By on January 6, 2014

23 -1971 Volvo 144 Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinWhile Volvo 240s continue to be crushed in alarming quantities, I also see quite a few Volvo 140s during my wrecking-yard trips. Prior to today, we’d seen this ’68 142, this ’69 145, this ’71 144 and this ’71 142, and now another non-rusty, solid-looking 140 is going to be eaten by The Crusher.
09 -1971 Volvo 144 Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinYears before American and Japanese car companies went to six-digit odometers, Volvo had enough optimism to go past 99,999 miles on theirs. This car averaged just over 3,000 miles per year during its life.
11 -1971 Volvo 144 Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinThe 140 was very advanced for its day, with four-wheel disc brakes as standard equipment.
14 -1971 Volvo 144 Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinSome might say that a pushrod engine with SU carburetors wasn’t so advanced, but the B18 got the job done.
03 -1971 Volvo 144 Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinThe combination of a rear defroster and a manual choke is one you don’t see every day.
01 -1971 Volvo 144 Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinSometimes I miss my hooptie 144, but not quite enough to try to rescue a car like today’s Junkyard Find. Still, a 142 with 16-valve B230 engine might be fun.

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19 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1971 Volvo 144 S...”


  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    I referred to my 145 as a Swedish Buick. It may have had 4 wheel disc brakes, but there was no power steering. At 140K miles, I rebuilt the engine and added the Laycock de Normanville overdrive unit with an idiot light as reminder to disengage the booger.

    That choke was more an enrichment device that lowered the jet seats on the SU carbs.

    All in all, the 140 Series was one of the cleanest looking designs of the period. The wagon had six feet of space behind the front seats.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    I am apparently the only person that made it into work this frigid and snowy morning. I was salivating for a primo junkyard find, a real POS perhaps with police evidence tags and a hatchetman sticker.

    “Prior to today, we’d seen this ’68 142, this ’69 145, this ’71 144 and this ’71 142, and now another non-rusty, solid-looking 140 is going to be eaten by The Crusher.”

    http://annakie.com/cpg/albums/userpics/10002/Computer-trash.gif

  • avatar
    mechimike

    I represent the Volvo Jihad, and I’m here to inform Murilee Martin that the vehicle in question came with a B20, not a B18. The B18 was phased out in the late 1960′s. B18 or B20 would be stamped prominently on the driver’s side of the engine block.

    If this car did have a B18, it was swapped in later in life. Although with that low a mileage, it should still be the original engine.

    On that topic, I can’t imagine one of these cars getting scrapped with barely 130k on the clock. A 140 series Volvo is about as complicated as a lawnmower.

  • avatar
    Bocatrip

    The 140,240 series cars had indestructible drivetrains, but when the miles piled on, so did costly repairs. Although it was known for safety, and I had dozens of these cars,it was a relatively high maintenance car. They made so many of them until 1993 and I still see them around. Fit and finish was another weak link, with the plastics and inside materials disintegrating over time.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I had a 1970 144S , the clapped out engine still required premium fuel and was dog slow with the Borg – Warner M35 slushbox tranny .

    Routinely got 23 ~ 25 MPG’s though .

    It handled like it had asphalt magnets and scared the living crap out of my GF & occasional passengers in the canyons and on the ACH .

    We called it the blue brick and in time I decided it was just too damn stodgy and sent it away .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      mechimike

      That 70 should have had a B20- no slouch with the indestructible 4 speed box. I’ve driven a B18 car with the BW35, though. Let’s just say acceleration was not it’s strong suit. Still handled well, though, and could carry whatever speed the drivetrain could muster through most twisties.

  • avatar
    Garak

    “The combination of a rear defroster and a manual choke is one you don’t see every day.”

    Huh. All of my cars have had a rear defroster, and most had a manual choke up until 2007 or so. Maybe it’s a market thing.

  • avatar
    jeffzekas

    If that Volvo was in Oregon, it would be considered a “young” car and ready for its new owner!

  • avatar
    TAP

    My ’70 142S(bought new),would simply stop if a couple hundred miles over the tune-up interval.
    Needed a valve job! at 24K
    Camshaft @ 60K
    Water pump, alternator and every other non-drivetrain part needed well before 100k.
    Always saw dealer service, too.
    The seats, vault-like solidity and gutsy performance(w/stick) sucked me in.

  • avatar
    guy922

    Looks modern enough that I would be down to drive it today! Always had a soft spot for Volvo’s though….


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