By on January 29, 2014

2014 Cadillac ELR

If you should become one of the early adopters who purchase a Cadillac ELR soon, the brand has announced that they will throw in a free charging station as a gift for paying $75,000 over the next 36 to 72 months for the luxury plug-in hybrid.

Normally, the 240-volt charging station would be installed at an owner’s home starting at $1,000, with financing available for installations between $1,000 and $3,499 spread over 24 months at 0 percent and $0 down, and 2.99 percent over 84 months with $0 down for installations above $3,500. The price range is determined after Bosch Certified Contractors look over factors affecting installation, including age of the home, location of installation, permits et al.

On top of the incentive, ELR owners will also acquire the services of their own ELR Concierge Representative, who will help their owner with information on battery care, home charging, service scheduling and other concerns regarding their purchase.

No word on when Cadillac will cease offering free stations, though the $699/month lease incentive for well-qualified consumers currently on offer will end on January 31 of this year.

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54 Comments on “Early ELR Adopters Receive Free Charging Stations...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’d rather save $70,000 and have a mint condition Toronado Trofeo. It’s just as whiz-bangey as this anyway.

    Don’t need no kawn-surgery to help me.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I can only figure the PR heads at Tesla have smashed Elon Musk’s iPhone into a million pieces and broke his fingers to prevent him from Tweeting over this.

    This is just so savagely over priced – free charger or not – and for Model S cheddar (admittedly base model S cheddar) the Tesla is by far the better deal.

    • 0 avatar
      stottpie

      Ehhh…. not really. This car has the better interior, by a gigantic landslide. In all honesty, this car’s interior is probably the best Cadillac on sale today, barring the Platinum edition XTS. The Model S is spartan, with a side of touchscreen.

      The true issue is the brand cache. Cadillac has none, especially in this segment. Tesla has it all. The people who want a luxury electric vehicle will also want to make a “green statement”. Tesla wins that category, at least in perception, hands down.

  • avatar
    jaybird124

    I’m rather baffled by the $75k price tag. I just couldn’t see this vehicle’s starting price being more than $50k. TTAC should see about giving insight as to how GM game up with the $75k number (To compete with BMW 6-Series makes zero sense).

  • avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

    And it’s probably some crappy Cadillac-branded 15A Voltec charger that retails for $500 but is actually worth half that.. This vehicle at that price makes baby Jeebus cry.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Cadillac once had great success by offering a couple troublesome Oldsmobile engines in a restyled Chevy econobox for Mercedes-Benz money. Maybe they think the Cimarron failed because they didn’t price it as exorbitantly as they did the first Sevilles.

    • 0 avatar
      jetcal1

      Ha! Good one CJ. A audio retailer took a look at a surge suppressor I bought and was very impressed by it. He then told me he could not sell it because it was not expensive enough to sell in his store.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Seems like they should also throw in an electrician to wire it considering the crazy money they are asking for those things.

    @jaybird124 – I’m a little baffled by the pricing as well. If the 2nd gen 2015 Volt is supposed to be cheaper and better the current model how does that play out with the expensive ELR which offers old, outdated tech. under the hood?

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      Don’t know about the price but the Volt tech is one of the most advanced in the world. We should take more pride in American technical achievements.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        Advanced how? The Li-Ion batteries are sourced from LG-Chem and available to anybody who has the cash for them. The drive unit comes from Aisin and probably contains a few GM-specific patents that neither Ford nor Toyota seem to need in their systems. The engine is an iron block of no particular sophistication. The aerodynamics are not impressive and the car is considerably heavier than a Prius (even after adjusting for the increased amount of battery) with less useful room. Once the battery goes flat, the CS mileage is not impressive at all.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          By the way, I do take pride in American technical achievements, when they’re real achievements.

          Check this:

          http://cnsnews.com/news/article/caught-camera-americas-curiosity-landing-mars

          Not only have we landed a rover on Mars (successfully! again!), we took a picture of the landing from our own Mars Reconnaisance Orbiter.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          I love it when a Prius owner tries to tell everyone what a lousy car the Volt is. Especially considering the Volt’s biggest customers are former Prius owners. Pathetic.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Iron engine without the faux Atkinson cycle that both Ford and Toyota use? Premium fuel requirement because they raised the compression instead? Hah! The pity is that there’s people that don’t recognize what a lousy car the Volt is.

            As for former Prius owners being the Volt’s biggest customer… that information is old. I’d like to see an update from GM abuot that. I’ve certainly not seen any used Prii available at the local Chevy dealer. But then I don’t see a lot of Volts, either.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            You can run 87 all day long in a Volt if ypu want. Your just gonna see lower charge sustaining mode fuel economy and may run into fuel issues as the higher octane has has a longer shelf life. With a Prius your at a gas station on weekly or biweekly, just like any other ICE vehicle. Volt owners visit gas stations on a yearly or bi yearly basis.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            “You can run 87 all day long in a Volt if ypu want. Your just gonna see lower charge sustaining mode fuel economy”

            Exactly. They will advance the timing to avoid knock and reduce the efficiency. GM tests with premium for a reason.

            “and may run into fuel issues as the higher octane has has a longer shelf life.”

            Total malarkey.

            “With a Prius your at a gas station on weekly or biweekly, just like any other ICE vehicle.”

            Yeah, it kills me to go there monthly.

            “Volt owners visit gas stations on a yearly or bi yearly basis.”

            Until they go out of town. In decent weather, the Prius has a 500 mile range with about 2 gallons of reserve. I’ve gone 520 miles between fillups on the interstate. The Volt can’t touch that.

            If GM had spend some extra money on this technological wonder for a decent engine, some “lightness” and better aerodynamics, it might be a different story. But for $40K, all you get is a bad copy of the Prius with “style” and extra D cells.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Sorry but the Volt is anything but a copy of the Prius. I’ll make it real simple. Your Prius is an ICE car with electric assist. The Volt is an EV with gas assist. Your Prius has more in common with my GMC Sierra than a Volt. Your Prius like my GMC is tied to a gas pump. Doesn’t matter how you drive it your gonna be visiting your local Holiday on a regular basis. The Volt runs off an entirely different fuel called electricity. It never needs it’s gas engine to help move it along as long as the battery has juice. That’s why Volt owners go go over a year without stopping at a gas station even if they are in their cars every day. Only way you’ll do that with a Prius is to park it.

            So your Prius can go 520 miles a tank of gas, What does that prove anyways? I drove a Volt 125 miles over 2 1/2 days and never burned a drop of gas. Let’s see your Prius do that. And the Volt covered those 125 miles at a 1/4 of the cost per mile as your Prius. The icing on the
            cake is that the Volt drives like a premium luxury car and is fun to drive.
            No one ever comments what a nice car the Prius is to drive because it’ isn’t.

          • 0 avatar
            rentonben

            As a passenger, that’s the real difference between the Volt and Prius: The Volt is a nice solid car, the Prius is a econo-box on casters.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            “I’ll make it real simple.”

            You’re making it real wrong. ICE + twin electric motor drive unit + traction battery = Prius, except not as good.

            It was obvious. all along, that Toyota could simply add a bigger battery to the Prius and, voila!, a Volt competitor, the Prius PHV. And there it is, with worldwide sales about equal to the Volt’s. It’s a matter of degree only. Ford did the same thing. For a $billion, GM didn’t steal a march on anybody.

            “The Volt runs off an entirely different fuel called electricity. It never needs it’s gas engine to help move it along as long as the battery has juice.”

            Really? Well, you drive that thing from coast to coast on electricity and let me know how that works out for you.

            The fact of the matter is, unless one keeps the Volt on a really short leash, it’s also tied to a gas pump and that’s when you will notice that critical portions of the Volt are not technology leaders. And the part that differentiates the Volt from a Prius – the bigger battery – that’s not GM’s and it’s available to anybody that is fool enough to build a $40K, 4-place, 40-mile car.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Sorry but your wrong. I can back a PIP out of my driveway with a fully charged battery and make the ICE come to life before I hit the end of my block. Or just drive it on any highway over 60 MPH and the ICE will be running then as well. The Prius needs it’s ICE to accelerate and maintain highway speeds because it’s electric motors aren’t powerful enough. That’s not the case with the Volt.

            Again, your Prius is an ICE with electric assist, Volt is an EV with gas assist. So let’s stop with the ridiculous statement that the Volt is a copy of the Prius. Nothing could be further from the truth.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            You have the right to remain wrong.

            Does the Volt have a bigger battery? Yes. Is it programmed to avoid runing the ICE? Yes.

            Does that have any relevance to the relative level of the actual technology employed in the Volt vs the Prius? No.

            By the way, the one time I tested the Volt, the engine came on as we left the dealer garage. The fully conditioned and charged Volt apparently didn’t like the cold.

            Now, you don’t need to take the word of a Prius owner for what a lousy car the Volt is, you can consult the market for an answer. With $7500 in tax credits (a ridiculous per-vehicle subsidy that represents about a 20% discount), GM has a hard time selling 2K/month (and that’s including their own big incentives).

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Well duh if it is cold enough the ICE will run to warm the battery, but then you can also adjust that set point. Again the Volt NEVER needs its ICE to help motivate it as long as the battery has juice, unllike the ICE biased Prius or Plug-in Prius. So really ignorant to say the Volt is a Prius copycat.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Agree about how advanced the Volt it is. My biggest disappoinment about the ELR is I expected the Voltec 2 propulsion system to be in it and give us a look at what we might see with the next generation Volt. While they did a great job with the ELR as far as the body and interior it really is a 2011 Volt underneath.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          I’m not disappointed… I was expecting a reskinned 2011 Volt. It would be naive to expect anything else.

          GM’s been rather quiet about the 201X Volt, haven’t they? Uncharacteristically quiet, I’d say. Either they’ve wised up and are getting better at keeping mum about plans or there’s nothing arriving before 2017.

          I doubt that they’re getting better at keeping quiet.

          • 0 avatar
            AlternateReality

            I rather despise the Volt and GM, but the company isn’t completely stupid. I’m sure development on the 201X Volt is well underway, and when it finally arrives it will offer some clear benefits over the rather slipshod Mark I version.

            I also suspect that GM hopes to make it cheaper, and I’m certain the company plans on sales of $75K ELRs to offset some of the cost. I doubt it will work out that way for them, but the thought process makes sense.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Except that they now must also pay for the development of the ELR. I bet that wasn’t cheap.

            The next Volt probably will be better but the segment is going to be more and more crowded. It’s likely that Toyota will offer a car with more range and they’ll be focussed on price point. I expect Ford will improve the C-Max. Basic BEVs will get cheaper.

            The Volt project was only a winner if it got GM some serious advantage in the market, a commanding market share to offset the losses. That didn’t happen, they have about 25% of the plug-in market. Compare that to Toyota’s 66% share of the hybrid market.

            The hybrid market can make some money and involves some serioius numbers of units. GM still can’t compete there and it’s the things that make the Volt a mediocre PHEV which would also lead to a very poor GM hybrid.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Ooh, forget the free charging station. I always wanted my own Concierge. Now that’s uptown Saturday night in the ’70s vernacular.

    Someone with the brainpower of the lesser spotted newt okayed the production of this back lot long term sitter. The name Akerson springs to mind, now retired, about to write a book on what a genius he is and enjoying numerous rounds of golf following his exhausting days at the wheel of GM.

    A true industrial genius.

  • avatar
    Robbie

    Everyone here wonders why this electric Cadillac is so expensive.

    Easy. The car cost GM $25K only to produce. But the extension cord however…

  • avatar
    Mud

    What if you just bought the charger then got the car thrown in for free?

  • avatar

    $82,000

    It’s the least they could do.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      I wonder, if I buy a C7 convertible and a Spark EV together as a package if I could get the Chevy dealer to throw in a charger? The again, with the $4k or $5k I’d save over the ELR I could get my own I suppose.

      • 0 avatar

        Or you could skip the ridiculous $30,000 EV altogether and buy a regular I.C.E vehicle for less!

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Actually, I was just pointing out that if someone was looking for an EV with a range extender, the Model C7 ICE range extender paired with a Spark EV was about the same price as the ELR. The Spark EV is about $20k after government subsidy and I think the C7 is about $56k.

          Personally, I want to add an EV to my little fleet. Economics and practicality don’t have to be in the equation. I just want one.

          Just like someone saying your transportation needs could be met with a base 6 cylinder Charger and a Patriot. You prefer SRTs (absolutely nothing wrong with that) and you don’t need to justify them. They make you happy and that’s good enough reason to own them. Same deal with EV fans, antique British Car collectors etc.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Over at GM-Volt.com, there’s a post by a guy who’s definitely going to buy the ELR…

    http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?96418-Blastphemy-has-spent-more-time-with-the-ELR…-and-now-he-s-sold-(at-a-discount)

    …when he gets a suitable discount. Down towards the bottom of the post, he mentions the dealer has 2 there with 4 more on the way and he’s pretty sure this is going to drive some deals.

  • avatar
    cRacK hEaD aLLeY

    Free 15A Voltec with a leftover Escalade EXT decal. Buy two, receive free replacement wiper blades for life!

  • avatar

    TTAC STAFF
    ALEX DYKES

    An ELR review would be a great review to go up right now – after having posted the Spark.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I already have a charger, which I installed myself. So instead, will Cadillac give me a discount on the car if I get an ELR?

    Fat chance I’d buy this thing. For the same money, I’d call Tesla.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      There was a Tesla S in the drop off line at my kids elementary school this morning. The temp gage in my car said -3 F. Kind of funny to see all the clouds of white smoke following all the ICE cars but nothing obviously at the rear of the Tesla. Very nice looking car! I’ll have to talk to that guy when I get a chance.

      • 0 avatar
        IHateCars

        Too funny, I saw one the other day as well, caked with road salt like every other car here in -20 C weather. Everyone looked toasty inside and yes, no white exhaust billowing out….it was neat to see. They are a beautiful looking car, I’ve seen several around town plowing throught he slush.

        Regarding the ELR, I think it’s an attractive car as well but $75 K in the US means that it’ll be $85 – $90 K up here….crazy money!

  • avatar
    mjz

    I am willing to buy the charger, if they will throw in a free ELR.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Can I just buy the shell? Then I’ll drop in my own Verano 2.0T drive train.
    I bet the dealers already have a 600 day supply of ELRs on the lots now.

  • avatar

    the only way this car is a success is if the marketing strategy was designed to entice ridicule, in that case it’s a home run!

  • avatar

    I’ll buy Cayman S.

  • avatar
    Mikein08

    This thing is uglier than the north end of a southbound mule. And for
    $75k +/-, I’m buying a Lexus.

  • avatar
    Alex Mackinnon

    I’m a little disappointed they didn’t change the drive train a little more, but I’ve been more than satisfied with how quick the Volt is so far. Coming from having a reasonably fast Mk2 GTI to a Volt was quite a large speed bump in the city. Not so much on the highway though…

    People have started hacking the systems though. Apparently you can force all the drive motors to engage simultaneously, which brings 0-100km/h down to 5.5 seconds. Sounds like there may be some interesting potential hidden in these cars.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    This is a miserable deal. Quibbles about the price of the ELR aside, the Voltec ‘charger’ (EVSE is the proper term and it’s the one with the coiled cord, not the Bosch) is widely regarded as a colossal POS. They’re cheaply made (internal fuses are not replaceable) and there are lots of stories of them failing shortly after the warranty expires. Units made by other manufacturers, while slightly more expensive, have no such issues.

    On top of the that, the home installation ‘deal’ is a huge scam. The companies that contract with GM exponentially overcharge for installation. It’s most definitely not ‘free’.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    After reading so much trash talk about electric cars, I can hardly wait for the hydrogen debate to start. The fuel cell debate can wait. Meanwhile the only thing that will threaten the ICE is di-lithium crystals.


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