By on January 7, 2014

Honda

The joke was that the little Honda was so old and undesirable that it would take a ten dollar bill on the dash and the key in the ignition to attract a thief. With 300K miles on the clock, the little car was old and tired, but my sister Lee and her husband Dave aren’t the kind of people who replace their cars very often. The Chevy Chevette they bought new in 1981 lasted ten long years under their care so the little Civic, purchased used in 1991 from one of my father’s workmates, was on target to last forever. Other cars came and went in the driveways of the other houses up and down the street, but in their driveway the Civic endured, a fixture of solidity and reliability in an ever changing world. And then one day, it was gone.

The little car had aged in the 21 years since it had left the assembly line. On the outside, its body was still in good shape but its rubber pieces had gone grey in places and its bright red paint had had faded from decades under the summer sun. Inside, daily use had made the car’s once plush velour seats worn and threadbare and the touch of human hands had removed the texture from the plastic shift knob, leaving it cue-ball smooth. Those same hands had worked on the steering wheel as well, leaving patches of shiny black plastic where they rested the most while other body parts, a resting elbow here a rubbing knee there, had worn other interior pieces. Below the line of sight, the edges of the pedals were worn smooth from use while the carpets, protected by at least three generations of thick rubber mats, still looked surprisingly good. It was not a luxurious place to sit, perhaps it never had been really, but time and familiarity had made it comfortable.

Photo courtesy of: imganuncios.mitula.net

Photo courtesy of: imganuncios.mitula.net

Mechanically, like almost all Hondas, the little Civic was solid. Thanks to regular oil changes and the kind of thorough maintenance routine that only an aerospace engineer like my brother-in-law could abide by, under the hood the car was as good as ever. Sure, things wore out once in a while, but they were supposed to, and when they did they were replaced. The efforts paid off and, despite the decades that had elapsed, the car remained a reliable daily commuter; a testament to its engineers and its owners.

The theft of the little Civic hit my sister’s family hard. Like anyone who is a victim of theft, they took the loss of the car personally. They may have joked that the old car was undesirable and toyed with the notion that not even a thief would want it, but that didn’t mean the vehicle was unloved. Losing it was like losing a member of the family and anger welled up inside. Within minutes of noting the car’s loss they were on the phone to the police.

Salt Lake City isn’t a hot bed of criminal activity. It’s a safe, clean city filled with upstanding, honest people who take pride in their community. Even so, the theft of the Honda wasn’t front page news and, although the police took the report and promised to get right on the case, the return of the car in useable condition wasn’t likely. Most “vintage” cars, my sister and her husband were told, end up in chop shops and even a simple joyride could end in a crash or vandalism. Chances were, the police informed them, if the car wasn’t already in pieces, it soon would be – one way or another. They steeled themselves for the worst.

Photo Courtesy of Wikpedia.org.   Photo Credit: Brett Neilson

Photo Courtesy of Wikpedia.org.
Photo Credit: Brett Neilson

Sometimes, however, there are happy endings and just two days after the police were made aware of the car’s theft, the little Honda turned up abandoned downtown, the flotsam and jetsam of a night’s worth of petty criminal activity, and a bag of half-eaten gummy worms, left scattered around the interior. There was no real damage, no bashed in body panels and no sliced up seats. In fact, the worst thing the thief, or thieves, had done was to shake up a can of Red Bull and spray it all over the headliner. Overall, the damage was light and with a little elbow grease the cars was soon restored to its former glory.

Today, the little Honda is back where it belongs and everything is, once again, as it should be. Other cars come and go from the driveways of the other houses up and down the street, but in my sister’s driveway the Civic endures, a fixture of solidity and reliability in an ever changing world. There are no more jokes about leaving the keys in the car and a ten dollar bill on the dash. The car is old but it’s not undesirable. It’s family.

Thomas Kreutzer currently lives in Buffalo, New York with his wife and three children but has spent most of his adult life overseas. He has lived in Japan for 9 years, Jamaica for 2 and spent almost 5 years as a US Merchant Mariner serving primarily in the Pacific. A long time auto and motorcycle enthusiast he has pursued his hobbies whenever possible. He also enjoys writing and public speaking where, according to his wife, his favorite subject is himself.

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64 Comments on “Little Car Lost: When Thieves Come Calling...”


  • avatar
    snakebit

    As unwelcome and, at the time, unbelievable the information from police that your stolen car won’t be returned and if it is won’t be in one piece, that’s the usual outcome. Your family was extremely fortunate.

    I had a new ’89 Integra LS five door company car stolen from my downtown parking spot, with only 600 miles on it, one block from the police station. When I got a call from the towing recovering company, they as much said ‘where do you want it towed?’ When I told them, ‘my home’, they responded that I wouldn’t want the car when I got it, that it had been torched, left on cement blocks to burn and warp in the middle of a grade school playground. And they were correct. The only salvageable part of the car was the motor and automatic transmission. So, ya, your family made out, considering what oft times happens to stolen cars.

  • avatar
    BMWnut

    Time to upgrade the little Honda with some modern aftermartket anti-theft technology.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Even antique anti-theft technology. I’ve known people to get the same car stolen several time. They still don’t get it.

      I hate alarms in my own cars/trucks, but I’ll just install the important stuff. A remote controlled ignition/fuel kill. No siren. No flashing lights. Just silent but deadly. And installed where thieves won’t find it. But set to arm passively/automatically when I walk away.

      And older Japanese cars are the easiest to steal. Sitting ducks.

    • 0 avatar
      dave-the-rave

      Yes, like a Chevy bowtie on the exterior.

  • avatar
    ant

    Will civics sold today hold up as well as this 91?

    A buddy of mine used to have a 91 crx very similar to the one in the photo. I recall that the muffler rotted out every year. Spunky little car.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      I used to have an ’86 CRX. The original muffler lasted 70,000 miles when I stupidly decided to replace with a Midas muffler. The Midas mufflers only lasted about a year on average. Sure, Midas replaced the mufler free, but then they charged you for related exhaust pipe replacements. So after 3 or 4 Midas mufflers over 3 or 4 years, I went back to the Honda dealer and had them install a more expensive OEM muffler and exhaust pipes, and no more problems for the rest of the time I owned the car. Over 205,000 miles total.

      My current Civic is a 2004. 70,000 miles and still on the original muffler and it seems fine so far.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        I’m at 265K on the original Honda exhaust system on our ’99. A little bit of noise from the joint between the rear of the pipe and the front of the rear muffler. Might need to replace the pipe in the spring but the muffler looks good as new. I’m in the southeast, and they do put salt on the roads here. I also rinse the car off after each snow/salt episode.

        I agree, the OEM Honda parts do noticeably outlast much of the after market stuff. I’ve worn out OEM stuff, tried after market and then returned to the OEM stuff again with this brand. Fortunately we have the internet b/c the local dealer fluctuates between having an affordable parts department and smoking crack.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Toyotas and Hondas of that vintage would last forever, if given some care. That cemented a reputation and a loyal base that remains today.

    The Detroit-three, on the other hand, did the contrary, and that reputation also remains today.

    • 0 avatar
      rpol35

      “The Detroit-three, on the other hand, did the contrary, and that reputation also remains today.”

      Not entirely, this story reminded me of my ’91 Cherokee especially the part about assuming no one whould ever want to steal it. It still runs strong and looks pretty good at 302,000 miles.

      A lot of it is in how you maintain and treat a vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        philipbarrett

        My 1992 Cherokee’s clutch went out at 70,000 miles. Comment from the mechanic? Yeah, they all go around that time!

        • 0 avatar
          mnm4ever

          Most of the time a clutch isn’t going to last much more than 70k miles, our 2001 Toyota MR2′s clutch is on it’s last legs at 72k miles. That’s hardly an example of poor design or reliability.

          • 0 avatar
            joeaverage

            I dunno about that. I’m at 265K miles on our Honda on the OEM clutch. I’ve owned it since new and it does about 70% city driving these days. I also tow upwards of 1K lbs several times a month with a few episodes of 3500 lbs over the past 14 years.

        • 0 avatar
          Felix Hoenikker

          60K miles on a cluthc sounds way to short for me. I have 237K miles on my 2004 Saturn Ion manual 5 speed, and I’m still on the original clutch. In less than 2000 miles, I will have reached the euivalent dietance of a trip to the moon. Driving technique is everything.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            So is usage. The MR2 is driven “spiritedly”, is almost exclusively driven around town in stop and go traffic, and was used to teach 2 teens to drive a stick.

            That being said, surely you can understand that getting 237k miles out of a clutch is way beyond normal service life. To get that many miles on a 2004, I am guessing you do a lot of highway driving, which doesn’t stress the clutch at all.

            Either way it doesn’t mean the Cherokee is unreliable. A clutch is a wear item, is designed to need replacement. Just like brakes or tires, sometimes they last longer than others but mostly 70-100k is about all you get out of them depending on the car and usage. And ours is still working, I only notice the clutch slip under hard acceleration. Its just time to start acquiring parts and getting ready for a big job.

          • 0 avatar
            Frownsworth

            I know someone with a Mk4 Jetta TDI on the original clutch with 400km+, and still going strong.

          • 0 avatar
            ttacgreg

            When it comes to clutches driving technique is everything.
            I never put power through a slipping clutch with the exception of easing away from a stop which I do with minimal possible motor rpm’s.
            A good friend of mine has a 74 Mercedes he bought new, It has 366,000 miles on it, And it has the original clutch.

            One thing I wish this article mentioned was how the vehicle was stolen? Worried the keys in the car? Did they hotwire it somehow?

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    “Mechanically, like almost all Hondas, the little Civic was solid”
    I beg to differ as I have an Odyssey with the self grenading tranny. It was severely under engineered for the weight of the minivan. It failed at 82K miles of very gentle use.

  • avatar
    philipbarrett

    After shopping in a local street market we returned to find our cantankerous but well loved Ford missing from her parking space. After blinking at the vacancy for a few moments we dutifully informed the police assuming this was the last we’d see of old Daisy (Daisy, as in “Daisy, Daisy give me your answer do” which for a reluctant starter was rather apt).

    Nonetheless, a week later we got a call from the police, Daisy had been returned to the same parking spot and was ours to pick up. Far from a week of ram-raiding, the thief had cleaned the car both inside & out and also fixed a few minor electrical annoyances!

    • 0 avatar
      Jellodyne

      Did the police ever find Chip Foose?

    • 0 avatar
      econobiker

      “Far from a week of ram-raiding, the thief had cleaned the car both inside & out and also fixed a few minor electrical annoyances!”

      Perhaps they only needed a vehicle to transport certain illegal substances.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Pay it forward?

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      This reminds me of two friends I had in tech school, who both got their cars stolen.

      One, was a G-body Monte Carlo that was “Hot-rodded” out. It was stolen, and in the course of a month, “Lowrider’d” out. It looked friggin sweet! My friend (being from the South) didn’t appreciate these modifications though, and was furious that the car went 2000 miles overdue on it’s oil change. This car was actually stolen twice when the theif went back to the impound lot, and stole it back somehow. My friend drove all the way down to St. Louis from Chicago to retrieve it, only to return empty handed. They eventually caught the perp in it a second time, and he got his car back.

      The other friend, got his T-bird Turbo Coupe lifted near Wrigley Field. The car was found the next day on the next block over. The thief had ripped off the interior door handle that was half-broken, and we presumed, hurled it out the window. He was furious!

  • avatar

    These days, a good piece of anti-theft technology is a manual transmission. Most of the thieves do’nt know how to drive them. A friend’s Integra was not stolen about a decade ago, because the thieves, who did manage to break into the car, didn’t know how to drive it.

    Glad your family members got their Civic back!

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      Yep. One of my friends had an attempted theft of his 240sx. They had started it and then it jumped the parking block. He found it teeter-tottering on it the next day, but at least it was still there.

  • avatar
    econobiker

    The Haynes DIY manual from the era when they were still printed on good archive quality, bright “white” paper.

    Now these are printed on an acid based paper that yellows and fades out fairly quick. Probably ok for the average car manual but I am glad I got some Haynes motorcycle manuals (for now vintage motorcycles) prior to the “cheapening” of the paper.

  • avatar
    JMII

    I had that same Haynes manual as the owner of an ’84 Civic S1500 Hatchback. I miss that little car, it got me thru high school and college. I beat it silly and never had a problem in over 160K miles, during which it was used a delivery vehicle for a local print shop.

    My very first car was stolen! It was an ’81 Mustang GLX with the inline 6. It drank gas like a V8 but had the power of an 4 banner (which was an even sadder Mustang engine choice available back then). I can only guess that someone thought it was a GT or needed parts for a wrecked Mustang since the GLX was the most boring Mustang ever. Mine was prone to overheating and the tranny often got stuck in park requiring the car to be rocked back and forth a few times before shifting into drive. On top of all that it was faded beige with a red vinyl interior, completely undesirable. The car didn’t have theft coverage because we just assumed nobody in their right mind would take it. The car was nearly worthless, I know for a fact the stereo was worth more then the car… yet it was taken from our driveway (in a nice neighborhood) and was never recovered. Now anytime I’m fishing and get snagged on something in the depths we joke “its the Mustang!” since everyone assumes my car *must* be at the bottom of a lake somewhere in Florida.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      I had that very same Mustang and you described the engine perfectly. Tough as nails, 90HP from a 200 cu.in. six (3.3.L) and drank gasoline like a V-8. Just a decade earlier the same engine supposedly was rated at 120HP. I had one and it clearly made more HP than the ’81 did.

      Mine was a good car from 80K to 120K miles miles before I sold it. I saw it years later (certain it was the same car b/c of it’s paint job) and it still looked good on the outside but the interior was trashed.

      How many cars go to the junkyard b/c the owner won’t bother taking care of it?

  • avatar
    Atum

    I think the reason the little Civics and other older Japanese vehicles are stolen so often is 1: They’re reliable, which means that when crooks escape from police, they don’t have to worry about breaking down and being caught. 2: They’re old and roughed-up. Driving a brand new Escalade in a lower-class part of town is suspicious, but an old Tercel or something, nah, doesn’t look stolen.

    • 0 avatar
      OneAlpha

      Driving a new Escalade in the bad part of town isn’t suspicious – it’s just some thug rapper keepin’ it real.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The reason that old Hondas are stolen so often is #1 there are extremely easy to steal so if you need to get somewhere and don’t want to walk, take the bus or pay for the gas to fill up your own car it is easier/cheaper to steal a Honda. #2 they aren’t that reliable in the real world and their parts are fairly expensive so people steal them for the parts.

      • 0 avatar
        Frownsworth

        As far as I can tell, this has a lot of truth to it. I know of some people who used to, but now refuses to buy used Hondas because of the high cost of repair parts (for DIYers).

        A recently retired Honda mechanic also told me to avoid Hondas, because they seem to have some chronic issues, one of which is the automatic transmissions.

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    Car thieves must sleep in. This morning there were four or five cars sitting in my neighborhood warming up. No owners in sight. Just hop in and drive away.

  • avatar
    ash78

    Gummy worms and Red Bull are Schedule IV substances in Utah.

  • avatar
    2KAgGolfTDI

    My BIL’s 97 Civic was stolen frequently in Salt Lake City, and was always found later, stripped of its interior.
    The insurance company paid to re-do the interior each time. The car always looked new inside, since it usually was new inside…

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Yup those year interiors are a bit of a dirt magnet and don’t wear that well so the seats in good condition are always in high demand. Had he got so crappy Hello Kitty or “Real Camo” seat covers and put them on it likely wouldn’t have been stolen quite so frequently.

  • avatar
    Eric the Red

    From the workplace logs of Ford Credit:
    The older hell-raising salesman wasn’t upset that someone had stolen his one week old Lincoln Towncar. He was mad that as they stole it they had thrown his briefcase out the window and everything in it was scattered across about a one block area. As a part of the lost car reports he had to turn in to Ford Credit he was supposed to turn in both keys to the lost company car. Dan (name changed to protect the guilty) had to quietly get a duplicate key from the Lincoln dealership because after a late night of “entertaining” clients he had misplaced his keys in the ignition of his unlocked car.
    The Towncar was shortly replaced by another new vehicle and life went on.
    Seven years later the local park/pond/old quarry less than a mile from Dan’s house was drained for some reason, and lo and behold the car was rediscovered.
    Moral: Don’t leave your keys and briefcase in your new Towncar unless you don’t want your new car and briefcase.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Had the same manual when my family owned our 1990 Cappuccino Metallic Civic Wagon. Bought in ’96 for $6000, sold in 2007 for $1400 plus $1300 insurance money from an Audi A6 backing into the driver door and denting it slightly a few months prior to selling it. Talk about low cost per mile! When we first bought it, it actually blew a headgasket, some sort of rare manufacturing defect in the head. Covered by the Honda dealer we bought it from thankfully. Besides that I think it needed one alternator, a timing belt change, a front spring (broke on a huge pothole my mom hit), and near the end of its life 2 lower balljoints, 1 upper, and both front CV axles. It also needed a gas tank and rear bumper support (we made one out of pressure treated wood lol) after spending its life in salty Central NY. I did some cutting out and bondo-ing of the rear quarter panels as expected of a Honda of the vintage. All together a reasonable ownership experience. The car was great fun to drive around town, even with an automatic. Airy cabin with incredible visibility, fantastic cargo capacity that is better than the 2007 Fit that replaced it. I drove it and maintained it for 2 years in high school, honest to god I have dreams about that car on a semi-monthly basis.

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      I love luxury cars but I can’t see giving up my 2007 Fit. Something about the pure honesty and simplicity.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Yeah we were waiting a long time for a worthy successor to come to the US to replace out trusty wagon. Finally the Fit hit US shores, and we had to drive out to Paterson NJ from Ithaca NY to find the one we wanted: Base 5spd manual. After the worn Wagon, the Fit seemed like a luxury car in terms of smoother ride and much lower NVH, but gave up a lot of visibility and go kart handling. That sounds strange since the Fit is liked for exactly that these days (visibility and go-kart handling), but the old Wagon had a lot more of that feeling and fishbowl like visibility.

        The Fit now has 47k miles on it, almost exclusively short commuting around our hilly locale, with a few longer trips up to the Adirondacks under its belt. Local driving in the summer yields 34 mpg or so, dead of winter commuting with snow tires gets 30mpg. Long trips on back roads to ADK has yielded as high as 47 mpg (going 55-60). The only issue is some rattling in the dash basically since new, and now it sounds like an exhaust heat shield may be loosening up. Besides that it’s been oil changes, 1 air and cabin filter, and I changed the manual transmission fluid at 30k. Oh and one set of summer tires, the original LRR tires have atrocious grip in the rain, and downright dangerous on snow. I bought a used set of steelies at the junkyard and put some cheap Kelly “pizza cutter” snow tires on it (tall and narrow), it’s a beast in the winter.

        Before the 1990 Wagon, we had a 1985 Civic Sedan that got totaled out in an accident, and before than a rusty 1982 brown Civic Wagon that we bought for $750 when we first immigrated in 1992. Our largely positive experiences with all of our Civics is in part what convinced me to buy my 2012 stick shift LX sedan last winter. It’s a competent and efficient vehicle, very airy and roomy like Hondas of yore, but is missing some of the fun driving characteristics and jewel-like construction of the older cars. It’s definitely better rust-proofed though!

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I had forgotten about the head gasket that my Mom’s 1990 Sonoma Red EX Sedan blew, split the bill with Honda after ONE complaint from my Dad to the dealer (and maybe a threat of a complaint to their zone office; the head gasket failure on my 1984 Pontiac Sunbird, along with the Buick dealer throwing parts at his 1986 Century was what soured our family on GM and turned us to Honda in the first place). My Mom also had the igniter failure which was common to those Civics.

      That Civic my Mom had (and the Wagon, IIRC) had the 1.6L engine and suspension straight out of the CRX Si of the day, and yes, the thing handled like it was on rails! Even with the slushbox, you could floor it whenever you felt like it, and the car just ate it up–NO problems! (My first new car out of college, a 1994 Civic EX in Torino Red, was the slightly larger 5th-Gen that followed the 4th (1988-1991), and revved just as nicely (same 1.6 as the Civic Si again, now with VTEC), and even if the handling wasn’t quite as crisp, the increase in refinement made up for it.) This marked the time when Honda, thinking about it now, started to lose the plot (even though there are folks on this very board who loved) by creating the targa-roofed delSol, instead of creating a third generation of CRX.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    First car to be stolen from me was a 1976 Beetle Conv. Stolen from a public parking lot in Manhattan. When i reported it to the police they told me to forget about it as it already was loaded into a container to be shipped to another country. Insurance Co paid me in full 30 days later $3,000.00 more then i paid for the car. Second was a 1984 Mazda pickup that my wife took to work and was stolen from the company parking lot. Had no theft insurance so reported it to the police and forgot about it. 2 1/2 years later received a call from the police that my truck was found parked on the street with no plates. They said it was stripped of many of the parts and was towed to the pound. The police wanted to know if i wanted the car junked due to being stripped or do i want to have it picked up. In Nassau County NY they use approved auto body shops to store the cars. Over the weekend i went to the auto body shop lot and looked thru the fence to see that the truck looked OK. Told the police that i would be picking up the truck on Monday and to have it released. I asked my Son-in-law (Police NYC)to meet me at the body shop and we would tow the truck home. Arrived at the body shop to pick up the truck and the owner would not release it because i was going to use a tow chain. Called the police station and was told i would have to have the truck flat bedded for approx $200.00 and i should just leave the truck to be junked. My son-in-law shows up and takes in the story and asks the owner of the shop if he also owns a shop in Jamaica, Queens NY and he says yes. My Son-in-law tells the owner he is stationed in that percent and checks the various body shops for stolen cars. He offered to check his shop on a daily basis. At once the owner offered to help us get the truck started and even offered to get us a set of keys from the Mazda dealer across the street. We used a screwdriver and declined the offer and drove the truck home. Total cost to get back on the road $50.00. Funny the truck bed was full of various clips used to hold trim on cars. Used that truck for another 6 years.

  • avatar
    bikephil

    The thing was worth about $300. Who cares?

  • avatar
    Donovan Green

    Thomas- I love your writing. I got to the end of the story, reading the bit with the car back on its street, in its rightful place- I thought, “Wait, who wrote this?” Ah, the guy who lived in Japan and wrote that Costco story I loved so much. You are a master story teller. Thank you so much for sharing your talent with us.

    If you have any books written- I’d love to know about it.

    We’ll done!

  • avatar
    DGA

    Awesome cars. One of the best Civic generations ever. In my mind it makes the current generation Civic pail in comparison.

    My brother had an ’89 Civic Si, his first car. This car went through so many iterations of the venerable Honda B series engine, it’s kind of funny to think about it now. 14 years later he’s trying to get that exact one back from his friend, who took it down to a shell, and for some odd reason does not want to give it up…schizophrenics I tell ya.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    My sad story: Old Nissan with about 230,000 miles got stolen. Called the cops to make a report, having little expectation my car would be recovered. “How much is it worth” the cop asked. I replied, “Maybe $500.” Cop hesitated and said, “Let’s call it a thousand and make it a felony.”

    The car was recovered in good shape a day or two later.

  • avatar
    Lugs Harvey

    There was a Monte Carlo SS in my area that was stolen and missing several years. The owner got a call it had been found, and when they got it back it had a beautiful airbrushed paint job, custom interior, and a high dollar stereo.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I know some one here in So. Cal. who had a similar Honda they couldn’t sell for $800 , nevertheless some stupid teenager from down the block stole and joy rode it for a day or so before abandoning it again .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    StingRaySpeed

    My 1991 Honda Civic has been stolen (and recovered) 3 times since I’ve owned it!!! My father bought it new and I from him in 1998. Still almost-mint condition with 205,000 miles on it. Going strong as ever while I save for my dream car. Never gonna give it up.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Something about this Civic generation was just..right!

      Same with the 4th-Gen Accords (1990-1993). The 1990/1991s in Hampshire Green were the “brochure cars,” and Honda couldn’t put them out fast enough! They still look good twenty-something years later, especially if they aren’t in tatters.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “…Civic endured/s, a fixture of solidity and reliability in an ever changing world.”

    That line wasn’t good enough to use twice! And why can’t they spend a little to make that thing -not- an eyesore, if they’re going to keep it for 500 years? Paint it brown metallic, get some new trim.

  • avatar
    emcourtney

    Naw, it wasn’t stolen, it was just having a midlife crisis and went on a bender.

    My mother in law’s red ’75 El Dorado was stolen, the thieves used it as a getaway car in a bank robbery! True story. She got it back rather quickly, as you can imagine the cops were more interested in its whereabouts than your usual stolen car. It still sits in the garage, one of these days my wife and I will do something with it.


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