By on January 8, 2014

2

There’s a new car sharing program in Columbus, Ohio called car2go (not capitalized). For $0.38/minute, smart cars are available for rent – fuel and insurance are included. They can be driven anywhere, but they have to be returned to a public parking space within the designated “home area”. The Columbus home area is essentially downtown, the immediately adjacent suburbs, and the Ohio State University campus. I am fortunate enough to live in the home area and for the past several weeks I have been tempted by a car-nu-co-pia of car2gos (cars2go?) smart cars parked everywhere.

5
Admittedly, I am not the target market for car2go, mostly because I have a functional car that I like and drive on a daily basis. This does not mean I was not curious about the service. Also, I really wanted to drive a smart car, if only to see if my opinions about them were right. I have a sort of personal issue with the little beasts. Anytime I see one, I yell, “Dumb car!”

Even when I’m by myself. But I always think it’s funny so it’s fine. My issues with them are pretty standard and commonly known: they’re too slow, too expensive, and they are not fuel efficient enough for their tiny size. They’re good for urban areas where parking is an issue, but parking is plentiful in Columbus. I rarely have problems finding some where to park even though my car spends a good amount of time at meters.
4
The car2go service isn’t set up for impulsive smart car driving; I had to sign-up on the website, they ran my driver’s license, and sent me a member card in the mail. It took about a week. The card is linked to my debit card and when minutes are used, I get charged. Because the service is new in Columbus, the $35.00 sign-up fee was waived and I got thirty free fun-filled minutes to explore all my smart fantasies.
3
The car2go phone app allowed me to find a car within walking distance. I had seen one parked in the same spot on the street for two days, so finding one wasn’t a problem. The smart car was locked with the key inside. There was a box on the windshield where I scanned my card and it unlocked the doors. Once inside the car, I had to verify that the inside and outside were acceptable and free of damage via a waiver on the screen for the navigation system. After that, I was free to drive a smart car to my heart’s content (which turned out to be about forty-five minutes).

The smart car that I drove was a 2013 with 297 miles on it. There wasn’t a lot whole going on in the inside. There were two seats, a steering wheel, heating/air conditioning knobs, a gear shift, and the navigation screen (with a radio!). No CD player or auxiliary jack. The cargo area behind the seats will hold things. Providing the things are small and of limited quantity. The only spot of any sort of personality was that the ignition was under the gear shift on the center console. For a split second I was able to pretend that I was in a Saab. Fancy.
6

I expected to feel unsafe in the smart car – a stupid moving target for big trucks and SUVs. However, it had a high enough seating position that I didn’t feel like I was in a small ridiculously tiny car until I looked back and realized that I could touch the hatchback glass. The gas and the brake were either a zero or a 100% proposition, with nothing in between. If I wanted to change velocity, I had to really want it. The brakes were sponge, sponge and STOP, like the car ran in to an imaginary brick wall. Flooring the gas created angry noise and marginal results (It was at this time when I had the sudden realization that slow and loud = bad and that loud and fast = good). The automatic transmission was the worst part. Shift times could be counted in Mississippis. There was a ‘sport’ shift on it and it was, like many sport shifts on non-sporty cars, completely pointless.

A smart car weighs 1600 pounds and has a three cylinder engine that cranks out 70 horsepower. It isn’t enough. Nominally, the smart has a listed top speed of 90 MPH. I tried taking it on the freeway to see if I could get it up to the top speed but I got bored by the time that it got up in to the mid-70s, so I gave up. I will assume that the top speed is possible if given a straightaway of similar length to that of the airstrip at the end of Fast and Furious 6. When I stopped and got out after the land speed record breaking non-attempt there was a distinctive burning plastic smell.
IMG_0651
I’ve spent some time thinking about car2go and if it will be successful in my area. There are 250 smart cars in the Columbus car2go fleet and I can see them being popular with Ohio State students who are stuck on campus and need to leave the area to run errands. However, a quick drive through campus shows a shortage of car2go vehicles in that impulse-pickup zone. The quiet area of downtown, where I live, however, has car2go smart cars parked everywhere. From casual observation, I’ve noticed that smart cars seem to sit about 2-3 days between adventures. I’ve only seen one in motion. I’m tempted to say that I don’t think it’ll work in Columbus, but I’m usually wrong about stuff like this, so it will likely be a rousing success for that reason alone. In fact, I rather like the idea of car2go. I just hate the idea that they’re doing it with smart cars.

I’ve also spent time thinking about the smart car. It’s designed to be basic transportation. Which it is, so it succeeds. To try and compare it anything other than basic transportation isn’t fair. It wasn’t designed to be great; it’s function over form. I just can’t wrap my head around the idea that anyone would want a car so devoid of personality simply because it’s easy to park. — even for thirty-eight cents a minute.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

73 Comments on “Review: car2go Smart...”


  • avatar
    danio3834

    I agree regarding the use of Smart cars. There are other cars available at a similar price and operating cost that would provide much more value to the consumer. Parhaps they’re using it for branding.

    I wonder how many more customers I could get if I used a fleet of Mirages or Versa Notes instead.

  • avatar
    TheOtherLew

    At 38 cents per minute, if you are using the car for at least 2 hours and 12 minutes, you have already spent $50, which you could have used to rent a real car.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Right about the 75 minute mark is where this service stops making sense. If a car is needed for more than a quick trip to the grocery store, you might as well hit up Enterprise and have an actual car for a day.

      • 0 avatar
        OldandSlow

        For my needs, let’s say the regular car is in the shop, the Enterprise route is the way to go. No pun intended.

        For someone in the downtown area where parking is a rental onto itself and the good availability of a nearby Car2Go – the pickup and time spent at Enterprise doing the paperwork is an added hassle. Car2Go has an arrangement with the City of Austin that allows one to park in any metered space for free – which is just about every parking space on the street between 1st and 29th Streets.

        ZipCar is the other care share rental and uses regular cars, but those must be returned to their own parking spot.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Being able to leave the car in a different location than where you picked it up is a nice plus. While the service might not make the most economin sense, the convenience seems pretty good.

          • 0 avatar
            wumpus

            Fast pick up and leave is a huge thing. Tacking on the time it takes to get a car and return one to Enterprise will take almost as long as 45 minutes (that might involve a few people in line ahead of you, but it will at least change 45 minutes to an hour including rental time).

            I still only see this flying in NYC (where smart cars aren’t so stupid after all) and places without zipcars doing the same thing with real cars.

    • 0 avatar
      TheOtherLew

      Their Web site says that the current rates are $0.41 (plus tax) per minute, or $14.99 (plus tax) per hour, or $84.99 (plus tax) per day. But then it also says: $0.45 (plus tax) per MILE after the first 150 miles.

      This information should have been in the TTAC article.

      In any case, there would seem to be a limited set of people and situations for which this would be a good value.

    • 0 avatar
      AustinOski

      It doesn’t’ work that way. It kicks down to an hourly rate once you hit a certain dollar amount. In Austin it’s $14.99 an hour one you go over 37 minutes.

      There is also a daily rate of $84.99. That’s high, but it includes gas, tax and insurance. Most people don’t use these for daily rentals anyway. Everyone I know uses it for quick trips.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    smarts have two purposes – advertising and parking. And a HUMMER advertises better. And is more functional.

    As far as its merits for being a parking – not a transportation – solution, Toyota does better with the iQ.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      However, the Hummer tends to advertise that the driver is a douche. In my 1.5 million metro area the only Hummers that I have seen with advertising graphics are for gyms/fitness centers. Make of that what you will.

      As an aside, funny how Hummers have gone to being somewhat common to almost completely &; quickly disappearing. Did the used ones get exported to Russia or the Middle east where Hummer + track suit + gold chain = status?

    • 0 avatar
      Splorg McGillicuddy

      Smarts fit between the “driveways” in San Francisco in my neighborhood – iQ’s do not. This is the only reason I own one, honestly. I can park it where the iQ would be a tow-away solution. And since it’s street parking, I care less that somebody bumps into it in general. In the meantime, I have reserve free parking in an area where a real spot goes for $300/month.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    “The automatic transmission was the worst part. Shift times could be counted in Mississippis. ” – an excellent description.

    With regards to street parking downtown – although they are two steps smaller than what I prefer to drive, the Mini and FIAT 500 would seem to be better city cars.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “It’s designed to be basic transportation.”

    It’s actually intended to be hip and cool transportation. That it misses the mark is another example of Daimler’s difficulties with understanding the mainstream car market. The company understands luxury cars, but it’s hit-and-miss with the cheaper stuff, as its Chrysler experience amply illustrates.

  • avatar
    snabster

    I think most of the comments are missing the real point: free parking.

    Columbus isn’t the best area for this, but in Washington, DC street parking is included in the price. And you can park in residential permits zones, which opens up vast areas.

    My average ride time is about 5 minutes, so it is a taxi substitute, not a car substitute. Or for short (2-3 miles) city trips where I don’t want to take my own car out.

    There are two models, which can be distinguished by having a sunroof. I’m impressed with the solar coating they use. The non-sunroof models are more recent and have a better transmission.
    I actually like the steering — I believe it is a non power and they are fun to handle. I’m looking forward to the electric ones which might solve the transmission issues.

    To be honest, it has been a huge success for Daimler, and will likely be a billion dollar business very quickly.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Smart has not been a success. There are rumors that the brand is on its last legs (although Daimler denies them.) Sales have been disappointing, and profits have been lacking.

      • 0 avatar
        OldandSlow

        PCH101 – Daimler always seems to decline comment regarding the profitability of the Smart ForTwo. So, I’ll assumed that the venture is in the red.

        MINI on the other hand offers premium editions – which I would hope help pays the utility bills at its Oxford plant.

      • 0 avatar
        snabster

        I didn’t say Smart, I said car2go.

        Sure, it was designed as a CAFE game, but business is booming. 20K members in DC.

        • 0 avatar
          DC Bruce

          Somewhere I thought I read that Car2Go was dreamed up as a means of moving all of those Smart cars out of Daimler’s inventory, because — not surprisingly — no one was buying them.

          • 0 avatar
            snabster

            Absoluely. After driving them around, anyone who buys one is even dumber than I though. Ride quality is, well, beyond horrible. Noise, vibration.

            But the car2go service — as I said it has been a huge success and will quickly be a billion dollar business. Open question on whether the induced demand for smartcars can keep smart going forward.

            I’m looking forward to the electric versions. Got to drive on in Georgetown in the summer, and quite a bit nicer.

          • 0 avatar
            blowfish

            they enjoy a reasonably success in Vancouver BC.
            I guess this is a way for Daimler to rid her excess inventory.

      • 0 avatar
        Splorg McGillicuddy

        He was talking about car2go, but we’ve already seen the next smart model in spy photos, so it’s not dead.

    • 0 avatar
      W.Minter

      I agree, free parking anywhere you like is a huge plus.
      What I especially love is using it one-way instead of taxi or mass transit, especially at night. Or one-way to/from the airport (available in Germany).
      Driving home from the city with car2go or drivenow is cheaper for me (2 pax) than taking the subway and 75% cheaper than taxi. That’s sort of crazy.
      Driving the smart cars is less painful when you avoid flooring them. The next generation will be based on a RR layout variant of Renault’s Twingo using a dual clutch gearbox.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I lived in Columbus, and am currently in DC. Columbus just doesn’t have the urban, downtown population to really support this sort of enterprise. The city is too car-centric and spread out for people to put up with this unpleasantness for a drive out to Easton or Polaris. I’m sure Mayor Coleman is loving it though.

      DC is different. Lots of people living in Dupont, Georgetown, Chinatown, Alexandria, etc. who primarily rely on the bus/subway system. This car just supplements that lifestyle. Columbus has a comparatively pathetic public transportation system.

      I wonder if C2G system is anything like the Capital Bikeshare program, where all the rides are left in business areas during the day, and the city sends trucks out to redistribute the bikes.

      Well, I only see one of these cars on a semi-regular basis, and I work right downtown. Somebody must be driving them if there are really 20,000 members.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        It felt odd how Columbus has city proper, and then you must drive a ways to get to suburbs. Normally cities are spread out much more gradually than Columbus is. I’ve only been there three times, but I live 1.5 hours southwest in Cincinnati, and it’s vastly different.

        Downtown Columbus also feels very hollow, which is the same as Cincinnati, except on sports game days.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    My university has a couple of Hertz On Demand cars, two Fiat 500s. Even if the company upgraded to a fleet of Fiats, it would be a huge improvement. I happen to have a vehement dislike for the Smart brand, the least of which is because its cars look like they could be replicated in someone’s garage…

  • avatar
    Garak

    I wanted to like the Smart Fortwo until I test drove one. It was a horrid experience. The idea is good especially for old European cities, but the product is miserable to use and has stunningly low quality.

    The diesel is even slower, but at least it has decent fuel economy.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      The EV has direct drive, which gets rid of the biggest complaint about the Smart (its crappy transmission).. I’d be tempted to get one if I lived in CA, given the leases you could get.

      • 0 avatar
        AustinOski

        The EV does drive better. They do have some in the Car2Go fleet here in Austin. The issue with EV and the Car2Go service is range. I drove one home and by the time I got home the charge was so low, it was automatically taken out of service. So, I guess they had to come get it.

        I wonder if they limit how low it can get? Otherwise, they’d have to flatbed it to a charging station.

      • 0 avatar
        Splorg McGillicuddy

        I have a gas one and would love to have the electric but it can’t handle my commute. Next gen maybe, but then there’s a lot of competition. My parking situation, though…

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Given that parking spaces are a designated size, the “parking ease” of a Smart For2 is barely a marginal improvement over the “parking ease” of, say, a Mini Cooper, a Fiesta, or a Fiat 500, all of which will haul more groceries — not to mention people — than a Smart For2.

    The real competition for the Smart For2 is a Vespa scooter. They both carry the same number of people, and about the same cargo. But the Vespa is much cheaper, uses far less gas, is truly easier to park and is more fun to drive. The only downside is that you have to deal with the weather.

    • 0 avatar
      bills79jeep

      Depending on the parking situation, this may more may not be the case. At least in Columbus, main streets downtown have painted spots. However, side streets don’t, you can park wherever. There are often 3/4ths sized car spots that I can’t park in that I assume this would fit in.

      Overall though, I still don’t know how large the audience is for this. I have many friends that live downtown and they all own cars. This just isn’t a city that’s easy to live in without one. Aside from the OSU campus where freshmen (and sophomores now?) can’t have cars, seems like a small pool of users. As for the college kids, I sure wouldn’t have been shelling out that kind of money.

    • 0 avatar
      AustinOski

      I’ll have to disagree on both counts.

      1. Here in Austin most of the city parking is not marked in designated size. We have parking with central meters where you pay and print a ticket (except you don’t need to if you use a Car2Go). As many cars that can fit, park. It’s one reason I use the service when parking downtown, I can almost always find a spot (and the savings on parking can almost wash the cost of the Car2Go).

      2.I really don’t think most people decide between a Vespa and a car with a roof, windows and AC/heater – regardless of how bad or small that (Smart)car is.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      In Europe most garages have “Smart” slots that fit three Smarts to a space. Also in many places they are allowed to park nose to the curb, and in both case get a MUCH cheaper parking rate. So the Smart makes a lot of sense as an urban runabout there. Parking is REALLY expensive there…

      Here, not so much. I agree, the next size up makes a lot more sense in the wide open spaces of ‘Murica. My Fiat is still a doddle to park. Very useful in downtown Portland ME.

      • 0 avatar
        AustinOski

        People started parking perpendicular to the curb here in Austin (likely inspired by the Europeans) and Car2Go had to issue a notice to members that it’s not legal to do so in Austin and the renter/member would be liable for parking tickets.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I can’t believe they haven’t brought over the For4 to compete more directly with Mini and Fiat.

    • 0 avatar
      Splorg McGillicuddy

      I can put seven bags of groceries in a smart car, not counting the passenger footwell. It has heated seats and a roof. This is unlike a Vespa.

  • avatar
    AustinOski

    I’ve used Car2Go since it started here in Austin, the first US city to get Car2Go. Here are some random comments/thoughts:

    1. I use it about once a week for short trips. It’s cheaper than a cab and I can often find one faster. Typical use cases:

    – Going to meet friends for a drink, know I’ll want to cab or walk home.
    – Drop a car for service, take a Car2Go home.
    – Meet my wife and daughter somewhere, when they already have one of our cars.
    – Want to end a long run somewhere else(not my house).

    2. Yes, we have 4 cars and I still use Car2Go.

    3. Smart Cars are terrible. The 1st to 2nd shift take about a week and the car loses a lot of speed. The ride is terrible, it’s slow.

    4. The charges are tiered. There are minute, hourly and daily rates. Once the cost for the total minutes used exceeds the cost for one hour, it drops down to the hourly rate. It’s $.41/minute, but $14.99 an hour. So, if you go for more than 37 minutes, the rate goes to hourly.

    5. Yes, free parking is huge. In Austin you can park in any public parking space for free.

    6. The sense of freedom/lack of responsibility is huge. Drive it, end the rental and walk away. It was a unique feeling the first time I used it.

    7. Yes, short trips are most common for me. And, yes, it’s cheaper than a cab.

    8. Seems pretty popular here in Austin.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Needs a flux capacitor.

  • avatar
    kmoney

    This service has been thriving in Vancouver for a while. The free parking anywhere and no need to obey “residents only” parking restrictions is a huge plus. If you get a car low on gas you get 20 free minutes to gas it up, so if u can do it in less time you can get a free 10-15 min ride out of the program.

    The only thing that sucks about these cars is that because they are time-based rentals and you are using CTG’s insurance there is a bit of a moral hazard problem. These things are always speeding and running red lights in order to beat the clock to their destination. I’m surprised it hasn’t been hit with one of the lawsuits that ended “30 minutes or free” pizzas yet.

  • avatar
    Slow_Joe_Crow

    I see these things around Portland Oregon, which makes sense as a target market, except that Car2Go apparently doesn’t allow bike racks. I personally don’t see much use but then again when I’m downtown I usually have either a family of 4 in the car or my bicycle for anything not within walking distance of a transit stop.
    Now that I think of it, they are missing a market by not putting cars at the suburban light rail stations for people taking the train who need to drive the last mile.

  • avatar
    singlespeeds

    it is not an automatic transmission. it is an automated manual transmission and automated manual clutch. has anyone replaced the automated clutch actuator with a foot pedal operated manual clutch actuator and the automated gear selector actuator with a gearshift operated manual gear selector actuator? if yes please provide details. thanks

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      “it is not an automatic transmission.”

      Yes it is. It’s just a really bad one.

      • 0 avatar
        Splorg McGillicuddy

        It is, in fact, an “automated manual” transmission. This means no torque converter with a robot actuator instead of a third pedal. It has ALL of the burden of an automatic with none of the benefits of a manual. As an owner, it really is the most stupid possible implementation (and it’s even dumbed down from the European market because Americans are stupid.) I really wish it had three pedals and the truth instead, but hell, I can park it and no other car at home.

  • avatar
    korvetkeith

    I dig those steelies.

    • 0 avatar
      AustinOski

      Me too. When they replaced the 1st gen Gar2Gos here in Austin with 300 new versions, they all had the steelies. I guess they got tired of replacing hub caps (a.k.a. – wheel covers).

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “A smart car weighs 1600 pounds and has a three cylinder engine that cranks out 70 horsepower.”

    My w115 300D weighed over twice that and had seven more horsepower.

    Cry me a god-damn river, okay?

  • avatar
    JK43123

    I have to completely agree. I think you need a public transit dependent population to make it work, and that ain’t Columbus (although the bus system has improved a bit, it actually goes until 9 pm on Sundays!)

    John

  • avatar
    bkmurph

    Y’all are going to think I’m nuts, but I have a couple unusual things to say about the Smart Fortwo:

    (1) The Smart Fortwo is one of the most fun cars I’ve ever driven.
    (2) Renting a Smart Fortwo through car2go makes me want to own/lease a Smart of my own.

    First, let’s get the negatives out of the way: The automated manual transmission is totally dopey and needs to be replaced by a CVT or a true manual. The engine could use about 20 more horsepower. The ride is a bit firm. The driver’s seat is a bit too high. (In fact, if I had my own Smart, I’d probably dislocate the rearview mirror from the top of the windshield and affix it to the top of the dashboard somehow. The dashboard is low enough that no one would mind the slight obstruction to visibility.) And the rear turn signals use the same red bulbs as the taillights/brake lights. For fuck’s sake, why!?

    IMHO, the positives far outweigh the negatives. Seat comfort, ergonomics, visibility, etc. are all superb. The transmission doesn’t take much getting used to; there’s not much of a learning curve to smooth driving. The RR drivetrain layout is useful when accelerating uphill on slippery Seattle streets that sometimes leave FF cars scrabbling for traction. Handling feels secure and predictable, although the limits are fairly low. (ESC is standing by.) The steering (power assist optional) feels naturally hefty and communicative. The ride is comfortably firm. The car as a whole feels solid, tight, and well-assembled. And you can flog it readily because it’s a small, nimble car with not much power.

    When I first drove a Smart Fortwo one year ago, my first impression was that it’s a terrible car that I happen to love. As an enthusiast and driver, I still love the Smart Fortwo, faults and all.

    As for the car2go service, it’s not meant to replace traditional rentals. It’s more of a complement to hourly rentals (e.g. Zipcar) and public transit systems. I find car2go especially useful when I’m out late at night and need to get home, but there’s no bus coming for 30+ minutes. A 10-minute one-way drive at $4.10 (current Seattle rates before tax) is pretty easy to justify under those circumstances.

    • 0 avatar
      Splorg McGillicuddy

      I would have paid $1500 more for a true manual in mine (another 30 HP wouldn’t have killed anybody, too.) It’s just DYING for a manual. That said, the only way it can be fun (and contrary to every “i drove it once” review, it can be fun) is to abandon the D mode and use the paddle shifters (and not the stupid floor shifter.) Then just run the gears out. If it can carry balls up and down the hills in San Francisco, it can do it anywhere. Hills are more fun, though.

  • avatar
    titiduru

    Pretty popular in Denver Colorado.I noticed they have their own parking spots near intersections.

  • avatar
    2fast4u

    The only thing to watch out for is the deductible for any damage. It’s a 1000 dollars here in vancouver, might be different in the states. The car also has weaker control arms so you might want to be careful over speed bumps and stuff. Although i heard there’s an agreement you can sign which reduces the deductible

  • avatar
    Alex Mackinnon

    I think most people are missing the point here.

    You drive the Car2Go to the bar/house party/etc., get drunk, and don’t worry about getting your car home. That’s all I use it for. It’s way cheaper than a cab, and you don’t have to call and wait.

    The best part is that you pay less if you drive fast, regardless of how much gas or tires you use. So floor it from every light, abs on every stop, don’t slow down for speed bumps, and they even have a little tree icon that withers when you’re doing it right.

    Just make sure you have the transmission in M mode. You have to put in the request about 2 seconds in advance.

  • avatar

    These things are all over my hometown of Portland, Oregon and are a hit with the “cars are evil but I still need a car to get to my vegan cooking class because my glassware set is hard to get on the bus” crowd. Good luck finding one within two miles of downtown during the evening rush hour and when parked, they’re rarely there for more than an hour before somebody else snaps it up. The electric versions seem to be popular too but regardless of propulsion method, they seem to go a long time between exterior cleanings which makes me wonder what the inside must look/smell like as the type of Portlander that likes this sort of thing also tends to have an unnatural aversion to soaps and showering.

    • 0 avatar
      AustinOski

      I’m not in Portland (Austin), but they are usually clean. Part of the touch screen wizard that you go through at the start of the rental asks about the cleanliness of interior and exterior of vehicle. The worst I’ve seen is slightly dirty (cleaner than my wife’s car on it’s best day). Wouldn’t the fact that it rains for about six months straight contribute to the fact that they get dirty quickly.

      “the type of Portlander that likes this sort of thing also tends to have an unnatural aversion to soaps and showering.”

      You must wear a suit and be an outlier. It’s pretty much impossible for me to tell the average Portlander from the average homeless person (and I’m that rarely shaven, shower every couple of days home-office worker).

      In fact, our homeless population dresses about the same as the average Portlander, except they usually have brand new shoes and backpacks. Still haven’t figured out that one. Must be a “shoe bank” near the “food bank”.

  • avatar
    pesteele

    Amanda,

    First time I’ve seen your work here – you write well!

    Portland (Oregon) is thick w/ these and they are actually pretty well utilized. I see quite a few on the road in a typical day & seems Daimler is doing well w/ this model (both car and sharing service) in Portland.

    Speaking of car sharing in the Midwest, has anyone heard any more about the supposed 1,500 electric car fleet in Indianapolis that was supposed to have been starting up around now?

  • avatar
    dwight

    I use this service in Toronto. It is a great idea that gives you the flexibility to dump the car at your destination. I occasionally use it to go to work. Dump the car for the day and then if needed, pick one up on my way home. I will use this service until I’m back on my back after the snow melts.

    Talking about snow, Car2go needs to put snow tires on these cars. Very sloppy performance without the traction of extra grippy tires. The car does not give any confidence as it sails off in whatever direction it wants. Yikes.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States