By on December 16, 2013
Ford Atlas Concept

Ford Atlas Concept

The Detroit News is reporting that Ford dealers are stockpiling 2014 F-150 pickups in anticipation of the launch of the next generation of Ford’s best-selling light truck. That may be a wise decision in light of TTAC’s report last week that the 2015 F-150′s launch will be delayed due to stamping problems with the aluminum panels that the new truck will feature. Even without delays, dealers are worried that when Ford’s Dearborn Truck Plant shuts down to retool for the new model they could be caught short of supply. Next year’s production numbers for the F-150 could drop as much as 10% because of the model changeover shutdown.

Suppliers are planning for production of the 2015 F-150 to start next summer. The production version of the new truck will likely be revealed next month at the at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

Some dealers are ordering up to 20% more than their usual inventories, and may run into allocation issues. Ford allocates trucks based on dealers’ truck sales over the past three months, and how many pickups they currently have in inventory.

Jim Seavitt, president of Village Ford in Dearborn, Michigan, not far from Ford world HQ, said that he’s going to ask for “as much extra allocation as I can get my hands on. We know there’s going to be a shortage of trucks because of the changeover.”

Another factor is that current high demand for the F-150 doesn’t leave many trucks available for extra allocation.

“If you’re trying to build up a huge supply, (Ford will) clip you,” Seavitt said.

The 2014 model will continue to be available through the end of the 2014 calendar year, manufactured at the Kansas City Assembly Plant, which will change over to the new model after Michigan Truck does.

Anticipating the shutdown next year, for is increasing first quarter F-150 production by 2% and in August it added a third shift to the Kansas City facility.

Ford and its F-Series account for about 90 percent of the company’s global auto profits, according to Morgan Stanley.

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39 Comments on “Ford Dealers Try To Stockpile 2014 F-150s Before Model Changeover Shutdown...”


  • avatar

    I don’t like it when you can clearly see the division between the cab and bed. That’s why I’ll always like the Avalanche/EXT.

    • 0 avatar
      jrhmobile

      Really?

      I appreciate — no, require — a separated bed from the cab of a pickup truck. The durability, flexibility for configurations and maintenance advantages for a work truck are absolute for me.

      Maybe you should buy that ‘Sclade before Cadillac phases them out. And change that label you use to “Big Ol’ Fashion Statements Made @ YouTube.”

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Agreed. The separate cab/bed made repairing the truck much easier as the bed could be removed with just a few bolts, giving ready access to repair/replace the bed itself and everything on the frame. behind the cab. That gap also helps protect the cab from a load in the bed that might slide–adding a second layer of steel and improving flexibility in a true working-class vehicle.

        That said, the smoother sides of a gap-free design improves fuel economy (there’s a reason why step-side trucks are so rare today) and if the truck is a light-duty model meant almost exclusively for the DIYer who typically carries less than a thousand pounds in the bed then the utility and safety of a separate bed is relatively unimportant.

      • 0 avatar

        I never haul anything. That’s why I just want it to look good.

        • 0 avatar
          Eyeflyistheeye

          Every automaker would be well versed to listen to you and do the exact opposite.

          While everyone here likes fun vehicles and performance cars, your only criteria for a car to meet your standards is for it to be a testament to overcompensation that you can try to wave in the faces of people who don’t care at all.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Your daily reminder that Ford already tried joining the cab and bed on the 1961 models. And it was awful for anyone who actually wanted to use their pickup truck like a pickup truck (which was a significantly higher percentage of pickup truck buyers in 1961). If it had actually been practical, they wouldn’t have gone back to conventional assembly in 1964.

      • 0 avatar
        dswilly

        I read years ago they had problems with the bed/cab sheet metal distorting or cracking when the bed was loaded and the cab doors wouldn’t open. Not sure if it was accurate.

    • 0 avatar

      I hear Ridgeline is making a comeback.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Not so much a comeback as finally a new model. The teasers give it a more conventional look, but we don’t know if that means body-on-frame or a Volkswagen-style (Rabbit pickup) unibody.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Forget that, I’d rather pull a bed off to change a fuel pump then drop a tank, 4-6 bolts and a cherry picker make that job way easier.

      If you want that buy a ridgeline, it would suit you well.

  • avatar
    Omnifan

    “Ford and its F-Series account for about 90 percent of the company’s global auto profits, according to Morgan Stanley.”

    How does this work? Or is it: Ford’s F-Series accounts for about 90% of its global auto profits?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Probably the latter.

      But I do hope that for 2015 Ford will at least have upgraded to what Tundra had since its intro in 2007.

      To see what I mean, watch

      “youtube.com/watch?v=xMoy5q0S1f8″

      • 0 avatar
        BuzzDog

        That video lost all credibility why I saw that 1) It was posted by a Toyota dealer, and 2) There are fanboi comments stating that “You do know that Toyota basically took apart a Ram truck and copied it!” I’m sure these kids posting in their parents’ basements can cite solid evidence for that allegation.

        Shoot, I’m a Ford loyalist (two in my garage, including an F-150) and I get tired of the “Calvin pissing on a logo” mindset that seems to be pervasive among my fellow truck owners. Why can’t we just be thankful that we live in a country where we have choices among some pretty good iron (and soon, aluminum) that are relatively affordable? Not many places in the world where one can say that, you know…

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Buzz, of course it was posted by a Toyota dealer! It was a 2014 MY demo training aid put on for the Toyota sales staff. No other brands would pitch Tundra.

          My brothers sold Toyota, among other brands like Ford and GMC, plus a bunch of foreign brands. So I got to look at the 2007 Tundra up close and personal long before I converted.

          I’m all for choice. People buy what works best for them, and what they can afford.

          I’ve owned Silverado, and I’ve owned F150. Now I own a 2011 Tundra 5.7 SR5 DC LB. And I sure like the way my 2011 Tundra is put together, long before this 2014 MY video came out.

          I do hope that my next Tundra 5.7 will have that magnificent Lexus 8-speed automatic in it.

          • 0 avatar
            BuzzDog

            While no other brands would pitch Toyota, there are other, somewhat more independent video producers out there who compare trucks. And my apology for the rant-like tone of my post…I can only offer that perhaps my nearly 50-year-old brain was reacting to the effects of studying for a six-part professional certification exam (which, thankfully, I passed). :)

            I’ve been pretty loyal to Ford over the years, but I’ve owned a GMC, as well as several Toyota and Nissan cars – each of them for several years and 80,000 to 200,000 miles. I’m intrigued by the Tundra, and was impressed by the refinement when I looked at one last weekend, but I keep coming back to one thing: If I still lived in DFW, there’s no issue, but when you roll around in a mostly rural state as I do, Ford dealers and parts seem to be more plentiful and less expensive, so for me it’s a fair trade off. Again, I’m glad the consumer has a choice, and look forward to seeing this next F-150.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Buzz, no apology necessary. I understand that loyalties and beliefs run deep. Up until the 2008 MY, I was a dyed-in-the-wool driver and buyer of domestics.

            I became a Toyota convert in 2008 with the purchase of a Japan-built Highlander but since then had a mental aberration when I bought my wife a 2012 Grand Cherokee in Nov 2011.

            Since then I have regained my sanity and her next SUV will most likely be a Sequoia 5.7.

            Don’t misunderstand, the GC has been a great vehicle, but I don’t want to chance it after the factory warranty expires, given Chrysler’s decades-long history of building crap-cars.

            I am one of those guys who routinely overloads the frame of his half-ton truck with supplies and materials, tows a flatbed trailer loaded to the gills with pallets of tile, grout and thinset, and goes up and down mountainous terrain in overload mode.

            I like good brakes, and what I found with the Tundra was gratifying, long before I knew this video existed.

            I also like a frame that springs back to its original form after having been overloaded and abused.

            I know people, among them my foreman, who have bent the frame on their pickup trucks by overloading the bed with more than 1000 pounds of materials while also carrying a couple of fat craftsmen in the cab.

            My point is this: if, like me, you actually use your truck to work with and have to haul loads, then I would recommend a Tundra 5.7, any Tundra 5.7, without hesitation.

            Friends still in the business have told me that the 2015 F150 will get a major rework from the frame up that is not just cosmetic, but also a drastic departure from the way domestic pickup trucks have been made for decades.

  • avatar
    mike978

    I seem to recall when GM was getting ready to switch to the new Silverado/Sierra that TTAC complained about stocking up before hand – all with pretty graphs showing days of supply. Admittedly that was under the previous management which had some issues with GM. That seemed to work out OK for GM.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      There is a new sheriff in town as you noted, and overall they are doing a solid job. If anything it is refreshing in general because the old EIC would have written some puff piece on how genius this was of Ford to stock up for the transition – and anyone questioning the logic would be subject to banning, or a troll poll, or a personally written tirade, or…

      It hasn’t been perfect – and it never will be – but if TTAC isn’t possing off someone everyone now and then they aren’t trying hard enough. Overall pretty happy with the new and improved leadership team. (fine I don’t like Caroline’s stories at all – no one says I have to click on them)

    • 0 avatar

      Isn’t it interesting how this story broke a couple days after we were the first outlet to bring you news of the delays facing the next F-150?

      You win some, you lose some…

      In any case, let’s see how the inventory situation pans out over the next year.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Oh joy! Ford now gets to go through the same hassles GM went through with its new model changeover. However, if Ford’s sales continue at the rate they’ve been going, they’re going to run out of stockpile LONG before the first new model leaves the assembly line.
    If that happens, I wouldn’t buy ANY of the trucks built in the first six months–they’re going to be so rushed through production that they’re almost all bound to be lemons.
    GM at least had the time to make sure the assembly line was ready before putting it into production.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      You do realize that they’re already training workers for the next generation F-150? It’s not like they’re just going to end with P-415 and jump directly into the new one with no experience.

      Also F-150′s leave Kansas City along with Dearborn. By the time Dearborn gets up to full capacity I would expect Kansas City to come back online.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Vulpine – I do not think that Ford will have the same “hassles” as GMC. The GMT900′s were in dire need of being replaced. The F150 interior and body is long in the tooth but the engines are not. It sounds like Ford will not allow overstuffed dealer networks. GMC deliberately stuffed their lots.

  • avatar
    LALoser

    This thing makes the new Colorado look even better.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    It could be fun to see what some buyer resistance for a new F150 does to Ford. Their customers don’t seem to care about quality, but the ones that matter may care about buying a truck that others perceive as strange and ugly.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    ” F-Series account[s] for about 90 percent of the company’s global auto profits…”

    Ford is just as vulnerable, if not more so, to a downturn in the economy, as it has ever been, and maybe even more so than very nearly at any time (with few exceptions) in its past.

    GM also depends heavily on its light truck sales for profitability, but I doubt that even GM nor any other major manufacturer in North America is as heavily dependent on light truck sales for as massive a slice of its profitability as Ford is.

    One bad move in product development, or one serious downturn in the economy that adversely impacts pickup truck sales across the board, and boom.

    • 0 avatar
      BuzzDog

      That IS scary.

      I suppose the thing that makes this slightly less scary than GM’s position in 2009 is the fact that Ford’s other products are relatively strong, certainly more so than GM’s auto products at that time. So while an economic downturn would be hard on Ford, they at least have other products which might appeal to those looking for more economical (read fuel efficient) transportation.

      Not a perfect scenario, but better than it could be.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    …Ford is just as vulnerable, if not more so, to a downturn in the economy, as it has ever been, and maybe even more so than very nearly at any time (with few exceptions) in its past.

    GM also depends heavily on its light truck sales for profitability, but I doubt that even GM nor any other major manufacturer in North America is as heavily dependent on light truck sales for as massive a slice of its profitability as Ford is.

    One bad move in product development, or one serious downturn in the economy that adversely impacts pickup truck sales across the board, and boom…

    You took the keystrokes right from my fingers. 90% of GLOBAL profits from the F-150 – yikes.

    If that’s accurate Job One at Ford – get it over with and shoot Lincoln in the head to stem the bleeding.

    (and yes my statement is ironic, following the rules of South Park, the assassination of Lincoln has been funny for over a century now)

  • avatar
    84Cressida

    90% of their profits stem from one model, that is highly susceptible to the economy and fuel prices, and is only sold in one region of the world. Just wow.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    Jesus Maria that thing is FUGLY.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Meanwhile, the body of the Super Duty will soldier on until the next millennia.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Sounds to me they need to stop offering their cars for free, and try to get profit from them rather than ask such a high premium for their trucks…

    Isn’t the focus one of the worlds best selling vehicles? And they can’t even make 10% of their global profits off of it?

  • avatar

    On
    NPR news this afternoon they said the new F150 would not be at NAIS due to development and production issues.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I do agree that if 90% of Ford profits come from the F-series line they need to hit a homerun with this truck. They also need to work on profitability of their other product lines.

    Luxury products have high profit margins and Lincoln is a rebadge joke. Drop Lincoln and offer high end trim packages in most of their vehicles. Take a page out of the F Series book and offer Limited, and Platinum levels of trim.

    If they insist on keeping Lincoln then it needs to be more unique just like Cadillac.

    I do hope that this truck is NOT the next F150. The grill is as ugly as the Super Duty snout. The rest of the truck body looks too much like the current F150 in my driveway.


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