By on January 9, 2014

001-2015-chrysler-200-leak-1

 

More shots of the next Chrysler 200 have leaked out, and the resemblance between the 200 and the Dart is definitely evident. There’s no escaping common hard points.

 

 

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128 Comments on “Mo’ Better Blue Chrysler 200 Pictures...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I really like it. If it fixes the Dart’s flaws, I might bite.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      It’s a logical alternative for someone who wants to buy “domestic”, offering some superior powertrain options.

    • 0 avatar

      I’m not crazy about the rotary knob. Doesn’t fit the character of the car. The “putter” from the 8-speed looks better.

      The exterior is understated, yet elegant. I like it.

      Needs an SRT version.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        I guarantee the joystick will be disappearing soon, most people can’t figure out how to use it.

        • 0 avatar
          Volt 230

          That rotary knob may be a deal killer for many buyers, why does Chrysler always seems to mess up their cars? It looks great inside and out.

          • 0 avatar
            mjz

            Hasn’t hurt the RAM, now has it?

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            I can understand the gripes about the stick shifter in the 8 speed as it can be confusing and difficult to hit the desired gear intuitively, but what’s the aversion to the rotary knob shifter?

            Many manufacturers have or are going to push buttons and rotary knobs and the complaints seem to be few.

          • 0 avatar
            PenguinBoy

            “Many manufacturers have or are going to push buttons and rotary knobs and the complaints seem to be few.”

            I think they should have a pushbutton automatic, and call it the “Saratoga” as suggested by Principaldan. Both seem brand appropriate to me…

          • 0 avatar
            WhiskerDaVinci

            Jag and Land Rover use that knob as well. So it isn’t THAT uncommon. But is a somewhat odd thing to get used to. I have a couple family members with Jags, and the rotary knob is odd for a couple weeks, then you’re fairly used to it.

            Just an odd learning curve, nothing more complicated than that.

          • 0 avatar

            It’s hilarious to me that people just won’t accept a column shifter anymore, even in trucks and minivans, when it’s obviously the simplest and most space efficient way to do an automatic.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    Considering this new 200’s lineage, I wonder if that will preclude a convertible version?

    My initial thought is yes as it would seem that a different platform would be necessary to support such a departure from this platform and accomodate a convertible.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      While I would never, ever, consider a 200 convertible, the thought of it no longer existing does make me kind of sad.
      Thus ends the affordable 4 seat convertible in America, right?
      Though I’m not sure the 200 convertible was ever affordable to start with. No clue what the MSRP was.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Or at least a coupe, if only because the sole remaining FWD midsized coupe is now the Accord Coupe and maybe the Eos (if it’s not considered a compact car), since Altima, G6 and Camry coupes have departed. Unless the 200 Cabriolet continues, if you want an American drop-top that can actually seat four people, you’re stuck with either the Camaro or the Mustang…and neither of those is all that accommodating in the rear seats…

      One reason for the 200 to continue in cabriolet form is the upcoming Buick-ization of the Opel Cascada…which I am still desperately hoping will get called “Riviera”.

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        I have known Rivieras, and THAT car, sir, is no Riviera.

      • 0 avatar
        WhiskerDaVinci

        You and my fiancee both want the Cascada called the Riviera haha. Which isn’t a bad idea actually. Either that or a Skylark.

        I am starting to get rather impressed with how Chrysler is improving as well. I’ve never really been a Chrysler guy, but each new one is making me go “hmmm…”. At least more than I had before.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Allpar reported awhile back that the convertible version was cancelled.

    • 0 avatar
      Volt 230

      Ram is still in 3rd place, can’t get out of that spot no matter what they do.

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        Well, it has always been in third place, but it had the highest percentage increase in sales of the volume trucks in 2013. Maybe it’s BECAUSE of the rotary shift knob, not in spite of it. Lol.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Fleet buyers are a finicky breed. Nothing scares them away faster than historical Chrysler product reliability.

        • 0 avatar
          PenguinBoy

          I suspect that fleet buyers care about ownership cost more than anything else. And one of the biggest factors in ownership cost is initial purchase price – so I expect fleet buyers buy what they can get cheap.

          • 0 avatar
            84Cressida

            If a car has a history of high maintenance costs, that would factor in to the ownership costs.

            Someone that’s owned a fleet of Chryslers that cost them $$$ in upkeep is not going to buy a batch of new ones even if the price is cheap.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    This car looks good in photos and suspect that it will look even better in the flesh. The interior, while I like the layout, looks pretty bleak and somber.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Color is key for the interior. I’d like to see it something other than black.

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        I could swear I saw a version of the interior done with the seats, door panels, center console and lower dash in an almost white color, with black trim, carpet. It had leather seating and looked to be a 200C, not the 200S depicted in most photos. To be frank, it looked TOO light and impractical. However, I can’t find that shot anymore. I would love to see saddle tan, dark red, and light heather colors, all with black trim, offered as options. So sick of all black and dull grey interiors.

        • 0 avatar
          bobman

          autoedizione.com has some pictures. One has the white interior. Back seat only. Looks very luxurious.

        • 0 avatar
          WhiskerDaVinci

          Right? A proper tan interior would be great to find. I’m tired of cool beige, gray, white and black. Tan used to be quite popular, for good reason. I wonder why it fell so far out of fashion. It’s not like it got dirtier than light beige.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    I see some MKZ in the side profile and in the hollow console. Also see the slanted dash ala the new Lincoln SUV. It’s an improvement for sure and I think it will get its fair share of sales. More than that? Not so sure.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    pleasant conservative looking car

    i find the headlight grille and front dam treatment to be very dull perhaps japan circa 1995 but i guess we’re all used to be being eye raped by Lexus and the ilk these days

    needs more headlights on the bonnet

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    Put a Pentastar engine in with a 6 speed manual, price it right, and I’d be tempted

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Ooh, that looks *really* good in that hue. The Optima is also available in a striking blue color like that. But I hope that Chrysler plans to offer a duller/lighter shade of blue, since that one can be a bit off-putting. I pointed such a blue Optima out to my mother—who likes flashy cars and who is ten years younger than most of my friends’ mothers—and she remarked that it looked juvenile and over the top.

    Another thing to applaud is Chrysler’s decision to use color-keyed door handles rather than chrome ones. The company’s newer products (Dart, Cherokee) look better without chrome door handles, and this 200 is no exception. It sort of lends the car a more European look, allowing it to transcend the cheap dressing-up tactics that are prevalent in this class. Chrome in general should be used more sparingly, a fact that even Cadillac has conceded, which is why the 2015 Escalade will use flat metal trim rather than chrome.

    Also, this is the seemingly the first three-spoke wheel for a Chrysler-branded product since the discontinuation of the first round of RT minivans, and before that, the NS minivans. I like it, because the four-spoke that is used throughout the current Chrysler lineup looks cheap and uninspired, like a knockoff of the Honda wheel that is in the previous-gen Accord and current Pilot and Odyssey. The Dodge one isn’t much better, and is an ill fit for the curvy, Euro-inspired Dart…and that might be because it was inspired by the one that debuted in the 2009 RAM series. The first Jeep three-spoke is okay, but it seems to have been cloned for use in SRT-branded vehicles. The new three-spoke in the 2014 Cherokee, Grand Cherokee and Durango looks top-notch, in my opinion.

    And as for this car’s resemblance to the Dart with which it shares its foundations, a lot of that is down to the fact that Chrysler chose to use the same basic side DLO shape as the one on said Dart.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      I would be interested in a comparison to see how much different the new 200 and the Dart really are … clearly it’s not the Golf and A3 level difference, but it ought to be more than the difference between Chevrolet and GMC pickups.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Maybe it’s tantamount to the difference between the Sonic and the Encore…which is a lot more than just ride height and styling…

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        What I want to know is if this is the same or similar platform, how does the Pentastar fit in the 200 and not the Dart?

        • 0 avatar
          Viquitor

          The whole front section looks quite bigger than the Dart’s. The 200 is from a different segment, a similar Dodge would be the Avenger and not the Dart. I’m sure they are not that similar underneath the skin.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          Similar platform.

          Although people seem to confuse “platform sharing” and re-badge.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          @Flipper35—Well, platform sharing isn’t always just done in one broad method. Sometimes, cars on the same platform literally look alike and are in fact rebadged versions of one another, like the previous-gen Dodge Durango and its Chrysler Aspen sister. Sometimes—and this is probably most common—cars that share platforms have similar dimensions and are mostly the same under the skin, but have different exterior styling, like the current Chrysler 200 and the Dodge Avenger. And sometimes vehicles share a very basic architecture, but have little else in common, and that’s probably the case with this new 200 in comparison to the Dart. (It is also a response against statements that the current Durango and Grand Cherokee share a platform with Mercedes-Benz M and GL-Class.) Aside from the fact that Chrysler Group produces enough RWD-biased gas-guzzlers that it doesn’t need to add a V6 option to its smallest car and thereby hurt fleet fuel economy even more, dimensions may have been used that prevent the V6 from fitting. I’m reminded of the Genesis and Genesis Coupe, which technically both use the “BH” RWD platform, but aren’t that similar. Because of this, neither the 4.6 nor the 5.0-liter V8 will fit in the coupe without heavy, *heavy* modification, and a lot of that is down to available lateral space for the engine block (or a lack thereof), the height of the hood and the layout of the firewall. The Genesis Coupe was simply optimized to accept the 2.0-liter turbo and 3.8-liter engines, rather than having its structure compromised to additionally handle a larger eight-cylinder option that Hyundai never wanted to offer for it in the first place. So too is the Dart probably optimized to make the best use of the available four-cylinder engines. That’s not to say that there isn’t in fact opportunity for a 3.2-liter-Pentastar-equipped Dart (maybe an SRT6), but I doubt it. When even midsized cars (Malibu, Fusion, Sonata, Optima) are solely four-cylinder affairs, the days of the V6-powered compact are over…if ever they even began.

          • 0 avatar
            Viquitor

            Yes, a V6 Dart doesn’t make much sense, specially in the age of downsizing. A while ago a Brazilian website had access to a Fiat roadmap for 2012-2016, it said somewhere that a multiair, 1.6 turbo was set to replace the current 1.4 turbo. That would make more sense.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Same basic platform, but stretched for more room. The Pentastar could be made to fit the Dart, but would be unlikely for marketing/cost/CAFE reasons.

          • 0 avatar
            mjz

            Allpar kept reporting the 200 would get the 3.2, not the 3.6, which is kind of a surprise. MAYBE they have decided to put the 3.2 in the 2015 Dart instead to differentiate the two cars. They also reported a 3.2 Dart had been spotted testing in Mexico (I think) recently.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Should be effectively Jetta vs. Passat, no? Maybe not as big a size difference, but a significant difference none-the-less.

  • avatar
    ash78

    inquire : inquisitory :: suppose : suppository

    IMHO, this car is sort of a middle finger to their former German overlords who more-or-less invented the CLS, which begat the CC, which begat every other ridiculous raked, rear passenger headbanging* aero design.

    *not a reference to the stereo system

  • avatar
    Amendment X

    Still not a fan of the new Chrysler logo

  • avatar
    dwford

    This is not a bad looking car, but really it’s too similar to the Fusion, Sonata, Altima, etc. It doesn’t stand out in anyway. For the last 10 years the problem Chrysler/Dodge has had is a total disconnect between the styling of their RWD drive cars and their FWD cars, and this new 200 doesn’t do anything to change that. This 200 bears NO relation to the current 300.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Well, do you want to paraphrase Katt Williams and say it looks like a 300; until a 300 pull up? Not everyone goes ohh and ahh over the 300. Sorry, BTSR. This car is going to war in the most competitive part of the car market: the four door family sedan. Bland sells a lot more than bold in this category. Anyway, we’re all just kvetching and speculating until we see this beast in the flesh and get prices. I would like to see a competitively priced 200 with a the pentastar V-6 and AWD.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        If nothing else this should help Ford’s goal of reducing Fusion fleet sales since many fleet buyers limit their selection to “domestics” – though Chrysler is once again legally Fiat owned.

        Seems that didn’t affect them when Daimler was the parent.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        When you’re coming from behind, then boldness helps to get you noticed.

        The market leaders have to be cautious, as they can’t afford to alienate the customers who made them successful. But those who are coming from behind have nothing to lose. Desperation should spur innovation.

        The Chrysler looks attractive enough. But it’s not an attention getter, which reduces its odds of being a hit.

        • 0 avatar
          mike978

          PCH – I agree although being an attention grabber doesn`t always work. The Mazda 6 is a great example with the consensus being it is very attractive. However it sells, for a variety of reasons, fairly poorly.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I didn’t claim that boldness guaranteed success. But the principle stands: the leaders have to worry about causing offense, while the rest have to worry about being invisible.

        • 0 avatar
          dwford

          I think the only automakers playing it safe these days are GM, Toyota and Honda. Pretty much everyone else has adopted a pretty dramatic coupe like style. The problem I’m having with the 200 is it just blends right in with everyone else. No one is gonna be able to pick it out of a line up of these cars.

        • 0 avatar
          PenguinBoy

          I think offering AWD, a ~300 hp NA V6, and a 9AT in this segment qualifies as bold, and should be an attention getter that differentiates the 200 from cars such as the Malibu.

          That said, I expect sales for this car to be slow at first, and ~maybe~ with luck increase over time, like the Dart. Chrysler hasn’t had competitive, up to date C and D class offerings since the original Neon and Cloud Cars came out ~20 years ago – and the early Neon’s Subaru like headgasket failure rate certainly didn’t help their reputation in this segment.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I’m actually relieved that Chrysler did not try to go and shrink the 300’s styling, Last time they tried to translate muscled styling onto a smaller car, we got…the Avenger. Quintessentially-American as it is, the 300 is somewhat blocky and brutish, and I don’t think that would go over well with buyers in this segment. The 200 actually looks quite a bit more intelligent and “continental”, so I wouldn’t be surprised if the next 300 is just a bit sleeker in turn…

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Maybe the next 300 will bear a relation to the 200 styling?

  • avatar
    Viquitor

    They should call it the Cirrus. Hope it comes to Brasil for Sonata money.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Have my own QOTD regarding the new 200. Since we know the new CTS is in fact a stretched Alpha, and this 200 is essentially a stretched Dart, does this trend make sense or would it be better to build the larger car and scale it back to make the smaller variant?

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Good question. This does seem to be a trend.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        My thought is you design for the “worst” contingency and work your way back. In the case of ATS/CTS, people who have driven the V6 trim have commented how the V6 is nose heavy. I wasn’t in the design studio but the fact CTS is being offered with a 2.0L (much to my chagrin) and the V8 was dropped suggests to me the Alpha platform wasn’t really intended/optimized to carry anything larger than an I4. This highlights the problem of sharing platforms among small cars and midsize/large cars. Bill points out Dart is in fact the smaller variant of a larger shared platform and is I suppose criticized for it. Seems there are tradeoffs in the sharing trend the OEMs are developing, maybe it’s not wise after all.

    • 0 avatar
      billfrombuckhead

      Actually they designed the larger car first and scaled it back, that’s the unfair criticism/failed marketing of the Dart. TheDart in the smallest CUSW based vehicle. They need to relaunch it as a sporty smaller more youthful midsize that is bigger inside than a Malibu, offers fun features like u-connect and 6 speed while competing against boring Asian economy cars in price and gas mileage.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I didn’t know that about Dart/200, thx.

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        Dodge has made a lot of improvements to the 2014 Darts. The 2.4 is standard on all but the base SE (2.0), and they have totally repackaged the trim lines. The 2014 GT and Limited are an absolute bargain at $20,995 and $22,995, with all the standard equipment they have. I think Dart sales will pick up after the Avenger is dropped and the people shopping the new 200 (which will probably come in around 5 to 6K more) see that the Dart is now a great value. I do think that Dodge should stop advertising the Dart starting at $15,995. That’s for the bare bones SE which does not even have air conditioning standard. Who buys a car without air conditioning? To get it you have to order a $1,300 “convenience package”, effectively raising the minimal base price to $17,295. It seems kind of misleading, and “cheapens” the whole line.

        • 0 avatar
          th009

          So they have made improvements to the Dart — have they improved the sales?

          • 0 avatar
            mjz

            The 2014 Dart just went into production/sale recently. Once they clear out the less desirable 2013 models (which they still have a ton of), and eliminate the Avenger (now out of production), watch for Dart sales to increase significantly in the coming months.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “Actually they designed the larger car first and scaled it back, that’s the unfair criticism/failed marketing of the Dart”

        That’s not actually true. For the Dart, they literally grabbed a Giulietta and cut it in half both ways and added 2-3″. It was purely derived from that smaller car.

        • 0 avatar
          billfrombuckhead

          The Alfa Romeo Guilietta compact platform was widened for the US, hence CUSW. The Dart is the smallest car derived from this CUSW platform which includes the KL Cherokee, the 2015 200 and probably the Journey replacement. A proposal for a new Alfa Romeo Guilia also used this platform but Marchionne decided instead to build a rear wheel drive Guilia in Italy instead of a front wheel drive/all wheel drive Alfa in the US.

  • avatar
    eManual

    How about a 5 door hatch version with a manual transmission? My favorite Dodge was a 1987 Lancer, with light blue interior/exterior and a 2.5L manual. Would buy one tomorrow if they made something similar.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Don’t hold your breath.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I had an 85 LeBaron GTS 2.2 non-turbo with the 5-spd manual (black with gray interior) – wonderful car. But given how awful the Dart’s stick is, I’d prefer their automatic today.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        I had an H-body also, a Lancer ES Turbo. There was a lot to like about that package. After seeing the photos from the other day and these today, I thought how cool would it be if this were to become the modern Lancer/LeBaron turbo?

        Imagine the 2.4 turbo with a nine speed autobox and the rest of the toys. Now, if we could get a hatch on it…

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    What I think it looks like is an Audi that fits between the A4 and the A6. Since it was built out of what was supposed to be an Audi competing Alfa Romeo Guilia before they decided to go rear wheel drive for the Guilia. This new Chrysler is a legitimate effort to build a Quattro for the masses. Heck it even recycles an old Audi nameplate . This car is aimed at VW and the Germans like a predator drone.

    BTW, white interior photos are out there.

    Mopar uber alles, indeed!

  • avatar
    whynot

    And just like with the current 200, the C-pillar is the weakest (styling) link.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      For me it’s the sculpting in the rear fender. But I’ll reserve judgement until I see it in person.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      The current 200 has a big plastic triangle glued to the C-pillar. The new one has a glass window and is styled to resemble the Audi A7. Not weak to my eyes.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        The current 200’s C-pillar shape does it no favors. Its understandable with the 200 because that car is just a hastily done refresh, but it didn’t work with the Sebring either.

        Even Chrysler knows it- which is why every picture and advertisement with it shows the car from either a low or high angle obscuring the C-pillar and its shape compared to the rest of the car as much as possible. (Seriously, they don’t even include a profile shot of the car in their photos- despite doing so for the 300 and the Town and Country)

        I don’t think the C-pillar on the new 200 looks terrible, just not as good as the rest of the car.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Mark my words, this won’t age well. The front looks old already, and the back is straight up Impala, perhaps with a little Passat in there. It’s got that stumpy look like the CLA, like they wanted to make it longer, but couldn’t due to platform constraints.

    For that matter, the side is Impala too.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    So the new 200 is a well styled exterior with a suprisingly good looking interior running on a respected motor pushing nigh-300 hp through a 9 speed tranny to all 4 wheels?

    I’m calling it now: I want to see a TTAC comparison of the 200 in sport trim with the 3.6L up against the S4 and 330xi.
    make it happen.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    I like it, the Mopar “S” vs the Ingolstadt “S”. This is Marchionne’s jab in the face to Piech& Co.

    Can’t wait for the AR Guilia and it’s Dodge counterpart.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      If Chrysler bolted a set of roller skates to a chihuahua, you would be praising it for its feistiness.

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        That’s the FIAT 500. Teehee.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Gotta love bill for his tenacity…

        Mopar uber alles? Brilliant!

        • 0 avatar
          PenguinBoy

          I suspect Bill might work for Chrysler – if so, I’m glad to see he’s engaged, and enthusiastic about upcoming new products from his company. I can see how some of his over the top hyperbole might not have the effect he’s hoping for, but at the end of the day he’s no worse that other fanbois like “Jimmyy” who think their favourite brands can do no wrong.

        • 0 avatar
          billfrombuckhead

          What has happened at Chrysler since Team Marchionne has been running it is an industrial miracle. The punditocracy hates it since it clashes with their jobs of defending the status quo through spinning the “conventional wisdom”.

          Can’t way for FIAT to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange, JapanInc fanborgs and anti bailout ideological trolls heads will explode across the nation when FIAT becomes an American company.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      The Giulia will arrive in 2010, err, 2013, err, 2016, err, …

  • avatar
    MLS

    It’s a shame Chrysler didn’t take the opportunity to give this brand-new car a real name. They might have even chosen a heritage name à la Dart.

    I understood the decision to drop the Sebring nameplate, since it had been irreparably tarnished by the third-generation car developed under DaimlerChrysler. But the 200 name never made sense (where the 300 has historical precedent), and the hastily reworked former Sebring has also taken a beating in the press. That the 2015 model will sport a “C” trim is an insult to Chrysler’s (ongoing) letter car heritage.

    Here’s calling for Chrysler Newport. Hell, even Cirrus would be better than 200.

    Not to mention the ludicrous hierarchy implied by Chrysler’s 200 and 300 and Fiat’s… 500?

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Everyone bitches when they change the model names too often. Can’t win. Nothing wrong with 200. It slots below 300 in size, makes sense. If it’s a good car, it will preempt the mediocre reputation of the current model. Why don’t you wait and see how the 200C with the 3.6 Pentastar, 9 speed ZF and all wheel drive performs before calling blasphemy for using the C badge on a 200? As for the “hierarchy” the FIAT and Chrysler brands are completely separate brands and sold in different dealerships. Both have decades long heritages with 500 (FIAT) and 300 (Chrysler).

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Why do we need names with historical precedent? The average person doesn’t know or care what a Newport is. It would just be a useless name change.

      In the case of Chrysler midsizers, harkening back to their history for a run of the mill sedan is not what they should be going for.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @danio, mjz, MLS: Those of us who are insane enough to car will do our own badging. When I see a Buick Lucerne in traffic I fantasize about prying the letters off and slapping a “Park Avenue” badge on it.

        • 0 avatar
          mjz

          I always felt the Lucerne was a replacement for the LeSabre, not the Park. Buick sells a RWD Park Avenue in China, perhaps we will get that someday, along with a Riviera as the flagship personal luxury coupe.

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        Newport was a name used on Chrysler land yachts from decades ago. Not appropriate for a state of the art midsize sedan.

  • avatar
    Short Bus

    Aesthetically I find this to be a nice car to look at, both inside and out. Pending a test drive, I could actually choose one of these over many other cars currently available.

  • avatar
    AlternateReality

    Anyone else see a Walmart-spec Regal/Lacrosse when looking at the dashboard pics?

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    I predict that this vehicle will have the same impact in its segment as the Dart had in the compact market.

  • avatar
    FerrariP4

    Looks nice in a restrained/conservative way…

    More pics, including white interior here: http://www.tflcar.com/2014/01/heres-sneak-peek-luxurious-looking-2015-chrysler-200/

  • avatar
    Atum

    Not very surprising. Basically a blend of everything Chrysler-Fiat: 8-speed transmission, huge Uconnect screen, small European design, well finished interior. It isn’t my favorite car, but it’s certainly not rentally like the old/current 200.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    9 speed transmission

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Bill,
      do you sell Mopars for a living? Not judging, I always liked Nullo’s views on blue oval products. Whilst I’m typing, I’d like to thank all the mechanics who give their opinions.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    Just a product evangelist for the world’s most exciting car company, FIAT-Chrysler

    Jeepster next on deck

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Confused about the Jeepster. Is it the REPLACEMENT for the Compass/Patriot? I was under the impression it would slot below the C/P, with replacement for the C/P still on the horizon. Allpar doesn’t seem clear on this.

  • avatar
    Ron B.

    Oh look it’s a Ford Mondeo ,VW,Mercedes (add generic styling ques here) by Chrysler.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      Oh, look– it’s one of the world’s 10,000,000 Ronalds complaining about unoriginality.

      Yer mama is unoriginal.

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        Chrysler is definitely coming from behind in this critical segment, so it has some room to take chances. A more pronounced family resemblance to the 300 would have helped set this car apart from the rest of the herd.


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