By on February 6, 2014

IMG_5645

One nice thing about being the company that builds the Prius: you can get away with stuff like this.

The TRD Pro trucks, discussed earlier today, ring the retro bell hard with the reintroduction of the simple “TOYOTA” script on the grilles. To a generation that remembers unkillable half-tons bouncing across the California dunes with half a million miles showing on the odometer, this is a welcome change.

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44 Comments on “Chicago 2014: Toyota TRD Pro Live Shots...”


  • avatar
    Banger

    If you’re talking old Toyotas bouncing across the desert, I wonder if you might mean quarter-tons. Didn’t have Tundras back in the day, but those little Toyota Pickups (pre-Tacoma days) were tough bastards.

    • 0 avatar
      agroal

      The first gen.Tacoma finally joined the 20th century and came with an IFS. Get over it. It’s not a Hilux. Those crude trucks are designed to help Majji and Mugibar spread jihad throughout Upper Shitghanisinstan. Tacomas need no defending their durability.(Frame rust not included:they bought back my ’2000 in 2011, and gave me $15,000.) 90% of Tundra buyer’s (wives)use them as daily drivers who will never tow or go off-road.

      • 0 avatar
        Banger

        Easy, agroal, I wasn’t dissin’ your Taco.

        I was speaking to the author’s words, “To a generation that remembers unkillable half-tons bouncing across the California dunes with half a million miles showing on the odometer…”

        He calls that generation of Toyota “half-ton” trucks, but I think he may very well have the old ’80s Toyota Pickup in mind, which definitely was not a half-ton.

        I’d consider a Tacoma as my next truck if Toyota didn’t price them like they’re a solid gold brick shithouse. Also, no stick-shift crew cabs with the four-cylinder. Same problem I have with the Nissan Frontier. Both trucks are outdated, and I can’t find them specced the way I’d want. I like work trucks, not loaded-to-the-gills, fancy carpet-having, leather-trimmed-wheel type trucks. That’s why my Ranger has a rubber floor mat instead of carpet — and a stick shift.

        But we’re straying way off-topic here. So I digress.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          Nominally speaking, the “HiLux” was a half-ton truck, with the exception of the “1 Ton” models:

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1bVH2gT5Mo

          Note that Toyota specified a 1400lb payload in 1983:

          http://www.toyoland.com/trucks/tacoma-hilux.html

          Door stickers on modern F-150s range from 1600 to 2200, but when you have a regular-cab truck, it’s not stretching things to call a 1400lb payload truck a half-ton.

          • 0 avatar
            Banger

            A half-ton according to the door jamb, but a quarter-ton according to popular U.S. truck parlance.

            I’ve loaded the Banger Ranger with 1,220 lbs of scrap metal in the past (relevant: http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/pp54/Bangermusic/DSC02457-forweb.jpg).

            As squatty as she was under that half-ton of cargo (photo: http://i397.photobucket.com/albums/pp54/Bangermusic/DSC02451-forweb.jpg), I can’t imagine how the smaller ’80s Toyotas could honestly handle that much weight without riding around on the bump stops.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Banger: Actually, by the ratings of the day, those old Toyotas were half-ton trucks. They were rated to hold 1,000 imperial pounds more loaded than their curb weight. Adding passengers took away from load capacity–supposedly.

          Today’s ‘half-ton’ trucks have gone the other way. Most of them are now rated for 1,000#+ OVER the passenger weight–as long as it is only the driver and one passenger. While in a way it’s more realistic, it’s also why many trucks claiming the half-ton rating are grossly underrated for their real capacity. Half-ton trucks today are the approximate equivalent of the full-ton trucks of 20 years ago. This is pushing the ¾-ton and 1-ton trucks into the Medium Duty category and approaching illegal capacities for non-CDL drivers.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            In a recent pick up comparison test the last-place Ram 1500 had a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of 6,800 lbs and a curb weight of 5,999 lbs. That means that passengers and payload could only total 801 lbs, or considerably less than half a ton. 1 ton trucks of the past were far more capable than the stuff the UAW-3 sells as half tons today. They’re not even always half tons. The RAM 1500 is so ridiculous that it can’t even carry four workmen and their lunches.

            http://www.caranddriver.com/comparisons/final-scoring-performance-data-and-complete-specs-page-5-1

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Which is why a half-ton shouldn’t even offer a crew-cab configuration. It’s an either/or configuration that simply cannot do both.

    • 0 avatar
      billfrombuckhead

      “To a generation that remembers unkillable half-tons bouncing across the California dunes with half a million miles showing on the odometer, this is a welcome change.”

      Sounds like utter BS. A bunch of paint and lift kits to kill the stench of the dying FJ Cruiser killed by the Wrangler.

      Toyota trucks are a weak sister compared to today’s American
      trucks and their pathetic sales prove it.

      Go to EPA.org and compare gas mileage, today’s Pentastar Ram gets a whole 100 miles more per tank of gas than a Tundra V6. Ancient trucks for people who won’t move into the 21st century.

      Go to any large dealership that sells both Mopar and Toyota and check out how many Toyota salespeople want to switch to Chrysler. The whining at Toyota dealerships keeps getting louder and louder.

      • 0 avatar
        salmon8ter

        This was probably the biggest load of BS I have ever read on these pages and I drive a SuperDuty with the 7.3L. I love my Ford truck but to claim that Toyotas are the weak sister to the domestics is pretty stupid. Yeah, they may not have the sales figure but the Tundra has been rated to most dependable truck for at least the last couple years or more. How much gas mileage will you get in your Pentastar when it’s dead at 150k miles? ZERO! I won’t even respond to your last paragraph you wrote because it was that dumb!

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    You know, when it comes to looks that actually ain’t too bad. The body color grill surround looks far better than hideous bright chrome that just makes the nose look too big.

  • avatar
    redliner

    Pff, TRD pro, LOL… In the middle east, people bounce around the dunes in their Camrys. No need for fancy suspension parts.

    • 0 avatar
      salmon8ter

      That’s a true statement-I’ve been there multiple times. In Qatar, I would say that 90% of the vehicles on the road are Toyotas. However I have slowly seen more and more GMC/Chevys. It’s a status symbol with them to own US trucks.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    As a former 4Runner owner… I want this one… in white… badly. I was always too conservative to modify my 4Runner from previous unintended consequences, so factory modded is pretty nice. They nailed the T O Y O T A grille. Looks just like the 70s LC one I bought for my 4Runner and never installed. I need a bigger garage.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Of all the various front-end treatments of the frightening-looking new Tundra, this is by far the most attractive. For one thing, no chrome…for another, I prefer the use of the T O Y O T A letters on trucks (like the dearly-departed FJ Cruiser) to the oval.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Oh What a Feeling! Toyota!

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I think it can only benefit them to offer the capital letters script. As an option. On all models.

      I’ve always liked that. It imparts a sturdy quality in my mind. Like a proud old brown LC.

  • avatar
    James2

    When in doubt… copy the Raptor’s front end.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I would have liked to see a twin turbo 4.5 litre V8 diesel Tundra.

    That would be something nice.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    A bunch of mediocre also-ran cars (that still sell well by default), decent body on frame trucks and a good sports car?
    Is Toyota trying to be GM of the ’80s.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    TRD (turd) Pro Sounds like a plumber’s special model.

  • avatar
    GiddyHitch

    Are we just looking at Tundras and Sequoias in these pictures or is there a Tacoma and 4Runner in there? Article gives no details or much useful information. These should sell well in Austin if this color makes it to the showroom floor – I’ve never seen so many orange cars meant to celebrate such a mediocre football program.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    It’s amazing how much better spelling Toyota across the grille looks than that funky oval.

    Makes me think of tough trucks that can only be stopped by rust (Hilux, 1st and 2nd gen 4Runner).

    • 0 avatar
      frozenman

      At least the Tacoma and Frontier still ‘get’ the tough/fun off-road truck theme, even as dated as they are. GM doesn’t seem to understand this with their new Canyon/Colorado, and Ford Raptor is not for the young and young at heart on a budget. Praise be the manufacturers that give you a six spd manual behind their best engines! Maybe the European love for stirring sticks will get us a new Dakota or Jeep pickup with some dirt cred. one can only hope.

      • 0 avatar
        Banger

        Hear, hear! If they’d do something about their abysmal fuel mileage, I’d be looking at either of those two pretty heavily right now, as we’re near paying off my wife’s Nissan cube and my regular-cab ’06 Ranger won’t cut it much longer if we plan on adding a second child to our family — which we do, tentatively. Our positive experiences with Nissan and their slightly better pricing locally mean that would be my preference, but the right deal on a Taco would be tempting.

        I look forward to seeing the “W/T” version of the Colorado to see if it looks a little more trucky than the Z71 shown here recently. So unfortunate Chevy probably won’t offer the stick shift in any crew cab guise, though. Most reports so far say it will only come in the extended cab W/T trim.

        • 0 avatar
          frozenman

          (warning rant!) The domestics piss me off! Ford kills the Ranger when with a little love they could have put in the 3.5 and improved fuel economy, maybe even stretched it into a four door. Then there’s Dodge cancelling the Dakota just as they come out with the pentastar v6/ 8spd trans combo. GM and the last gen Colorado/Canyon with their goofy 3.5/3.7 5cyl when they had a terrific inline six on the shelf. Stick with your products for a change and perfect them!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You know froze, looked at a different way maybe GM did exactly what they set out to do, take a couple years to completely re-design their aging product and let the time help build demand. Unlike Ford, they didn’t make any excuses about how it was getting too close to their full-size to make economic sense, they just simply shut it down without comment and now, two years later, re-introducing it as an all-new, better than before model.

          • 0 avatar
            luvmyv8

            This’ll piss you off then….. Ford did indeed offer a crew cab Ranger….. down Mexico way. You occasionally see them in the San Diego area along with the odd Volkswagon Amorak or 2.

            As far as the Ford goes, I have no idea what they used powertrain wise down there…. probably the Vulcan 3.0 V6 and the Duratec 2.3 like here….. but I don’t know.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    So what’s the purpose behind building an indoors MX course then driving three neon orange trucks in circles around it, while they are packed with journalists?

  • avatar
    cdotson

    The lower front bumper on the truck in the lead pic looks to have been “claimed” by the neighborhood dog.

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    I like them…Tundra front end treatment looks great! I’d consider a TRD Forerunner..I’ll take mine in black!

  • avatar
    mikey

    Someone correct if I’m wrong here. All of these big goofy, cow catcher,long chin, front ends are a result of government regulations. Something do with hitting pedestrians, or crashing into a Miata?

    I just can’t imagine the designers, doing this without being forced to.

  • avatar
    carguy

    The front end is definite improvement but there is not much engineering involved in the TRD Pro setup. From what I can see its just the new grille, different shocks and a 2″ lift which is not much different from what most basic after market kits offer.


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