By on December 10, 2013

2012 Acura ZDX-014

Every year, new cars arrive in the showrooms. Some are brand new to the world, others go through evolutions and revolutions. Yet, every year, some cars are sent off to the showroom in the sky.

This year, we’ve lost seven vehicles. Some died due to poor sales, some to improper marketing, and others to horrible execution. 2014 will bring about the deaths of these seven vehicles.

  • Acura ZDX 
  • Cadillac Escalade EXT 
  • Nissan Altima Coupe  
  • Toyota Matrix 
  • Volkswagen Routan
  • Volvo C30
  • Volvo C70

In some cases, like the ZDX and Routan, the product was poorly conceived and faced an equally poor reception in the marketplace.  In other cases, like the Escalade EXT and Altima Coupe, they were based on previous generation cars and the business case wasn’t strong enough to justify a replacement. The Volvo twins and the Matrix weren’t necessarily bad cars, but they were long in the tooth and faced declining sales, thus leading to their euthanization.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

105 Comments on “The Cars We’ve Lost in 2013...”


  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    The Altima Coupe is gone. That leaves the Accord coupe in that nearly non-existent segment.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Mustang, Camaro and Challenger would like to have a word with you. Unless your referring strictly to the front wheel drive full size coupe market?

      • 0 avatar
        jz78817

        did it really need to be spelled out? Or do you honestly believe people cross-shop the Accord coupe vs. the Camaro/Mustang/Challenger?

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          I’m not a fan of nuanced conversations. Even if you include the pony cars its still a very small segment. Less than a quarter million sold this year I believe.

        • 0 avatar
          OldandSlow

          Raph – I don’t consider the pony cars to be in the same segment as the FWD Accord and Altima coupes.

          Yep, you can get a V6 in a Camaro, Challenger or Mustang – but the image I have is one with a V8 under the hood.

        • 0 avatar
          mnm4ever

          I would agree that they are not in the same segment as the Pony cars. But I think the typical buyer does cross-shop them. Coupes are a tough sell these days, most people want a sedan, so the FWD market has that covered in droves. The buyers actually looking for a coupe I would bet don’t really care if its FWD, they are buying for style. In the past the Pony cars were a bit rough and tumble, but now they are stylish, easy to live with and not embarrassing to be seen in. Also, the luxury brands are more accessible to many buyers too, so someone who might have shopped an Accord coupe 10 yrs ago can now shop BMW or Infiniti instead. Hard top convertibles have made convertible ownership easier as well, so those cars are stealing some traditional coupe buyers as well. The Altima coupe was never a big player in the market anyways, aside from price there was little reason to choose one.

          • 0 avatar
            jz78817

            “But I think the typical buyer does cross-shop them.”

            based on what?

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            “Hard top convertibles have made convertible ownership easier as well…”

            I’m not that big a fan of hardtop cabrolets. Except for the BMW E90 cabriolet and the (apparently-departed) Volvo C70, I really don’t like them. A softtop looks so much better, especially on something like a Camaro, Mustang or Jaguar XK…

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            @jz — based on my magical crystal ball, same as you. It is my opinion, based on who I see driving the newest crop of V6 pony cars and who I see driving Accord and Altima coupes, along with who I see driving BMW coupes, Infiniti coupes, hardtop convertibles, etc. Also based on the coupe offerings from 10-20 yrs ago compared to today.

            @Kyree — I agree with you, I am not a fan either. But they are popular these days, and I speculate thats because it satisfies the desires of both traditional coupe buyers and convertible buyers. Also I think they appeal to people who kind of want a convertible but don’t want to live with the perceived compromises that come with a soft top.

          • 0 avatar
            ash78

            I agree with the cross-shopping comments. The average non-enthusiast would definitely consider a V6 Mustang against a V6 Altima Coupe, drive wheels be damned. And at least up to the six-tenths driving point, they probably wouldn’t be much different (the VQ is still a beast). It would probably come down to personal style for most people.

          • 0 avatar

            @kyree – I don’t really have much of an opinion either way on hardtop convertibles, but as someone who has lived in and still works in a large, crime infested city, I could totally see the appeal of driving a vehicle that can’t be accessed with a steak knife.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            @MadAnthony — because they don’t have big rocks in crime ridden areas? :)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The SL looks good in hardtop cabrio format :)

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Somehow, I’d think that, despite my quasi Honda-fanboi status, boiling the rear tires down to the rims is gonna trump any torque-steer any day! (It’s reduced to the point where it’s not dangerous, but I can still feel a little pull if I floor my 2013 Accord Sedan V6.)

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        No, we’re talking strictly midsized FWD coupes. Coupe versions of the Altima, Camry and G6 have abandoned the segment. But if you throw in convertibles, you can get away with putting the 200 Cabriolet in this group, which of course still exists.

    • 0 avatar

      What about the Civic? That one still exists, doesn’t it?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I’d argue the C30 was in the same segment.

    • 0 avatar
      phreshone

      Considering the 2 door Golf/GTI seems to be gone in the US as well (check the VW USA site yourselves. In the last 2 months I’ve tried to build/price a GTI or checked for GTD a couple of times, 4 doors only on the build/price tool

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Oh wow I just checked, you are right!! And I saw the 2-dr on there not too long ago when comparing pricing for a co-worker, perhaps 3 months ago at most? So this is a good subject for TTAC, what happened to the 2-dr Golf and GTI??

        • 0 avatar
          krayzie

          Wait until the Mexico Golf 7 run comes online by April. They could be just clearing out the remaining Golf 6 stock.

          • 0 avatar
            LeeK

            This. No more Mark VIs being made. Stock of two doors is nearly gone, so what is left are four doors. Next year we get the Mark VII Golfs, but it looks like mid-year at best, according to the latest rumors.

          • 0 avatar
            phreshone

            I was hoping it might be to make room for the Scirocco in the North America line up

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          The website just changed about 2 weeks ago, when the “2014″ MKVI cars took over. The 2013 models still had 2-doors available. All the 2014 GTIs that you see were built in May 2013 or earlier.

          Also, did you enjoy the ability to select from three whole colors? Black, Gray, White – the possibilities are endless!

  • avatar

    BRING BACK THE DODGE MAGNUM…

    Make an AWD model with the 6.4-L.

  • avatar

    The EXT won’t be missed.

    I’m still waiting to find out how Lincoln replaces the Navigator.

  • avatar

    Bring back the PACIFICA. Two choices: Pentastar with 9-speed and AWD or PACIFICA SRT with 8-speed.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Why? They already have the Journey.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The Journey might be on the dropped list soon. Besides, it’s a Dodge. The original Pacifica was a Chrysler, with a better interior until Daimler started cheapening it. The next generation Pacifica might have gotten the upscale 300 interior and Pentastar engine with an AWD option.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The Journey is rubbish.
          The Pacifica was nearly rubbish. It was like a big PT Cruiser. The people who drive Pacificas around now are the same ones who drive around in Galants and Suzuki’s.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Wouldn’t the Pentastar equipped Durango be a much better vehicle in the same line as the Pacifica?

            For the record I have heard little good about the Pacifica.

          • 0 avatar
            Atum

            A woman on my street has a 2006 Touring model with about 200K miles or so. It’s been very reliable. Impressed with Chrysler; kind of makes me want to buy one.

            But if the interior of my mom’s 2012 RAV4 Limited bothers me…

      • 0 avatar

        Journey rides a lot higher than the Pacifica. The Pacifica basically started the crossover market and for whatever reason Chrysler abandoned it when all they needed was to give it an AWD option and a good V6 – which they didn’t get until the Pentastar/ 8-speed ZF became available. That car would be great now. Same goes for the Magnum.

        DAVEFROMCALGARY

        The Durango is too heavy and too “truck-ish”. The Pacifica would make a nice replacement for the Journey, but the Journey actually has strong sales – stronger than the Durango de to the higher price.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I guess the Pacifica was one of the first crossovers, but no other company said, “We need to build a Pacifica!” The Honda Pilot, Lexus RX, and Subaru Forester came out before it, and the Ford Freestyle came out at about the same time. Plus those products weren’t terrible.

          I guess the AMC Eagle would probably be crossover Genesis.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            I am actually starting to see your point, bigtruckseries. Even though the Durango is a crossover, it competes more with full-sized BOF SUVs like the Tahoe and Armada. There is room for a nicer Chrysler-branded version of the Journey, to be a serious contender against the Highlander and Pilot.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          @BTSR

          I guess my comments about the Pacifica were definitely based on it being a larger vehicle with underwhelming engine/transmission combo. Certainly they were large versatile vehicles. That being said, I would personally prefer the longitudinal engine layout of the Durango than the transverse layout of the Pacifica.

          The fact the Journey sells well doesn’t susprise me. The Journey, since the Fiat committed to spending more on the interior, really isn’t a bad option for a cheap and cheerful large hauler. Pentastar equipped at 25K Canadian, its hard to think of a more versatile vehicle at that price, except the Grand Caravan!

    • 0 avatar
      Atum

      I thought that the Aspen and Pacifica were discontinued ON PURPOSE because Chrysler didn’t build SUVs anymore; just cars and the Town & Country, also known as the Enterprise Rental Center & Country.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    The Escalade EXT was more of a combination of low sales and the end of the GMT900 series, right? It could be seen as a discontinuation instead of a flat-out cancellation.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Weimer

      They got rid of the Avalanche as part of the switch to the new platform, so the EXT got axed as well.

      Folks weren’t buying those “convertible” trucks since they could get a regular 4-door pickup for less money. Too bad, because the GMT-900 Avalanche looked tons better than the pickups.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        GM did sell 800Kish Avalanches through the run. The spike m gas prices in 2005 ended the run.

        People ooooh and ah over Dodge’s coil springed Ram – Avalanche had it back to 2001.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I think you’re right, although the Avalanche (at least in the second generation) was more of a Suburban with a pickup bed than a restyled Silverado. Likewise, the ZDX, a restyled derivative of the MDX, also isn’t going to be ported over to the new platform.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff Weimer

          They were always a Suburban with a pickup bed. First gen was a restyled Suburban with a pickup bed. Then they modified the pickups to look more like the Avalanche.

          Second gen, I think the Suburban/Tahoe/Avalanche styling was so much cleaner they should have used that on the pickups too.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Correct. The parts content of the GMT800 based Avalanche was 80% ‘burban according to GM at the time.

            The only time I don’t miss my Avalanche is backing up, parking, and at the gas pump. Otherwise it was a great, versatile vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Redshift

      Speaking of, shouldn’t the Avalanche be on this list? I believe 2013 is the final model year. (GMT 900 Avalanche owner.)

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Funny, I will miss none of them. None of those cars stirred any fascination with me, except the Accord coupe, which I thought was cool.

    The biggest problem with larger coupes is their lack of back-seat room due to fastback rooflines and the sealed-window environment. If the OEMs would make a proper two-door sedan with open-able windows, it may be a different story, but which OEM would take that risk? Besides, the sedans look just as nice as coupes used to, so it probably doesn’t matter.

  • avatar
    ash78

    I’ve seen maybe 2 of the ZDX ever, no single one on a regular basis. But I see several Altima Coupes and Routans every day. The rest are somewhere in between around here.

    The Routan is being killed, I believe, because the joint contract was probably fulfilled and VW wants to create a time gap so they can introduce their own minivan in the next couple years. I was/am a fan of it because it took a great-but-frumpy underlying vehicle and added enough touches to make it downright attractive. I’ll still probably end up with the Chrysler or Dodge version because I don’t want to ever have to deal with VW parts or service again (20 years straight, I’m tired of it!).

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The Routan seems like one of those products you’d have a hard time finding panels and trim for in a couple of years. Just different enough from the Chrysler, and unloved, to make things costly.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Didn’t Chrysler hold back on the most thoughtful features of the minivans, like the stow-and-go seating, and all the hidden cubby holes? I thought that made VW a bad buy – an decontented vehicle with a higher price.

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    The C30 will be missed. I really liked that car and worked for Volvo when it came out. The main competition was the MINI and the GTI… of which it competed very well with until Volvo/Geely let it get as stale as two year old Saltines… just like the majority of their lineup. When first released, one could be had for cheaper than a base GTI or MINI Cooper S. $21,995.

    Now that they’re injecting some much needed life back into the line, they axe the two cars that really gave appeal to a different type of audience aside from the middle age, white collar types.

    Sad, really.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The C30 will not be missed. My wife has one because I agree its a great little car, very unqiue, but nobody knows the darn thing even existed. Volvo sold less then 300 a month. And good luck finding a base one at the price listed, almost all C30 were MORE then thier competition when new as they were optioned up to the max. That’s why I waited two years for scooping up a used one. Since they were unpopular they are a bargin on the used market. Smaller then a GTI but bigger then a Mini – its the perfect grocery getter, my wife LOVES hers dearly. Its a 2008 v2 with the contrasting skrit/areo package: Cosmic White with Java Brown accents.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I love the white/brown version! Also the aqua/black-grey one looked good. And red/brown.

        But I couldn’t find one that was properly loaded, and a car at this price and in FWD guise needs leather and sat nav as options. Most of them didn’t even have heated seats.

        Oh, and I feel they should’ve put AWD in it and jacked it up a little because AMC.

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        FANTASTIC color combination, and the one I would have gotten myself.

        I will agree that most of the ones that were on our lot were the 2.0 (v2 as you called it) but the 1.0 could be gotten easily. I think that car could have gone a long way if they had actually marketed it.

        Weird- seems like we’ve spoken of marketing problems about Volvo before….

        @CoreyDL-
        The base model (1.0) came standard with the t-tec seats and not much else by way of typical luxury car appointments. The 2.0 model (mentioned above) had the leather (standard IIRC) and sat nav (optional).

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          That explains it, the 2.0 was out of my price range, since they waited too long to do the update (in typical Volvo fashion).

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            The 1.0 and 2.0 were out at the same time. It’s just the trim line designators- only displayed on the Monroney label. Nowhere on the car was the designator “1.0″ or “2.0″ on the car. Basically, it’s the same thing as an Accord LX (C30 1.0) and an EX (C30 2.0).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ah. Volvo should have called it something via a badge to make it stand out as a better version!

    • 0 avatar
      zaxxon25

      C30 owner, White on Blonde (wait, isn’t that an album title). When considering the alternatives reviews seemed focused on its faults (too pricey, low MPG for the size, tacked on nav) rather than its charms (T5 mated with MT6, volvo reliable, quiet for a small hatch). Most didn’t even know it existed, I can at least say I would have never considered a Volvo otherwise. Future subject of a Junkyard Find!

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I saw two ZDXs total. The car made no sense what’s so ever. Like the Crosscabriolet, which I don’t see on the list, but thought it too had been discontinued

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I see a white one and a black one driving around these parts, with some frequency. The black one looks better because it’s less hefty and you can’t see all the panel lines and creases – but that’s about the only advantage. Still looks like a blocky black piece of cheese.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I always forget they exist, it gets mentioned on here every couple of months, and I sit and think a few second before going “oh yea”.

      Can’t say I’ve ever seen one.

      Of course it doesn’t help when ever I see letters I think acronym.

  • avatar
    Ion

    There was a time when the Routan routinely outsold the Passat and Jetta wagons, sometimes combined. When the Town and Country got refreshed after the buyout the Routan made a less compelling case to the consumer.

    The only real lose here is the Matrix. Quirks aside I love our first gen. There’s no denying however Toyota really fumbled the second gen. Toyota will use the loss of Pontiac and Nummi as excuses, but the truth is like the Corrolla it was based on this generation of Matrix was too many steps backwards.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    I cross shopped the C30 to the A3 I bought. I guess I had a very small part in it’s demise.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Quattro/FWD? Why’d you choose the A3 in the end? Come on, provide more info.

      • 0 avatar
        fredtal

        I have a 2007 2.0T S-line with manual and FWD

        It was over 5 years ago so I don’t recall many specifics. Mostly it came down to feel, the C20 didn’t seem as quick even tho the numbers were better. The interior of the A3 is much nicer overall, except I remember the Volvo seats were more comfortable. But maybe it came down to that I found a very nice low mileage used A3 that was closer to my budget.

  • avatar
    TorontoSkeptic

    The “problem” with the Matrix is the same as the “problem” with a Cruze wagon in the US: it cuts into selling entry-level CUVs. Why buy a RAV4 when a Matrix serves the same purpose (family hauler), is cheaper and gets better gas mileage? Why buy a Chevy Equinox if there were a Cruze wagon?

    The RAV4 just got redesigned, it’s very comparable to the Matrix in terms of interior space but ~25% more expensive.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      The ungainly styling didn’t help, I’m sure. It probably sent lots of hatchback buyers to the Mazda3 hatchback, or even the Vibe and Caliber when they were still available…

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The loss of the Vibe didn’t help either – business case wise.

        And the styling got too dated. It looks too close to the original, which was quite stylish back in 02 or whatever, but old old now.

        • 0 avatar
          TorontoSkeptic

          I don’t think the Vibe was unpopular or a bad seller? It was just part of the whole GM bankruptcy along with the rest of Pontiac, Saturn, Hummer etc.

          There are compact hatchbacks for most brands, only the Civic, Sentra and Cruze lack them (and the Cruze doesn’t really lack, it’s just not imported). Ford Focus, Mazda3, Kia Forte, Hyundai Elantra, Subaru Impreza, VW Golf, etc. Surely a Corolla-based wagon makes sense… except it doesn’t financially when you’ve got a new RAV4.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The two cars were produced together in the NUMMI GM/Toyota factory. It’s why I said business case wise.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Yes, the Vibe did really well, especially the first generation. It probably boosted GM/Pontiac’s reputation for people that didn’t know it was really a Toyota. But the second-gen Vibe always looked subcompact to me, like it was a size smaller than it actually was.

            Meanwhile, Toyota still makes the Yaris hatch for masochists and Luddites, alike…

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      The problem with the matrix is a hatred of hatchbacks in the U.S. Toyota officials have told me that it will continue to be offered in Canada.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The Murano CrossCabriolet took all of the best qualities of a certain excellent CUV and completely did away with them. I don’t know why it’s not on this list, but my guess is that when the third-generation Murano debuts (mid or late 2014, most likely), the CrossCabriolet simply won’t be ported over, much like the ZDX and Avalanche.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    And yet there’s the 2014 Nissan Murano Crosscabriolet. It must sell in the tens.

    • 0 avatar
      Atum

      You sir bring up the truest point ever. Not to mention I’ve found several used ones on cars.com which, according to CarFax, are lemon law buybacks.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      There is one at my plant. Every time I see it, I do a double take. It doesn’t matter that I have seen it probably 100 times since I started work, here. It is unbelievably weird looking.

  • avatar
    NewLookFan

    The Matrix is the real loss for me. Toyota drops the ball on the 2nd generation – I mean, just look at it. Then, when comparatively few people buy one, they discontinue it just when it appears the new Corolla five door is appealing. They’ve just lost a sale.

  • avatar
    Aaron2013

    yawn. none of these losers will be missed. “Routan”? “Matrix”? Smell ya later, losers!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India