By on January 29, 2014

Honda_Produces_1_Millionth_ExportThe year 2013 was a record year for exports of U.S. made cars and light trucks and for the first time in its history, in 2013 Honda Motor Co. exported more vehicles from its American assembly plants than it imported into the United States from Japan. According to Automotive NewsHonda exported 108,705 Honda and Acura vehicles that were made in the U.S. while it imported 88,537 units from Japan and other countries.

In a statement, Tetsuo Iwamura, president and CEO of Honda North America said, “Achieving net-exporter status is a natural result of our commitment and investment in the U.S. and North America.” Honda’s North American production went up 5% in 2013, to 1.78 million vehicles, a calendar year record. Honda’s exports from the United States are sold in over 50 countries, with Saudi Arabia, Russia and the United Arab Emirates being the best export markets for U.S. built Hondas.]

Honda’s U.S. facilities assembled 1.3 million vehicles in 2013, an increase of 7% over the previous year. Honda’s Marysville, Ohio assembly plant was th3e first attempt by a Japanese automobile manufacturer to build cars or truck in the United States. Today, almost 95% of Honda and Accord branded vehicles sold in the U.S. are assembled in North America. Next month the company will begin assembly at its 8th North American assembly plant in Celaya, Mexico, raising total capacity on the continent to 1.92 million cars and light trucks.

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32 Comments on “Honda Exported More Vehicles From U.S. Than It Imported Here in 2013...”


  • avatar
    AlternateReality

    Well, I for one am proud to be driving a HondAcura vehicle, capably built by non-union American workers in Indiana. I’d much rather support a Japanese-owned company at this point than Detroit, Dems and the UAW.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Ya! YA! That rotten Democrat George W. Bush and his auto industry bailout. The bastard! Saving all those UAW jobs and propping up the American auto industry…

      Wait a minute…

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      I’d much rather support a company that has provided my family with reliable, affordable, comfortable transportation, and, as of today, the two that have done the best job of it are Honda and…Ford.

      When we replace both vehicles, it will most likely be with a vehicle from the same manufacturer. The union-non-union debate is a non-starter with us…as it is with virtually everyone else I know in the real world.

      • 0 avatar
        AlternateReality

        “The union-non-union debate is a non-starter with us…as it is with virtually everyone else I know in the real world.”

        If your argument is that most Americans are mentally disengaged simpletons who care more about the easiest and most immediate solution for their own gratification than the long-term financial health and productivity of their nation… well, it’s hard to disagree with you.

        • 0 avatar
          toxicroach

          It’s odd how things change. I remember the anti-Japanese sentiment that swept the country twenty-five years ago. Now buying Japanese is the American thing to do? Odd.

          • 0 avatar
            kvndoom

            That’s the end result of true globalization. Imports are built in the US, and domestics are built in Mexico.

            I’m not saying it’s bad, I’m just saying it’s the world we live in now.

  • avatar
    poltergeist

    I watched President Obama’s SOTU address last night, and no mention of this. He talked about wanting to bring manufacturing and jobs “back to the USA”. Why no mention of Honda’s USA export milestone?

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    @poltergeist – it wouldn’t be Kosher for Obama to mention a Japanese company as a shining light in the USA automotive industry.

    • 0 avatar
      poltergeist

      Bingo!!!

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      And you’re completely right, but it’s too bad that this is the case. The amount of a car’s cost that comes from factory production is a well-guarded secret to every automaker. It may be that, collectively, America makes more money off of each produced Accord than Japan does. Still, the fact of the matter is that any company making a profit in America and playing by the rules is helping the American economy in some way, especially if the company is exporting products from America.

      But many (most) American citizens don’t seem to understand that. They think: Honda=foreign=money going overseas=ewww….

      And while we’re (kind of) on the subject, I won’t be bullied into buying a car just because it’s American, like some of my family and friends will. I absolutely love GM, but I won’t buy from them just because they’re GM, and certainly not because they’re American. They have to compete for my business by collectively offering the best experience…in price, in the quality of the car, and in customer treatment. Right now if I were going to buy a midsized car, I wouldn’t even look at the Malibu unless it was deeply, deeply discounted. I probably wouldn’t get the Fusion either, because I think the rear-end is hideous and I’m wary of its reliability (or lack thereof). I’d be looking primarily at the Accord, 6 and Optima…all of which are foreign.

      The legitimate threat of foreign competition is what will keep the domestic automakers on their toes, and the sooner people realize that, the better.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Look for Honda and possibly Toyota and/or Nissan to eventually relocate outside of Japan probably over the next twenty years.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Yup – because the Japanese unions want too much, and we are eager to race to the bottom at the expense of our infrastructure, tax base, and future generations.

      That’s OK thought – we’ll be building lots of shiny new Hondas for the Chinese middle class – who cares if the wages are below market from 50 years earlier when adjusted for inflation (I’m projecting 20 years out) – at least we have jobs.

      Heck, I can see vast Foxconn complexes building iPhones for the Chinese market here – being in debt to the corporate store and dorm life will be back in vogue in no time.

      But at least – you have a job.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Foxconn has already been looking for factory locations in LA and Detroit. Maybe Omni Consumer Products can help them find a suitable location here.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          We’re not that far away from OCP.

          The interesting/sad thing when you watch Robocop (the original) is that many of the warnings (whether dark, or a wink and a grin) to the future have come to be. And a lot of the technology envisioned, exists today (that is both cool, and scary).

          If the financial crisis taught us anything, there are a growing number of Dick Jones out there – who cares if the ED-219 doesn’t work. Military contracts, spare parts, retrofit programs…

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        “Heck, I can see vast Foxconn complexes building iPhones for the Chinese market here – being in debt to the corporate store and dorm life will be back in vogue in no time.”

        It’s called “sustainability,” and I’m guessing you vote for this future every opportunity you get.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          You have no credibility to discuss the future of global economics considering you feel we live in a Nazi regime.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Fascism supports a state-controlled economy that accepts a mix of private and public ownership over the means of production.[171] Economic planning is applied to both the public and private sector in a fascist economy, and the prosperity of private enterprise depended on its acceptance of synchronizing itself with the fascist state’s economic goals.[172] It supports the profit motive. However it emphasizes that industries must uphold the national interest as superior to private profit.[172]

            Fascism promotes such economics as a “third position” alternative to capitalism and Marxism, as fascism declares both as being obsolete.[173]

            171 Robert Millward. Private and public enterprise in Europe: energy, telecommunications and transport, 1830–1990. Cambridge, England, UK: Cambridge University Press, p. 178.
            172 a b Cyprian Blamires. World Fascism: A Historical Encyclopedia, Volume 1. Santa Barbara, California, USA: ABC-CLIO, 2006. p. 189.
            173 a b Joseph, Frank (2010). Mussolini’s War: Fascist Italy’s Military Struggles from Africa and Western Europe to the Mediterranean and Soviet Union 1935–45. West Midlands, England, UK: Helion & Company. p. 50.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascism#Third_Position_economics

            Early 20th century progressivism is alive and well.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        Unless we enact severely restrictive protectionist trade measures, manufacturing wages in the US are simply going to be lower than they were 50 years ago – before China, Mexico, India, Hong Kong, Thailand, Vietnam, etc., etc., etc., etc., became industrialized and capable of efficient and cheap manufacturing. Anyone who refuses to recognize this is delusional.

        In my opinion, we should abolish the National Labor Relations Act and allow unions to die altgether, or exist only in very limited capacity (perhaps in the low wage service sector where jobs cannot be exported and reduced consumption may even be desirable – want less fast food consumption? Let their workers unionize). I would also fight for favorable export conditions with China in other nations with the growing middle class, to enhance demand for our country’s manufactured goods. We no longer need unions to ensure that manufacturing jobs pay a middle-class wage, as Toyota and Honda have clearly established. Greater global demand would push wages even higher. That would be best for the country in the long term.

        • 0 avatar
          threeer

          We won’t fight for favorable export with China because we’re: 1) afraid to poke the bear (gov), 2) addicted to cheaper goods (consumer “votes” with their dollars and 3) addicted to the profit and control that comes from having hundreds of thousands of workers living on-site working for peanuts (corporations). The three-legged stool we are perched on virtually guarantees that a “fair” exchange with China will never be. $300 billion in trade deficit last year alone is pretty strong proof of that. Even as wages for China’s middle class rise, companies are not actively seeking to pull work back to the US (“considering” vs “doing” are two distinct actions).
          That said, I am fiercely pro-American, and not at all ashamed of that. Being a car buff makes that stand rather difficult, as I have a genuine love for many makes and models that are not even American-branded, much less assembled in the US (I grew up an Army Brat in Germany and have an unhealthy love of small Bavarian boxes on wheels). Heck, even the next car I want to buy after I return from my assignment here in Saudi Arabia (Jeep Wrangler), while made in America, is now under Italian control! So is that more or less “American” than the Accord that might be parked next to it in a parking lot one day?
          I’m sure the guys/gals screwing together Hondas in the US (and for that matter, Toyota, BMW, MB, Hyundai, etc…) are proud of the work they are doing and seem to be turning out competitive cars that allow them to put food on the table for their families.
          It’s tough being a patriot and car nut!

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            1. Afraid to poke the bear – Poke now while the U.S still has a stronger military. Balance won’t get more favorable with increased Chinese wealth.

            2. Addicted to cheap goods. Americans need to spend less. Besides, cheap goods don’t last as long and cost as much in long term anyway when faster replacement costs are factored in.

            3. Control of underpaid on-site workers – So what? I’m talking about American policy, not corporate policy. The average American doesn’t give a hoot that GM’s life is easier because it can have an employee barrack complex filled with exploited workers in Shanghai!

      • 0 avatar
        Chicago Dude

        “Heck, I can see vast Foxconn complexes building iPhones for the Chinese market here”

        Why bother looking into a crystal ball when you can just look at the newspaper?

        Chinese firm Lenovo just bought Chicago-based Motorola Mobility, which has a state-of-the-art facility in Texas that makes (and exports) their fanciest phones.

        Labor is such a small component of the cost for high-value products that the United States, Japan and Germany have always been in the worlds top 5 manufacturers.

      • 0 avatar
        TW5

        Manufacturing isn’t returning to the US because of race to the bottom. Manufacturing is returning to the United States because global shipping costs have risen sharply during the last decade, and because China’s foreign exchange reserves policy has increased Chinese inflation. In other words, Chinese labor less competitive.

        Since US economic sovereignty is also at stake, DC is certainly applying all kinds of pressure behind the scenes to get manufacturers back into the US.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Should this off shoring of units lower their recalls for 2014?

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    If you have a good product it does not matter were you build it or how much you pay for the labor… Gosh!
    Good for Honda for showing the way.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    This conversation needs more VanillaDude.


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