By on December 5, 2013

2015-ford-mustang-convertible01-1

 

In case you haven’t had your fill, live shots, as well as shots in of the ragtop below. Ford was coy with powertrain details, but the 2.3L Ecoboost will make “more than 305 horsepower”, helping it exceed the 3.7L V6′s output. The 5.0L V8 is said to top the current car’s 420 horsepower. The convertble top will apparently raise and lower in just 5 seconds, while bigger brakes, paddle shifters and MyFord Touch all make an appearance. Despite adding a 4-cylinder engine and independent rear-suspension for world markets, Ford expects them to make up just 10 percent of sales.

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57 Comments on “2015 Ford Mustang Coupe And Convertible Live Shots...”


  • avatar

    That’s really interesting news about the ecoboost. The need to turn their performance guys loose and get an SVO edition out there quick.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      The eco boost car will have a handling pack which comes with the base GT 4 pot Brembos. The sixer gets a handling pack as well but its saddled with the slidding calipers

      Muscle Mustangs & Fast Fords has a little more technical info on its web page

      • 0 avatar
        johnny_5.0

        Thanks for the pointer, hadn’t checked out their coverage yet. They had more detailed info about the wheel/tire sizes that I was curious about. Looks like the perf pack steps up to 9.5 inch rear wheels and 275 summer rubber. Woot.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      As some one who bought an SVO new, and enjoyed the hell out if for 11 years, I second that idea, Thomas.

      But as Derek worded his post(“Despite adding a 4-cylinder engine and independent rear-suspension for world markets”), he leaves some confusion on the matter of the 2.3 for the domestic market and for that matter, the IRS.

      Boy, that convert looks good.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Mustang_SVO
      http://www.fifteen52.us/project-st/history-lessons-22-1984-mustang-svo/

  • avatar
    CarGal

    I’ve never been a huge Mustang fan but this is simply gorgeous.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Like

  • avatar
    arun

    I never realized this from the previous stills but THAT IS ONE LONG ASS CAR!

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Lengthen it, square it up, smooth out the lines, and add the boat tail and you have the Mark X convertible concept.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    looks more broad and muscular.

    “and independent rear-suspension for world markets”

    does that mean those of us in Canada and the USA who are not part of “the world” will get stuck with a solid axle rear end?

  • avatar
    greaseyknight

    That front 3/4 shot of the grey convertible is totally amazing!

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I do think it looks good, I think the proportions are more an homage to the original than the current car which is like a fusing of Generation 1 and Generation 2 styling cues.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Beautiful, but at first glance I thought it was a BMW… not a bad thing

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    From most angles it looks quite nice, but it looks best when the camera lens is mounted high or very low.

    They need to KILL THAT GRILL though, because it is just plain ugly, oddly shaped, and hence, out of place and incongruous based on the proper proportions of the rest of the vehicle (this Mustang has sexy & sophisticated legs).

    I am not a huge fan of the headlights, either, but that be due to the fact that they’re trying their best next to that grill.

    By the way, I predict that this new Stang will look best in Kona Blue and Silver, and worst in black or white.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      The grille looks like weird vampire teeth or exposed support podiums. Thankfully it is a Mustang so the aftermarket will take care of the terrible grille and hopefully make a traditional fog light grille.

  • avatar

    I don’t like it as much as I like the current model. Some of the problem lies in the Aston Martin/Ford headlights. Besides aesthetics, I think it’s better to differentiate the car stylistically from the rest of the Ford lineup.

  • avatar

    5 seconds to open and close the convertible top? That sounds too good to be true. If there’s a latch mechanism that needs to be done/undone, that’ll definitely add some time either way.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      S2000 was 6 seconds, not counting the two front latches which take maybe another second each :p

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      With the NA/NB Miata, it is less then 2-seconds.

      5-seconds is fast for a power top, but I wish they offered an optional removable hardtop like the Miata and earlier BMW’s and some others. The SL Merc’s had the removable top as standard equipment.

  • avatar
    brianyates

    That front spoiler looks like it could double as a snow plow,should sell well in the north east.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    It looks decent to me, but in a 1990s kind of way. Perhaps Ford is after the 40+ something demographic? I was hoping the new Mustang would become more 2013, like the Scion FRS. To me, it seems many vehicles from Detroit are too influenced by the past legacies of the respective automaker, whereas the Japanese and Germans seem to be delivering more future oriented vehicles. While Toyota will soon be delivering Fuel Cell vehicles, Detroit is fixated on old fashioned turbos in overweight vehicles. Detroit has yet to master the Hybrid … they are still licensing technology from Toyota.

    But, the big questions will be reliability, price, and resale. Possible the resale might not be there since it is a niche vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      jimmyy

      Perhaps Ford did a study and is targeting it’s vehicles at an older demographic? That would explain the 1990s styling, and that may be a smart business decision.

    • 0 avatar
      ttiguy

      Go out, get some fresh air and get a life.

    • 0 avatar
      SV

      1) Ford does not license hybrid technology from Toyota; their hybrid tech is entirely proprietary. This point has been literally beaten to death but perhaps people on the coasts aren’t disposed to paying attention.
      2) The new Mustang is roughly 200lbs lighter than the old one, not exactly “overweight” by modern standards.
      3) If the FR-S is what a 2013 sports car is supposed to look like, then I’m not ready. The proportions are great but the surfacing and detailing is absolutely hopeless.

      • 0 avatar
        AlternateReality

        Don’t be so certain about your second point. Edmunds and others have posted “estimated” curb weights heavier than the existing models, with the GT coming in somewhere around 3700 lbs. Had Ford been able to meet its weight targets, I’m sure we’d have heard about it today.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      “Detroit has yet to master the Hybrid … they are still licensing technology from Toyota”

      How many times do people need to correct you on this jimmyy? What licensing does GM have with Toyota for the Volt? As for Ford;

      green.autoblog.com/2009/07/03/once-more-with-feeling-ford-does-not-use-the-toyota-hybrid-syst/

      “The reality is that Ford independently developed its own hybrid system at the same time Toyota was doing its own. The basic architecture of both systems is the same and both are based on the concepts developed and patented by TRW engineers in the late 1960s. When Ford introduced the Escape Hybrid, Toyota went after the Blue Oval for infringing on its patents. Ford had patents of its own on the technology that Toyota was using. Eventually, the two companies reached a cross-licensing agreement that gives both companies the right to build their own systems. Such cross-licensing agreements are common in these kinds of cases, but Ford did not use the Toyota hybrid system. The only other company that uses Toyota’s system is Nissan for its Altima hybrid, and they actually buy hardware from Toyota”

      • 0 avatar
        jimmyy

        Nonsense.

        Ford cross-licensed with Toyota but they traded other patents to get the license for the hybrid technology in question. They didn’t have to pay cash, but they did end up trading clean diesel patents to Toyota. Obviously both companies got something out of it, but you’re making it sound like Ford had a ton of hybrid system patents of it’s own that it cross-licensed with Toyota which just isn’t the case.

        Also, Toyota Hybrid were being sold many years before any Ford hybrid hit the market. Clearly, Ford reverse engineered the Toyota system, then licensed the patents from Toyota.

        • 0 avatar
          Loser

          jimmmyy, do you have any proof of what you are saying or should we just take your word over proven facts? Both companies used technology developed by TRW.

          You never did answer what licensing GM has with Toyota on it’s hybrids.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    The advanced reporting and leaks on the next generation Mustang had me believing Ford was going to totally screw it up. I’m happy that, to my eyes, I was completely wrong.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    Looks great, but the absolute best thing about it will be when tat 2.3 Turbo finds its way from the junkyard into an 87-88 T-Bird Turbo Coupe or an XR4TI!

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    It remains to be seen if the wheel gaps shown will be accurate to what you really get when you can buy one.

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    While I’m unlikely to trade in my ’12 convertible for one of these, the five-second up/down time is appealing.

    That’s one of the few complaints I have about my current Mustang, but since it’s my first power-operated convertible top, I have no true point of reference.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I’ve always been a big Mustang fan, it was my very first car, but I’m just not feeling this new design.

    It looks good from the side and back, but something about the proportions on the front headlights and grill just doesn’t look right to me.

    I’m hoping it looks better in person.

    My ranking on the musclecar offerings are the Camaro has the best engine (LS V8) but is cartoonish looking, the Challenger is the best looking (but a bit too large and I simply don’t trust Mopar quality) but the Mustang was the best all around and the one I’d likely actually buy.

  • avatar
    theonewhogotaway

    This is a gorgeous car.

    Interesting that this is a global car with one really funky (for Ford) detail: Gas tank door on the driver side… Looks like they are targeting the Asian market

  • avatar
    Ion

    If I nit pick there’s alot I don’t like:

    The center console visually looks less elegant than mine.
    The foglights are no longer LED which lead me to believe the taillights are not LED either.
    The high beams are not HID
    Whats with the weird support beams in front of the grille?
    What was wrong with the button layout on the current wheel.

    Nothing that would really stop me from leasing another but I feel certain things are a step back so when they eventually do the mid-generation refresh it’ll feel worth the upgrade.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      Actually the more I see of it the more I realize they must have gone with the whole premium and base trims idea again.

    • 0 avatar
      jz78817

      “The foglights are no longer LED which lead me to believe the taillights are not LED either.”

      ??? jump to conclusions much? The taillights are LED. Besides, I’d rather have halogen fog lamps because the LED ones in the ’13-’14 Mustang are too bluish.

      “The high beams are not HID”

      where are you getting this from?

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        I don’t see a seperate reflector inside the headlight housing so deductive reasoning would lead to the conclusion that the hi and low beams share the same projector. Since you’ll never fit a halogen bulb (bright enough to function as an OEM high beam) and an HID element into that small space, I’d say the comment of “The high beams are not HID” is inaccurate.

        • 0 avatar
          jz78817

          “hi-beams” are not necessarily brighter. In the halogen world, both low- and hi- tend to be 55-watt filaments; the difference is in the hi-beams project further down the road. in a dual filament bulb, the hi-beam filament is in the “focal point” of the reflector or lens, and the low-beam filament is offset to aim the light “beam” lower.

          with projector HIDs, there is a shutter inside the housing which cuts off the top portion of the beam to provide low-beam lighting. The shutter gets moved out of the way to provide hi-beams.

  • avatar
    agent534

    The Silver convertible picture shows some really wide fender flares.
    Is that an artifact from widening the car for the IRS, or are they not that pronounced in person?

    Per the USA Today article:”We started having some trouble with the steering and proportion of the vehicle,” Nair says. “We decided fairly late in development to widen the vehicle.”

  • avatar
    cirats

    Anybody have a sense for how usable the back seat will be on this? The coupe has a great looking roofline but it looks like it kills the headroom in the back seat. The convertible looks like it has a more traditional roofline – not as dramatic or appealing – but perhaps one that makes the back seat more liveable. How are back seats on the outgoing model – coupe and convertible?

    • 0 avatar
      agent534

      Somewhat related, I can’t get a Mustang for the next few years if you can’t fit a rear facing carseat in the back and still use the front seat. I’ve said it before, if they could offer an optional ‘car seat shelf’ in the back, I’m thinking get rid of all the padding on the seat back maybe to get the car seat more space or similar, they could sell a few more ponies.
      For laughs, here is the car seat fit check for a Boss:
      blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2012/02/2012-ford-mustang-boss-302-car-seat-check.html


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