By on November 18, 2013

2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid, Exterior, Front 3/4, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes

From the neon-drenched beaches of Miami and the hipster enclaves in New York, to the high-tech castles in San Francisco and the studio lots of Hollywood, the Ford Fusion is experiencing a coastal market surge in popularity.

Nationwide, sales of the Aston Martin-esque Fusion made up 71 percent of all sales for the Blue Oval last month, with huge gains found on the East and West coasts ranging from 62 percent in Miami to 77 percent in Los Angeles.

The reason? Style, style, style. Aside from goodies such as touchscreen and voice-activated controls and various types of horsepower under the hood, the Fusion’s luxury looks are attracting buyers who would normally be found shopping for clothes at Zara and smartphones at their nearest Apple Store. Further, some of these same buyers are trading in their Toyotas and Hondas just to be seen in something hipper than a cheap toaster, a fact not lost on Ford.

Thus, the automaker opened a second factory to meet demand in Flat Rock, Mich. this past August, allowing for more than 400,000 Fusions to be screwed together annually while putting pressure on Toyota’s best-seller Camry, a title the latter has held for the past 11 years with 460,000 units made per year.

Paired with the decision by Consumer Reports last mont to strip the Camry of its recommended status due to failing new crash tests administered by the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety, the Fusion could claim 12 percent of the mid-sized car market by the end of 2013 according to analysts at LMC Automotive, up from 10 percent a year ago.

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239 Comments on “Ford Fusion Rides Coastal Wave To Sales Success...”


  • avatar
    E46M3_333

    Nice looking car, but it’s still a Ford. If I were in the market, I’d wait until Toyota or Honda copies the styling–I’m sure they’re working on it now.
    .
    .

    • 0 avatar
      CoastieLenn

      They’re not immune to quality issues anymore either, you just have to go beyond the “Consumer Reports” cartel to read about them. Owners forums are full of bobble and turmoil.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        Still much better than Ford.

        The Fusion is still 4th place, in its “game-changing” first year.

        • 0 avatar
          CoastieLenn

          To each thier own, I guess. Coming from an Accord, my wife and I purchased our Fusion because it actually felt like a new atheletic car. The new Accord (didn’t even bother with the uber-softee Camry) felt just like the outgoing one in every way… just with a few nicer buttons.

          I’ll take soul over bland any day of the week. So long as Ford warranty picks up the tab for repairs, it can have as many issues as it wants. You don’t buy anything “first model year” and expect perfection and we’re not getting it.

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            Considering the new Fusion is not as highly regarded as the new Accord in most professional tests, I would say that you are an anomaly.

            Heck, someone has to buy the Fusion, why not you?

        • 0 avatar

          Cars tend to improve from their first year performance, so that’s actually not so bad.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Ford just expanded production to 400k when Flat Rock production came online.

          Toyota has the capacity to build 460k Camrys annually.

          And as for “quality” – (aside from all the recalls), let’s see how Toyota fares when they stop using long-int-tooth engines and transmissions (still the 4 spd AT in the Corrolla – really?).

          • 0 avatar
            84Cressida

            So many sour grapes. Nevermind that Toyota was the first to come out with an 8AT, has DI in many Lexus engines, is coming out with turbo 4 cylinders, the Corolla’s 4-speed is on one model that won’t sell (while offering a brand new CVT, selectively forgot that didn’t ya?)

            Nevermind that Toyota’s V6 engines have better acceleration, fuel economy and NVH than any turbo Hyundai can chuck at them and the fact that the Camry Hybrid, a 4 cylinder with 74 less HP, beat the Sonata Turbo 0-60 in a MT comparo.

            And as for “quality” – wasn’t it your quality chief over at Hyundai who just resigned this past week? And didn’t you guys just have to re-do EPA mileages that were grossly over stated?

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Ever notice you see Toyotas and Hondas parked on the the used car lots of GM and Ford dealerships all the time.

        • 0 avatar
          geeber

          How many of those Toyotas and Hondas were bought at dealer-only auctions?

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            Good point but they ended up there for a reason, though.

            You can’t use the justification “Lease Turn-in” either because if the car was as good as they’re touted, the owner would have purchased it after the fact.

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            I also know that there are TONS of reasons that any car can end up in the auctions, but the number of used CamCords is high. If they were as good as they’re touted, the number of available pre-owned examples would be low.

          • 0 avatar
            Sammy B

            Not hating on Ford or defending toyota/honda, but don’t forget about perpetual leasees. They do a 36 month/36K lease and typically just go right back to toyota/honda. About 5-6 months before the lease is up, the manufacturer starts making sweetheart deals to basically never give the leasee the opportunity to shop. I have a neighbor who has done this is 3 times now. 30-33 month effective terms before the dealer mailings say we’ll get you out of your lease early and offer a no-increase or nominal increase payment for a whole new ride. wash/rinse/repeat. she never even shops or considers buying the car out (the latter negates her primary reason for leasing….always wanting something relatively new and not worrying about repairs and what not). it’s not for everybody

            just pointing out there’s many out there never planning to get off the lease train, regardless of how good the car may be.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @CoastieLenn

            I’m on the Toyonda-is-screwing-you bandwagon but a high number of used Camcords on the block could also be indicative of a higher volume of models sold vs Fusion/Malibu/W-Impala.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Can’t answer how many are there due to auctions but I’m sure most are tthere from people that traded them in on a domestic. My first new car and my wifes were a Toyota. I guess if they were as great as some of the fan boys on this site would have you believe, there would be a Tundra parked where my GMC Sierra is and a Sequoia or 4Runner where the Tahoe is parked.

          • 0 avatar
            AlternateReality

            “You can’t use the justification “Lease Turn-in” either because if the car was as good as they’re touted, the owner would have purchased it after the fact.”

            Sure you can, just remove the Toyonda Hate blinders. Those lessors decided to step into the newest version of their lease turn-in, or another vehicle in the product line.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            The Ford bandwagon otherwise known as TTAC can really be a painful read often.

            The Fusion is in 4th or 5th place in terms of overall sales in its segment, and on top of that, the % of Fusions being sold to fleets is massively higher than the sales’ leaders, Camry & Accord, yet TTAC digs deep to wax anecdotally about how “the coasts” are so enamored with the Fusion BECAUSE IT ALLEGEDLY COMPRISES A HIGHER % OF FORD VEHICLES SOLD THERE THAN IN PAST TIMES.

            I’ll say it again; reliability is the biggest determinant factor as to the long term loyalty (or disloyalty) for any particular brand/manufacturer, so the nonsense you’ve spouted notwithstanding, let’s revisit Ford’s fortunes in a few years in terms of repeat buyers.

            And for the record, I think the Fusion has a better chassis and better NVH levels than any of its rivals, but wouldn’t touch one with even the most head.over-heels-in-love-with-Ford-TTAC-staffer’s penis since it will statistically be likely to suffer mechanical breakage at a rate at least 5x greater than any Accord or Camry, whether covered by warranty or not.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @DW

            “I’ll say it again; reliability is the biggest determinant factor as to the long term loyalty (or disloyalty) for any particular brand/manufacturer”

            Please explain BMW, Mercedes, Audi, VW of A, etc.

          • 0 avatar
            Flybrian

            Camrys are softening up on the block. High incentives on outgoing ’13s doesn’t help, neither does generally weak demand.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            So Ford must not be aggressively trying to move these at the retail level and the $199/month sign and drive leases for a Fusion SE advertised heavily in the tri-county metro area of Michigan must mean these are rare treasures…

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            @28 – VW has been hurt by shoddy reliability (and I’d argue by quite a bit, at least in te U.S.).

            The other brands you mention are aspirational status symbols of the upper middle class, and probably have a lease to purchase ratio of 90% to 10%, so zeee problems will be fixed under the warranty during the lease term.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            ….Please explain BMW, Mercedes, Audi, VW of A, etc…..

            Aside from VW, the snot brands can get away with crap reliability that for other, more pedestrian brands would never be considered acceptable.

            Ford has done a good job here, assuming the fit and finish issues have been settled. I have been checking out all the Fusions I see. Some do have marginal fit, but most do not. I can’t tell which were built first as I am not going to read VINs on the dash. If this car is at least average in reliability, it will be as good as a red dot special 7 years ago – more than good enough.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            @goldenhusky -

            Fit & finish issues are the least of the Fusion’s issues, should one find Consumer Reports credible in terms of its reliability survey & index (I do).

            By that index, motors, transmissions, electrical systems and cooling systems are all “far worse than average” on the Fusion (and most of Ford’s other vehicles).

            But I’m sure that the same people who accused CR of being anti-domestic will chime in with their well-worn & vacuous tirades again, now that CR has scored vehicles such as the new Chevy Impala, Chrysler 300, Cadillac ATS, Cadillac CTS, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Buick LaCrosse, Chevy Cruz, Chevy Corvette C7 and other domestic vehicles far ahead of Japanese, ZeeGerman and Korean competitors.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            @ DW

            Ford only had the capacity to build around 320k Fusions (now with Flat Rock production – capacity is up to 400k).

            Toyota, meanwhile, has the capacity to build 460k Camrys.

            And again, a big chunk of Fusion’s fleet sales is to govt. and commercial while the vast majority of Camry fleet sales is to rental.

            Last year, even with an all-new Camry and Ford selling the old Fusion for most of the year, it was Toyota that sent more Camrys to rental fleet.

            And Toyota has even better deals on the Camry.

            The Fusion is in the top 2-3 when it comes to ATP in the segment; the Camry is at the bottom (lower than the Chrysler 200).

          • 0 avatar
            dolorean

            @bd2 Well-played. Match, Set, Game.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            @bd:

            I’m too tired to dig up the stats, but Pch101 did in another thread, and it’s factually provable that Ford is selling the Fusion into fleets at a much, much higher % of overall production than Toyota is the Camry.

            If you wish to deny concrete evidence, so be it.

    • 0 avatar
      onemp21

      your an idiot E46M3_333, if you actually read anything you would know that most American cars are just as good if not better then the foreign ones. Your uneducated statements make you sound stupid. Quit embarrassing yourself.

    • 0 avatar
      200k-min

      I was wondering when the first comment about Ford not being up to Camcord quality would hit….#1….the best & brightest are predictable, that’s for sure.

      Right now I’m in the market for a new mid-sizer to replace my aging Accord and I must say while the new Honda’s have more toys they aren’t what I’d call knock me out improvement. Capable vehicle worth consideration yes, but vast improvement over the past decade, I’m not sold.

      Compare that to Ford who literally got a token look and pass when I bought my Accord back in 2001. At that time the old mid-size Taurus was clumsy, poor quality and cheap. Dealers were begging me to just offer….anything. I bought a used Accord with 20,000 miles for more than I could’ve got a new taurus and was perfectly ok with that.

      I’m not saying Ford is perfect, nor is Honda, Toyota, GM, etc. But what I will say is while Toyota and Honda maintained their status quo (or let it slip ever so slightly) Ford has made huge, literal MASSIVE, strides. Not too long ago we wouldn’t even talk about the Fusion and Camry in the same sentence. Today they are competitors – virtual equals. That’s worthy of praise no matter what side your bias lies on.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        I’ve been driving the mid-size cars to replace a 6th gen Accord and Ford had moved up in the world in terms of refinement compared to the old Taurus. Takes about 5 years to a decade to determine quality, but the previous Mazda6 based Fusion seems to have done pretty well so far. My main complaint about the current Fusion is it’s too European with the tall pedestrian-friendly front end, high beltline, and small turbocharged engines for fuel economy tests. Section 2 or 3 inches out of the bottom half of the car, slim down the chunky A pillars, and give it a better naturally aspirated engine option and it would be much better car.

  • avatar

    The real shame is that Ford and Lincoln have beautiful cars, but they are strapped with the most gutless engines either – punctuated by a
    sh!tty infotainment system.

    I just came back from testing the Jeep Cherookee fully loaded V6 with ultraview roof and Uconect. It was almost no different than being in my JGCSRT.

    • 0 avatar

      The Cherokee is one of the few (if any) small SUV to offer a Pentastar V6 and AWD and still manage to sticker at less than $37,000.

      The MK/Fusion is nice if you get the 2.0t, but for a car this size, I DEMAND a V6. If I could put a V6 Pentastar into the MK/Fusion and swap that SYNC crap with Uconnect, I’d LOVE the car.

      The MKS is equally underpowered. Buyers in this segment want a naturally aspirated V8. If ford wanted to make waves, the MKS would have a twin turbo V8 optional with a Brembo Brake kit. Do you really think the buyers wouldn’t spend the extra money? they would! and a lot of them are fleeing to Chrysler to get the traditional V8/RWD they grew up with.

      sales of the Fusion near my area have been strong, partly due to the car being available post-Hurricane Sandy. Most of the dealerships here were sold out of everything. Sales at 300% in fact on Sunrise Highway in Lexus, Cadillac, BMW and Mercedes.

      If I was interested in the fusion at all, I’d rebuild one into a racing spec.

      • 0 avatar

        My personal favorite in this segment is the Hyundai Sonata 2.0t.
        The 2014 model and its new color options are gorgeous. Thank God I needn’t make choices like this though.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I’m a buyer in that segment and I have no interest at all in a v8. Nor much interest in a 6. A turbo 4 is about perfect. I really have no need for more than about 175hp with decent torque. I’ll take added economy any day.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I just got rid of my RWD V8 for an AWD V6, because my short commute time and somewhat hilly environment in a snow area makes RWD a liability and a V8 a PITA to get warmed up to operating temps and avoid oil goop.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Oh you sold the GS? :(

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yeah, just yesterday actually. Guy came down from Michigan and got her. I owned it for three years, and took the mileage from 92K – 109K, sold for $600 less than I paid. :)

            So now I have an 09 M35x. Cobalt metallic/light grey. Looks just like this http://imganuncios.mitula.net/2009_infiniti_m35x_base_bridgewater_ma_98641931813176099.jpg

            +35% tint.

            My commute is 3.3miles each way, and I live in SW Ohio where it’s VERY cold all winter. I wasn’t getting the engine temp up high enough regularly, and it was going to cause issues. Plus with the plowing they -don’t- do on side roads around here, got stuck a couple times last winter.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I feel your pain as I’m in the same latitude and deal with the same ineptitude regarding winter plowing. I also have a short commute and this is what the fwd beater is for, I usually let the other cars sit in the dead of winter. Hopefully the GS lives a good life with its new owner.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I think it will. It’s for his wife, replacing her 3-Series wagon. She likes the ride of a Lexus better, apparently.

            Though have fun driving it in winter in Michigan!

            Oh, and if I had a garage space for a 2nd cheaper car, I’d of gone that route. Ultimately, I decided I didn’t want a car parked in my driveway all the time.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I could see that, a Lex is somewhat smooth and luxurious ride I imagine a 3-series is much more tight and susceptible to the terrible roads of the Northeast. My Volvo has somewhat of a tight, call it “European” feel and I feel every bump and defect on the horrible roads I have to drive on. I complained to the Volvo mech wanting to know if I could get wallowy suspension upgrade/kit and he just laughed.

            “I decided I didnt want a car parked in my driveway all the time.”

            I’m resigned to the fact I will always have a car parked in the driveway, out back, and probably in a friend’s garage if I can manage it.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I always felt the GS could’ve been a little softer, for my tastes. I guess I’m used to larger, less-sporting type cars. I think they had to beef up the suspension for the V8 version, so I’m betting the V6 rode better.

            The M35 has a MUCH better ride than the GS ever did. Much more compliant. It’s on par with the A8 I used to have.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Happy driving in the M35.

      • 0 avatar

        240 HP and 270 torque aren’t bad figures. I wouldn’t discount the 2.0 turbo simply because it’s not a V6. If you’re going to be a purest for American sedans, your puny 6 just can’t keep up to a V8 (which made under 200 hp during much of the 70s and 80s)

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        What is the obsession with Brembo brake kits? Brembo is just a brand. Why not Balo, Ate, Wilwood, Stoptech, or Zimmerman?

        Brembo might make capable brakes, but the more I hear of them, the more I think of them as the Bose of brakes.

      • 0 avatar
        Shawnski

        Pentastar then you would buy it it? Pffft. Have you really ever driven a Fusion with that so called gutless 2.0 EB? I have not either, however I ran a 6.65 0-60 and 14.85 @ 91.7 Qt mile time in our 2.0 EB Escape (G-meter, accuracy verifiable by other runs/vehicles). Not bad, and 24 mpg avg. Oh and Sync may not be up to late model IDrive standards, however it is easy and responsive to link a phone.

    • 0 avatar
      toxicroach

      Well, after a very rough start for me, the Sync system has been patched up into a decent system. Until your comment I hadn’t realized I hadn’t had any problems with it in months, where at first it was giving me trouble constantly. So I think that issue may have been resolved.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        With or without MyFord Touch?

        • 0 avatar
          toxicroach

          With Touch.

          I hadn’t even remembered how much it used to piss me off until this thread. At one point I was writing pretty heated emails to Ford letting them know exactly what I thought about it. Now I haven’t had a real issue in months. Even Spotify is working well with it.

      • 0 avatar
        Felis Concolor

        The only issues I had with Sync/MFT were in my initial syntax use. Now that I’m familiar with “Sync-speak” I don’t suffer anything worse than asking for Vollenweider and getting 2NU instead. I just block favorite artists into their own zones and make direct track requests for my favorite playlists.

        Audio and phone commands are parsed directly; climate and navigation commands must be specified first. And since the mid-seat climate controls are only accessible electronically from the front seats, their lack of inclusion in the voice command set is a continuing black mark for the programming team. C’mon Ford; that should have been in the last upgrade.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      What were your impressions of the new Cherokee? I know the front is polarizing, and the software fix is unproven, but damn it had a nice interior.

      • 0 avatar

        The V6 and AWD in a SUV that size is a WINNER. The 4-cylinder is sluggish. The steering wheel, Uconnect and moonroof are pulled from the same parts bin as my 2014′ Jeep SRT. The interior materials feel like a cross between Dodge Charger and Dodge Dart. The car has the same storage bin under the passenger seat for example.

        I was very impressed by the car. Great pickup and powertrain.

        I easily would take a cherokee over the Subaru Outback if I didn’t need the extra space in the trunk. The Outback used to be my runabout whilst getting work done on my 300SRT 6.1. Now I’ve got the Jeep so I won’t need to rent Outbacks anymore. I swapped from the Pirelli tires to Goodyear Eagle GT.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          How do you like the Eagle GTs? My MKT has the Goodyear Eagle RS-As and I can’t say I’m a big fan.

          • 0 avatar

            EAGLE GT’s are heavy, thick tires with huge tread patterns. The Eagle RS-A are a decent, cheap tire for LOW TORQUE vehicles, but my SRT grinds them to dust in short order.

            I REFUSE to replace the Pirelli’s on the Jeep with more Pirelli’s even though it doesn’t wear them down as quick as my 300. Because it’s RWD, the 300 has destroyed my Eagle F1 Supercars after just 3500 miles.

            I switch to EAGLE GT’s because:

            #1 If you rotate regularly, Goodyear will replace them under warranty if they wear down too quickly.

            #2 NYC has mild winters so I need an All Season during December – March.

            Your MKT won’t be too hard on them, but I’m surprised you don’t have Michelins like my uncle’s 2013 MKS Ecoboost? I thought Lincoln used Michelin on everything.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    I’m sure “Jimmyy” will be around shortly to explain how these are all being sold into rental fleets, since “coasters” wouldn’t dream of touching anything other than an Accord or a “Cam Cam” in this segment…

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      I suspect Ford is heavy on the coastal incentives, part of their guerrilla marketing campaign.

      Usually the Fusion is 30% fleet or about 6X Toyota and about 30X Honda, although it may be closer to 25% now.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “Guerrilla marketing”?

        LOL…the unmitigated gall of them to market aggressively, or do different incentives for different parts of the country!

        FIENDS!!!!

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Let’s clarify the whole fleet-thing.

        Much of Ford’s Fusion fleet sales is to govt. and commercial fleet and even tho Ford was selling the old Fusion for much of 2012, Toyota, with the new Camry, sent more Camrys to RENTAL fleet than Ford did with the old Fusion.

        Also, it’s Toyota that has been very aggressive with the incentives – with the Fusion having a significantly higher ATP than the Camry.

        • 0 avatar
          goldtownpe

          Your clarification is not very clarifying.
          http://www.automotive-fleet.com/statistics/statsviewer.aspx?file=http%3a%2f%2fwww.automotive-fleet.com%2ffc_resources%2fstats%2faffb13car-reg.pdf&channel=

          Yep…6571 more Camrys went to rental fleet than did the Fusion in 2012. But 141,922 more Camrys went to retail than did Fusion as well. Percentage wise, more Fusion went to RENTAL fleets than Camry. In terns of percentage and total numbers more Camry went to retail than Fusion.

          “Much of Ford’s Fusion fleet sales is to govt. and commercial fleet”
          This statement is only true if 37.2% is greater than 62.8% which is the percentage of Fusion fleet that went to commercial/govt and rental respectively. Hope your head didn’t explode with that fact.

          Spin it all you want, Fusion is still second tier when it comes to the retail side. When Fusion actually surpasses the Altima in retail sales, maybe then we can start talking about it in the same class as the Camry and Accord.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Percentages don’t matter as much as TOTAL NOS. going to rental fleet.

            Mazda could be sending 50% of Mazda6 sales to rental fleet, but when it comes down to what is filling the rental lots, it would be a small player.

            Also, that was for the brand new Camry vs. the old Fusion.

            When the fleet sales nos. for 2013 come out, I’ll bet we see a good bit more Camrys to rental than the Fusion.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “Percentages don’t matter as much as TOTAL NOS. going to rental fleet”

            Your disinformation campaign has officially gone off the rails.

          • 0 avatar
            84Cressida

            Okay this is hilarious.

            If Ford sells 1000 Fusions and 500 of them went to rental, that means they’re dependent on HALF OF THEIR SALES coming from Enterprise, Hertz, and Budget. If Toyota sells 555 cars to fleet, but sells 2000 cars total, guess which one is more dependent on fleet sales?

            The new Fusion went on sale of July of 2012, so it had half of the year 2012 to sell. And you do rather conveniently forget that even if you take away all the fleet that the Camry did while being enormously generous and counting every Fusion sale, the Camry still handidly outsold the Fusion. Like you said, it’s all about TOTAL NOS.

            Your continued attacks to try to portray Toyota as the new rental car of America is hilarious.

          • 0 avatar
            goldtownpe

            How come you never talk about how many Fusion are actually sold to retail vs the Camry? Does 6500 more Camrys to rental fleet matters more than 141k more Camrys to retail?

            As I mention above, Fusion can’t even compete with Altima at the retail level, let only Camry or Accord.

        • 0 avatar
          84Cressida

          So why is that Toyota is offering $1000 cash back on the 2014 Camry, while I can get a brand new red-hot-gamechanging 2014 Fusion for 0% APR for 60 months or $1500 cash back?

          And why is it that I can lease a Fusion for less money/month AND less money due at signing? ($199/ month with $2528 due at signing vs. $220/month with $2999 due at signing for Camry) Ford will also give you an extra $1000 bucks if you trade in any competing vehicle, something Toyota is not doing except for Hondas.

          This myth that Toyota is giving away Camrys and that Ford can’t keep people from knocking down the doors for Fusions needs to end.

          This entire article reads as a Ford PR piece.

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            >>This entire article reads as a Ford PR piece.<<

            Because it was largely based on a PR puff piece:
            http://www.newsday.com/classifieds/cars/ford-fusion-not-toyota-camry-or-honda-accord-gains-coastal-cachet-1.6382039

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Ford is pushing the Fusion pretty aggressively here on the East coast. But Toyota advertising here is non-stop and deals on Camry are outstanding. Times have changed. Once upon a Fat Camry, Toyota commanded list/near list and high financing rates. Today, the Camry is one of the more heavily discounted rides and super cheap interest rates are common. Toyota still leads in reliability, but its competitors are quite good as well. Average today is damn good.

        • 0 avatar
          84Cressida

          There are several commericals on Youtube for the Gen 2/3/4/5 Camry that advertise attractive leases and financing. None of that is new.

          My family has been buying Toyotas for over 30 years and we’ve never paid near list or list price for them.

      • 0 avatar
        jimmyy

        Actually, this is another one of those articles which originated on Bloomberg, which is the trading system on every wall street trader’s desktop. Bloomberg is famous for putting out pro-Detroit articles in an attempt to run F and GM stocks up.

        I’m sure Ford loves the deceptive advertisement and you will shortly read this article toting statistical garbage in every media outlet in the country. This article is a statistical gem that can fool the average high school graduate since it is very easy to post big percentage sales increases since so few Fusion products sold historically on the coasts. Furthermore, many Fusions rolling on the east and west coasts are wearing bar codes, and I suspect the big fleet push by Ford resulted in a number goosed by fleet sales that they needed to get this article out … Ford only needs a relatively small sales increase to get a big percentage gain since so few Fusion sales have taken place in the past. You will notice the article does not state the actual vehicle numbers sold on the coasts since this would reveal the slow Fusion sales. This article will do little to solve Ford’s sales problems on the coasts, but it will do wonders in the Midwest where the less educated people will flock to their Ford dealer thinking a Fusion will make them east coast west coast cool. They will be highly disappointed if they ever visit either coasts to find their Ford brand is the champion of rental fleets.

        This type of deception is in line with the “47/47″ scandal. What I find incredible is Ford is sticking with “47/47″ on the Fusion Hybrid even though real world tests are not even close … but the Camry Hybrid, which runs with similar Hybrid technology does get it’s EPA numbers in the real world ( “43/39″ ). Frankly, I am surprised people would do business with a such a company with poor reliability.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      “I’m sure “Jimmyy” will be around shortly”

      Patience, it takes time to gather anecdotal evidence from the entire east and west coasts of the continental United States.

    • 0 avatar
      jimmyy

      Simple. This is just more bull marketing. A 75% increase of a very low sales number is still a very low sales number. Face it. Fusion is a failure.

      • 0 avatar
        Shawnski

        Ok, which of the current mid sized cars would you find the most appealing? Or which of the current mid sized cars has moved the ball further I.e. Improved? While I think the Accord is a nice improvement and it’s refreshing to see some actual design cohesion come back to Honda, the Fusion IMO is the most inspired of the existing competitors. It’s doing to the market similarly what the current Sonata did. One thing is for sure market share gains are hard to win and even harder to keep.

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        By the numbers I see driving around, I’d say that your comment is a failure.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Yeah, interesting. So if they sell 400,000 copies of the thing, will it sill be a failure? If so, what constitutes a success?

          I have no idea why I’m even entertaining this. Maybe I just want to know what color the skies are in jimmyy’s world.

          • 0 avatar

            +1000

            We all have our preferrences, biases, whatever but some posters become, let’s just say, a bit tedious with their over the top narrow views.

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            @ Marcelo-

            I can’t agree more. At least when I bash a Honda Accord or Toyota Camry for being “hit or miss” appliances with reliability woes themselves, its because I owned it (Accord) or have first hand experience with it (Camry). Same applies to my Fusion. When I hold it in high regards but also will divulge that it’s DEFINITELY not perfect, its because I own it and have the right to do so.

            The number of people on here that are keyboard warriors that have baseless opinion tracks that also lack experience in anything they’re speaking of absolutely kills me.

            The ability to pull statistical data to support ANY opinion exists on the internet. Finding facts and figures to support your opinions is fine, but to hold them as gospel when there’s plenty of other resources that will counter those facts and figures (but you have to be willing to consider the counter-points) is ludicrous.

            I hope they enjoy living in thier skewed statistical fogs.

          • 0 avatar
            goldtownpe

            @CoastieLenn,
            Show us those “plenty of other resources that will counter those facts and figures”.

            We may live in a statistical fog but you are living and anecdotal world. The problem with arguing based on anecdotal evidence is that anecdotal evidence is not necessarily typical, only statistical evidence can determine how typical something is.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I doubt it’s a factor, but it’s interesting to note that the Fusion is one of the few available passenger cars that comes with a factory tow rating. Sure, it’s only 1,000 lb., but most of the competition is rated at zero.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    The Fusion is one beautiful car. I’d be hard-pressed to make a decision if I were in the market and had to choose between a Fusion or a Malibu, Chevy-guy that I am. An extended test-drive with both would be required, for I have great respect for Ford in the last 5 years or so. The Fusion does seem a bit larger, however, both inside and out.

    I doubt I would choose a 4 cyl. in either one, though. Too heavy I think.

    Also, I no longer believe “foreign” cars are any better than domestics, as I have heard my share of less-than-stellar accounts of various Toyota and Honda products in recent years.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      After renting a Malibu recently, there’s no way I’d buy one over the Fusion.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      After watching my folks good friend’s 2006 Camry eat wheel bearings, rotors, engine intake seals, a master cylinder and various sensors at only 60K miles and now his 2011 Avalon in for spark knocking, idle roughness and suspension clunks I agree 100% that Asian/German cars are no longer better than ours.

      • 0 avatar
        84Cressida

        You said the same thing a week or two ago about your folk’s good friend’s uncle’s sister 2006 Accord that had the same problems. You always have some distant person that is somehow connected to your life that has all of these problems with their Japanese car.

  • avatar
    redav

    But, is it a game-changer?

    Personally, I wasn’t wowed by it. I liked the new Accord & Mazda6 much more.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I was shopping last January, and went with the Accord, although every time I see a new Fusion, my head turns. That never happens with an Accord.

      I’m happy with the purchase, but if Ford had inventory on hand that was a better match for my needs, and if they had been as willing to deal as the Honda dealer was, I’d be driving a Ford today.

    • 0 avatar
      Offbeat Oddity

      I think the new Accord and 6 are superior to the Fusion as well. I prefer the styling of both cars to the Fusion, as I think they’re much-better proportioned. Their powertrains also seem far better. More power plus better fuel economy? Sounds like a win-win to me.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      I might be in the market next year (either compact or midsize) and I’m not sure I would even test drive the Fusion. The looks are overrated. Accord, Mazda6, and Malibu all look better to me. To pour salt on the wound, both the Mazda and Honda have reasonably strong (especially the Honda), naturally-aspirated engines. Maybe the Ford has a nice chassis, but I think it’s already behind in looks and powertrain. That’s too much to overcome.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Actually, the Accord comes w/ a 1000 tow rating also.

    btw,the Accord Hybrid has by acclamation made the Fusion Hybrid irrelevant:
    http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1088280_green-car-reports-best-car-to-buy-2014-honda-accord-hybrid

    The Ford Granada looked like a Mercedes. The Fusion is today’s equivalent, a purloined face on a Ford toaster oven.

  • avatar
    ash78

    It’s already a victim of its own success, IMO. The problem with really good design is that it’s diluted by ubiquity. This is not to say they shouldn’t strive for attractive cars, but it just loses a lot of luster when I see a new Fusion 20 times a day. “Look, kids! Big Ben. Parliament.”

    Most people wouldn’t want to live in a row of identical houses or have the exact same 3 outfits as everyone else. It’s confounding because there’s strength in numbers, but there’s no individuality in numbers. Fashionistas (and shallow car buyers) must be really, really conflicted by this conundrum.

    Overall, this news still makes me happy as a Ford shareholder, and it further bolsters my opinion that most car shoppers are shallow and impulsive.

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      So going by your points, I have to ask what are the ramifications of seeing even MORE drab-looking Camrys at every intersection, than I do good-looking Fusions?

      If every bar you walk into has 5 women who look like Scarlett Johansson and 7 women who look like Paula Deen, then…which ones are you STILL going to look at?

      I mean, you seem to be trying to turn a positive into a negative here.

      • 0 avatar
        ash78

        That depends…if I can get Scarlett to call me racial slurs and cook a mean corn casserole, then all bets are off.

        I haven’t changed my tune for my entire driving life — I love cars that are mainstream-yet-slightly-esoteric, but I fully accept that the bulk of the market wants big brand sedans. And that yes, it’s much nicer to have these to look at. But they’re already blending into the background…I think the newest Accord is almost as attractive as this, and I never compliment Hondas on their appearance.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      People like to drive vehicles that are viewed as “successful.” The first-generation Ford Taurus was a huge success, and initially very distinctive (at least compared to Japanese and other American cars of that time).

      The car’s ubiquity didn’t hurt its sales. What ultimately hurt the first Taurus was Ford’s reluctance to give it a major update in the face of a constantly evolving Camry and Accord. The ugly 1996 restyle was one of the final nails in the coffin.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Just think about how far Ford has come in less than a decade. Think about Ford’d car offerings in 2003 and compare them to now. A truly remarkable turnaround. With this kind of pace, they’ll take back the crown they haven’t held since 1996.

  • avatar
    86er

    “From the neon-drenched beaches of Miami and the hipster enclaves in New York, to the high-tech castles in San Francisco and the studio lots of Hollywood, the Ford Fusion is experiencing a coastal market surge in popularity.”

    I won’t believe this article until *jimmyy* shows up here with his report.

  • avatar
    mfgreen40

    I am glad to see the success of the Fusion. This might force Camry to become an even better car than it is, just in time for my next purchase.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    So why isn’t the Lincoln Fusion, er, MKZ selling? It’s the krill-strainer grille, isn’t it?

  • avatar
    TorontoSkeptic

    But has there been a concurrent drop in Aston Martin sales to go along with this?

    I live in the ultimate import-worshiping location and I see maybe one fusion a week compared to hundreds of accords, altimas, etc.

    It’s not so pronounced for other types of vehicles – the F-150 is by far the most popular vehicle in Canada, and the Edge, Escape and even Flex are pretty common. But the Fusion (and Taurus and Fiesta) are practically extinct here.

    Could be a pricing thing as the big 3 can be very odd in their Canadian pricing selection. The ones that are built in Ontario (Charger, Camaro, 300, etc) are reasonable but some of the US/Mexico built domestics can be brutal.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    The problem I have with the new Fusion is the engines and the stupid Sync system. The base 2.5 is not very peppy and gets class trailing mileage. The 1.6 T is adequate with the manual but not much quicker than the base 2.5 and has not convinced me of being very reliable over the long run and it’s lower torque same HP 1.5 replacement that also gets the same MPG as the larger 1.6 leaves me cold. The only engine with anything resembling performance is the 2.0 turbo but those are only found in the 32-35K high trim level cars. Then there is the hybrid which doesn’t seem to meet MPG expectations.

    Enough has already been carped about Sync so I will close by saying that the interiors of these cars could use a little more warmth and color contrast. Silver black and gray are really getting old and tired.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Sync is OK in my experience; it’s the Ford “touch” system that needs lots of help.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Personally, I would have liked it if they just kept the 3.5L Duratec as an option, or made the 3.7L from the MKZ available. Then again, that V6 is a differentiator between the Ford and Lincoln. Still, a lower end V6 model would be more enticing to me.

      Chrysler did that with the 200, making the 3.6L available in all but the base trim. The result is a bargain hotrod that barely suffers a dip in fuel economy over the 4 banger.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        It would have been especially nice since the power has been bumped on the 3.5. The Fusion Sport had the 26 3HP version. Now, the Edge and Taurus have a 285 HP version while the Explorer has 290 HP. Here’s to hoping that the 2.3T or upcoming smaller ecoboost V6 can find its way into the Fusion.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          In my opinion, the 3.5 and 3.7-liter naturally-aspirated Duratec engines are complete dogs (as is the Volvo-based platform that these engines usually motivate) but Duratec engines are more comforting to see than the new downsized and turbocharged engines. It’s sort of like the familiarity of a Buick 3800 V6…

          • 0 avatar
            Fordson

            One of those 3.7-liter complete dogs will get a 3500-lb. Mustang to 60 mph in around 5.5 seconds. But I guess the folks running the tests and recording those numbers should consider your opinion and adjust their test results accordingly, huh?

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            They feel as fast or faster than the Turbo I4s that are replacing them to me. While being a good deal smoother too.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      I will say that the interior of the Fusion is light years better than the schizo interior styling of the Focus and Fiesta, both of which will look dated very quickly. At least the Fusion interior will remain tastful for many years.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    If the most important thing in any car is its drive-line, what’s the difference if it looks cool or not? Cool is not get you to the mechanic after you break down out in the middle of nowhere!

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    After three throttle bodies on my wife’s 4 cylinder Fusion I don’t believe I’ll be buying another Ford. Ford knows they’re defective but just like times of old gives us the finger.

    There’s a reason Toyota sells a ton of Camrys.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Yeah, they’re all sold to people who haven’t figured out they’re no better than the competition anymore. But they’ll figure it soon enough.

      Toyota’s been coasting on the Camry’s reputation for a long time now.

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        Honda will milk the legacy of the Accord for as long as it can, too while churning out milquetoast products that are just as flawed as the rest.

        One of these days, I keep telling myself- the sheep that flock to the imports based solely off legacy WITHOUT consulting resources beyond CR- will die off and Hondyota will actually have to turn out a decent car worthy of the praise it got decades ago.

        Until then, I’ll know my experiences with our Accord (2004 EX-L- Transmission and sensor monger) and my parent’s experiences with thier Camry (2007 hybrid- GIANT P.O.S.) and will not hesitate to give those opinions to any article like this.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people – P.T. Barnum.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          I’ll give you the Camry, but the Accord is actually extremely well-put-together and well-thought-out. It may not be as exciting to drive, but it certainly doesn’t feel cheap. It actually feels like a car that’s secure enough about itself and the little details that it gets right that it doesn’t need flashy styling. The Passat would also fit that description if Volkswagen had used better materials and offered more features…

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          Considering the Fusion doesn’t do well in comparative reviews your comment is w/o merit.

          I guess it must suck to buy third best – at best.

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        I have friends and relatives who own domestic cars, and we have both a 2003 Honda Accord (206,000 miles) and a 2005 Ford Focus (178,000 miles). The Focus is the only one that has equaled the Accord in reliability, even if it hasn’t “aged” as well.

        My parents’ 1999 Buick Park Avenue and 2002 Oldsmobile Bravada both experienced major problems (as in, the type that result in a high three-figure to low four-figure repair bill) at around 100,000 miles. They got rid of the Bravada after it suffered a burnt engine valve that left my mother stranded (after it had experienced some major transmission and HVAC problems), and before it developed any additional problems.

        The Park Avenue was reliable for the first 100,000 miles, and after that point it was one major problem after another until they traded it with about 150,000 miles on the odometer. Their Buick Lucerne has had a few niggling little problems.

        My mother-in-law’s 2004 Chevrolet Malibu (four cylinder) with 80,000 miles on the odometer feels “older” than my Accord does with over twice the mileage. The Malibu has had some minor electrical problems, but, fortunately, no major transmission or engine issues at this point.

        Some of us have been hearing the “Honda and Toyota are going down the toilet, and the domestics are just as good” refrain for close to two decades now, and watched it be proven incorrect repeatedly, so color us skeptical.

        • 0 avatar
          CoastieLenn

          Completely understandable statement considering your basis for comparison. Anything domestic (particularly GM 6 cylinder ANYTHING) from the late 90′s-early 00′s was just a rolling liability and an excersize in “I’m buying what I can afford at the moment.”

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            I will say that my wife’s uncle bought a 2006 Toyota Camry four-cylinder brand new, and that car hasn’t done much to impress me, either in driving dynamics or overall quality.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Funny I have the opposite opinion, if I am buying something cheap from the period my first look is GM V6 (bearing in mind the dexcool fiasco on the 60V6). Chevy 4.3 (or Vortech or whatever its call) and 3800 are both sound choices, just have to watch the car built around them.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Uh-huh. I’m a GM fan, but I utterly despise the 3.1 and 3.4-liter V6 engines. However the 3.8-liter Buick 3800 V6 was an excellent powertrain, one that GM continued to use for quite some time. So was the 4.3-liter Vortec 4300 V6.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            IMO, the L36 version of the 3800 is alright, but from a pure longevity standpoint it doesn’t have anything on the LN3 or L27. The LN3 is really where the “3800 can never die” legend comes from.

            I wouldn’t be shocked to hear that a ’99 Park had its UIM or intake gaskets meltdown sometime after 100K. Then again, I wouldn’t be shocked to read that the engine was flawless. Those naturally aspirated Series II engines can be a bit of crapshoot, just like with the old LG2/LG3 version.

            Any Buick V6 is still better than a 60-degree though.

          • 0 avatar
            goldtownpe

            The 4cyl and v6 transmission can’t be the same since the Honda 4cyl and v6 engines of that era spins in opposite directions. The 4cyl mounts on the driver side while the v6 mounts on the passenger side.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          As someone with a lot of experience working with both, I can say that both can be hit and miss, depending on what individual model you get. The best thing you can do is research the vehicle and powertrain as best as possible, irrespective of the brand.

          I would much rather have a 2004 Grand Prix over a Honda Accord V6 of similar year with their fragile transmissions.

          Likewise, I’d rather have a 2003 Camry any day over an Impala with the 60* V6 of similar year due to their gasket problems.

          I’d take aNY 2006 Fusion over a 2006 Altima with a QR25 engine due to the major ring issues they’ve had.

          InB4 the brand white knights jump in and say those problems were fixed before those dates. Spare me, GM supposedly fixed the Northstar head bolt issue by 2001-2003 depending on who you talk to. Doesn’t change the fact that I’ve seen the same issue on 2004s.

          I can tell Bill that from my time at Ford, I have seen no conclusive proof that Ford *knows* about Fusion electronic throttle bodies being *defective* in particular. I have no idea what the repair background is on his vehicle, so it’s entirely possible whoever is repairing it is pounding ETBs when something else is the cause. Poor diagnostics could be causing him to write off a brand.

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            I had a 2007 Mazda6 with the 2.3L (presumably the generation/engine as the aforementioned Fusion) and after 115k miles, had only to replace an ECT sensor and regular maintenance.

            I will always sing the Mazda 6′s grace…. 6 cylinder cat converter issues aside.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            The Accords with the fragile transmissions were the 1999-2004 models with the V-6 engine (actually, it was any Honda or Acura with the V-6 engine and five-speed automatic transmission from those years).

            Our 2003 Accord has the four-cylinder engine, and we have not had any transmission problems. But, yes, I wouldn’t touch a V-6 Accord with an automatic transmission from that era.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            MY03 is the third highest car in terms of complaints on Carcomplaints. The vast majority were transmission issues and 155 acceleration issues.

            http://www.carcomplaints.com/Honda/Accord/2003/

          • 0 avatar
            goldtownpe

            Our 1998 Accord V6 with 223k miles still have the original automatic transmission and engine. The Delphi alternator has been replaced 2 times though. This third one (rebuilt Chinese from Autozone) have last the longest so far at 90k+ miles.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Apples and oranges, MY98 didn’t have the glass transmission. Nice to hear you got a rebuilt alternator to run 90K without issue.

          • 0 avatar
            goldtownpe

            Do you know what they change in MY99 vs MY98 (Asking ‘cuz I would like to know)? MY98 was the start of the 6th gen.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m not sure on year to year changes for Hondas but I believe the 5spd glass transmission came out in MY01 (someone else confirm/deny?). I have a former co-worker who put 230K on a MY99 Acura TL V6 who never had a transmission issue either, but it seems like they started to blow up in 01.

            EDIT: According to Wikipedia, the auto transmission in the TL changed from a 4spd to a 5spd in 2000 but it doesn’t specify if this was for MY00 or MY01 (I would lean toward MY01 for the year 2000). So in your used Honda buying, check the VIN and determine if your looking at a 4spd or 5spd in auto V6, and avoid the 5spd.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acura_TL

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            In response to goldtownpe,

            The 4spd in the v6 accord also has a higher-than-average failure rate, but with easy driving and highway miles, along with fluid changes, I’m sure it can go the distance.

            That Honda tranny really wasn’t made for dealing with the torque of a v6, it’s the same transmission that’s put in the 4cyl models as far as I can tell, where they tend to last longer. It might also correlate with more v6 ending up in the hands of more aggressive drivers (on average) that would put more stress on the tranny with jack-rabbit starts.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I am firmly of the opinion that there are very few bad cars, but there are an awful lot of bad dealer service departments. Three throttle bodies means something else is wrong with that car.

            I just can’t see anything in it among any of these mid size cars today, they are all basicly the same. Just different shades of biege, get whichever one floats your boat. Assuming you lack the imagination or means to buy something better.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @krhodes1

            I think the problem is effective troubleshooting is a very difficult skill to teach. I used to work with robotics and the field service techs were taught how to build the robot but few had the skills to effectively troubleshoot it, they were instead taught to throw parts at it usually in a certain order based on the problem’s symptoms. I imagine your run of the mill dealer tech is no different, not everyone in the shop is a master mechanic unfortunately.

          • 0 avatar
            Bill Wade

            danio3834, sorry you don’t read your own TSBs.

            http://www.fordservicecontent.com/Ford_Content/pubs/content/~WT/~MUS~LEN/3567/tsb10-21-06.htm

      • 0 avatar
        84Cressida

        I love when I hear domestic fanboys cry and howl that Toyota and Honda are going down the drain, year after year, yet at the same time they still rank tops in pretty much every reliability and quality survey.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’m always skeptical of who conduct those surveys but despite their other shortcomings I will give Toyonda props for not jumping head first into unproven technology and using their customers as beta testers. I suppose it helps when truck sales are a very small part of your portfolio.

      • 0 avatar
        Bill Wade

        Be that as it may, I’ve spent less money on my 05 4Runner in repairs with over 300k miles than I have on the Fusion with 80k.

        Also something called the tailgate control module failed at 120k. Toyota replaced it free of charge since it apparently had been an issue. Ford KNOWS they have a problem and they tell their customers to stick it, just like they’ve done for years.

        Don’t believe me, talk to 6.0 diesel owners or anybody with the faulty 5.4 and V10 heads.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          6.0L Navistar diesel equipped Ford truck owners are getting reimbursed by Ford for a good amount of repairs done outside of warranty. I’ll be the first to tell anyone those engines sucked, but Ford isn’t not doing anything about the costs owners incurred.

          I spent a while at Ford with truck engine service issues under my umbrella of responsibility and I’m not sure what you’re getting at with the 5.4L/6.8L defective heads. Stripped spark plug threads from some years? Otherwise the heads were pretty robust. My ’03 2V has never had an issue in that area with 200k.

          If you told them, Ford might know that you had a devective throttle body, or according to your mechanic…3 but as far as the data is concerned, it’s an anomaly. There aren’t any trends for that issue. If you want my honest opinion about what to do, if you have another ETB fault, take it somewhere else to get looked at. Techs pounding throttle bodies for faults elsewhere is exceedingly common.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    After having seen all the base midsizers in person, the best design goes to the new optima…that is one sharp car. 2nd goes to the mazda 6 and 3rd to the fusion, 4th accord, 5th altima, 6th passat, 7th malibu, 8th 200/avenger. Camry doesn’t rate and neither does the hyundai until the next gen shows up.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’d like to advise anyone buying a Fusion NOT to pick that watery green/blue color up there. It’s especially cheap looking, and offensive paired with those chrome multi-spokes. It will also age poorly. Think 95 hunger green JGC.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      My C-Max is that color. I think it looks bad on the Fusion though.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I’ve seen a few in that darker olive green metallic. When paired with the darker 5 spoke wheels, I think it actually looks pretty great. Not often I can say that about a shade of the “no sale” color. It’s probably still “no sale green” on the Fusion, but I like it.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I mean if it was the olive metallic, and with dark or gold wheels, and a gold trim/tape stripe package, maaaybe.

        My favorite loaded 90s JGC is the Orvis with red trims/special color, or bright red with gold labels and gold wheels. Those looked so good in red.

        The 99+ rounder one looked great in dark maroon metallic with gold.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I’d personally like to see Fusions in some of the crazier Focus and Fiesta colors. Tangerine Scream or something like that. AWD + 2.3T + Tangerine Scream is my ideal Fusion.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      I think that is more of a pale blue; I like it as it reminds me of another car I know that has worn that color well for 18 years. ;) The Greenlight Collectible model of it at least is the same color. I had my doubts about it too, but it really stands out; especially on a clear spring or fall day when the sky is an intense blue.

      (Not as much the pale, more summer-like sky in this picture, but like in my avatar and this:

      https://scontent-b-dfw.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/486440_3216868675112_1167999401_n.jpg)

      “Simple. This is just more bull marketing. A 75% increase of a very low sales number is still a very low sales number. Face it. Fusion is a failure.”

      Just wow; Ford is ramping up to build 400,000 a year, we are comparing it to the Camery and Accord, and jimmyy declares it a failure. But I should not have expected otherwise.

      Someone here on TTAC got in hot water for calling it a “game changer”; but the fact that we are having this debate sounds like a game changer to me. It is doing well for Ford, and will keep Toyota and Honda from resting on their laurals, or they will eventually fail if they do; that sounds like it could be a game changer to me. I agree the long term reliability will tell is this merely a good attempt; or a long term success.

      • 0 avatar
        jimmyy

        According to cars.com, their are nearly 42K Fusions on dealer lots … this only several thousand short of Camrys on dealer lots, even though Camry massively outsells Fusion. That is a failure.

        Then, their is that little Ford reliability disaster. That is another failure.

        Hard to imagine the Fusion with packing problems and reliability problems that sports a premium price tag will be a success. Only Japanese haters and biased fools that lived in the Midwest will crave such a vehicle.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    I should add. Living in SoCal, I see some fusions but the king is still the bmw 3/5 series. I see more of those than any other marque.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      When my wife and I visited the southern California region in late 2005, I remarked to her that the BMW SUVs were as common there as Ford Explorers and Escapes were here in Pennsylvania.

  • avatar
    kkop

    I’m driving a Fusion right now (rental). I’m not sure what engine is in it, but (other than for the commenters here) it does a fine job of propelling the car. The target audience for this vehicle ( NOT these same commenters) will like it just fine.

    The infotainment system is terrible though, especially in this cheaper (non-touchscreen) version. (I rented a Taurus last month, and while its touchscreen improved usability, it still not very intuitive)

    Also, the Fusion, like the Taurus, confirmed my theory that Ford designers (at least those for the cars) hate tall people. The seats look cool, but are on the short side and not very comfortable in the long run (>200 miles). Sure, my 6’4′ height is not exactly average, but if Dodge can make their cars fit me (Charger, Challenger, 300), why can’t Ford?

    Don’t even get me started on the shin-destroying ever-widening center consoles… ugh.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I also do not understand the current trend of super wide center consoles, and detest high dashboards (and high belt lines, while we’re at it). I can see the belt lines having to do with side impact safety, but the consoles? Utter stupidity. The Focus was a non-starter for me due to the ‘cockpit feel,’ the Fusion sounds like more of the same. I’m sorry to hear that the seat cushion is inadequate as well, new Toyota cars have the same problem, as do Subarus. Is it such a luxury or expense to make a larger seat? Driver/passenger comfort and visibility seems to have been thrown out the window with all of the focus on infotainment and these preposterous active safety systems. On a long trip, I start to care less about the resolution of my touchscreen, and more about how sore my posterior is.

      I’m glad to hear that Ford is doing well and is opening another plant, it means more Americans have jobs. I do worry about what people buying Fusions will think 5 years down the line when some of this new equipment will need to hold up. If it backfires, Ford may have created a whole new generation of Camry and Accord drivers.

  • avatar
    vcficus

    Danio/28-cars… Being a supplier has always been a little better vs working for the OEMs, it’s become 100% better now that job security at OEMs has been thrown to the bankruptcy wolves. I was mocked for years by a Chrysler engineer in the 1990s after my supplier workplace kept getting bought out; after the third owenership change in a decade he’s not laughing so much now.

    There’s still a few good jobs for Best/Brightest types but the amount of time you spend at the job to stay there let alone get promoted is not a sacrifice I want to make anymore.

    Still glad I help people make cars, though!

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Just my take, but the Fusions style will look good for about a decade after the Koreans look dated. (unless a REAL Austin pull up). If I were forced into the market I’d have to test both the Hybrid Acord and the eco-boost Fusion. A cool drive train might be enough to keep me happy, but I might need better styling. Then I’d go buy something used instead. :)

  • avatar
    84Cressida

    “Further, some of these same buyers are trading in their Toyotas and Hondas just to be seen in something hipper than a cheap toaster, a fact not lost on Ford.”

    Lines like this, calling Camry and Accords “cheap toasters” while extolling the virtues about how glamorous the “styling” on the Fusion seem more like an attempt to get back on Ford’s good side rather than any shot at journalism.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Good point, I have an idea. Since you mentioned you work in the rentals business pick a couple of common components (ie door handles, dash material, seat cloth/leather, outside grille/bumper material) and do a capsule piece on MY14 Fusion vs MY14 Camry on comparing just those components. I would be honestly interested to see the results. If those “cheap” comments are incorrect it would show in the materials.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Well it might not bode too well for the Camry, I’ll tell you that. I always notice how the sides of the rear bumpers reverberate on the newest cars at highway speeds. Having waxed my gf’s SE recently, that part of the bumper feels really thin and flimsy. The paint is also taking an incredible beating, multiple stone chips right past the primer/zinc that have started to rust. My 1996 4runner with 101k miles has no such serious chips in the paint. On the interior, the plastic pieces that flank lower dash to center console transition are hands down the worst looking/feeling pieces I’ve seen on a car interior since 1990s era Chevy cavaliers. It really is that bad. HVAC knobs feel pretty cheesy as well, about on par with a 2006+ w-body impala. Interior cloth is worse than that aforementioned w-body, with its 90s era mouse fur velour that I like very much. The Camry SE has scratchy and stiff cloth fit with vinyl inserts. At least it cleans up easy after the dog’s been all over it, I can just wipe it off with some interior spray.

        Having said all of those bad things, the Camry really does drive great. The 2.5 I4/6A engine transmission pairing is simply fantastic. It lopes along at 2000rpm at 80mph, and will quickly and smoothly drop a gear if need be. Around town it is completely smooth yet direct, feels like the TC is locked up all the time. Very quick off the line (yes, I’m being serious), and hauls butt without fuss well past any sort of legal speeds. All the while the cabin is nice and quiet. Handling is very competent, ride is actually not totally creampuff on the SE, but not jarring in the least. She has a lifetime average of 29mpg, on a road trip to florida (liberal A/C use, 75+mph) it got 33mpg, and left me with a slightly sore butt (short and narrow seat cushions).

        Overall it is an incredibly composed bank vault of a car with a polished drivetrain that will last 20+ years with minimal maintenance, let down by some decontenting and poor materials.

      • 0 avatar

        28, I don’t really think Cressida would be capable of any objectivity but a rather nice idea.

      • 0 avatar
        84Cressida

        These are what I can compare off the top of my head.

        Interior door handles there is no difference in feel, both cars have a satisfying sound opening and closing the doors and neither feels flimsy. The outside door handles on the Fusion feel like they’re disconnected from rods inside. The Taurus is by the worst. The Camry feels more connected and there’s a satisfying resistance while using the handle. Can’t really describe it online.

        As for the paint on the outside, I don’t see any more rock chips on Camrys than I do anything else. I see people complain about this issue due to the use of water based paints on modern cars and yearn for the “good ol’ days” when apparently rocks didn’t chip paint. I can assure anybody the problem existed then just as it does now.

        Both cars have soft touch dashboards. I’ll give this to the Fusion since the Camry’s doesn’t have as much padding in it, and stops about halfway to the windshield away from driver. The Fusion does put padded vinyl pieces on the sides of the center console that runs to the bottom of the dash, but they’re pretty flimsy feeling and can pop off without much effort. The piano black in the Fusion scratches easily and looks like crap after awhile. I’ve heard a lot of people complain about the Camry’s HVAC controls as feeling cheap. I think they could be better, but the Fusion’s knobs don’t feel any better.

        As for the hard plastics on the lower parts of the dash, I strongly disagree with the above poster who says the ones in the Camry are like a Cavalier. The Camry’s are no worse than anything else in this class and they all have hard plastic for the bottom half of the dash.

        The center console and glove box movements in the Camry feel more substantial than in the Fusion. The Camry’s arm rest also slides.

        Window switches – same.

        The cloth in the Camry is softer, the Fusion’s feels firmer. Don’t really care either way, I can sit in both. The Camry SE has cloth inserts with Softex (leatherette) seats, and that cloth is the more firm type found in the Fusion. Most Camrys that have cloth (LE models) are gray or tan, so they’ll show stains and dirt more. Most Fusions have black interiors. Leather quality definitely goes to the Camry. If there’s one thing that Toyota still does quite well it’s the leather quality in their interiors. The steering wheels and seats just have better graining and feel softer when new. I’ve never been impressed with much of the leather in GM and Fords. Chrysler, if I have to admit it, puts some nice cow in the Grand Cherokee.

        Carpet goes to the Fusion. That car uses real carpet, Toyota went cheap and uses this thin carpet that traps dirt and debris easily. Not to be outdone, Honda and Nissan for the Accord and Altima use the same stuff as of their redesigns. The current and previous Malibu also had horrible carpet. It irritates me to no end.

        As for the bumper covers and grilles, never found either to have a problem. Bumper covers today are supposed to be light and all will be considered flimsy to ones from 10 years ago, let alone 20 years ago. Both cars have grilles that are separate pieces from the bumper cover, where as the Malibu’s is built in and feels “flimsier” I guess.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Nice post 84Cressida, I appreciate the time it took to gather the information and post the results.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          1984Cressida,

          I’m specifically talking about the pieces that the driver’s right knee and passenger’s left knee touch. There’s a massive 5mm gap for a transition to the rest of the lower dash, and it makes a nasty creaky sound if you rest your knee on it. It is absolutely terrible and an embarrassment. The fact that you can defend such poor design and assembly is quite indicative of how biased you are towards anything Toyota. According to you they can do absolutely no wrong.

          While we’re on the topic of cheap Toyota interiors, have you seen what LE-grade 2013 Rav4s get to replace the stitched vinyl dash pad of the Limited (which itself I find fairly unappealing)? A piece of rubber with molded stitching, it feels like Chrysler circa 2004 all over again. The epitome of a “Rubbermaid dash.”

          There’s nothing wrong with hard plastics, there’s ways to make it look and feel decent. The 2nd gen Prius is a prime example, and I’d argue that my lambasted 2012 Civic is another. In fact I will say that the 2nd gen Prius was a high point of ergonomic and design simplicity in Toyota interiors (touchscreen HVAC notwithstanding).

    • 0 avatar
      Offbeat Oddity

      I also disagree with the Accord and Camry being “cheap toasters.” I actually prefer the Accord’s styling to the Fusion’s, as the Accord has a simple elegance that will age well. The Fusion has a great grille, but it looks tall and bulky on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I agree, the latest Accord is a very clean design and large greenhouse, and I also think they will age better than just about anything else in the segment (Passat is another contender). The Fusion looks great coming head on, but from any other angle I just see its fat slab sided-ness. The Koreans look cheap and nasty to me, the front on the Hyundai and the rear of the Optima look terrible IMO. The Camry looks aggressive in a contrived sort of way (why is any Camry short of a v6 SE supposed to be aggressive?), the Altima just looks melted and without a real direction in terms of style.

        The Mazda 6 looks great to me, but lacks the Accord’s understatement, and probably its rustproofing lol

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Camry looks “aggressive” – lmao!

          The Accord is basically the BMW greenhouse with the Hofmeister kink and the Genesis sedan rear.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I guess I should have specified the SE-trim Camry with the sharply creased lower valence and deeper skirts and rear bumper. The sharp angles on the taillights add to the effect (for me). Again, key word is “contrived” here.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    The Fusion is the Mondeo here and does not sell very well. The Market is the domain of the Japanese and Koreans in Australia.

    • 0 avatar

      Here it’s the opposite. though on offer, the Camry and Accord are nowhere to be seen while the Azera disputed and sometimes passed the Fusion until the last generation. The new Azera vs. the new Fusion? Fusion, clear biggest seller.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “The Fusion is the Mondeo here…”

      No, it isn’t. The next Mondeo will be a rebadged Fusion, but for now, they are separate cars.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Basically the same thing, rebadged or other wise. Still sells very poorly.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          No, they aren’t the same car.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            I know they are not the same car but the Fusion is based on the Mondeo and it sells like a stone here.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “the Fusion is based on the Mondeo”

            It isn’t. Same vehicle class, but different cars. This shouldn’t be that difficult to understand.

          • 0 avatar

            RobertRyan, I think Fod let the Mondeo go stale. It does seem Ford built the new Fusion/Mondeo on the Euro car, but it is much evolved and better. Much better.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Marcelo,
            Did not have a chance to go “stale” here was a non seller from day one.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Ford delayed the release of the Mondeo because of the European recession. The next Mondeo should be out next year.

          • 0 avatar

            The 90s was a good time for the Mondeo here. After that due to changes in import tariffs, it just stopped selling. But by the late 90s I don’t think it was much better than the competition.

            Question: in that class, what sold in Autralia in the 90s?

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Also they are not that different outside of some sheetmetal changes
            “The CDW27 project turned out not to be a true world car in the sense that the original Ford Focus, the Mk V Mondeo (known in the US as the 2013 Ford Fusion) and the Mk VI Ford Fiesta would later be, one design for the world.”

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Marcelo,
            It will be have to be more than a “pleasant surprise” to beat the Japanese and now Korean competition. Well the Mondeo was pretty ho hum as well, no surprise that he Fusion had similar characteristics.

          • 0 avatar

            RobertRyan, I don’t have an answer for that. What I do know is that driving a 96 or thereabouts Mondeo was very exciting, while the 2002, give or take a couple of years, was not. Then the American Fusion took over and the new Fusion is so much better. But maybe my viewpoint is warped as all the experience i’ve had recently with the Fusion was the American one. Maybe, since your driving the Euro car you won’t be so impressed. Ayways, it’d be worth a drive and I’d be interested in hearing what you’d have to say.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The current Mondeo and Fusion are on different platforms. They are not the same car. This should not be difficult to understand.

      • 0 avatar

        In Brazil, the Fusion is the one pictured above. Here, the Euro Mondeo sold until the beginning of the 00s (IIRC) and then was substituted by the American, Mexican built Fusion. The Mondeo was a great car but as time wore on Ford slowly abandoned it. The new Fusion is now world class.

        BTW, I wonder why the delay in launching the new Fusion in Europe. it’ll be interesting to see if it can regain lost ground.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Marcelo it would have to be vastly better than “The Mondeo was a great car” to sell here.Nonoe is even looking at it.

          • 0 avatar

            The Mondeo was a great car in the 90s! After that, not so much. Like I said, it just went stale. The American Fusion was always very ho-hum. But the new Fusion is a pleasent surprise. It’s not perfect, but I do think it now rides better than most everything else in its class. Like back in the 90s.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            “No one is looking at the Mondeo” in Great Britain because cars in this class are perks that employees receive as compensation in place of a higher salary (for tax purposes).

            The employees aren’t buying the car with their own money, so many of them prefer a vehicle from a German luxury brand.

            I’m sure that if these drivers were paying for the vehicle themselves, and were also responsible for the maintenance, the Mondeo would suddenly become more popular. Or they would move down to a next class of vehicle, and get a Ford Focus, which has often occupied the number-one slot for sales in Great Britain since it was introduced.

  • avatar
    mfgreen40

    The Fusion is a very good car, but you had better thank the competition instead of running them down.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I’ve had good luck with Ford products, I like what Ford has to offer. Now, I don’t consider myself a rabid Ford fanboy in the slightest amount, but is there a good reason why I shouldn’t continue to buy Ford products? I mean, if you’re happy with certain brands that have worked well for you, is that not the best reason to keep buying them?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      You should as long as you realize that just because your last Ford vehicles were outliers in terms of Ford’s fairly awful reliability (CR has them @ 27th worst of 28 brands, with only JLR faring worse), your next one is statistically likely to suffer either “worse” or “much worse than average” reliability.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I do agree and believe in the law of averages and even though I’ve had good Fords I know others have had bad Fords. I always buy mid to late cycle and refuse to be a beta tester. Like you, I’m still very concerned about the turbo 4s/ longevity, but with fewer and fewer options may have to rethink brands until I hear terms like “bullet proof” and “can’t kill it” in connection with a turbo-4. I’m only a fan until I get the one I wish I hadn’t

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I like the Fusion, but I have a hard time getting over the rear-fascia, especially without the Titanium’s trapezoidal exhaust-tips to tie things together. The rear end of the Fusion is flat and boxy and narrow-looking, and the tail-lamps look like little alien eyes. This is compared to the Malibu, which makes the blocky rear-end-look work well, or the Sonata, whose tail end has a sleeker taper to it that keeps the car from looking narrow and tall. For that, I’m sure you lose trunk volume on the Sonata (actually I *know* you do, because we have a late-model Sonata), but I still think the Fusion’s rear-end could have been made to look better.

  • avatar
    Acd

    I’ve rented two Fusions and a Camry recently and based on those experiences I’d gladly take a Fusion over a 4 cylinder Camry. The last Camry I rented three years ago drove like an early 1990′s Buick LeSabre with a mushy suspension that lacked anything resembling handling. The one I had a few weeks ago drove like an early 1990′s/late 1980′s Corolla. It had that same buzzy, cheap plasticky, harsh feel as an old Corolla only in a mic larger size and with a nice leather wrapped steering wheel. I can’t imagine any circumstance where I’d actually want to buy one.

    The Fusions just seemed to be nicer places to spend time inside of, as well as being more engaging to drive. One of them had a horrible lag between stepping on the gas and when it actually began moving but the other one was fine.

    Fusion sales may have been held back by lack of capacity. Once production begins a Flat Rock it will be interesting to see what happens. Even though the domestics claim not to chase volume just for volumes sake if they start piling up on dealers lots they may end up with a boatload of cash on the hood. Of course if Camry or Altima sales begin to slip they could trigger an incentive war as well.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I haven’t driven the new Fusion, but I suspect I’d like the experience better than that of the Camry, which I have had quite a bit of familiarity with. As far as the Altima goes, I think it ranks with the Accord in terms of being reliable, but still well-put-together (unlike the Camry). The Altima generally has more-striking styling as well, in my opinion, than the Accord. But I will rank an Accord Sport over any Fusion for good looks.

      • 0 avatar
        84Cressida

        Every single Altima’s center console is not securely fastened down to the floor and therefore can jiggle from side to side quite alarmingly. It’s even more pronounced if you open the lid and shake the whole thing. The Altima also uses insanely cheap cloth in the S models that tears easily and traps lint and hair forever. The same cloth is on the door panels and it wears down very quickly.

        I really liked the Altima when it was unveiled and when I first got to drive one, I still like how they drive, but the rest of it seems like a huge downgrade.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      ” One of them had a horrible lag between stepping on the gas and when it actually began moving”

      That would be a deal breaker for me if it’s not corrected. I’ve always disliked turbos and have shunned them because of lag, which to me says “no power where and when I want it”= no sale

    • 0 avatar
      jimmyy

      A financially savvy individual knows reliability problems equals poor resale … so, avoid the Fusion.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        If a person is financially savvy he should have enough money that he does not have to lose sleep about any potential resale value difference between a Fusion and a lesser handling $20 – $30K car that does not look like an Aston Martin.

        If a person thinks that he has to buy a Camry because a Fusion is too risky then he probably should not be buying a Camry. Maybe a Yaris.

        • 0 avatar
          jimmyy

          Many wealthy people do not throw money away by making stupid decisions like acquiring an unreliable vehicle at a premium price.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Have you met the Range Rover and the people of questionable intelligence who buy them?

          • 0 avatar
            racer-esq.

            The Fusion is neither unreliable (we are not talking about an Audi or LR) nor premium priced. *If* a Fusion is slightly less reliable than a Camry I still expect it to have better resale value than a Camry since, unlike the Camry, the Fusion is not an ugly, or worse disgustingly bland, car inside and out.

            I repeat, anyone that has to loose sleep over whether a $25K Fusion is slightly less reliable than a $25K Camry is not successful enough to be considered financially savvy.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            I’ve met plenty of people that are now smarter than they were when they bought their Range Rovers.

  • avatar

    For those who worship CR – new V6 Accord is not recommended by CR but they do not say why while new Fusion 2.0 Ecoboost is recommended. Reliability for 2013 2.0T model is much higher than competition while Audio is worse and body integrity is average. Something similar with Mazda6 which is recommended but described as a less premium choice. I was surprised that no problems with Ford 6 speed transmission were reported. They had problems after 2010 redesign.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    @Lie2me: I was behind an Evoque recently and was just shocked at how ugly it was and how horrific its rearward and lateral visibility must be.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Was it running or waiting for a tow truck?

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Running. I don’t think any modern Rover could be as unreliable as the original Range Rover and early Discovery, but I could be wrong.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          I was just talking to some Range Rover guys on another site, it didn’t sound like there was a whole lot of improvement and I wouldn’t expect much in the future. The way these guys were getting perverse pleasure out of trying to top each other with the issues they were having with their respective Rovers. If Rover were to improve their vehicles to the point of reliability I suspect it would cost them sales

  • avatar
    CelticPete

    The fusion seems nice – but I don’t think its really all that great looking. It looks better in pictures – IRL it seems like a very big car with a very small engine.

    I am amazed they put a 1.6 liter engine in something that size. I’d take the Accord or Mazda 6 with a stick any day of the week over the 1.6 turbo.

    Plus you can get the Accord with the V6 and stick for a genuninely quick car. It might be boring – as its FWD but its still more fun then any Fusion.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Shopped for 2-3 year old depreciated 4-pot midsizers for family duty a few months ago and I wish the new Fusion had been around a few years earlier so it could have been in the mix.

    The outgoing 2012 we tried had a loathsome automatic that lunged for sixth gear and refused to give it up until you stomped the guts out of the gas pedal. Maddening, balking, sluggish powertrain. They botched the interior storage too, which is a big no-no in this class. Shame, nice car otherwise.

    Regarding the Camry, excepting SE versions it is a top-notch powertrain wrapped up in a completely competent but utterly unlovable vehicle in which everything you see and touch comes off as budget-bitten and indifferent.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I thought the previous gen Fusion was a decent looking and driving car as well, with big throne-like seats and very cushy touch-points (door armrests and center armrest). The transmission is not only lethargic as you point out, but it is also having some pretty serious reliability issues. Look up “Ford 6f35″ on google and you’ll see what I mean. I had previously thought that these Fusions were the sweet spot of ford build quality before they went whole hog with the whole MFT and ecoboost thing, but apparently even these fords have some serious issues.


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