealer visits per 100 units accumulated over a 3 year span.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Lou, I agree, and will go further and state that I have little regard for J.D. Power’s Reliability Survey due to what I believe is their flawed methodology for deeming something “unreliable.”

            However, it may be of some use when coupled with the higher volume data being tabulated & now reported regarding the reliability of some newer motors and transmissions (roughly circa-2011 and newer) by Consumer Reports, which, for example, reports that there is not a single Ford turbocharged motor that rates higher than “below average reliability” with most rating “well below average.”

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      As a GM fan, it disappoints me that the new trucks in general seem to have only caught up to the competition…if that. It’s questionable as to whether or not they’re competitive with the RAM 1500, and there doesn’t seem to have been any forethought into what Ford would be doing with the next-gen F-150, which is sure to be better than the current one that GM has obviously benchmarked. And since GM’s trucks go mostly unchanged for six or seven years, it’s important to get these things right…

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        “the next-gen F-150, which is sure to be better than the current one…”

        Why/How do people who haven’t driven a vehicle yet, nor had any experience with its real world reliability, assume such things?

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Basic assumptions I would guess. Rightfully so. If a new vehicle is replacing one on the market with only minimal change, someone in the organization should be (metaphorically) shot.

          I think the biggest criticism of the new Chevy/GMC was a very conservative redesign. The ergonomics and driving dynamics are better, as is the gas mileage. If anything I’m surprised that market share has slightly shrunken since (generally) the folks that need a truck tend to be conservative. Personally I like the GMC, but have little to no use for a truck.

          I’m also not too sure how many leaps and bounds truck designs and abilities can or need to take.

          The new Ram? Gorgeous! Recent family experience with Dodges? Eyebrow raising.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            @DeadWeight

            I’m quite certain that the F-150 won’t remain stagnant between the current generation and the upcoming one. They already claim to have made gains in fuel economy due to weight savings, so that’s one thing.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @DeadWeight – drivetrains aren’t going to be much different between the 2015 and the past gen trucks. The new “dark horses” are the 2 bottom end engines in the 2015. The 5.0 and EB3.5 are carryovers and make up the bulk of F150 sales. The transmissions are unchanged but the trucks will have upgraded axles.
          The frame and suspension tweeks are new along with a new frame and body.

          Most worry more about drivetrain than anything else.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Dave, Kyree & Lou – I only have my hypotheses, gleaned from my life experiences & education (formal & informal), that I sometimes share with others (whether they are likely to agree or not), and I’m sometimes correct & sometimes…well, not so much.

            If I rub anyone the wrong way, it won’t be due to ad hominem attacks, nor even with specific intent.

            Sincerely,

            Mr. Cynical a/k/a Life Lessons Learned

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Ad hominem…I only just learned that term last week. I guess this crap they teach us at university actually *does* have some practical application…

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @DeadWeight – I have doubts about Ford’s Turbo Ecoboost line. Reliability hasn’t been where it needs to be. I’d rather wait and see how all of this stuff pans out in the hands of John Q Public.

            BTW – You haven’t rubbed me the wrong way.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    So, about GM: Are they chasing profits instead of market share? That would be progress. OTOH, maybe Mopar is just eating their lunch. Time will tell.

    About engines: I believe NA mileage gains on the EPA cycle translate into real-world results that gas turbo engines are unlikely to match unless driven by Grandma. 10% less fuel consumption in a steel vehicle with minor styling changes is a BFD, especially as PUs burn a big share of passenger motor fuel.

  • avatar

    we don’t have a product problem, we have a sales and marketing problem. distress merchandising has damaged our brands and the confusing as can be incentive structure is a disincentive. I will say that the TV ads have improved significantly but GM has no clue how to market effectively, which means making the phone ring and the door swing.

    after retailing over 25,000 units in a 40 year career, I have the knowledge and experience that has allowed me to develop the answers and could bring tens of thousands of potential customers into the showrooms while actually lowering costs. but will GM management even try my ideas? of course not! what would a car salesman know about selling cars?

    Buickman
    Founder
    GeneralWatch.com

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      Buickman, you have been beating this drum for a few years now. As a good salesperson you should know which prospects to try to close and which ones are a waste of time. Point blank, GM is not and will not buy what you are selling: time to move on to a new prospect.

      If your ideas are worthwhile you can make yourself and some other automaker rich. If not you are just some other guy at the sports bar telling Tom Brady how to throw the ball.

    • 0 avatar
      Vetteman

      Hi jim good to see your comments I retired from 30 plus years at the helm of a large Chevy west coast store . I enjoyed your web site and your comments on the death of our Company for many , many years . As a current Silverado Duramax owner and having bought my first of 12 new Chevy pickups in 1974 The new truck to me is a clear miss . I really wanted to like this new design and give me a reason to get a fresh horse but alas The new GM ( NEWCO) has picked up the ball from the Bankrupt dead company called General Motors Corporation and fumbled it at the goal line. Putting my customer glasses on not my working mindset as a General Manager working to run a successful business this truck is just a refresh in appearance and while so many aspects are so much better than vehicles of years past it really just brings the truck up to parity with Ford F series and Ram . I have heard from so many friends that the desire to have a fresh new and different new truck has them looking at Ram and somewhat Ford and Toyota. It is a shame as the die is now cast for GM to suffer for many years with a weak product that will have to be heavily incentivized to get peoples purchase intentions. One factor not talked much about is Gm’s pricing of vehicles to achieve higher net transaction profit . This will only work when the product is HOT , HOT , HOT One other issue I have noticed since the Bankruptcy is that GM has dramatically increased Gm dealer parts prices . I have received many , many complaints from friends and relatives and old customers who have experienced parts price gouging from GM dealers . While a dealer is free to set a retail price he believes the market will bare what I have found is GM has made huge increases in the price they charge the dealer for parts . I have found many examples of doubling and tripling of common parts at dealer cost. This type of gouging in the service department and at the parts counter will not serve to retain loyal GM customers for long . Based on what I see of GM financials it looks like a desperation move to me . If these trucks don’t start selling soon the panic in the Tubes will be widespread. They already have been changing upper management like I change my socks. The management revolving door is still spinning . Same as it ever was , Same as it ever was!

      • 0 avatar
        Thatkat09

        All OEM parts sold by dealerships are going to be overpriced, regardless of the company. My sister’s 300$ emission sensor on her out of warranty PT Cruiser would have been alot cheaper had she not gone to a Chrysler dealership.

        • 0 avatar
          Thatkat09

          So, I called my sister and asked her about the total cost of the sensor. The Sensor itself was only 125$(not bad, but still pretty hefty for what it is). The labor was 300$. Guess I misunderstood what she was telling me last week about the total repair and not just the parts.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          This.

          The domestics, regardless as to where the part sold was actually manufactured, are likely to charge less on average than what foreign badge dealership parts counters charge (but make no mistake, buying parts from a dealership is asking to be robbed).

          I have been able to find equal to or better quality parts by avoiding the dealership altogether, and in many cases, the parts available at places like rockauto.com or via Amazon sellers are OEM parts, often rebranded, such as is the case of Bosch plugs that BMW uses by slapping a BMW label on, anyways.

          For things such as brakes or rotors, you’re not going to do much better than something like Akebono pads or Centric rotors, anyways – and again, these companies supply many factory installed OEM parts as it is.

          Sourcing used parts when it comes to non-moving, non wear and tear in the traditional sense ones, such as electronic or electrical ones, is another way to save HUGE A$$A$.

          I’ll never forget the episode of Wheeler Dealers where the guys found a low mileage Jaguar XF that the owner was desperate to dump because it would suffer an electronic problem after 20 minutes of driving where it would go into limp mode, and the dealer wanted $3,800 to replace some relatively mundane electronic component that the dealer also charged $1,800 for new, and they found the same part used on eBay for $150 and it took them 15 minutes to install, successfully curing the problem.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Funny you should mention GM price gouging parts. When my wife hit a deer with our 07 Tahoe last winter State Farm spec’d the estimate using reconditioned(junkyard) parts to fix it. My bodyman fixed it using all brand new GM parts. He told me GM was losing a lot of parts business to this practice and adjusted their pricing such that he could buy brand new GM parts at the same cost as the reconditioned parts.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    1 out of 5 fullsize truck sales last month went to Ram and Sergio is pouring on even more technology and incentives.

    Mopar uber alles!

  • avatar
    GoFaster58

    When the new Ford goes on sale all of the others will be knocked out of their saddles.

  • avatar
    mtr2car1

    You could look at January’s performance as a problem or you can look at it as a level set to more natural volume level.

    If you go back and look at what everyone was hammering GM on this time last year – it was the amount of trucks they had on hand as they were gearing up for the new truck rollout. In typical GM fashion, they poured on the incentives for the trucks in Jan of last year and picked up 33% in combined Sierra/Silverado sales.

    This year, they sold 40,045 combined against 48,290 last year and 36,365 the year before – which I think is a better comparison, +10% or +16% for a 2 year comparison.

    Something to watch, but not alarming considering the massive incentives from last year. Ford better pay attention given all the incentives they’re poring on right now too.

    • 0 avatar
      Thatkat09

      1+
      That makes a lot of sense. Thank you for the great insight.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The numbers tell us that the Silverado/Sierra twins lost about 5% market share, and that GM’s loss was mostly Ram’s gain.

      During a period when the overall market (excluding the Avalanche and Escalade) declined by 3%, Silverado/Sierra sales fell by 17%.

      There is no positive way to spin those numbers — they are bad. The best that one can do is attempt to explain them.

      It’s only one month’s worth of data, and for GM’s sake, they had better hope that this one month was just a fluke.

  • avatar
    Dan

    I’m surprised they’re selling as well as they are. GM’s pricing has been a joke. Even with the much touted Feb. incentives they’re still running $4,000 over a Ford or Dodge. Last year it was $6-7,000.

    GM had the choice to go for conquest sales or cash in off loyalists and they chose the cash. When it was that much cash I don’t really blame them.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Truck buyers are very sensitive on price, not only did GM screw up on pricing, but they screwed up on the trucks on the whole.
    Electric power steering?
    Required to get the LCD? Seriously?

    Prices need to drop 10k all the way around. If they cannot continue to profit even after that, the trucks were poorly designed as far as cost goes.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      “Prices need to drop 10k all the way around” The Historic trend is for increasing prices not decreasing ones.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Yes I know, but GM significantly increased price, they added way too much luxury and left no value in it.

        Trucks shouldnt be luxury items at the bottom of the scale, and people that are brand loyal are the ones who buy the best packages.

        And by ‘best’ I absolutely do not mean top of the line.
        I mean the options that allow customization for the future, wether 4:10 for bigger tires, V8 for more power, bigger axles when possible, best front ends.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Hummer – Ford has EPS and IIRC Ram will follow. I spent 9 days in an EPS F150. I found it more dead and heavy at centre than my hydraulic system but overall there isn’t a noticible difference. You don’t get a whine from the pump at full lock or extremely cold weather.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Hummer
      I don’t think the average truck buyer in the US would notice the difference between hydraulic and electric power steering.

      I have seen people drive with a flat tyre and not notice.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Oh if I could only count the number of times..

        “I have seen people drive with a flat tyre and not notice.”
        —-
        Regardless, hydraulic power steering is superior when demands outside the factory spec are met. Which aren’t hard to meet.

        I cannot stand the steering feel of electric steering, it makes fullsize trucks feel like they’re the size of box trucks with the weight of a cardboard box.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @BigAl, @ Hummer – my favorite “not notice” is a driver with a door not completely open and 2 feet of seatbelt hanging out the door with the buckle rhythmically bouncing off of the side.

          In second place would be someone who forgot the park brake on and is billowing a cloud of smoke behind their vehicle from burned brakes and tires.

          I suspect that hydraulic steering will go the way of the dodo bird on all but HD trucks.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Wow that market share drop with a new product is startling. GM basically handed their market share over to Chrysler.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    I would guess that it’s some combination of styling and net pricing/incentives.

    Back in September, GM was claiming that there was a shortage of eight-cylinder engines. Has that production issue been resolved? (After three months, I would hope so.)

  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    There was a $10k difference in price between the chevy and fords we got quotes for here at work… That’s a pretty big gap for some ugly projector headlamps… Oh well, the 2009 and 2010 chevys they will replace had a lot of little problems and I’m not going to be sorry to see them go…

  • avatar
    dts187

    I think pricing is the biggest factor here. I recently bought a new truck and the Chevy was $6k more than a comparable Ram and $4k more than a comparable F-150. The Ram handles better. The Ram 5.7 has more HP and torque than the Chevy 5.3. The interior quality between the Ram and Chevy are very similar. Also, the Ram can be had with a body color front end and bumpers. Which looks much better than the sea-of-chrome or unpainted black plastic options on the Chevy.

    I went with the cheaper, more powerful, better handling, and better looking Ram 1500.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    a discussion of new pickup truck prices are a non starter for myself. to me a truck is nothing but a wheel barrow that carries dirt and bulk items from sams club, when i see a $30k sticker i just look the other way. go right ahead and part your cash.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Based on recent expedience, I’d bet food money that the median MSRP/sticker price for a full size pickup is on the order of $40,000.00 (and I saw quite a few that were well in excess of 50k, and I’m not talking about F250s, F350s or true HEAVY DUTY trucks, either).

      I’ll SWAG that the time is soon approaching for heavy duty incentive wars ASSUMING any particular manufacturer that’s in the game for volume wants to keep capacity utilization high, and doesn’t want to idle a significant % of its production (this is why Marchione desperately wants to squeeze more production out of existing RAM factories than commit to a massive expenditure in building a third factory in North America).

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I know if you look at the investment General Motors made with the Colorado was a poor effort globally.

    GM knew that they had stiff competition from the Ford Ranger/BT50 and VW Amarok.

    It seems GM was only interested in improving it’s own product lineup and not better the competition. Sort of a Toyota’ish approach.

    The real culprit with the half assed new vehicles that just don’t quite come up to the competition could be the fact that GM needs money to develop better products.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    GMC’s “Raise the Bar” campaign was a joke as they raised the bar only as it applied to their own products. The GMT900 platform set the bar very low.
    From what I’ve seen and experienced with the 2014 Chevy’s, their high end models compare to mid level trim from Ford and Ram. The Sierra has a much nicer interior but that standard is not available in the Chevy. That is stupid considering the Chevy is GM Corp’s biggest seller in the USA. The Sierra outsells the Chevy in Canada.

  • avatar
    mcarr

    I am a GM fan and I’ve owned a couple Silverado’s in the past. Like everyone has said, the new version doesn’t even catch up to the competition. I test drove a V6 version; the truck was nice, competent, but the V6 engine was a huge letdown. I’ve owned two other vehicles with a 4.3L V6, and this brand new version sounded like a cement mixer and couldn’t get out of it’s own way. It made the old version look great.

    So, Ford takes a huge gamble on V6 engines, and their take rate is almost 50%. GM phones their V6 in, and no one in their right mind will want it.

    Also, where’s the promised weight savings, the 8-speed auto, and the 6.2L? At least they’ve got a $9,000 incentive on them now, which actually makes it cheaper than the 2009 version I bought.

    • 0 avatar
      luvmyv8

      I had the exact opposite experience with a Ford F150 roughly 2 years ago.

      I was looking to replace my ’06 Mustang with a fullsize truck or SUV. On a lark I decided to rent a ’12 F150 crewcab XLT for the weekend. I wanted to evaluate it in the real world. Being that I was getting a crewcab, I was expecting a Coyote 5.0 under the hood. Now way a car company would put a ‘puny’ V6 in a fullsize crewcab, right?

      Wrong. When I got the keys and opened up the hood, I saw plenty of space an a 3.7 V6. WTF!!?? I thought I was in for a truck that wouldn’t be able to move out of it’s own way and I thought I would hate it….

      Wrong again. I was very much pleasantly surprised by the 3.7. No wonder people swoon over this engine in the Mustang. Now it wasn’t a rocket ship, BUT this engine did move the truck with authority and it was quite docile and refined just cruising along, but give it some throttle and it gets pissed and does what you need it to do. Hell, it even sounded good. In a crewcab. It even got pretty good fuel economy. At worst at least on par with my ’12 Pentastar equiped Wranger, probably slightly better then that…. and I really like my Pentastar Jeep. The Ford really did impress and I came very close to signing on the dotted line; granted I probably would have gone 5.0 anyhow, but that 3.7 would make me think real hard. Plus the Ford had very thoughtful touches; the center console compartment was HUGE and it even had a spot for a SLR camera WITH a lens, my Nikon N75 fit with no problem. Even on a rental spec basic XLT which is probably decontented from a normal retail XLT. (the base model F150 is the XL- rubber floors and vinyl seats)

      The only reason why I didn’t sign was that my life changed dramatically before I bought, I ended up moving to San Diego and an F150 would have been too big and too much a hassle to park at my apartment and would have been ungainly in San Diego traffic congestion…. which is partly the reason why I have a Wrangler now.

      Another thing too….. a Pentastar Ram would be another engine that I’d more then likely be impressed with in a fullsizer….. it makes my 4000 ibs Wrangler faster then it should be.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    GM ran with the mistaken notion their loyal fan base would buy whatever junk they throw together. Trucks should be their #1 priority. They’re only their #1 money maker by far. . #2 most profitable cars in the world. But no, GM would rather burn billions on R&D of low margin and other loss leaders.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    @DenverMike – I have to agree. They gotta sell a sh!tload of Corvette’s to make up for the money they are loosing on pickups.

    I liked the 2014 Silverado when it first came out but after a few months of looking at them it felt like 1987 all over again.

    The Sierra looks like a warmed over GMT900.

    Even using the same displacements as the old engines even though the new lumps are “all new” gives the impression of “same old same old”.

    Those are mistakes that are dangerous to make. Ford gets away with the grill of the year club but when a big change is made it is obvious inside and out.

    Ram and Ford are the only companies pushing the truck market with new (for trucks) technology.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    Before too many conclusions are drawn from a single month’s data, one ought to consider the geographic strongholds of the various brands and the severe winter weather conditions in many areas in January. It certainly has depressed sales in my region.


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