By on January 14, 2014

The 2015 Acura TLX Prototype

It’s become a great tradition of the Detroit Show: Acura shows next year’s TL with chrome trim. So here we go!

The wheelbase is the same as last year, but the body’s about four inches shorter. The better to make the RLX look premium! An all-new and lighter-than-before 2.4L four-cylinder will come matched up with an 8-speed DCT. 3.5L V-6 models will have a nine-speed torque-converter transmission. If you want AWD, you’ll need to take the V-6.

Acura’s promising greater control of the driver experience through increased customization features for the active noise cancellation and other dynamic options.

Let’s hope that this TL represents the same quietly impressive leap over its predecessor as the Accord on which its based.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

103 Comments on “NAIAS 2014: Two Transmission Choices For The New Acura TL...”


  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    An Acura transmission with a competitive number of gears? Whaaaaaa? What’s next, DOHC and direct injection? Let’s hope these new gearboxes work out better for them than when they introduced their first 5-speed about 10 years ago, and they all blew up.

    • 0 avatar
      klossfam

      Good one! I had a 2002 TL Type-S with one of the exploding 5-speeds…at 35,000 miles…I’ve owned a couple other Honda 5-speeds with good results aka no issues…I guess until recently Honda thought direct injection might be a passing fad…but they got with it in time and seem to have done a good job in the Earth Dreams engines. I really like the new TLX…as some have mentioned – makes me think of the clean design of the 2004+ TL. Even the beak is semi-passable in this design.

    • 0 avatar
      IndianaDriver

      Are these Honda transmissions or ZF transmissions? See the story link below. ZF has an 8 speed DCT in many vehicles already and their 9 speed has been rumor linked with Honda for a while:

      http://wot.motortrend.com/we-hear-honda-acura-getting-zf-9-speed-automatic-by-2014-182755.html

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        ZF makes 7-speed DCTs and 8-speed automatics. I can’t find anything about them building an 8-speed DCT, nor can I think of any cars currently using an 8-speed DCT.

        • 0 avatar
          IndianaDriver

          This link from ZF says the 8 speed is dual clutch. Is it a mis-print?

          http://www.zf.com/eu/content/ru/france/corporate_fr/productsandservices_fr/highlights_fr/8hp_fr/8hp.html

  • avatar
    Pch101

    You forgot the “X” at the end. (Acura has this thing these days for three letters, not just two.)

    It looks better than the RL(X), that’s for sure. Shame about the nose, though.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      I like this one, but my first thought, too, was, “Why buy the car that looks like a super-sized Accord when you can get this better-looking car for less money?”

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The Honda Legend (RLX) is Honda’s home market answer to the Toyota Crown, a car that is conservative to a fault.

        A variant of the latest Acura is offered in China, where rear seat room is a primary selling point in the executive sedan class.

        None of that makes much sense for North America. I do hope that the guys at corporate are congnizant of that, and don’t have high expectations for it here. This TLX looks much better suited to our tastes — except for the beak, that’s a nice looking car.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I agree with you, but I don’t think offering a model with real rear passenger room would be a mistake.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            It is a good looking car, evolutionary from the current TL. The 2004-2008 TL was a very understated, but attractive car.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          The Crown series is a bit varied.

          The Crown Athlete is supposedly to be a bit sportier than the Crown Royal and the Crown Majesta is pretty much a totally diff. higher-end model which Toyota sees as a competitor to its own Lexus LS.

        • 0 avatar
          GiddyHitch

          Ugh, the Crown. It’s like someone decided to copy the sheetmetal design of the ‘generic Japanese sedan’ from a Grand Theft Auto game and make it into a real car.

    • 0 avatar
      stckshft

      I haven’t followed Acura’s lineup much lately. So what does (X) denote?? Brazzers actress of the month?

    • 0 avatar
      Aquineas

      Couldn’t agree more. It looks awesome from the windshield back.

  • avatar
    krayzie

    They need to have beak delete as an option.

    • 0 avatar
      NotFast

      Why? That allows you to spear pedestrians. It’s a special feature!

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I hate the design language on Acura with the beaks – but it seems every model year they give it less and less beak.

      On this one, the beak seems to work – sort of. Either that or I’m just getting use to it and other car companies are giving me worse designs to scratch my head over.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The basic shape of Acura’s grill (pentagon) is the same as that for Mazda.

        The toned down beak still doesn’t look good, nor does Acura’s current “jewel” headlamps.

        The heyday of Acura design was 2 generations ago.

  • avatar
    fvfvsix

    That is actually quite striking. I wonder if it will have the same presence without the 20″ wheels and the non-legal wing mirrors.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Sounds like a reasonable competitor to the new Chrysler 200.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Weren’t those wheels on Volvo R series cars circa 2005?

    Also, downsizing it is going to make it look cheaper when it pulls up next to an older, larger TL. I can’t think of any other car in recent history which got smaller with a redesign.

    It looks like it has gauze on the lower valances front and back, maybe from its nose transplant.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    ..and that leaves the pitiable ILX as the last stick-shift Acura, and it too will disappear in a few years. I weep for the brand that was…

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Upside-down logos are a sign of distress, right?

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I’m left completely puzzled on what Acura is doing as a brand. In the 90′s to the mid-2000′s Acura came in a very close second in several car buying decisions. In 2001 it would have come in first place had one of our cars in a bad wreck had gotten totaled (the insurance company elected to repair).

      There is nothing in the line up that compels me anymore. The ILX is getting murdered (the Verano owns its segment as TTAC outlined with over 40% of sales in the compact near-premium/premium marketing going to the Verano). The ILX sells IMHO due to some damn good lease deals (I’ve seen down to $209 a month on national advertising).

      It just feels like Acura is in a race to the bottom of the near luxury segment with Lincoln. A couple more years of this and I’ll call it a dead brand walking. It isn’t yet, but if they keep shredding their reputation…perception will catch up to reality.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        How has Acura’s business model changed?

        They were/are all FWD Honda-based models, as is Lincoln (FWD Ford based0 and the top selling Lexus models (FWD Toyota based).

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Acura’s original business model was JDM Hondas sold in North America as a pseduo- luxury brand. Over time it shifted to partially USDM Hondas with JDM Honda Inspire and JDM Honda Legend being offered as TSX and RL respectively. Next year the TSX/Inspire are being dropped from North America, leaving Acura to be represented by reworked USDM Hondas and RLX, the sole JDM offering. Lexus and Lincoln to an extent were once independent brands (Lexus especially). Lincoln, like Acura, has become a trim package while Lexus straddles between “platform shared” Toyota models, JDM models (GS), and unique models (LS, former SC430)

          • 0 avatar
            TEXN3

            The Accord Inspire and the TSX (European Accord) are different cars. The Inspire was the TL until 2004, then became slightly modified US Accord EXL V6. I’ve had essentially 2 Inspires: 1998 3.2TL and 2012 Accord EXL. The US Accord is popular in places like Malaysia.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Actually, the Lexus SC 430 was the Toyota Soarer in the JDM, as was the original SC 300/400. But your point is still very valid.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @TEXN3

            The TL became a reworked Accord in 1999 for what looks like MY99, not 2004. TSX is the current JDM Honda Accord, a.k.a. Honda Spirior.

            “The TL “Touring Luxury” debuted as 1996 model, first with the 1996 2.5 TL available with the 2.5 L 176 hp (131 kW) SOHC 20-valve 5-cylinder engine from the Vigor. The 3.2 TL used the 3.2 L 200 hp (149 kW) SOHC 24v V6 from the second generation Acura Legend.”

            “The very first 1996 Acura TL rolled off the assembly line at Sayama, Japan on March 28, 1995″

            “In 1998, Honda revealed the TL-X concept car, showing a preview of the second-generation TL which would debut in fall that year. The second-generation TL (now called 3.2 TL) was released in 1999 and was now derived off the US-market Honda Accord platform. It was available with a newly designed 3.2 L 225 hp (168 kW) SOHC VTEC J32 V6 mated to a four-speed electronic automatic transmission with SportShift.

            The second-generation 3.2 TL (the 2.5 was dropped) was built in Marysville, Ohio, alongside the Honda Accord, at Marysville Auto Plant. These cars were imported into Japan and sold as Honda Inspire in the Honda Clio dealer network, and as Honda Saber in the Honda Verno dealer network. The main difference between the two cars were the front grille; the Inspire and Saber were also available with a 2.5 L Honda J-series V6 exclusive to the Japanese market.”

            “The TSX is badge engineered from the CL-series Accord (also known as the European Accord or JDM Accord) sold in Europe, Japan, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.[2] The TSX initially had a restyled interior and different suspension tuning than the European Accord when it was introduced. However, since 2008, the interior is now standardized for all three markets.”

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acura_TL

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Accord_%28Japan_and_Europe_eighth_generation%29

  • avatar
    TMA1

    How in the world do you cut four inches off of a car and expect people to view it as the same vehicle?

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      So vehicles always have to grow in size with each generation?

      In this case, the four-inch reduction has resulted in a tidier, neater looking vehicle. One of the biggest complaints about the current TL has been that it’s too big and looks a little bloated. This TL nicely addresses those complaints.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Not always, but they usually do. They’ve obviously created the RLX and now have to justify it’s absurdness by shrinking the next thing down the ladder.

        The 04 TL was about the epitome of the model, downhill from there.

        • 0 avatar

          *sigh* For you and all those complaining about the change in dimension.

          The 2004 model that you called the epitome of the TL line (I agree) was 189 inches in length. The 2009 was just over 195 inches in length. The new one? 190-191ish by my calculations. So, remind me again, why is this downsize such a bad thing?

          Man, people will pick on anything when it comes to Acura.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Hey, I wasn’t aware it grew since the 04 generation! Its longer and wider than my M, which is hard to believe looking at it.

            So with this knowledge you provided, I’m okay with it going back to 2004 sized. :)

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            “Man, people will pick on anything when it comes to Acura.”

            Yeah, they’re already picking its nose… I mean beak.

          • 0 avatar

            Fair enough CoreyDL, I wasn’t sure until I looked it up either. Basically, Honda was developing the previous gens of the Accord and TL with a “bigger is better” attitude. Then they found out that that wasn’t actually what their customers wanted, so we are finally seeing the product of those changes.

            And you are right, I would never guess that the last-gen TL was longer than an M.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        I wasn’t sure if this was a new generation or not. I thought that vehicle would be the TLX.

      • 0 avatar
        IHateCars

        Agreed….I gotta say I like it despite my conviction that Acura was going to screw it up. I’m still not a fan of the bugeye headlamps but they actually don’t look too bad here (can’t believe that I said that!)

        A big complaint of the previous gen TL were the crazy overhangs which it sounds like they solved if the wheelbase is the same. I do lament the loss of the 6MT though…

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      The length of the Accord on which the TLX is based was also reduced by about 4 inches without reducing any useful interior room that I could detect. They mostly trimmed excess overhang. It’s like they sent a bloated car off to the gym to get back in shape.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    2012 Honda Accord: 194.9″. 2013 Honda Accord: 191.4″. How are you people all shocked that the new TL(X) is smaller than the last one? You DO know what this thing is based on, right?

  • avatar

    Oh god, the wheels on the right side are backwards (there was an article by, I think, Sajeev on this topic).

  • avatar
    LeeK

    I like it. The thing that always bothered me about the TL is the large overhang, particularly with the front wheels. It looks like this is less pronounced with the TLX.

  • avatar

    How has everyone missed the fact that Acura is going to sell a four-cylinder TL? The TL is supposed to be a premium version of the Accord, not a clone. Why bother with a rattly four banger?

    I think it’s ok in the TSX but not the TL.

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      I kind of agree, due to the size of the car. Personally, I would’ve preferred if the TLX was the same size as the TSX – alas, people apparently need bigger cars. I’m hoping that either the 2.4 puts out some amazing numbers, or the TLX is ridiculously lightweight.

      In either case, I think the last gen (K24) 4-banger can hardly be considered ratty. It has a far better sound than the J35 used in the 6-cylinder cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      Considering that you can now drop 60 large on a 2-liter, 4-cylinder Audi A6, I’d view this more as a sign of the times than as a knock against the Acura. I highly doubt that the “all-new and lighter-than-before 2.4L four-cylinder” will be a clone of the Accord’s engine.

    • 0 avatar

      The TLX is replacing both the TL and TSX, so this makes plenty of sense.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Interesting 4cyl Accord gets CVT and 4cyl Accord in Acura suit gets a Dual Clutch Transmission? What other vehicles are going to share this DCT to justify its development? Or is this a fall back if the CVT isn’t popular with customers?

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      I was thinking the same thing – that’s a lot of R&D for a small number of 4 cylinder TLX sales. If Honda isn’t getting the CVT and not the 4 banger-only DCT, what else will they use it for?

      • 0 avatar
        frozenman

        An upgrade for the CRV trans or maybe a Civic Si auto option? Honda Accord coupe for a sporty touch? RDX with a 9spd would be of help against the competition as well, would be nice if they could up the tow ratings of RDX/CRV to 2500lbs.

        • 0 avatar
          frozenman

          I guess this shows that for Honda the cvt is strictly for mpg and they have other ideas for sport, this is a good thing imho. Subaru and Nissan should take note of this.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I think they’re going to be ramping that up and using it for Acuras, and the CVT for the Hondas.

      I test-drove a CVT-equipped Accord, and Honda did well! No “rubber-band” effects; only a normal driving experience minus the upshifts.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    “Acura shows next year’s TL with chrome trim.”

    I don’t know about the car as far as performance, but I don’t care – the bright trim atones for any sins in my book.

  • avatar
    vtnoah

    I like this. Nicely tidies up the old design which honestly isn’t thaaaat bad in the flesh. Love the wheels and color and the 8 speed transmission with SH-AWD and the V6 should be a pretty slick ride. Dare I say a reliable alternative to the Audi S4?

    • 0 avatar
      darkwing

      They’re probably not going to be in the same ballpark. The TLX is going to be down 33-ish HP and quite a bit of torque to the S4. I’d be a little surprised if the TLX posted a sub-6 0-60 time.

  • avatar
    Tosh

    I’ll wait for the 6spd manual, thanks. (and a beak delete)

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Ah, the Unicorn Fart package will debut in 2017.

    • 0 avatar
      doublechili

      Could be a long wait, like never. The absence of that (supposedly) great 6 speed is the real news here. More bad news, but no surprise.

      • 0 avatar
        Nedmundo

        IIRC, the 6MT didn’t show up on the last gen TL until its second model year, and I think it was limited production at first. I wouldn’t be surprised if that happens with the TLX. They’ll pump out the high volume DCT and AT models for awhile, then make room for at least one MT variant. I’d actually expect two: a 2.4L FWD and V6 AWD. Honda still offers MT in the Accord, so I think we’ll see it in the company’s sport sedan too.

        Also, some of you seem to be forgetting that this car replaces both the TL and the TSX, which is largely why its size slots between them.

      • 0 avatar
        love2drive

        It is a fabulous manual transmission. I have a ’13 AWD 6MT. I bought it because I read this gen wouldn’t offer a MT anymore. I’m glad I did. I’m so so on the looks, admittedly, but it’s a great driving midsize car.

        • 0 avatar
          Nedmundo

          I have a 2010 TSX with 6MT, which proves Honda still has its magic touch with manual transmissions. Others are good too, but I haven’t tried one that’s better. It would be a shame if one of these excellent MT’s didn’t work its way into the TLX, which looks great IMO and seems very promising otherwise.

          • 0 avatar
            doublechili

            Thanks for your replies. Nedmundo, I hope you’re correct that the 6MT will be added later. Otherwise, I’d have no objection doing what love2drive did and get an outgoing SH-AWD 6MT. I’d be so-so on the looks too, but you can’t see your own car from the driver’s seat, right?

            I’ve got a couple of sports-playing elementary school boys who’ll be over 6′ tall by the time I sell my next car, so I’d like some rear seat and trunk room along with my AWD, MT and driving performance. Unfortunately, according to car-makers I don’t exist.

  • avatar
    Short Bus

    I like it. Drastic improvement over the outgoing model.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    “Now with Select-o-shift 23 speed transmission and dual gearset final drive for a total of 46 gear choices- enhancing the driver experience while saving a whopping .001 percent in fuel over the life of the vehicle.” Ok..I am being sarcastic here, but this whole increase in gears sounds like the razor blade wars to me. Just go to a CVT already.

  • avatar
    arun

    Those headlights remind me of the kaiju in Pacific Rim…just awful design really…

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Oh that’s brilliant – they make it look like the ILX rather than making that shitter ILX look like TL. Brilliant! And two brand new overly complicated transmissions as the only choices? 24 month leases, here we come!

  • avatar
    xtoyota

    I find it interesting how many new car introductions have copied Hyundai’s Fluid design concepts :=)
    Acura hasn’t had a good designs since the late 80′s

  • avatar
    DGA

    …but the Beaver tooth remains…hmmmmmmm

  • avatar
    MLS

    So when do we get to see the faux-wood-trimmed, heavily-buttoned interior?

  • avatar
    TR4

    Transmission “choice”? Automatic or automatic. Most Accura buyers won’t care though…

  • avatar
    awg08

    This title is misleading this is the new Acura TLX.

    The TL and TSX are being discontinued.

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    Interesting. What looks like a pretty wicked car is going to need to battle an ingrained hatred caused by years of poor design. And win back former fans who jumped ship due to mediocrity.

    Have we been here before?

    • 0 avatar
      84Cressida

      I think most of the comments here that hate it saw the headline “Acura TL” and just ran with it. This is a great looking car. The refreshed current gen TL was also a good looking car.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        I think it looks nice. Hell, I think the 2013′s look nice, since THE BEAK is toned down (I just looked at pics of a 2010 and daaaaaaam that thing’s fugly). I only lament one fewer opportunity to row my own gears.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        I don’t like the way it looks and it extends far beyond the “beak” everyone makes such a hot fuss about. I find the current TL ugly even post-refresh. The lines are wrong, the rear end is a mess, the whole car looks heavy, bloated, ponderous to me. This coming from someone who absolutely adores the 2004-2008 version.

        This new one is still tall & bloated and recycles the uninteresting corporate front end from the ILX and RLX.

  • avatar
    krayzie

    Why not a CVT but a 9 speed?

  • avatar
    hifi

    Well shucks…. An attractive Acura.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    If this article hadn’t told me this was the new Acura, I don’t think I would have noticed. It’s OK looking. It’s stale looking. We’ve been looking at this general design for years now and it wasn’t that impressive to begin with.

    The car looks like a 2004 TL that is retaining water. Too tall and puffy.

    9 speed automatic? Is there a point of diminishing returns in number of gears? I haven’t driven anything with more than 6 gears, so perhaps someone could tell me if 8 and 9 gears are useful or if they just make for a very busy, indecisive transmission

    • 0 avatar
      johnny_5.0

      FWIW, the ZF CEO made statements about a year ago that a 9 speed was about the natural limit before diminishing returns made more gears kind of pointless (other than getting to market your 17 speed gearbox as a wiz bang feature).

      http://www.motorauthority.com/news/1080293_zf-ceo-says-nine-speeds-are-the-natural-limit

  • avatar
    mypoint02

    I really want to like this car. It’s getting there. Much better than the previous generation, but the beak is still borderline too much for me. Any word on prices?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    It’s nice enough—especially that color–but I lament Acura’s decision to remove exhaust tips from its lineup. First was the RDX, then the ILX, then the MDX, then the RLX. I’d have thought the TL(X) was safe, but apparently not. One of the things that makes a car look premium and sporty is the use of exposed exhaust tips. Even the plebeian automakers seem to understand this.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Ever seen an E39 that wasn’t an M5? They didn’t have exposed exhaust tips, and it isn’t like BMW has styled anything remotely as well since.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Yea, I prefer hidden tips to the large chrome-ringed bumper cutouts most cars get today.

        It’s one of my favorite features on the Impala LT V6 (the LTZ gets the big bumper cutouts).

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        This may be so, but the last E39 units were sold well over ten years ago, so they aren’t exactly indicative of modern design practices…and even *then*, the E39 was the exception rather than the rule. Moreover, it’s only your opinion that BMW hasn’t styled anything better since the E39, and you’re entitled to it. I happen to disagree. I think the E60 5-Series was a miss in terms of styling, but the new F10 5-Series looks quite nice. And I think the exhaust-pipe integration on the current F01 7-Series is tastefully executed…

        And as far as this Acura goes, IMO, the implemented lower-rear fascia looks cheaper and chintzier than exhaust tips would have…

        • 0 avatar
          IHateCars

          I agree…I’d like to see the exhaust tips as well, integrate them into the rear fascia. Perhaps they’ll do that with a (hopefully) Type-S version in the future…with a 6MT!

          But I doubt it…

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            That would be nice. Was there ever even a a Type-S version of the current generation TL…?

          • 0 avatar

            Kyree: The Type-S version sort of became the SH-AWD trim in the last gen. Like the previous Type-Ss, it had a larger engine and some performance enhancements. Unlike previous versions, it was the only one available with a manual transmission and included AWD as standard. As well, Acura had previously only introduced the Type-S for the last few model years of the previous gens, whereas from 2009 on it was constant trim level.

            TL:DR: Yes, but it was a trim level instead of a special edition.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Awesome; thanks for the info, EChid!

  • avatar
    johnny_5.0

    I don’t understand why the seemingly sportier rev-matched DCT (based on the scant info we have now) is only available with the 4 cylinder, and the engine with more grunt gets the conventional automatic. Surely the DCT can handle the torque of the NA V6. Is it a volume thing and they can’t make as many vs. the 9 speed? Is it the planned replacement for any remaining manual models in Honda’s lineup and this is just the first place we are seeing it?

    Glad to see some potentially competitive transmissions, but Acura (along with Lexus and Infiniti) needs some new engines. 306HP from the IS350 was stout when it came out back in 2006, but a lot has changed since then. The FI offerings from BMW and the upcoming ones from Mercedes (354 lb-ft!) will stomp this thing in a straight line, even if they cost considerably more. I don’t see Acura dropping in the new powertrain from the RLX anytime soon.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I see your point. Entirely. But the TL almost exists in a vacuum. As a front-drive-biased luxury car that is definitely sporty and is *actually* a mid/full-sized car—as compared to the S60 and Regal, which are borderline compact–the TL almost exists in a vacuum. It can’t really be compared to compact or mid-sized offerings from other brands.

  • avatar
    GiddyHitch

    Hopefully the design works as well in the flesh as it does in these pictures/renders (I can never tell these days). Best Acura design since the last gen MDX. Cohesive overall with some tight lines and a tidy profile. I’ve always been impressed with the quality of HMC wheels but this is the first set that features an exciting design as well.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India